Hypothyroidism Normal Thyroid Levels

A big reason why natural treatment methods can be so effective with autoimmune thyroid disorders is because they address the underlying cause of the condition. Rather than just controlling the symptoms through medication, a good natural treatment protocol will attempt to strengthen the weakened immune system, address the adrenal glands and other areas that might be contributing to the problem, and will ultimately restore the normal function of the thyroid gland when this is possible.

Now just imagine that the gland is secreting these hormones in greater than normal quantities. Not only is this going to derail all the normal activities of your body, but it is also going to show symptoms of hyperthyroidism, which may start with heart palpitations. In fact, your complete metabolic system is going to be over stimulated. Your metabolic rate is going to work at twice the speed, which means that your body is going to be using up energy at an increased rate.

Hypothyroidism is a condition where our thyroid output has slowed down to almost a halt. We’re not producing enough T3 and T4 hormone causing very low energy and weight gain. It’s really a very vicious cycle, one that has been difficult to break out of.

Although the condition called hyperthyroidism, which is due to excessive action of the thyroid gland, was first observed around 1830, a really complete understanding of the condition did not develop until 1890. Excessive action of the thyroid may occur at any age. The condition is much more frequent in women than in men. In areas in which goiter is infrequent, women may have excessive action of the thyroid gland in a proportion of four women to one man.

I felt it is time to take a new decision. I talked to my husband about it and we together decided to try alternative medicine. We came to know of Thyromine. It is the only over-the-counter medicine which did not contain stimulants like caffeine. I started using it. Within a week it showed results. Now I am using Thyromine regularly. I am free of all the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Thyroid conditions are very common in the western world today, with over 11 million people in America suffering today. This condition causes very low energy and weight gain, we just don’t feel like ourselves at all, we can’t concentrate and feel sluggish all the time.

Thyroid conditions are extremely common in United States and elsewhere in the developed world. There are many different causes for a thyroid condition but in every single case the victim suffers from very low energy and weight gain. If you’re been diagnosed or have self diagnosed yourself with hypothyroidism then you can eliminate your symptoms with natural therapies.

If you have been diagnosed with Graves’ Disease, want to avoid taking medication if at all possible, and don’t even want to consider treating your condition with radioactive iodine, then the information you’re about to read can be life changing. I am a licensed healthcare professional and was personally diagnosed with Graves’ Disease.

People with thyroid problems, usually hypothyroidism, have trouble concentrating and also have trouble losing weight and getting healthy. Our glands, especially the thyroid have an enormous effect on our entire body, they are like the generals of the body. They effect every cell in the body. So, getting out hormones balanced, especially the thyroid gland, is imperative.

Thyroid disorder is one of the most common and often misdiagnosed health conditions affecting Americans. Approximately 58 million people suffer from some form of thyroid disease; unfortunately, these disorders often go untreated. While there are many disorders of the thyroid, the most common is related to abnormal thyroid hormone production.

The best foods to include are fruits and vegetables – especially egg yolks, garlic, seafood, mushrooms, and radishes. Adding the above foods into your hypothyroidism diet can help your thyroid to produce more hormone. Eating these foods cooked is better for a healthy diet than eating them raw. But eating them raw is still better than eating foods, like those in paragraph below, that could exacerbate your hypothyroidism.

Low thyroid function, whatever its cause, leads to heart attacks, fibromyalgia, auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, adrenal failure, and on, and on. All added, of course, to the pile of symptoms you start with.

Medical experts have found that a malfuctioning thyroid can also contribute to other malladies such as heart disease and that explains why any disorders affecting this gland need to be taken seriously.

People who maintain an acidic pH level in their bodies can also cause damage to their thyroid. The pH level can be affected by diet and other medication one may be taking.

The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system, which includes the hypothalamus, pituitary, pineal, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pancreas, and reproductive glands.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are normal levels of thyroid hormones ?
    What are normal levels of thyroid hormones tsh, t3 and t4? and at what level do they start treating for hypothyroidism? My levels have been borderline for years and I have all the syptoms but my DR doesn’t want to put me on medication…. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      The normal level for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) according to the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinology the normal range is from 0.3-3.0

      If one gets to that higher level of beyond 3.0 the endocrinologist may start to treat.

      I also have the link to a site that may help you find even more information:

      http://thyroid.about.com

  2. QUESTION:
    how long does it take to achieve normal thyroid levels?
    Recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Been placed on medication for past two weeks. Still showing symptons of hypothyroidism. I’m a type two Diabetic and have not been able to control my blood sugar even though I follow diet, exercise daily and take medications.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve been taking Synthroid for 13 weeks, and I still have HypoT symptoms. The first 6 weeks, I took 25 mcg a day. After that I increased to 75 mcg., and within two weeks, my hair started to fall out! I spoke to my MD a few days ago, and I told her how frustrated I’m getting. She told me that I need to be patient until we find the right dosage, but I can’t help but wonder if I’ll ever feel good. She told me that the first year of treatment will be frustrating…and so far she’s right. I’m trying to be optimistic about this whole thing.

      I’ve been reading about HypoT ever since being diagnosed, and from what I’ve read, the average dosage that most people seem to stablize on is 100 or 125 mcg.

      I don’t know what type of diet you have, but I know I look and feel my best when I keep my carbs low.

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven’t changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don’t wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  4. QUESTION:
    Normal Thyroid Levels?
    I was diagnosed with Grave’s Disease in January of this year. I underwent the radioactive iodine treatment I-131 to kill my thyroid in February. After a visit to the doctor this last week I found out that I am now hypothyroid with a TSH level of 36. They tell me that normal is .2 to 5.0. I have gained nearly 23 lbs in one month but they say that it is water retention.

    I’m assuming I still have the Graves Disease as I believe it never goes away. What are some of the symptoms of the hypothyrodism? My endocrinologist isn’t much help and tells me to research the internet for help instead of getting answers from her. How frustrating.

    My question is, my level seems awful high? How long does it take to get regulated once you are on synthroid? What are some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through the same thing about ten years ago. You still have Grave’s disease. I found that out for sure when I had serious eye problems from it years later. Most people end up hypo active after radio iodine. They’ll adjust your medicine to make your levels normal. I gained weight, had water retention, sleep a lot, and was crying over nothing until my dosage was straightened out. I was also cold, cold, cold. I still seem to have some mild symptoms of both conditions. I don’t know if it’s in my mind. I feel much more sane and healthy with normal thyroid levels. Be sure to let your doctor know any symptoms you’re having as they are adjusting the medicine. Don’t let them go by the “numbers” alone.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can you have hypothyroidism but have normal ts4 levels?
    I was hyperthyroid for seven years I was treated with PTU and now my thyroid levels test in the normal range. However, I have hypothyroid symptoms now. My hair fell out, I gained 50 lbs. I suffer from the fatique and have dry skin and am tired all the time. sometimes I can feel my thyroid speed up and I am a bag of nerves but by the time I get to the doctor the episode is over again. I still have the insomnia. But my doctor will not remove my thyroid or refer me back to an endocrinologist because my t4 and t3 say normal uptake. Is it possible that my body feels hypo because i no longer am hyper and can still have my thyroid removed and put on synthroid based on my history and symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think they would remove your thyroid, particularly if you have more hypothyroid symptoms than hyperthyroid symptoms. The fact that you’re having both is worrisome. Generally when you display hyperthyroid symptoms, your heart rate speeds up unnaturally, so perhaps they could give you one of those take-home heart monitor things to track it (they gave my mom one once). They certainly aren’t going to want to mess with any kind of medication if they don’t know what they’re dealing with.

      As far as hypothyroidism goes, the scale is a guideline and “normal” levels really can differ from person to person. Most general practitioners go strictly by the scale, which can cause problems. I had hypothyroid symptoms for years, but my levels tested at the very bottom of the normal range, so several general practitioners ruled out hypothyroidism and tried treating me for depression instead.

      I finally went to a good endocrinologist who let me know that the normal range is just that–a typical range. Different people have optimal levels within that range. So he put me on a low level of thyroid hormones–it moved my thyroid levels more into the middle of the normal range and the symptoms went away. Even better: no more antidepressants. For me, the bottom of the normal range was just too low.

  6. QUESTION:
    There seems to be controversey over “Normal” Thyroid TSH levels…What is normal?
    Is 1.63 considered normal? Do T3 and T4 make a difference in determining Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Different people/doctors/labs consider different ranges of TSH to be normal. Some say .3 to 3 is normal. Some say .5 to 5 is normal. Etc.

      1.63 is a normal TSH level.

      OK, now that we have that out of the way, TSH is irrelevant. TSH isn’t a thyroid hormone. It doesn’t determine your symptoms. It’s only used as a second hand, indirect way to make a guess at what your T3 and T4 levels are.

      Your free T3 and free T4 levels are the ONLY measurements that determine if you have hypothyroidism.

  7. QUESTION:
    My doctor said my thyroid levels are higher than normal?
    I went to the doctor a few days ago. They got some blood from me and sent it to be tested. Today my doctor called and said my thyroid levels are a little high. He is going to send me to a endocrinologist. What will they do to get my levels back to normal? The strange thing is I gained weight and have been unable to lose it. So I thought I had hypothyroidism. But my levels are high instead of low. This has me a little confused. If by chance you are someone who has hyperthyroidism, tell me about your experience with it. Thanks for your help :)

    • ANSWER:
      The high ‘level’ most likely is TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and does mean hypO rather than hypER and you will most likely be prescribed Synthroid to bring it down (.2 – 3 hopefully)…..go to Yahoo Groups & you will find some excellent ones there to join and get good answers. Members will tell you HOW to take the meds and WHEN to….of course your doctor should too. Prayerfully yours…many blessings

  8. QUESTION:
    can you have thyroid problems and normal levels ?
    Please correct me if I’m wrong.
    Free T4 is how much thyroid hormone my thyroid is producing ? (mine is .8 – on the low side of normal range)
    TSH is what the hypothalmus is telling the pituitary to produce in order to stimulate the thyroid ? (mine is also .8 which is normal I guess) But, I have had many symptoms of hypothyroidism. My question is if you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto’s can you still have these “normal range” levels ? Also, I read it runs in families and my mom has hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      You are at the low end of the “normal range”, and if you are experiencing symptoms of hypothyroid, you should demand to be put on a low dosage of synthroid or levoxyl (10-20 mcgs) because normal for one person might be a .8 while someone else needs to be 1-2 to feel well. Most endocrinologists like to see patients towards the middle of the range and will prescribe, especially in women because your thyroid function decreases with age. Because of your family history especially, you are a good candidate. I know that my TSH needs to be around 2 to feel good. Be sure that you get your TSH tested every 4-6 weeks initially to find the right dosage for you. It can be a long process in finding the right dosage and reaping the full benefits of medication, so be patient.

      If your doctor doesn’t take you seriously, change doctors or ask for a second opinion. If you have a good HMO and are able to go directly to a specialist, see an endocrinologist. Endocrinologists specialize in endocrine diseases and I assure you will take your symptoms very seriously.

      Another suggestion is to have an antibody test. If your antibodies are elevated, it could be Hashimoto’s causing hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s causes antibodies to attach your thyroid. It’s rare, but the antibody test is the best way to diagnose if TSH doesn’t.

  9. QUESTION:
    thyroid levels, are these normal?
    I’ve been dealing hypo thyroid issues since i was 19, I am now 41. My levels have never been out of normal before but when I began losing my hair and totally stopped having periods at age 26 I began taking meds for it. I’m currently taking levothyroxine 112.

    The past 6ish months I have been having symptoms of hypothyroidism. I gained 10 lbs in 3 months, I joined a gym and cut out some calories and fat but after 6 weeks of 4-5 one hour workouts a week I gained 5 more lbs. I’m tired all the time and don’t use the bathroom w out drinking large amounts of sugar free metamucil. I had my levels checked last week, TSH came back at .043, T4 was 1.16, and T3 was 92.

    The Dr. said my levels are right where he wants them. I think the TSH seems to be Hyper, but the others Hypo? I’m really frustrated and I can’t get into the endocrinologist until October. I don’t want to feel like crap for three more months. Has anyone else experienced this?

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism, What can the effect of really high TSH levels have?
    The last time I got a blood test my TSH level was at 287!!! And normal thyroids function between 1 and 5! The doctor said that she had never seen thyroid levels in someone who was still walking and talking. But they did not even increase my Synthroid. All i know is that I am tired all the time. I am sick all the time. I don’t eat anything but still am gaining weight like crazy and bounce back in forth from being catatonic to an insomniac. I know these are all normal for hypothyroidism, but I am really scared. I go to college and take care of my grandmother but if something doesn’t change, I will not be able to do either anymore. I barely have the ability to shower every couple of days and makes sure I don’t starve myself.
    Yea, i went to an endocrinologist when I was 9, after my initial diagnosis. But now because of my insurance, they will not send me unless htey have “exhausted traditional methods” first. I think that after taking the medicine and still having such high levels, That traditional methods are obviously not working.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow go to an endocrinologist, mine was 27 right after I gave birth and they sent me to my endocrinologist. I am tired all the time, how are you functioning are you gaining weight, that normally is the first side effect I see. Good luck they need to up your synthroid how much do you take?

  11. QUESTION:
    Thyroid levels all out of wack please help me someone?
    I am 22 year old female who had a child 5 years ago and was diagnosed with lupus 5 years ago my ANA was 2000 points high and I have also test positive for those 4 qualifying things the RNA DRNA and whatever else but I did not have one of the four…. anyways I have chronic fatigue, arthritis, mouth and nose ulcers, and my hair falls out in a lot… But my ana last time it was tested was back in normal range but haven’t had it tested again in 2 years… but now to the thyroid… the doctor says i don’t have hashimoto and i don’t have the normal hypothyroidism or the hyperthyroidism… Is the lupus causing my body to attack my thyroid? I can’t get into a endocrinologist for 3 weeks and I am freaking out… Some suggestions please Thank You
    TSH reads 0.372 normal levels 0.400 – 5.500
    T3 is 1.67 normal range is 0.70 – 1.79
    T4 is 1.5 normal range 0.8 -1.8
    thyroglob ab 133.0 normal range 0 -60
    thyr perox ab is 217.0 normal range 0-60
    ultrasound- normal

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t know the answer but I hope someone else can, this sounds very worrying for you. Good luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism and started on Nutrisystem but can’t lose weight is this normal?
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism last week and started on medicine? I just started Nutrisystem and weighed myself today but I didn’t lose an ounce. I would have thought on my first week I would have lost something. I stuck to the plan and started walking. Could it be that I have to get my thyroid levels in a normal range before I’m going to be able to lose any weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism can certainly cause someone to gain weight or fail to lose weight as in your case. If you started the Nutrisystem not too long ago, then you may not notice results this quickly. Do not let it discourage you. I am assuming you are being treated for your hypothyroidism with thyroid hormone replacement and this will help return your thyroid levels to normal. When your thyroid levels are normal it will hopefully easier to lose weight. Weight loss is not easy and it requires a combination of dietary modification and regular exercise. It is good that you are walking. If you want to lose weight, then consider increasing your aerobic exercise which could be fast walking, running, swimming, or biking. Good luck.

  13. QUESTION:
    I have been on Synthroid for a month, and now my thyroid levels are normal. why don’t i feel different?
    i feel the same as i did a month ago when i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism
    the tiredness is way more than normal; i sleep for at least 12 hours a day.
    also, i teach martial arts and watch what i eat, so weight loss should not be a problem

    • ANSWER:
      Two possible reasons:
      1) A month isn’t very long – it often takes several months for the thyroid medication to take full effect.
      2) I don’t know what your symptoms are, but they are usually things like tiredness, difficulty losing weight etc. A lot of people feel like this! It may be that the hypothyroidism was found by chance – i.e. it showed up in a blood test but it wasn’t the reason you’re not feeling great.

  14. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism? even with normal TSH levels?
    hi guys so im a 24 yr old male in good health except for this

    ive been having these symptons for a few months and finally decided to go to the doctor to get checked out, basically i have;

    shaky hands,
    fast heart beat,
    sweating of palms,
    trouble sleeping,
    nervous,
    moody (quietness)

    so basically the doctor did a bllod test for TSH levels and the results came back normal 4.46, but he wreckons that i still may have hypothroidism so hes done more blood tests and ive to go to a radiologist this week for ultra sound on the thyroid.

    my question is is it possible to have hypothroidism even with normal TSH levels ? and also all my symptons seem more related to hyperthroidism not hypothyroidism.

    Another thing is that the doctor is doing a blood sugar level test to test for diabities can this also be a sympton of hypothyroidism?

    anyone got any info?

    • ANSWER:
      4.46 is not normal. It indicates hypothyroidism.

      But your symptoms indicate hyperthyroidism.

      Yours is a very perplexing case, and you need to make sure you have a very good doctor who is able and willing to get to the bottom of this. You need more blood tests for a definitive diagnosis. Then you need to have the TSH vs. symptoms conflict explained. You need free T3, free T4, TSI, TPO.

      You may find that you have something completely unrelated to your thyroid going on.

      Diabetes is not a symptom of hypothyroidism.

  15. QUESTION:
    thyroid hormone levels. TSH over 2.0 still normal?
    I just got the results of my thyroid test. they are
    TSH:2.1norm:0.3-4.0 mU/l
    T3:2.3norm:0.8-2.8
    T4:6.3norm:4.6-12.4

    I was told these over phone and the lab guy neglected to say whether the t3 and t4 are ng/l or nU/l or or whatever so help me out here(!).

    so my “problem” is that my thyroid levels looked like this last year. (note the TSH)

    TSH: 1.14norm: 0.3-4.0 mU/l
    Free T3 3.52norm: 2.0-4.2 ng/l
    F. T4 15.05norm: 8 – 18 ng/l

    according to wikipedia TSH over 2 is a tad fishy.
    and the fact that my TSH has doubled since last year leads me to the beliefe that it could be the beginning of hypothyroidism, unless someone tells me that TSH and tyroid hormones fluctuate.
    My t4 seems also be in the lower normal range now…..

    so please help me out here. What do you think?
    is there any explaination for this other than emerging hypothyroidism?
    should i take this seriously?
    i have an appointment on friday but i need some answers before friday….;-)

    Thanks for reading all this.
    first time i was tested at 6 AM
    the last test was done at 11 am or so

    • ANSWER:
      A TSH over 2.0 can cause problems in the body. Do you happen to know what time of day you tested? TSH should always be done first thing in the morning when its still near its high point. By 2PM, its at its lowest point.

      Better thyroid tests are the free t4 and free t3. It looks like last year you had a free t4 and free t3, but this time you had a total T4 and total T3.

  16. QUESTION:
    I took 25 mcg of synthroid a day not knowing my thyroid levels were back to normal!?
    I was on synthroid because a blood test said I was hypothyroid. The thing is that it was months before I got the results because they sent the results to the wrong house. In the mean time I stopped taking a medicine that was (I know now) the cause of the hypothyroidism.

    He gave me 25 mcg. Now this was after so my t4 levels had returned to normal. which leaves me 25 mcg a day for 6 weeks overdosed.

    Anyways I feel really dizzy and tired all the time and I stopped taking the meds on the 30th of march. SO thats 9 days without it and I still feel dizzy and lethargic.

    Is it going to go away?

    What’s happened to me?
    @ curious : The half life of synthroid can be up to to 10 days.

    • ANSWER:

  17. QUESTION:
    Thyroid levels: T4 high /TSH normal?
    What the heck is going on? I was dianosed with hypothyroidism 10 yrs ago and have been taking levothyroxine for it.. my tests always come back like this and my doc keeps upping my dosage, but From what i am reading a high T4 means Hyperthyroidism! I am confused..

    • ANSWER:
      GO TO A HOMEOPATHIC DOCTOR THEY WILL ACTUALLY FIX YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  18. QUESTION:
    Can you have thyroid problems even if your blood levels check normal?
    I am asking this because I am a 19 year old girl who has had horrible fatigue for years but no one has ever been able to find out why. I have always very swollen glands around my neck, and even had a few cysts on my thyroid at one point, but my blood level checked out to be normal. When I looked up the symptoms of hypothyroidism I had so many of the symptoms, except that I am a thin girl. Is it possible to have hypothyroidism and not to have it appear in blood tests? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You sure can. My first thyroid test came back as normal too, but 9 months later I finally got diagnosed. There are reasons for this. The standard test is called a TSH test. Unfortunately TSH is always changing throughout the day. TSH is highest while we sleep and lowest around 2PM. When you have TSH tested, do so first thing in the morning only while its still at its high point. That way if you are hypothyroid, there’s a better chance of catching it with the TSH test. Anothe problem with the TSH test is the range. Labs like Quest have it at 0.3 to 5.5. AACE recommended years ago that the range should be 0.3 to 3.0. If you are getting tested by Quest, the doctor may say you are fine with a TSH of 4 or even 5.

      I suggest next time you test, do it first thing in the morning and see if the doctor will also do a free t4, free t3, and an antibody test along with the TSH.

      Usually the conditio will show in a blood test, sometimes not the TSH. For some reason the TSH takes a long time to show you have hypothyroidism, but it eventually will show it in most people. I had almost every textbook symptom before my TSH went above the 5.5 at Quest.

  19. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism -but now fluctuating thyroid test?
    So I was told that i have hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s), and so I started taking low dosage synthroid. Well it’s been a good 4-5 months now. I took a blood test a while ago and it stated taht my thyroid was pretty normal, meaning that the pills were working.So I took a blood test last week and now the tests state that my thyroid levels are actually depleting now…as in it is going the opposite way. As in my thyroid is probably normal and because I am still on the pills, they are creating a hyperthyroid affect. has this ever happened to anyone? I thought that i would have this forever and that I would have to me on meds forever, so now i’m confused.My doc told me that I could basically get off meds now and check my blood in another 6 weeks to see if it is normal or back to hypo mode. normally I would love to get off of meds, but I really don’t want to keep switching back and forth between being on them and not, so do you think it would be ok to stay on them and check in a month 4change?
    well, my doc said that it is really up to me, that I could stop it now and check in 6 weeks to see if it is back normal, or if I really want to, I could keep on it and see if it is still going hyper mode or normal in 6 weeks. He didn’t seem too concerned either way…but i am. have any of you dealt with this before? I don’t understand how my thyroid could have just changed to normal all of a sudden…I mean for good… i’m worried that if I stop meds now, i will only develope it again and have to go back on them. or would it be worse to keep the meds? ah i dont know…

    Also I have PCOS, so I have to get on meds for that soon..i think it’s called metformin. I havn’t asked my doc if thyroid pills affect metformin or vice-versa yet.
    Valy, I do go to an endo. And it’s not that my med is not working, it’s that it did work, and then I became normal, and then it crossed to the opposite, to hyper-like mode.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid disease is so complicated and frustrating, isn’t it? Learning more about the disease is helpful. I recently subscribed to a newsletter that brings me up to date on the latest news and offers tips on how to live with my condition. I hope you’ll take the time to check the links below. If you scroll to the bottom of the first one, you’ll see that it specifically addresses your issue. The second link provides other information and also provides additional links on the left side that will further help you in learning more about what’s going on with your thyroid. I hope this helps. Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism: TSH Levels?
    I recently got the results of some blood tests back. One of them was for my Thyroid my TSH level was at 3.5. My doctor said this was normal and that I didn’t have a problem with my thyroid. Infact the only thing that showed up was quite bad anemia with hemoglobin and 10.2, No stored levels of ferritin and also low red blood cell count and the red blood cells are also too small.

    I feel I have many of the symptoms of Hypothyroidism such as :
    feeling tired and sleeping a lot
    feeling the cold easily
    dry and/or pale skin
    coarse, thinning hair
    sore muscles, slow movements and weakness
    a hoarse or croaky voice
    depression
    problems with memory and concentration
    fairly dramatic weight gain
    constipation
    heavy, irregular or prolonged menstrual periods
    light sensitivity, dizzy spells, palpitations
    I could go on. Is it possible that I could be Hypothyroid and still have TSH levels in the normal range?

    • ANSWER:
      symptoms

      Sudden weight loss, even when your appetite and food intake remain normal or increase
      Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) — commonly more than 100 beats a minute — irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) or pounding of your heart (palpitations)
      Nervousness, anxiety or anxiety attacks, irritability
      Tremor — usually a fine trembling in your hands and fingers
      Sweating
      Changes in menstrual patterns
      Increased sensitivity to heat
      Changes in bowel patterns, especially more frequent bowel movements
      An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), which may appear as a swelling at the base of your neck
      Fatigue, muscle weakness
      Difficulty sleeping

      is your thyroid gland inflammed

      Thyroiditis. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis).

  21. QUESTION:
    My thyroid level is 0.4, I have almost all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, doctor says no, can he be wrong?
    I have read that your thyroid level can be in the “normal” range and still be to low for your body. Does anyone know anything about this? I have talked to my doctor, but am not getting anywhere. The lowest level in his reference range is 0.3, mine is 0.4. Could a thyroid supplement help?

    • ANSWER:
      Like you, I have all the symptoms and thyroid runs in my family. Unfortunately, without a test to back up hypothyroidism, you can’t be treated for it. My tests are always borderline or low normal.

      I have not tried any supplements as I have been told that it is just throwing your money away…and, being truthful, that is really how it is with these homeopathic remedies. I have never used any that worked for other issues. Maybe you will have better luck than me…all you lose by trying them is your money.

  22. QUESTION:
    Does hair grow back after it falls out from hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and i’ve lost almost all of my hair, it’s devastating, it upset me so much. Apparently my thyroid hormone levels are normal now and my tablets should be working but they aren’t. I’m taking evening primrose oil, bioton, and i’ve just using certain shampoos, nothing is working, and i’ve had no new hair growth :(

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    What levels of TSH and t4 indicate a thyroid problem?
    I have had symptoms of hypothyroidism for several years that have recently been getting worse and want to know if my levels are normal or not. I am a young adult on birth control and my recent t4 level was 1.0 and my tsh level was 1.75. is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as your levels are concerned they are considered “normal”. I have been going through getting diagnosed with hypothyroidism also. I suggest first of all go to stopthethyroidmadness.com and learn all you can about the disease, I am still researching. As of 2003 they changed the levels for diagnosis, but most labs and doctors still go by the old levels. The new levels are TSH 0.3-3.0, free T4 0.7-2.0 and free T-3 should be 2.3-4.2. I would suggest that you have your free T4 and free T3 checked along with your TSH. Also ask to have your ferritin levels checked. I was low on ferritin which is the protein in your blood and can lead to anemia if not corrected. Low ferritin levels can also make you very tired and experience hair loss. My ferritin was at 11 and most people feel good at 70-90 range. Make sure and find a doctor who does not just treat you by what the lab reports say, but will also treat you for your symptoms, because a thyroid problem can be hard to discover and many go left untreated because of so called “Normal” lab results.

      Wish you all the luck and hope this helps.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to still have an underactive thyroid even if the TSH level is normal?
    I was dignosed in 2008 with hypothyroidism for which I was successfully treated, my thyroid gradualy got better with time and I was taken off Levothyroxine. Medical proffesionals put it down to pregnancy. I had another child in 2009 and started to feel terrible again, I also moved to a new area with different doctors, I requested a new blood test and it came back with a TSH level of 2.11 (this is considered normal) though at the high end of the scale. She did not test my free T3′s and T4′s. Can someone please tell me why this is? and also does anyone know if it is still possible to have an underactive thyroid with a normal level of TSH?

    I am from the UK… I know different areas have different result meanings. ( this is STUPID) why cant every lab have the same result meanings?

    • ANSWER:
      The problem is that your testing has been inadequate. TSH alone is no more than a screen test. If disease is suspected or has been previously identified, T3, T4 and thyroid antibody also need to be checked. Most thyroid disease is due to an auto immune condition, previously known as Hashimoto’s auto immune thyroiditis. It can produce both over and under activity and requires constant monitoring.

  25. QUESTION:
    How do I get a doctor to treat low thyroid hormone levels?
    My sister has been tested by 2 different doctors. Both physicians have told her that she is at the very bottom of the “normal” side of the scale, and they both admit she shows symptoms of hypothyroidism, but say they see no need to initiate treatment. She is now feeling worse. She is cold all of the time, her fatigue has worsened, and now she is experiencing numbness in her fingers and feet. I am so frustrated with doctors I don’t know what to do. She has tried pushing herself to exercise more thinking that this would help (and after one doctor’s comment that maybe she should try eating some salad), but then all she can do is sleep for hours afterwards because she is so wasted.
    I should also add that my sister never had a problem with her weight and then about two years ago she started to gain weight and had trouble losing it even after increasing her exercise and decreasing her calorie intake.

    • ANSWER:
      First thing your sister needs to do is find out the number result of her test. Also, if it was an afternoon test, it may be inaccurate. All thyroid tests should be done in the morning because TSH is at it’s highest when we sleep, so if we test first thing i the morning it will be caught near it’s highest point. The TSH is the test doctor’s usually diagnose hypothyroidism with. If it’s above a 2.0 it’s suspicious, though most labs will have normal as high as 5.5. I had problems with this 6 years ago and it took anothr year before the TSH finally went above the 5.5 and I got diagnosed. Your sister really needs to research this, as it’s the only way she will get the proper treatment. Once I finally read up on the topic I knew what tests to ask for and what medication would work best for me.

      The next time your sister gets testing. She wants a morning TSH, free t4, free t3, and an antibody test. I’ll include a great thyroid link below for your sister. There are great thyroid message boards on yahoo groups. Check them out sometime.

  26. QUESTION:
    Can someone explain my thyroid levels?
    So my doctor called me and told me my levels, and said one was normal but high normal, and the other one was not even detectible. She said I have hypothyroidism, and I need to see a specialist. Can some explain what the levels shoudld be?
    T-4, Free 1.5
    TSH 3rd Generation <0.01 L

    • ANSWER:
      You do not have hypothyroidism. You misunderstood.

      You have hyperthyroidism. Most likely Grave’s disease. That presents with nearly undetectable TSH and high T3/T4. You need further testing though. You are female? In that case you need Free T3 and Free T4. Women always needs frees. You also need TSI for a definitive diagnosis of Grave’s disease.

  27. QUESTION:
    Can i get pregnant with Hypothyroidism and irregular periods ?
    I have been having irregular periods since teenager. Moreover recently found that i have Hypothyroidism, im taking Thyroxine. Its been a year since im married and I love to have a baby. The Thyroid level is never normal, im struggling hard to keep it normal. Doctor said that the Hormones and Ovaries are normal. She said that the Ovarie is not releasing at the correct time. Please kindly give me an answer for this question

    • ANSWER:
      My wife is 37 and has had Hypothyroidism since age 8.

      She said that Hypothyroidism is a non-issue concerning getting pregnant. They are not related.

      However, the fact that you are stressed over keeping your thyroid levels in check plus the fact that weight gain and loss can be so unpredictable may explain some of the reason your cycle is out of sync.

      Good Luck and try to Relax…..God knows when that little one should get here….even if it takes some medical help from your doctor.

  28. QUESTION:
    Normal TSH level, but enlarged thyroid… what’s the problem?
    I’ve had an enlarged thyroid for a few years now, it’s somewhat noticeable. I also feel uncomfortable if I wear close-neck shirts or necklaces, I keep pulling it away from my neck.

    I have some symptoms of hypothyroidism, so I had a thyroid ultrasound which shows a nodule. I then had a needle biopsy which showed it was benign.. but every time I have a blood test, my TSH level is normal. (My test about a week ago showed a TSH level of 1.64 uIU/mL).

    What should I do to reduce the enlargement when hormone therapy is obviously not needed? What could the problem actually be if not hypothyroidism? Please help me understand what’s going on..

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest a test for antibodies. I had hashimotos, which is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid. sometimes it was big, and I was a bit hyperthyroid and sometimes it shrunk back and I was hypo. It took years to get the correct diagnosis….but when I look back at old photos, I can see it! Also, at one point, my daughter had thyroiditis, which is an inflammation of the thyroid.
      as to nodules, when they do your blood work, you should keep track of your tg levels, if they are going up, it could be a time for more tests. If your nodules and thyroid are making you uncomfortable, at some point your doctor may suggest a removal. I am giving you my thyca web site (which is for thyroid cancer), not because I think you have it, but because of all the resources…endos, surgeons, studies, etc. The recovery was so much easier than you would think! I also learned alot from the mayo clinic (look under nodules) and there is a book called the complete thyroid book by dr. ain which was pretty good. Learn all you can about nodules and hashimotos etc…and if your endo is mostly diabetes, you may want to look for a specialist. there is a thyroid chat group in the yahoo health groups…not cancer, just about thyroid and maybe they would be able to help as well. good health.

  29. QUESTION:
    I have been taking levothroid for hypothyroidism since 1/07 and my thyroid still fluctuates up and down.?
    I have had bloodwork every 8-10 weeks to check the levels and at first it was still sluggish, so the dr. increased the meds to 50 mgs. The second test showed that the levels were normal. Last week the bloodwork showed a very sluggish thyroid. I was taking the same amount of meds. Is this normal for the levels to fluctuate so much even while on medication. The dr has now increased it to 75 mgs.

    • ANSWER:
      The TSH fluculates throughout the day, so if you want to get a more accurate picture you need to test first thing in the morning each and every time. Also, keep in mind on T4, you want the morning TSH to be around 1.0

  30. QUESTION:
    Anyone have pain and numbness in shoulder and arm due to hypothyroidism?
    For 2 weeks I have had horrible pain in my rotator cuff. A week after that the numbness set in. Its only on the right side. I was wondering if this could be due to my hypothyroidism. I am not on Synthroid but I am on Raw Thyroid. My levels are all within normal range.

    • ANSWER:
      I do not think there is a spot on my body that I have not had some pain at some time. I was not on anything (Synthroid or Armour) until recently due to not having funds.

      This may be something new however so you may need to have it checked.

      Blessings

  31. QUESTION:
    fluctuating thyroid and ANA?
    My son (age 16) has been having symptoms of fatgiue, muscle and joint pain in the legs and a general “yucky” feeling for almost a year now. We finally went to the doctor who did a blood test and said his ANA was elevated. That doctor sent us to a rheumatologist who did more blood work. This showed his ANA was back to normal but his thyroid level was a 4.02 which they called “low” I thought normal was 0.2-3.0 so I am not sure how 4.02 is considered low, but anyhow they siad it was low and they suspect he has hypothyroidism. They reffered him to an endocrinologist who took more blood and the results came back normal. He didn’t want to put him on meds with normal levels so he basically said there was nothing else he could do for the moment. I don’t really want my son to have anything wrong with him but these fluctuating ANA and thyroid levels are driving me crazy. He is still in incredible pain. He has trouble walking long distances, he is always fatigued and other symptoms we never thought were related may now be. He has very dry skin, he is very forgetful and more. Can anyone offer any suggestions on where I might turn next?
    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      “thyroid level was a 4.02 which they called “low” I thought normal was 0.2-3.0 so I am not sure how 4.02 is considered low ” high TSH (4.02) means low or underactive thyroid

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  32. QUESTION:
    Can an under-active thyroid (hypothyroidism) cause low body weight or weight loss?
    My doctor suggested I go to an endocrinologist because I was complaining about bad sleep, low mood, and a severe lack of energy. I feel tired nearly all the time. The endocrinologist said that these are signs of underactive thyroid. He did a test and said that my thyroid hormone level was just on the low end of the normal range. It might be a problem or it might not. He suggested I try a low dose of thyroid hormone pill for 6 weeks. He didn’t feel certain that it was a thyroid problem, so I’m a little wary of trying the medication. Most of my symptoms fit hypothyroidism except for one: I have a very low body weight, even though I eat well. hypothyroidism usually causes weight gain, not loss. Is it at all possible that I can have a low body weight, fatigue, and low mood because of an under active thyroid? The conditions seem to clash a bit.

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    what is the treatment for someone with high TSH thyroid Level?
    Apparently my T3 and T4 levels are normal but my TSH level is 5.6 which is apparently the highest possible average,
    will this possibly mean I’ll have to take medication for a certain amount of time or a lengthy period cause my mom has hypothyroidism and has had to take pills everyday for years

    • ANSWER:
      It means you are borderline hypothyroid.

      You will probably need a follow up blood test in a few months to see if it has got better, worse or stayed the same.

      If it gets any worse you will probably need medication like your mother.

      Once you start medication it is generally for the rest of your life.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to tire easily when starting thyroid medication?
    I’ve been diagnosed with hypothyroidism – my TSH level was 8.8. I started taking levothyroxine a couple of days ago and I get tired easier than before taking the meds. Will my energy level go back up once my body adjusts to the meds? Thank you for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Levothyroxine is a t4 only drug, and for some reason, probably money for big pharm. companies, doctors love to prescribe it. A drug that will probably work better for you is dessicated thyroid like Naturethroid or Westhroid. Also, if you have been hypo for a while without being diagnosed, you may have adrenal fatigue. A great site to go to is www.stopthethyroidmadness.com
      It’s a great site that I stumbled upon when trying to figure my hypothyroidism out. Hope it helps!

  35. QUESTION:
    Can antidepressants and adderall affect a thyroid test?!!?
    Hi. I was tested about a year ago and had hypothyroidism. For the past few months I have been on antidepressants and adderall. I just had my thyroid tested again and they said my levels were normal. I was disappointed because I have a lot of hypothyroidism symptoms such as being cold all the time, have had a major increase in weight for unexplained reasons, and I’m often weak and tired. Why were my thyroid levels normal? Could it be because my medication is affecting the results? I must add I do feel much better when I’m taking adderall; I’m warmer and can think more clearly. But if I don’t take it for a few days I’m back to being cold all the time. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, they can.

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘normal’ should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. (WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find this) May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      God bless

  36. QUESTION:
    Can I abruptly stop taking my thyroid medicine?
    I had a lot of symptoms of hypothyroidism and my thyroid was tested. My levels were normal but because of all the symptoms, my doctor put me on levothyroxine. After 6 months I was tested again and my levels were still normal so we thought it was working. I’ve now been taking it for about a year and I was tested again, and my thyroid levels were starting to go the other way, toward hyperthyroidism. I want to stop taking my medicine altogether, but I’m not sure if it’s okay for me to stop abruptly or if I should wean myself off slowly? It’s hard to get my doctor on the phone so I thought I’d ask here in the meantime.

    • ANSWER:
      The answer is a definite no as it will cause a major health crisis and you may actually die.
      Thyroid medication stops your thyroid from working alone and the medication continues instead, just like someone taking prednisone for a long time, to stop it can cause a major health crisis which can make you a very sick person. You are tapered of these medications so the organ such a a thyroid can kick start and work again, if it can. Sometimes the thyroid does not work properly and people stay on medication for life. The thyroid is an important function in how many major organs work in your body.

      You need to see your doctor and discuss your concerns, and if not happy see someone who will listen.

      Do not stop taking the medication and see your doctor asap.
      If your tests came back like that it concerns me that the doctor did nothing or even explain why and what they are doing for you.

      Are you seeing a GP or a specialist as this is really a specialists job who can then have the GP oversee the progress but you need a specialist.

  37. QUESTION:
    Anyone with hypothyroidism have no energy?
    I have hypothyroidism and I have been on medication for about 8 months. While my thyroid levels have returned to normal, I still have absolutely no energy. I am so tired all the time. My MD said I was too young to be on a b12 supplement(I’m 22), but what else can I do? It gets really depressing to go for months without a day of feeling energetic.

    • ANSWER:
      If your thyroid levels are now normal then it sounds like you could be anemic. There are other iron supplements besides B12. You should have a blood test called a CBC just to find out if your hemaglobin is low. Fatigue is a major symptom of hypothyroidism but you say your lab results are normal.There is human error in labs as well. I would ask for the Thyroid profile to be repeated. Also you could ask for a referral to an endocranologist who specializes in thyroid, diabetes hormones etc. as a last resort after you finish more blod work.

  38. QUESTION:
    Can being on the low side of normal with hypothyroidism be too low for some?
    I recently had an blood test and my thyroid levels were abnormal. They didn’t say low but that is what I have been expecting. I have always been on a very healthy diet and exercise nearly everyday but I have gained nearly 30 pounds in two years. I have to stay below 1200 calories a day to not continue gaining. I have absolutely no energy and have no tolerance for cold, as well as other symptoms, dry skin, legs swelling, brittle hair and nails. My real question is, if my doctor determines that I am just on the low side of normal and doesn’t put me on meds, can normal still be too low for some?
    another detail, I have been on high cholesterol meds for over a year, and I just turned 23.

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    is it possible for hypothyroidism to switch to hyperthyroidism?
    hey folks i was just wondering if anyone could help me out with this, i,ll check with my gp but any advice would greatly appreciated, i was diagnosed about 4 years ago with hypothyroidism but my last blood check which was a few months ago came back a normal thyroid level, now i,m not sure if i was supposed to keep taking the thyroxine medication but anyways i did keep taking it as normal and i have now developed all the symptoms of hyperthyroidism does anyone know if thats possible and do you think its a result of the medication as now i imagine my body is producing sufficient amounts of thyroxine and i,m adding more as i said any advice would be greatly appreciated thanks so much

    • ANSWER:
      1st question:
      OH YES! That is called Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis where we, at the START, cycle between hypO & hypER.

      As I read on & see that you have been on the thyroid meds for a few yrs:
      It could be that your dose is too high and needs lowered! I say this because, w/ Hashi’s, if we get on the meds, the body allows the meds to take over in regulating the levels.

      Here is other info:
      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  40. QUESTION:
    TSH levels are normal…?
    Ive had my TSH levels tested and came back with the results of 1.170 and my T3/T4 levels were 0.94. Now in the lab that is considered normal. However my sodium levels were low at 132 out of the range of 135-146. Basically in a nutshell to the Dr. My levels are normal. BUT, I am losing my hair, Im weak, always tired, Im always cold, I always have severe migraines, my skin has become a disaster and Ive gained 10lbs in 2 months but havent changed my diet at all! The ultra sound of my thyroids showed 2 nodules which they now want me to get scanned, which I am set for that appointment. My question is though… Is it possible that I have Hypothyroidism with these levels? I have ALL of the symptoms of it EXCEPT that my levels run in what is considered the normal levels… Has ANYONE had this issue? And if so, what was done and how do I approach this?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you get your FT4/FT3 done? Those are more sensitive in detecting subclinical hypo or hyperthyroidism.

  41. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, constipation, intolerance to cold, and muscle cramps
      Later symptoms include mental clouding diminished appetite, and weight gain.

      Some other signs may be brittle fingernails and dry hair.

      You need tests to confirm, but it sounds like you have it. However, the prognosis is great. You may have to undergo hormone relacement therapy, but that is easy. But if you experience hypothermia and stupor, you require immidiate medical attention.

      Have your doctor test your T4 and T3 levels.

      By the way, I’m not a doctor. So dont take my advise over any real medical professionals. I’m just a high school freshman who wants to be a doctor one day.

      Get well. Let me know if I was correct,
      Jake P

  42. QUESTION:
    Does adderall increase TSH levels in a blood test?
    I recently went to the doctor and she did some blood tests to check if I showed signs of hypothyroidism. The tests showed that my TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) levels are higher than normal. When these tests were done I was under the influence of adderall which I am not prescribed. Is adderall the reason for my increased TSH levels, or are these two things unrelated? Thanks.

    P.S. Please save any comments about adderall abuse. What goes into my body is my decision.

    • ANSWER:
      No comments on the adderall use except that it it is more likely to cause a decrease in TSH

  43. QUESTION:
    Normal T4 normal TSH, thyroid problems ?
    A blood test revealed I have normal t4 level of .8 and a normal tsh level of .88. However, I still think I have some kind of thyroid problem (hyperthyroidism ? ) based on pregnancy losses I’ve had and the inability to gain any weight and tachycardia, chronic diarrhea, heat intolerance.
    What is t3 and since my doctor didn’t check it, could that be a cause of hyper or hypothyroidism. Please help, I’m confused ! Any knowledge you might be able to share is greatly appreciated.
    no, i’m not on any meds at all. i think i have hyperthyroidism based on the symptoms, i have almost all of them. after my second 2nd trimester miscarriage at about 18 weeks, i’m the one who’s asked for the thyroid test, also i failed to mention that my mom has had hypotyroidism for about 10 years now, i know it tends to run in families. my levels “seem” to be normal, but my doc is sending me to an endocrinologist, which I can;’t get an appointment with until December. I’m so confused.
    Free T4 was .8
    TSH was .88
    ok, sorry, i keep adding details, hopefully those who have already answered will read again. no, i dont have high blood pressure. i do have tachycardia, the heat intolerance, sweating, i have weighed exactly the same (no even a pound fluctuation) over the past 5 years despite not dieting, except while pregnant, I had actually lost weight (both times)despite a healthy appetite, and the diarrhea was for the whole first trimesters and was NOT because of the vitamins. I also have hypercalcemia – don’t know how or if that’s related.

    • ANSWER:
      I am no endocrinologist but I am a medical student. Your TSH may be “normal” but it is at the lower end of normal (which is 0.3 – 0.5 with a best level around 2.5). Your T4 doesn’t sound right. A “normal” T4 is generally from 4.5 to 11.2. I think you meant “free T4″ which is normal from 0.9 to 2.0. You are just on the cusp of a low/normal FREE T4.

      a really low T4 would indicate “secondary Hypothyroidism” in which the pituitary gland is not producing enough TSH which produces a low T4. There are a lot of reasons to this could occur but a doctor should send you for a MRI of the head if this is the case. I know that this could also indicate a difficulty with getting pregnant but I don’t know about miscarriages.

      A thyroid gland releases mostly T4 and some T3. T3 is the active form and much more potent than T4. Certain cells in your body have the ability to turn T4 into T3. In general, the amount of “free T4″ is an indication of how well your thyroid is functioning. Some people may have difficulty converting T4 (thyroxine) to active T3, and certain medications can interfere with this process (like lithium). Usually it is not necessary to check T3 unless the doctor suspects an inability to convert T4 to T3. Really, if you are unsure as to be referred to an endocrinologist for a second opinion. If you have had multiple pregnancy losses a fertility specialist may be helpful as well.

      One can have an elevated T3 with a normal T4 (a T3 thyrotoxicosis) but this is less common, but should be checked out with someone presenting with clinical signs of hyperthyroidism.

      Do you have high blood pressure? It is rare but some poeple have a “pheochromocytoma” which produces
      uncontrolled high blood pressure,
      tachycardia
      Palpitations (abnormal beats or a “fluttering” feeling in the chest.
      Anxiety often resembling that of a panic attack
      Diaphoresis (sweating)
      Headaches
      Pallor (Paleness)
      Weight loss

      There is another condition called carcinoid, which is really rare (I hope you are not a hypochondriac!) but can produce:
      Flushing
      Diarrhea
      Wheezing
      Abdominal cramping
      Peripheral edema (swelling)

      How chronic is your diarrhea? Are you having more than 3 stools a day? Are they bloody, black and tarry, yellowish, associated with mucus? Have you lost weight recently? These are all signs that you should bring up with your doctor.

      Hope this helps.

  44. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s and normal tsh levels? Possible to feel hypo?
    Any tips from others dealing with this would be greatly appreciated and would make me feel like I’m not crazy. :)
    I had doctors telling me my thyroid gland felt enlarged since January 2010,they’d test my tsh and everything was normal. Finally this May a different doctor ordered an ultrasound of my thyroid gland, radiologist and my doctor agreed it is “mildly enlarged”, they also found that 2 of my parathyroid glands are also enlarged. I was sent to an endocrinologist late May and she ordered a load of labs, parathyroid function, kidney function,tsh, metabolic panel, vitamin d and tested for thyroid antibodies.My tsh was .93 (late may), my last tsh was this january and was 1.9. I tested positive for thyroid antibodies and my level was 69, my vitamin d is also low and is the supposed reason for my parathyroid glands being enlarged,am now taking 1000 units of vitamin d daily now.
    At my initial appt. with my endo she talked to me mainly about hyperthyroidism because of they way my level dropped, I told her I have none of those symptoms. She called me at work to tell me I have Hashimoto’s and low vit d levels, take vitamin d daily and she will recheck my tsh and vit d in 6 months. She had no time to answer any questions and said absolutely no to any medication.. so I did my own research. I have just about every symptom of HYPOthyroidism and have had them for years. My mother had hashimotos and no longer has a thyroid gland, almost every one of her siblings is hypo and a few are hyper (there are 9 total). I called her back w/my concerns and still said absolutely no to treating it.
    I’ve had pain in the joints of my fingers x 3 years
    pain/swelling in my knees x 8-9 yrs (i do not have lymes or arthritis, mri and xray done on my knees show nothing wrong at all) I’ve seen orthopedic doctors for this.
    my muscles ache all the time in all sorts of places, legs,arms, back.
    my skin is very dry and seems to be bad yr round, am now using a prescription scalp solution for my horribly dry scalp that seemed to come out of no where 2 yrs ago.
    I cannot get pregnant again (5 yrs of trying-finally gave up and decided it was’nt meant to be), i missed 2 days of birth control 9 yrs ago and got pregnant instantly.
    I could sleep all day if I did’nt have a life, I am tired all the time and feel like I’m in a fog. I have been on 3 antidepressants (over 5 yrs) the doctors threw at me and nothing really worked so I just stopped them.
    I used to be someone who never really got nervous or scared about things..over the past few yrs I have anxiety over many stupid little things that shouldnt bother me,even meeting w/friends for dinner and sometimes break out in hives on my chest and back when my anxiety is bad.
    my weight fluctuates every couple months w/ no change in diet. I gain about 10 lbs and a month or so later I lose that plus maybe some more. (i am not a large person, so this usually goes unnoticed by most people)
    I have and have had bad menorrhagia for many yrs. but usually don’t get anything to stop the bleeding because I have a clotting disorder already and extra hormones puts me at higher risk for a clot.
    the list goes on…
    If my tsh was only .93 in May, why do I feel like someone with hypothyroidism? Maybe it’s just coincidence? I have a very slim neck and my enlarged thyroid is a tiny bit noticeable (by my endo and now me since she showed me) Why is this a “wait and see” disease? Why would they allow your thyroid gland to get bigger? It does’nt make sense.I would rather feel hyper than hypo any day, I have felt like crap for way too long.
    (fyi- i am 28 yrs old..going on 80) I have an appt with a new endo on Thursday but he works alongside with the last one I saw so I’m guessing he wont be of any help either and just a waste of another copay.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, the TSH test as the only thyroid test, and no treatment? ugh
      This is NOT a wait-and-see disease. The thyroid is one of the most
      important glands in the body. It regulates the entire metabolism, and when
      the thyroid is not functioning properly it can affect everything from
      adrenals, sex hormones, bones, circulation, hair, and weight, to energy,
      mental acuity, eyesight, and so on…

      Here is an article that might help you find a better doctor:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

      Here is the Hashimotos article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos

      Lots of great thyroid treatment info:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      Recommended tests:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      What the test results mean:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      There are a couple of thyroid groups that I think will benefit you:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones/

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless (co-mod has Hashis)

      I sincerely hope this info helps you.

  45. QUESTION:
    Have a nodule on my thyroid, will increasing synthroid dose help?
    I trust my doctor, big time. He is a great doc. and I kinda feel bad asking this, but I went to see him about a pain in my throat which he just felt and told me that it was a nodule on my thyroid (i have had hypothyroidism for about 7 months now) anyways, my t3 and t4 on my blood work is normal, however, he upped my does from .075mcg, to .1mcg in order to make the nodule go away. But if my thyroid levels are normal on .075, then won’t .1mcg make me HYPERactive? I don’t get it..i mean he has been in the practice for decades and knows what he is doing, but has this happend to anyone else out there, and is this common? he is having me come in again in about a month or 2 to follow up. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Have you have an ultra sound? Have you had an FNA? Have you had radioactive iodine testing to tell you the nature of the nodule?
      It could be bigger than he is feeling.
      I am sorry to say, but increasing you meds will NOT make the nodule go away – unless you really know what the nodule is. Normal levels mean squat. I had a friend recently with all normal levels and a tiny nodule and hers was cancer… you just cannot tell. Mine was big and a cold nodule – and it was a follicular benign one – but you need testing!

      http://thyroid.about.com/ is a reliable site to get information. Get more testing and a better doctor. Get copies of all your tests! Now and forever!!!

  46. QUESTION:
    Do these thyroid levels make sense?
    I’ve been dealing w hypothyroidism since 19, I’m now 41. My levels were never out of the normal range and for the first years I didn’t take anything for it. At age 26 I started losing hair and stopped having periods even though my levels were still within normal boundaries, I insisted on starting meds as I didn’t want my hair to continue thinning. Over the years my meds have been raised as needed. I now take levothyroxine 112.

    For the past 6ish months I’ve been having more hypothyroidism symptoms. Super tired, gained 10 lbs. in three months, after joining a gym 4-5 workouts a week and dieting I gained 5 more lbs. I went in and got bloodwork checked and my levels came like this: TSH was .043, my T4 was 1.16, and my T3 was 92.

    My Dr. says this is just fine and is keeping my meds the same. But i feel like crap. Not sure but to me it seems like the TSH is hyper and the T4 and T3 are hypo?? Am I wrong? I can’t get into an endocrinologist until October. I don”t want to feel like a fat slug for 3 more months, has anyone else experienced this and is this normal?

    • ANSWER:

  47. QUESTION:
    Thyroid blood levels?
    Okay here they are:
    TSH, 3rd generation: 5.39 (Ref range: 0.40-4.50)
    T4, Free: 1.0 (Ref range: 0.8-1.8)
    T3, Free: 308 (ref range: 230-420)

    I have hashimotos, now it looks like it has turned into hypothyroidism. My question is how much synthroid do you think i should be on?
    Also I am extremely concerned about infertility. So as long as I keep the thyroid levels controlled with meds I should be able to reproduce right? (well given that everything else is normal)

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    SUPER LOW TEMP’S HELP!!!?
    Hi, anyone out there that has been charting their waking BBT’s ever had their pre-ovulatory phase with waking temp’s between 95 and 96 degrees? If so have you successfully conceived? I am not on any medications and have not been diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Thyroid levels have been within normal range. Any thought? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      What TSH do you consider to be in the normal range? Even though some labs use 4 as the cut off, my RE likes to see TSH below 2.5.
      Your temps do sound a bit low. Are they rising after ovulation? It would help if you posted a FF chart of your BBT.

  49. QUESTION:
    I have many symptoms (getting worse) of hypothyroidism but, my blood test are normal…what can I do?
    A few years ago, I had a tumor on my thyroid and had 1/2 removed. Before haveing it removed I had many symptoms of hypothyroidism (hair falling out, very dry skin, weight gain, foggyness, constipation, always feeling tired even first thing in the morning) but, blood test always came back normal. Most doctors did not even feel my neck to notice I had a goiter. Now several years later my symptoms have increased I now have bumps all down my arms, I am growing hair on my navel & chin, my weight is continueing to rise. I have tried everything. I even fasted for 3 weeks and was shocked to see my weight unchanged. I go to the doctor and my blood levels are still normal and I just feel like I can not get help. I have an appointment tomarrow to check the blood test again…What should I be asking or telling my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a mild thyroid problem which had started during my puberty years, more than 20 years ago. The thyroid lump was so small, it
      was not visually perceptible. I could only feel it as a small solid bone, when I touch the front of the throat , and also had to chew a good number of times, before swallowing food, and became
      a slow eater. The doctors were then dismissive about my problem for 2 main reasons — one, thyroid tests were were quite dicey and so was thyroid treatment; two, during puberty years, many undergo hormonal changes which take a little time to stabilize. However, the fallouts of having thyroid ( I realized only in recent years), had led to very severe
      gumpain, and hair loss, though I did not have any weight problems, and having endured these persistent stresses for very many years, led to chronic fatigue and stiffness
      in the neck. It was in the process of using yoga to relieve my
      stiffness problems, that I discovered that my neck muscles
      were squeeze dried over the years gradually due to the
      frontal compression of the persistent (although, mild) thyroid problem (in fact, my blood test showed the thyroid hormones were within the statistical limits and were pronounced ‘normal’,
      though I felt like having a small pebble in the middle of the throat).
      I undertook yoga seriously, to stretch all parts of the body
      (not just my neck) very sloooooowly for several hours
      everyday (it is 4 years now), and I found with improved blood circulation,
      I was able to relieve the tensions in the neck and my
      thyroid functioning has stabilized very well, so much so
      I dont have any lump and feel my throat has been emptied out. My body is much lighter.

      People suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome often
      have carried thyroid problems for long, and yoga has been
      found to be extremely beneficial, recent research suggests. It sloowly, but very
      surely restores the body to get back to its comfortable state.
      Very sloooooow stretching, with spinal twists will immensely
      help.

  50. QUESTION:
    Anyone else with hypothyroidism have trouble losing weight?
    Before I found out that I had hypothyroidism, I gained 80 pounds in a matter of about 6 months and had no period. I got on medication and my thyroid levels are now normal. I was told by my doctor that I should start losing weight after my numbers were back to normal. Well, that was over 2 years ago and I’ve only lost about 20 pounds. I’ve tried eating less and exercising more but I need something different to help me lose weight. Any ideas? And does anyone else have this problem?

    • ANSWER:
      My mum had the same problem, and we never solved it for her. Take a look at the website below, it has lots of info and links and you may find some answers there, but personally I cannot give you any help from what I know (which is probably very little! lol). Good luck in finding what you need.


Hypothyroidism Normal Range Of Tsh

In 2010 a very ground-breaking book was written by DR.Datis Karazian, one of the world’s foremost authorities and researchers on thyroid metabolism and disorders.

In this book of the same title doctor Karazian very methodically explains the physiology andinteraction of the thyroid gland and it’s influence onthe rest of the endocrine system and how this can affect overall health and function. Heorganizes thyroid metabolism problems into 7 main categories This article is the first in a series of articles that will help the chronic thyroid patient understand why they continue to have thyroid symptoms despite medical care and what can be done to correct it. Thyroidbook.com

#1 secret to overcoming chronic thyroid symptoms:

Is understanding that laboratory ranges are too Broad! As a result is that they miss find body dysfunction every day. Laboratory ranges are based on the averages of all the sick people who went to medical clinics last year, the ranges differ one lab to another and differ state to state. Does it make sense to use the date of sick people to set the standard for what health should be? No. A better range for blood testing is the functional range, is a national standard that is set by a regulatory committee based on the data of healthy people with no symptoms. let’s look at some scenarios that are common in the patients that I see highlighting the differences in the laboratory vs functional ranges.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism TSH normal?
    I have been tested for thyroid. My TSH came back Normal and My antibodies where 356 and the normal range is <34 so I tested positive for the antibodies. I do have some of the symptoms like i feel tried and exhausted, I want to sleep alot, I feel I dont have as much energy as i use to...I have mild deppression and anxiety and I get easily irrated at times. I also have lichin on the lips of my vagina which the gynocolgist said alot of thyroid patiants have. I also find it hard to consentrate, cant think straight at times and some im forgetful. I do not have brittle nails and i dont think my hair is falling out but I do feel very tired and weak. I also have shoulder and back pain. and sometimes my feet with get numb and tingly. Is it possible that I could have hypothyroidism because my Antibodies are postive?? The last doctor i had would not give me the medication for thyroid due to normal TSH. I heard alot of ppl suffering from this dieseas has this problem. So I switch to a new doctor and will be seeing her Tuesday. so what do you think??

    • ANSWER:
      TSH is elevated in primary hypothyroidism, but not in other thyroid problems. Also, there are different antibodies associated with different thyroid diseases. Though you have lots of partial information here, there isn’t enough to tell you much, at least with any degree of certainty.
      My guess, and it’s only a guess, is that you’ve been tested with the idea that you have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Hashimoto patients do indeed sometimes have low thyroid function, and may benefit from thyroid supplementation (more to prevent goiter than for the symptoms you describe), but you’re simply going to have to rely on a doctor you trust to do the right thing with the information at hand.

  2. QUESTION:
    “normal” range TSH but symptoms?
    I have always had “weird” things going on with my body. Since I was young I have always been hotter than most others even during the winter. Hot water is not uncomfortable to me and I am capable of taking showers on even the hottest setting. Starting in high school I began having panic attacks but never went to the doctors about it (I just tried to use breathing techniques to calm myself down). I am 20 years old and had a son at age 17. Once pregnant, my panic attacks went away. Recently they just started coming back. Racing heart, shaking hands, sweating, dizziness, and irritability were my panic attack symptoms. I have also had an enlarged gland in my neck for the past 3 weeks that hurts when I swallow or talk too loudly. I went to the doctors with the concern of the lump and also told her my symptoms (without labeling them as panic attacks). She asked if anyone in my family had thyroid problems and I told her my aunt has hypothyroidism. She did a blood test and my TSH level is 0.9 with her stated range as 0.1-5.0. I understand that my number is technically in the normal range but because I have symptoms of hyperthyroidism and a relatively low TSH level should I ask her to test my T3 & T4 or just accept that it’s in the normal range? I do NOT like these “panic attack” symptoms I have been getting though. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      That normal range you state is quite low. I know Endocrinologists usually like to stay around the .4-4.0 range. Anyways, you should ask for your Free T4, Free T3, and antibodies test since they are the most accurate at telling if there’s a thyroid problem.

  3. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Blood Test: Low T4 Free & Normal TSH Plus Symptoms of Hypothyroidism?
    Hi! I am a 25 yo female who has experienced unexplained weight gain (30 lbs before stabilizing), constipation, fatigue, amenorrhea, dry skin, etc., for the last several years. I have visited a GP, a nutritionist, an endocrinologist, a GYN, and a gastroenterologist, without any resolutions.

    Last week I visited a Naturopath and she was amazing. We are investigating blood sugar, adrenal, and food intolerance problems and meeting again in 3 weeks.

    I just received back my latest blood work and it shows my free T4 below normal at 1.42 (reference range is 1.53-3.85 units). My TSH showed up normal as it has on countless other tests. I had never been tested for free T4 before.

    Basically, I have almost every basic symptom of hypothyroidism and now I actually have a test result to back this up. As my past blood work has always been normal, doctors have seemed to disregard my very real concerns. This makes me nervous that they will overlook the free T4 results as well. Should I just wait to share the results with my ND (I am in NY but she can make diagnosis and write prescriptions because she is licensed in CT)? Or, should I see my general practitioner about this issue now? I really appreciate the advice!
    Thanks for your helpful answer af!! When I went to my endocrinologist she didn’t include the free T4 on the comprehensive blood panel. The ND I have gave me prescriptions for other blood work because she is licensed in CT.

    • ANSWER:
      I will suggest you to go to a good endocrinologist .

      Thyroid function test should be done at a good lab and your TSH should be measured by 2nd or 3rd generation assay method (also called sensitive and ultra-sensitive method ,respectively) not the first generation one.

      TSH is usually first line thyroid function test because it is most sensitive and specific indicator of thyroid dysfunction then free T4 (measured by equilibrium method not direct assay method as direct free T4 can have significant inter-assay variations).

      In almost all cases normal TSH indicates euthyroid (normal thyroid) status,
      except when there is problem with hypothalamo-pituitary axis. or when there is chronic starvation or severe illness which is rare and very much obvious if present .

  4. QUESTION:
    My thyroid tests were within normal range but I still have most of the hypothyroidism symptoms?!?
    I had TSH and T3 and T4 tests…they all were within the normal range but I still am intolerant to cold,often sleepy, depressed,constipated ….dose anyone know why? I also find it difficult to lose weight even though my calorie intake is low…

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, some of the answers you got above mine are not correct. Yes I know why you have those problems.. Because being in the ‘normal’ range does not mean you are without hypo. For one, the TSH test is the most stupid test created. My brother’s wife had a “normal” TSH for about 9 years with hypo symptoms like yours. It took a really neat doc to move here and explain to my s-in-law that she did have hypo and that the TSH was not showing it correctly. Also the T3 and T4–its ‘where’ your results fall that tell the story, not the fact that they are in that ‘normal’ range. I learned from Stop the Thyroid Madness that if you have a FREE T3, and make sure it was the free T3 you had and not just T3, and if that result was midrange or lower with those symptoms, you do have hypo. Good grief, your symptoms are hypo symptoms. Go to the Stop the thyroid Madness site and read it all over. It is you. Look at the ‘long and pathetic’ page which shows symptoms, too.

  5. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism: TSH Levels?
    I recently got the results of some blood tests back. One of them was for my Thyroid my TSH level was at 3.5. My doctor said this was normal and that I didn’t have a problem with my thyroid. Infact the only thing that showed up was quite bad anemia with hemoglobin and 10.2, No stored levels of ferritin and also low red blood cell count and the red blood cells are also too small.

    I feel I have many of the symptoms of Hypothyroidism such as :
    feeling tired and sleeping a lot
    feeling the cold easily
    dry and/or pale skin
    coarse, thinning hair
    sore muscles, slow movements and weakness
    a hoarse or croaky voice
    depression
    problems with memory and concentration
    fairly dramatic weight gain
    constipation
    heavy, irregular or prolonged menstrual periods
    light sensitivity, dizzy spells, palpitations
    I could go on. Is it possible that I could be Hypothyroid and still have TSH levels in the normal range?

    • ANSWER:
      symptoms

      Sudden weight loss, even when your appetite and food intake remain normal or increase
      Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) — commonly more than 100 beats a minute — irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) or pounding of your heart (palpitations)
      Nervousness, anxiety or anxiety attacks, irritability
      Tremor — usually a fine trembling in your hands and fingers
      Sweating
      Changes in menstrual patterns
      Increased sensitivity to heat
      Changes in bowel patterns, especially more frequent bowel movements
      An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), which may appear as a swelling at the base of your neck
      Fatigue, muscle weakness
      Difficulty sleeping

      is your thyroid gland inflammed

      Thyroiditis. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis).

  6. QUESTION:
    thyroid TSH My last Tsh test was 2.73..is this a normal, healthy range?
    I feel that I have many symptoms of hypothyroidism but my doctor made no comments about the test results, only that it was normal. I know that the new normal range is 0.3 – 3.00. Thanks for any input.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep, it is normal. If you have symptoms like being cold or very tired, talk to the doc. These could be from other causes. Hve questions ready, and be assertive when you talk to the doc, let him/her know you need answers.

  7. QUESTION:
    What happen when your TSH hormone is very very low?
    My 3-year-old son was diagnosed with Central Hypothyroidism. Both his TSH and T4 hormone are lower than normal range but whenever he is sick, his TSH hormone will drop to very low level (0.005). Have everyone heard of cyclic THS? If yes, what does that mean to your health?

    • ANSWER:
      “It is common to see a transient minor suppression of TSH into the 0.02 – 0.2 mIU/L range during the acute phase of an illness, followed by a rebound to mildly elevated values during recovery.”

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/452667_5

  8. QUESTION:
    Very Low TSH normal T3 T4…Any Endocrinologists out there?
    T3, Total………..176 (in range)
    T-4, Total……… 9.5 (in range)
    TSH……………..0.01L (out of range)

    I’m going to see an Endocrinologist soon but what do my results mean exactly? They said that it is hyperthyroidism but it seems like hypothyroidism…? If that makes any sense. I mean I’ve been absolutely exhausted lately, my vision has changed, I’ve gained a significant amount of weight in only a short time, my menstrual cycle is out of whack (usually six weeks, but now its 7 weeks here, three weeks there, four weeks and then eight weeks)! Thyroid disorders also run in the family.

    Rather my question is are my T3 and T4 results normal? and would it be, according to those stats, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism???

    • ANSWER:
      I am not a doctor but someone who had a thyroidectomy after thyroid cancer. Your test results seem odd to me, so I looked it up.

      On the web page I looked up there was a chart.

      Low TSH, with normal T3 and T4, it reads as either Mild (subclinical) hyperthyroidism or rare pituitary (secondary) hypothyroidism.

      By your symptoms I would guess hypothyroidism.

  9. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and TSH levels?
    hypothyroidism runs in my family. My grandmother has it and a few other family members on my moms side. I think I have it to. I have some of the symptoms. I feel tried all the time like I have no energy and I sleep alot. I also feel weak and slugish, sometimes dizzy when I get up from bed. Another symptom is deppression and I have been feeling deppressed and sad lately. Also they said you may have trouble thinking or be forgetful and lately its been hard to think..sometimes Its hard to say what im thinking and I jumble my words. I notice that I have been a little forgetful. Like I’ll tell myself to remember to do sumthing then when I go to do it I forget what I was going to do. forgetfullness is a sign of it. I also have heavy periods and some consitipation which are other symptoms. and my feet and hands get tingly at times. I’m pretty sure I have it what do you think??

    I went to the Doctor and got a blood test for it and my TSH is 2.32 could this mean I have it what is the range. I also been reading that patiants who really have it sometimes get misdiagnosed. The Doctor will say they are fine an in the normal range but they have all the symptoms. Is this true that they you could have it but be misdiagnosed??

    I just dont have alot of energy and want to feel better cuz I notice when I go to the park with my friends im not as energised as I use to be. Like running around going on the swings… tires me out easily now where as before it did not. Advice and help would be appericated thanks! ^__^

    • ANSWER:
      You could be HypOthyroid.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      My doctors goal is to get mine down to < 1.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  10. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what ‘normal’ levels of TSH and T4 would be?
    I have hypothyroidism and my doctor always reads the numbers out to me and says this is high or low, but I’d like to know what the normal range is.

    • ANSWER:
      TSH 0.40 – 5.5

      T4, FREE 0.8 – 1.8

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight with hypothyroidism and you are currently taking 112mcg of Synthroid?
    I was on a dosage of 125 mcg, but that was found to be too high of a dosage. Now that it’s been lower, it appears as though I’ve gained weight overnight. But my T3 and T4 levels were in the normal range with my TSH only being considered slightly elevated by .08. I feel sluggish, blotted, and my face feels funny all the time. Also, my heart skips irregularly frequently. I live in the south and cannot bear the heat. I start sweating the minute I walk outside.

    • ANSWER:
      I think I have hypothyroidism…the doctor said that my thyroid gland just wasn’t working altogether. So far I’ve lost 25 lbs. in 2 months and I’m on 75 mcg of Synthroid. He is pondering upping the doseage to which I hope would help me lose even more weight…and faster. I stay hot even in cold places and used to be totally cold natured. You may need to be checked for diabetes. I also have that. The sluggish feeling could be associated with low blood sugar! Hope my answer helped you! Good luck!

  12. QUESTION:
    can you have thyroid problems and normal levels ?
    Please correct me if I’m wrong.
    Free T4 is how much thyroid hormone my thyroid is producing ? (mine is .8 – on the low side of normal range)
    TSH is what the hypothalmus is telling the pituitary to produce in order to stimulate the thyroid ? (mine is also .8 which is normal I guess) But, I have had many symptoms of hypothyroidism. My question is if you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto’s can you still have these “normal range” levels ? Also, I read it runs in families and my mom has hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      You are at the low end of the “normal range”, and if you are experiencing symptoms of hypothyroid, you should demand to be put on a low dosage of synthroid or levoxyl (10-20 mcgs) because normal for one person might be a .8 while someone else needs to be 1-2 to feel well. Most endocrinologists like to see patients towards the middle of the range and will prescribe, especially in women because your thyroid function decreases with age. Because of your family history especially, you are a good candidate. I know that my TSH needs to be around 2 to feel good. Be sure that you get your TSH tested every 4-6 weeks initially to find the right dosage for you. It can be a long process in finding the right dosage and reaping the full benefits of medication, so be patient.

      If your doctor doesn’t take you seriously, change doctors or ask for a second opinion. If you have a good HMO and are able to go directly to a specialist, see an endocrinologist. Endocrinologists specialize in endocrine diseases and I assure you will take your symptoms very seriously.

      Another suggestion is to have an antibody test. If your antibodies are elevated, it could be Hashimoto’s causing hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s causes antibodies to attach your thyroid. It’s rare, but the antibody test is the best way to diagnose if TSH doesn’t.

  13. QUESTION:
    “Normal TSH” Low T4…treatment thoughts?
    My TSH is 2.5 (reference range .450 to 4.500) and my T4 is .77 (reference range .82-1.77). My T3 is normal at 2.5 (reference range 2.0-4.4). A lot of patients say that a TSH under 1.5 is when they feel their best, but besides that, my T4 IS actually abnormal. My internist wants to put me on Armour Thyroid to for optimum thyroid health, or at least Synthroid to build up the T4. My endocrinologist is having a fit saying that because my TSH is normal, it means there is absolutely nothing wrong with my thyroid.

    I have diagnosed pituitary disease (ACTH deficiency and on steroids to treat it), and I am in my early 30s, overweight and still gaining despite a very restricted diet, autonomic nervous system dysfunction causing heart problems, I have cuts & bruises that never heal and I’m constantly cold with my hair falling out. My grandmother had severe hypothyroidism in her 20s and had a thyroidectomy in her early 40s.

    Given my symptoms, my family history, and my host of health problems, doesn’t thyroid disease seem likely? I can’t figure out why my endocrinologist is being this way. She said I should not take any thyroid medication at all, yet can’t explain herself.

    Any advice? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      You could be in normal range .3 – 3 per TSH, but that is not the whole story……you need test for antibodies…Endo will know. If he/she refuses, get another Endo.

      Blessings

  14. QUESTION:
    thyroid hormone levels. TSH over 2.0 still normal?
    I just got the results of my thyroid test. they are
    TSH:2.1norm:0.3-4.0 mU/l
    T3:2.3norm:0.8-2.8
    T4:6.3norm:4.6-12.4

    I was told these over phone and the lab guy neglected to say whether the t3 and t4 are ng/l or nU/l or or whatever so help me out here(!).

    so my “problem” is that my thyroid levels looked like this last year. (note the TSH)

    TSH: 1.14norm: 0.3-4.0 mU/l
    Free T3 3.52norm: 2.0-4.2 ng/l
    F. T4 15.05norm: 8 – 18 ng/l

    according to wikipedia TSH over 2 is a tad fishy.
    and the fact that my TSH has doubled since last year leads me to the beliefe that it could be the beginning of hypothyroidism, unless someone tells me that TSH and tyroid hormones fluctuate.
    My t4 seems also be in the lower normal range now…..

    so please help me out here. What do you think?
    is there any explaination for this other than emerging hypothyroidism?
    should i take this seriously?
    i have an appointment on friday but i need some answers before friday….;-)

    Thanks for reading all this.
    first time i was tested at 6 AM
    the last test was done at 11 am or so

    • ANSWER:
      A TSH over 2.0 can cause problems in the body. Do you happen to know what time of day you tested? TSH should always be done first thing in the morning when its still near its high point. By 2PM, its at its lowest point.

      Better thyroid tests are the free t4 and free t3. It looks like last year you had a free t4 and free t3, but this time you had a total T4 and total T3.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to turn into being hypothyroidism from hyperthyroidism?
    My last blood test ( last week of May) my TSH is below the normal range, my FT3 is in normal, and my FT4 is below the normal range. I am still taking PTU 50 mg. 2x a day. I wonder if i am turning into hypo now because my hair is falling out. I don’t experienced any symptoms except that I feel tired sometimes.

    • ANSWER:

  16. QUESTION:
    My TSH is 3.6, I have high cholestrol & triglycerides- could I still have hypothyroidism?
    I read up that hypo thyroidism normal range has been changed. It also affects cholestrol and triglycerides. Do u think I may still have hypothyroidism. I have classic symtoms- fatigue, lot of weight gain, puffed up face. I exercise for 45 minutes – 200 calories 3 times a week. No weight loss. I have fruits and veggies.

    • ANSWER:
      You sure could have hypothyroidism. In fact, by AACE standards you do. Back in 2003, they changed the TSH range to 0.3 to 3.0. Unfortunately most labs still have the range at 0.3 to 5.5 and doctors don’t realize its outdated. Plus, TSH changes throughout the day, so depending on the time you had it the result could be totally different. TSH should always be done first thing in the morning.

      Below are some thyroid links that should help.

      My first TSH was 2.6. Within a year, it rose to 6.8 and I got diagnosed. Was I hypo at 2.6? probably. The TSH is a lousy test and its not actually a thyroid test. It’s a pituitary test. Better tests are the free t4 and free t3

  17. QUESTION:
    I have sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Should I consider treatment?
    I have had my thyroid hormone levels tested for the past 3 years. There has been a constant increase in the TSH level and slight decrease in T4 level. My TSH level is currently 6.34 while T3 and T4 are within the normal range. Hypothyroidism runs in my family. My father, sister and a paternal cousin have it. I have had excessive hair-loss, weight gain and signs of laziness for the past 3-4 years now. My doctor suggests therapy. Should I consider it? Thank you in advance for all those who care to answer.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaanya … if it were me, I would definitely start therapy ! Chip

  18. QUESTION:
    Can you have severe hair loss if your TSH is very low (0.2)?
    I had hypothyroidism and treated it aggressively, with gradually increasing my Synthroid dosage. My endocrinologist was of the opinion that we’re going to shoot to put me at the low end of the normal range of TSH, because I was very depressed. My psychiatrist was happy with that too. When I was hypo, I was not only depressed, but always had chills, was very tired, gained weight, and was losing hair. Now, after two years of treatment, I am much thinner and have more physical energy. The problem is that I think my hair is falling at an even faster rate, it is dull and lifeless. I thought that hair loss was typically a hypothyroid symptom. Is it not? Is my low TSH causing my hair to fall?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes! Hyperthyroidism can display some of the same symptoms as hypothyroidism, even if it is normally opposite- hair loss, night sweats, and unusual body temperatures are included. This is a pretty good indication that your dose is too high!

  19. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Antibodies: What is the normal range?
    Hi there
    I am 29, and have had symptoms of hypothyroidism, tiredness, cold, weightgain etc for about 4 years despite (trying) to lead a healthy and active lifestyle, the tiredness is crippling.
    My TSH is 1.8 and my thyroid antibodies are 604. Because of this I am to be referred to an endocrinology unit. Family history is sister with goiter (Now removed) and mother had a pituitary tumor when she was about 20 years old and later developed an underactive thyroid. Please could you tell me whether medication is likely and / or what is the normal range for thyroid antibodies? THANKS

    • ANSWER:
      The antibodies may indicate Hashimoto’s. Your TSH looks good, but the antibodies are high. Hashi’s is usually an inherited disease, I have it. The Endo, if they know what to check for, will also look at T4 free, and T3 free. If they don’t suggest testing these make them do it. You may need a little thyroid hormone replacement.

  20. QUESTION:
    DO U THINK that i have hypothyroidism?
    I AM 23 YRS FEMALE, i have some symptoms of hypothyroidism-weight gain( BMI-38),lethargy,lack of concentration,muscle cramps….my thyroid report says my T3,TSH within normal range but T4 just at borderline……had these test 2 years back ,, same findings, but i didnt take it seriously,,,, but know i think something is really fishy…. i am pretty sure nobody would start medicine based on thisreport(they want high TSH)…. what do u think?

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    I think I have hypothyroidism?
    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, but my doctor won’t put me on medicine. My tsh levels were high for the normal range, but still “considered” normal. I have chronic symptoms of hypothyroidism such as: constant fatigue, weight gain, constipation, depression, missed periods, brittle fingernails. What should I do? I am on birth control, does that change the results?

    • ANSWER:
      Get a new doctor

  22. QUESTION:
    Thyroid results – confused! Is this subclinical hypothyroidism and safe to treat?
    Well, I got back some thyroid results and it’s completely confused me.
    My TSH has always been on the lowest end of normal or one point under (eg 0.43 of a 0.5 normal range minimum) and the T3 an t4 have been normal ,so no Dr has looked at doing anything about it.

    Yes I do have some of the thyroid symptoms and have for years.

    But the result I got back today was different and I was hoping someone who knows about this could tell me if it reads like sub-clinical hypothyroidism? My Dr said it’s not worth treating but I asked to try thyroxine and he was okay to write a script for it. Before I think of starting it I’m a bit worried as I heard that if you take thyroxine you can go hyperthyroid easily and it can screw up your thyroid if you don’t really need it??

    My results and reference ranges were:

    ref range result
    TSH (0.5 – 4.5) 0.61
    FT3 (3.5 – 6.0) 3.4
    FT4 (10 – 20) 9.4

    If anyone has a clue I’d really appreciate some feedback here! Dr’s are driving me nuts and I’m a bit skeptic of the medical profession as all the health probs I’ve had in the past I’ve had to research the symptoms myself and ASK to be tested – 80% of the time I’m right while they never would’ve had me tested in the first place!

    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Low free T4 and free T3 along with a low TSH is an indication of a malfunctioning pituitary gland. This is known as hypo­pi­tui­ta­rism or secondary hypothyroidism. Treatments are hormones to replace those not being made by the thyroid and pituitary gland. Commonly seen deficiencies are growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotopic hormone(ACTH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Surgery (through the nasal cavity) may be needed if a pituitary tumour is found to be the cause. I would recommend a referral to an endocrinologist

      These links go into more information and other tests to request>>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hypopituitary-faq/

      http://www.ehow.com/how_2334889_treat-hypopituitarism.html

      http://www.cushings-help.com/hypopituitary.htm

      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/tsh/test.html

  23. QUESTION:
    My TSH levels are not at a good level do I need to worry about trying to get pregnant?
    Ive been diagnosed with hypothyroidism for years and have been treated-But my TSH level dropped and is at .05 which is Hyper. My husband and I are thinking of trying to start a family but with my thyroid not being at a normal or an okay range- Should I worry about trying to get pregnant right now?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, thyroid can certainly affect fertility as well as pregnancy so you need to get that in control first. One can usually do that in control within a month or two with meds (e.g. PTU), so it doesn’t take long at all. You will also need to be carefully monitored during pregnancy and dosage may be adjusted then as well.

      If you are still taking meds for hypothyroid, obviously stop taking that.

      Good luck.

  24. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and am on synthroid but I don’t feel better =(.?
    I’m 18 and was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism about 4 months ago. I’ve been taking synthroid (50mcg) since then. I’m aware that it will take anywhere between 2 weeks and a month before you start feeling better and I have a little. The problem is I still have very low energy, my skin is still dry and other symptoms are still present as well… My doctor says my TSH is withing normal range, but it’s at the high end of the normal range.

    If it’s normal, why do I still feel like crap? Does everyone with hypothyroidism continue to feel this way even after treatment?
    s p Mishra m…. I didn’t understand your post.

    • ANSWER:
      The goal of the treatment is to be symptom free. For those on Synthroid, the first thing in the morning TSH should be under 2.0, closer to 1.0. Your doctor is keeping your TSH too high. A TSH over 2.0 is causing damage within the body. You need to speak up and get an increase of your medication. While you’re at it, ask for a free t4 and free t3 at your next testing. The free t3 will show how much of the Synthroid you are converting to T3 (the active hormone) Remember to always test in the morning. Links below

  25. QUESTION:
    TSH levels are normal…?
    Ive had my TSH levels tested and came back with the results of 1.170 and my T3/T4 levels were 0.94. Now in the lab that is considered normal. However my sodium levels were low at 132 out of the range of 135-146. Basically in a nutshell to the Dr. My levels are normal. BUT, I am losing my hair, Im weak, always tired, Im always cold, I always have severe migraines, my skin has become a disaster and Ive gained 10lbs in 2 months but havent changed my diet at all! The ultra sound of my thyroids showed 2 nodules which they now want me to get scanned, which I am set for that appointment. My question is though… Is it possible that I have Hypothyroidism with these levels? I have ALL of the symptoms of it EXCEPT that my levels run in what is considered the normal levels… Has ANYONE had this issue? And if so, what was done and how do I approach this?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you get your FT4/FT3 done? Those are more sensitive in detecting subclinical hypo or hyperthyroidism.

  26. QUESTION:
    Are my TSH levels normal?
    I had hypothyroidism for two years, but my doctor says that it seems to have gone away. My TSH levels are 0.97 mIU/L. Is this really a healthy range? I am always tired, gain weight easily (I eat very healthy and work out for an hour every day). My hair is also very dry and brittle, and I have an enlarged pituitary glad without a tumor. I also have high levels of anxiety, as well as mild vertigo. Anyone have any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal values are 0.4 – 4.0 mIU/L.

      However, those without signs or symptoms of an underactive thyroid who have a TSH value over 2.0 mIU/L but normal T4 levels may develop hypothyroidism in the future. This is called subclinical hypothyroidism (mildly underactive thyroid) or early-stage hypothyroidism. Anyone with a TSH value above this level should be followed very closely by a doctor.

      If you are being treated for a thyroid disorder, your TSH level should be between 0.5 and 3.0 mIU/L.

      Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

      *What are your T3 and T4 values?

  27. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism UK T3 and T4?
    My TSH level is 1.62

    A few months after my first child was born in 2007 I was diagnosed with an under-active thyroid and was told I would need to be on medication for life, this was distressing for me but I felt much better after taking a small daily dose of levothyroxine and regular check up’s with my endocrinologist.

    I became pregnant with my second child, the symptoms vanished and the bloods went back to normal so I was unusually taken off my medication and postpartum hypothyroidism was blamed. Shortly after my daughter was born in january 2009 I started to feel ILL again really really ILL like DYING ILL. I knew it was my thyroid as I had suffered with the same symptom’s in 2007-2008 for which I was successfully treated with levothyroxine.

    I also moved to a different area and only recently discovered that there are different lab results meanings for different area’s, this has been distressing for me as I know if I still lived in my previous area I would most likely be treated, however because I live here I will not get treated. I tick almost every symptom of hypothyroidism yet my blood work for THIS AREA is within the normal range.

    The doctor only tested my TSH levels??? Why wouldn’t he check my T3 and T4??? Yes my TSH levels are within the normal range, I understand this, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the illness and many people are going undiagnosed for 20 or 30 years, suffering for years whilst waiting for there TSH levels to rise enough to be treated..

    My TSH level is 1.62 very normal in most people’s eyes but I feel terribly ill and they wont do anything for me. I would rather DIE than suffer like this for the next 20 years, it could take years for my TSH levels to rise, yet I have RAGINGsymptom’ss.

    My doctor has said if the results come back as normal then there is nothing they can do other than rule an illness out and try to find out what the real problem is.

    There is NO other problem, I know what is wrong with me and I know what I need to feel better.. I need levothyroxine. But you know DOCTORS KNOW BEST… What am I supposed to do? I am at a loss with myself, I want to live a normal happy productive life and have been held back for 3 years, I have missed 3 years of my life. we only live once and I cant suffer like this any longer.. Can anyone help me please?? What should I do?? Who should I see?? Should I self medicate. I was considering buying levothyroxin from the internet and taking them to prove to my doctor that taking them WILL make me better.

    I am thankful for any responses which I get.

    Sorry this has taken so long to read and thank you for your time. :- (

    • ANSWER:
      Number one. Doctors do not always know best.
      Two. Do not self medicate.
      You need to go back to the doctor and say what you have said on here, that you need T3 and T4 checked.
      They will do it if you ask for it.
      ]For any one, Doctors see so many patients in a day, that your case is not unique. Make sure you say something to him/her while still in the surgery if you think something is not right. There is no use stewing on it at home. It is your body. Ask questions and discuss things. Only you know all your symptoms and lifestyle.
      Good luck.
      Please do not self medicate. especially if breast feeding

  28. QUESTION:
    Hyporthyroid & just found out I’m pregnant! YAY! Qt. about current TSH level..Help!?
    First off, thank you all who are taking the time to respond to my qt. Well, I’ll give the main details first. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism back in August 2009. Had my levothyroxine medication adjusted twice so far. When I was just diagnosed, my TSH level was 4.1, probably the reason why I had a very early miscarriage months before, in May.. My endo. started me on 50 mg. of levothyroxine. It wasn’t working, so she increased it to 75 mg, and I started to feel the difference, in a good way. About 2 1/2 wks ago, my levels were checked again, & now I am at TSH of 2.373 (normal range supposedbly is from 0.5-6.0), so I am right on track, and levels on FREE-T3= 2.87 (normal range of 1.5-5.5), and FREE T-4= 1.19 (normal range of 0.8-1.8)… Now, it all seems to be right on track. Because my endo. is on maternity leave (won’t see her till end of March, beg. of April*), my primary physician has been the one checking my levels. Before finding out I am pregnant, he said that he’ll keep me on the 75 mg. of levothyroxine. Now…. I just found out about my pregnancy, which Hubby and I have worked very hard for, last week (Feb. 11th).. If all goes well, this will be our 2nd child.. I was told by the nurse at my endo’s office that since my endo. is out, that I can have my OBGYN monitor, and if need be, increase the dosage of levothyroxine. The prob. is, I won’t be seeing her until March 1st.. Would that be waiting too long to have my dosage increased?! I had already planned to contact either my OB or my primary in order to have them increase the dosage, because after extended research of mine, I found out that the IDEAL TSH level to conceive and have a pregnancy go smoothly is between TSH of 1-2… I am at 2.37… Does this mean that I am bound to have complications before I get in to see my OBGYN??? Anyone had this level before, and had a healthy pregnancy/baby??? I need all the help I can get.. If need be, I will be be persistent with my OB’s office, so they can squeeze me in alot earlier than March 1st… I really want everything to go well with this pregnancy.. I cannot bear having another miscarriage… We’ve been trying for almost a yr. now after our first miscarriage, & def. don’t want to take a step back again.. Thanks for the help in advance! =)

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmm It probably would be fine until march 1 , but why take a chance and you know you’ll worry until then. Try to get in earlier.

      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/pregnancy.htm

  29. QUESTION:
    Low TSH-Low SHBG-Erectile Dysfunction?
    I was tested and found out that i had a low SHBG-8 ( range is 10-50) and the doctor gave me another set of exams in which i found out that i had low TSH but normal 0,86 while the range is 0.5-5 . I had these tests because i experience erectile dysfunction and i found a bit conflicting to have low SHBG ( which leads to Hypothyroidism) and low TSH (which leads to Hyperthyroidism). Could there be something wrong with my pituitary? Any ideas? Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Introduction. Men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) wasting and hypogonadism are frequently treated with testosterone and oxandrolone, an orally administered anabolic–androgenic steroid hormone. We observed reductions in testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, in association with complaints of erectile dysfunction, after prolonged exposure to this therapeutic regimen.

      Aim. First description of an association between long-term receipt of oxandrolone with erectile dysfunction, low SHBG and testosterone.

      Methods. Case report of three human immunodeficiency virus-infected hypogonadal male patients receiving treatment for wasting syndrome and hypogonadism, and highly active antiretroviral therapy. All three patients received long-term oxandrolone in addition to testosterone replacement therapy.

  30. QUESTION:
    Being treated for hypothyroidism?
    I initially started out with my TSH level being 420! Now, it is in normal range. I will, of course, continue medications to control levels. Will I still have a healthy pregnancy, even being treated? Will I have trouble conceiving?

    • ANSWER:
      There’s no contraindication.

  31. QUESTION:
    Is there a correlation between low blood sugar and hypothyroidism?
    I have a non-functioning thyroid (had hyperthyroidism and the radioactive iodine treatment and am now hypothyroid) and my TSH levels are in the normal range. It was 1.25 My blood pressure was 90/53, and I usually run lower than the “norm”

    I keep having symptoms of low blood sugar and had a bunch of tests done by my doctor. I have a daughter who is a Type 1 Diabetic, so I also check myself on her meter when I am not feeling well. My numbers are usually between 61-68 when I am feeling low. My doctor says 65 is in the normal range. I know for my daughter, her range is 70-100 and lower than 70 is considered too low.

    The doctor originally suspected an insulinoma when I saw him 6 months ago and the testing then came back normal. A week ago, they did a fasting and PP insulin test on me, along with InsW and C-Peptide. I still haven’t gotten the result of the fasting (checked on daughter’s meter and it was 67 about 30 minutes before I had my blood drawn) and the PP was 80. My C-Peptide was 0.8 (lowest normal on the reference range) and the InsW was 2.5. They also did an A1C on me which was 4.8.

    I’m not sure if the blood sugar issues have anything to do with the hypothyroidism, as they are both autoimmune. My doctor doesn’t seem to be worried, but I have been experiencing what are low blood sugars to me (including all of the hypo symptoms) for about six months. Should I request other tests to be done as well to try to figure out why I keep having lower blood sugar?

    I’m really confused and want to be sure there isn’t something more serious going on. Thanks in advance for any help!

    • ANSWER:
      Connection between thyroid disease and diabetes:

      “To counteract this lack of awareness, and encourage Americans to uncover their family health history to discover their at-risk medical conditions, AACE is launching a new campaign, “The Neck’s Generation: Thyroid Genealogy,” to educate the public about the genetic links associated with thyroid disease. Research shows that there is a strong genetic link between thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases including certain types of diabetes, anemia and arthritis (2). In fact, thyroid disease affects more than 13 million Americans, yet more than half remain undiagnosed.(3)”

      and…

      “The Diabetes-Thyroid Connection

      AACE’s survey found that 79 percent of Americans did not know there is a connection between diabetes and thyroid disease(6). In fact, fifteen to 20 percent of diabetics and their siblings or parents are at a greater risk of presenting with thyroid disease compared to 4.5 percent of the general population(7).”

      http://thyroid.about.com/library/news/blneckgen.htm

      and…

      “Diabetic patients have a higher prevalence of thyroid disorders compared with the normal population (Table 1). Because patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that up to 30% of female type 1 diabetic patients have thyroid disease. The rate of postpartum thyroiditis in diabetic patients is three times that in normal women. A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder.” http://journal.diabetes.org/clinicaldiabetes/v18n12000/Pg38.htm

  32. QUESTION:
    My baby has transient hypothyroidism. Question’s long. Please read if you’re familiar?
    My baby (now 3 months old) was diagnosed with transient hypothyroidism. He was started on the lowest dose of levothyroxine. A month later, his TSH levels are now in normal range but his T4 is a little high 14mcg/dl. (Normal is 4.5-12.5). I’m afraid that he’ll be hyperthyroid this time. What’s considered high T4? Should I still continue his levothyroxine? Doctor’s already reassured me but I just wanted to hear what other people with experience have to say.

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    Are you diagnosed with hyperthyroid, or hypothyroid, what was your TSH level on your blood test?
    I think I might have hyperthyroidism. But my TSH level was 1.2, falling in the normal range. That was about 6 months ago, so I’m thinking of getting another test soon to see if there have been any changes. I’m curious if you can still have mild hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism even when you fall within the normal range. My symptoms include:

    -Panic/anxiety…daily feeling of nervousness
    -Can’t gain weight
    -Weird stools-sometimes hard, sometimes soft
    -have always been told that i have thin hair (i’m a guy btw)
    -oily skin on face
    -sweaty palms
    -noise sensitivity
    -had really bad strep throat right before panic attacks began, then had laryngitis in a month….possibly affected thyroid??

    These are the ones I can think of as of right now.
    Trust me Lisa, I truly have these symptoms, why would I lie? They have only ruined the last 6 months of my life basically.

    • ANSWER:
      Normally, people with untreated hyperthyroidism have undetectable TSH. It’s so close to 0 that the difference between 0 and the level of TSH is meaningless.

      You have a perfectly normal, healthy TSH level. Anyone with thyroid disease would kill for your test results.

      If you truly have symptoms, you need further testing. You need free T3 and free T4. TSH isn’t a thyroid hormone, and measuring is only an indirect, second hand way to guess at what your actual thyroid levels are. The actual thyroid hormones are T3 and T4, so I would insist on the free T3 and free T4 tests.

  34. QUESTION:
    Anyone can answer my below queries?
    My son is being treated for Hypothyroidism since the earlier months of his birth. Now he is 2 years and 4 months old. His weight is about 14.7 Kgs (birth weight 3.65 Kgs). He takes Thyronorm 25mcg every day. He looks very healthy, brilliant and hyper-active.

    However, we had stopped the medicine for about 6 months as per the advice of a doctor. He reduced the dosage of medicine gradually. He conducted Thyroid tests periodically and once the Pituitary Scanning. Finally he concluded that my son is free from any thyroid deficiency.

    One year back we consulted another doctor. He suggested starting the treatment again and we follow his instructions.

    Kindly note that my son’s T3 & T4 levels are normal even without the medicines. He has the problem only on the TSH level. It seems always unbalanced.

    The recent test report shows that his TSH level is slightly higher than the normal. We contacted the doctor and he instructed us to give 1/2 tablet extra additional only on Saturdays & Sundays.

    Now we are totally confused. We have few questions as follows:

    1.I heard that there is an entity called Sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Is my child suffering from Sub-clinical hypothyroidism? If yes, is it good to continue the medicine?
    2.Why doesn’t the doctor request us to do T3 & T4 tests?
    3.What is the normal range of TSH for the children below 5 years? The reference list of a hospital shows as follows:
    TSH Normal Value:
    Upto 1 month 1.00 – 20.0 uIU/ml
    1 – 12 month .5 – 20.0 uIU/ml
    1-5 years 0.5 – 15.0 uIU/ml

    4.If the above is correct, isn’t my child’s TSH level perfect?

    Thanks & regards,

    Dileesh Kesavan

    • ANSWER:
      Your reference ranges seem higher than other websites. From wikipedia the results state normal reference ranges are:

      for normal-term infants at birth, 1.3 to 19 µIU/mL
      10 weeks old: 0.6–10 µIU/mL
      14 months 0.4–7.0 µIU/mL
      dropping during childhood and puberty to adult levels, 0.4–4.0 µIU/mL (this has changed to 0.3 -3.0).

      Other websites state from age 1 up to puberty 0.6 to 5.5 µIU/ml. So 15.0 µIU/mL is far too high a reference range.

      You haven’t stated what your child’s TSH level is however so i can’t say if your child’s TSH level is in the normal range. T3, FT3 and T4, FT4 tests is more accurate at diagnosing subclinical levels and can pick up thyroid problem when the TSH looks “normal”. I’ll add a few websites to check out.

      Hypothyroidism:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid-stimulating_hormone

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      Interpreting thyroid test results:

      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/tsh/test.html

      T3, FT3, and F4, FT4 levels:

      http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/thyroid-hormone-tests?page=3

  35. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    My friend was experiencing symptoms of hypothyroidism – fatigue, headaches, weight gain, difficulty to breath etc. She got her blood tested a month ago. The TSH level turned out be 4.2. The doc did not give her any medication as TSH was considered to be normal. She continued to feel the symptoms. So, she went got her blood tested again in the same lab 2 days ago. This time her TSH is 6.2. (T3 & T4 levels are within normal range). This time too the doctor refused to give her any medicine saying that my friend comes under subclinical hypothyroid and medicine will be given only if TSH is more 8. The doc asked her to get her blood tested for TSH after 6 months.
    My questions are –
    1. Is it normal for TSH to shoot by 2 units with a month?
    2. Is TSH 6.2 a clear indication of hypothyroidism? I have heard that different labs in different countries use different ranges. In my friend’s case, what should be done? Is it safe to leave her untreated with a TSH 6.2? What is the standard range for TSH in general? Have anyone else with TSH 6.2 been put on medicines?
    3. Is it possible that she experiencing those symptoms due to some other reason (like stress, dietary change) and not because of hypothyroidism?
    Please help!!
    Additional info – she in 27-year-old & she has no other illness and has never faced any health issues before.

    • ANSWER:
      Subclinical hypothyroidism is a condition in which thyrotropin (TSH) levels have started to increase in response to an
      early decline in T4 levels in the thyroid. However, blood tests for T4 are still normal. The patient may have mild
      symptoms (usually slight fatigue) or even none at all. Subclinical hypothyroidism is very common (affecting about 10 million Americans) and is a topic of considerable debate among professionals because it is not clear how to manage this condition. For instance, subclinical hypothyroidism does not progress to the full−blown disorder in most people. In one study, the risks for progression after 10 years ranged from 43% to over 76%, with the risk increasing the higher the TSH levels. Other factors, such being an older woman or harboring immune factors suggesting an autoimmune condition, also predict a higher at risk.

      Some thyroid enthusiasts recommend that people use measurements of basal body temperature and not blood tests to determine whether thyroid levels are adequate. Basal body temperature is measured by placing a thermometer under the armpit before arising in the morning. According to proponents of the marginal hypothyroidism theory, a measurement of lower than about 97.5°F indicates a problem. People with basal body temperature readings below this level and symptoms consistent with hypothyroidism are advised to use Armour Thyroid (or various other animal-source thyroid gland supplements that can be obtained with a bit of work). The net result is supposed to be a great improvement in overall health and the resolution of many illnesses.

      Evey lab has it’s own standard for normal levels. Generally, the accepted levels are 0.5 to 5.0 or 5.5. Some researchers consider anything under 7.5 to be within normal ranges. It’s difficult to nail down a definitive range with so many different opinions of what is normal. In my office, we consider 0.5 to 5.5 normal and treat anything above that as hypothyroidism. You can read more about it on webmd.com and it gives quite a bit of info on symptoms and treatments.

  36. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism issue?
    Was diagnosed 6mths ago with a tsh of 12.8. Was put on thyroxine and my tsh level dropped into normal range – despite this I still feel unwell- fatigue, aching, hair and skin probs… asked my doc if I could be referred to an edcrinologist but he said no. Could I still be having thyroid issues?

    • ANSWER:
      That doesn’t sound right…..if you live in the UK and go to a GP (family doctor) practice where there are several different doctors, you could ask to see a different one than your usual, who might be more efficient at referring you to an endocrinologist (I can spell that because I am a medical secretary!)…..apparently there are further thyroid tests that can be taken, apart from the standard ones, which could diagnose any imbalance you still might have despite being on thyroxine.

      If you have health insurance or win the lottery (!), you could arrange to see an endocrinologist privately (without a GP referral). I know of a couple here in London UK who are good . I hope and pray your hormones will come into the right balance sooner rather than later, because those symptoms are horrible!

  37. QUESTION:
    Am hypothyroid: Why is my TSH < 0.03 and free T4 still so low too!?
    I can't seem to find any information that makes sense with my bloodwork.

    I'm 25, been treated for hypothyroidism for about 5 years now. For the past month or so I've had increasingly worsening symptoms that include exhaustion even though I'm sleeping 10 hours a night and taking a nap in the afternoon, difficulty concentrating, almost constant headache, tingly/purple/white hands and feet (Reynaud's Phenomenon), carpal tunnel pain and numbness that has gotten increasingly worse, other joint pain (especially elbows and shoulders). The mental symptoms are what are really upsetting me, they seem to be progressing into blurry vision and even disorientation and confusion at times.

    Doing a bunch of testing (sleep apnea, autoimmune, etc...). Got bloodwork results this morning, my free T4 is low even though I take 37.5 mcg levothyroxine and 50.0 mcg liothyroxine (T3) daily.

    Free T4 is 0.23 (my lab's normal range: 0.78 - 2.10 ng/dL)

    TSH is < 0.0300 (lab's normal: 0.465 - 6.680 mIU/L)

    Everything I can find says that low TSH should correspond to HIGH T4 and vice versa, what's going on here!?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there,

      Your TSH is too far too low, meaning your thyroid is now over active and is being stimulated too much by the medication you are taking, or by something else.

      You MAY have a Pituitary/Hypothalamic Dysfunction, but without further investigation hard to say.

      Often times hyperthyroid has the same symptoms as hypothyroid, but the low Free T4 is not making sense.

      Thyrotrophin-stimulating hormone (also known as TSH or thyrotropin) is a peptide hormone synthesized and secreted by thyrotrope cells in the anterior pituitary gland, which regulates the endocrine function of the thyroid gland.

      Many medications—including estrogen, certain types of birth control pills, and large doses of aspirin can affect total T4 test results. Drugs that can decrease T4 measurements include:
      Anabolic steroids, Androgens, Antithyroid drugs (for example, propylthiouracil and methimazole), Interferon alpha, Interleukin-2, Lithium, Phenytoin, Propranolol.

      Please see your doctor ASAP to possibly have the dosages adjusted, and for further investigation. You’ll need to be referred to a specialist, an endocrinologist.

      Leaving links below for your information, there are a number of people on the net who have similar results as yours.

      Hope that helps,
      Barbara

  38. QUESTION:
    High tsh 5.82–hypothyroid? Is it causing my problems?
    I just went to the doctor and got a copy of my blood test (it is from April 2005, but its the only thryoid test I’ve gotten). This is what it said
    TSH: 5.828 uIU/mL
    Free T4: 1.01 ng/dL
    T4: 10.0 ug/dL
    Isnt a 5.828 a really high TSH? My lab sheet says that the normal range is .360 to 5.8. Isnt it from .3 to 3?
    I am going to the endocrinologist on Monday to do another test…I wonder if it will be better or worse?
    I think my symptoms are getting worse though. I keep getting weird headaches, cant concentrate, all my muscles ache and I toss and turn all night because of it, and today in the store my hand got a little tingly like it was going numb. I also have had irregular periods (they actually stopped completely for about a year), I have bald spots on the front of my head, I am always tired, fatigued, have anxiety and slight panic attacks every once in a while, and I just feel like such a lazy person
    What do you guys think–hypothyroidism causing my problems?

    • ANSWER:
      The lab reading, as far as I am aware is correct. The slighlty raised TSH is suspicious of hypothyroidism even though your t4 is within normal range. Sometimes when you do a thyroid function test you may catch the condition when it is changing and may not be conclusive and has to be repeated in 2 months or so. Given your symptoms thyroid disease is a possibility but the symptosm are so non specific that it could have other causes. i’m sure your endocrinologist will get to the bottom of this and help you recover.

  39. QUESTION:
    secondary hypothyroidism????
    Hi,
    I have so many symptoms of hypothyroidism, but my results are normal.
    TSH = 1.10
    T4=1.03
    Since these are both on the low end of the ranges, does anyone have experience with this? Would meds help?
    I am lethargic, depressed, overweight, dry skin, etc.

    Thx

    • ANSWER:
      If you had secondary hypothyroidism, clinically you shouldn’t have a normal TSH level. You should be out of the normal range or have no TSH at all. Secondly, your thyroid wouldn’t produce T4 and your values show that it is. Lethargy and depression can be associated with hypothyroidism as ca weight gain, but looking at your posted lab results its not conclusively related. Other problems, such as depression, can lead to lethargy, weight gain etc. Perhaps you should talk to a physician about your depression to see if that is the source of your symptoms. Concerning you thyroid other labs may be needed to asses your condition but it appears that your pituitary is releasing enough TSH and your thyroid is responding. Just because your values are on the low end of normal doesnt conclusively indicate any abnormality. I’d go back to your doctor and get an assessment.

      I just wrote some other info, please re read.

      Good luck!

  40. QUESTION:
    TSH (thyroid) test was 5.490?
    I had a TSH test and the result was 5.490. The “normal range” on the Quest lab paperwork is 0.450 – 4.500. I am outside of that range. My doctor said he didn’t see cause for concern, but some website say my result is clearly hypothyroidism. Someone who knows about this, PLEASE if you can advise me, it would save me a lot of worry. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      What was your T3 score? I have hypothryoidism in the family and the doctors always seem to look at both. I don’t have it personally. Maybe your T3 was normal or 5.49 is not significant enough in that doctor’s eyes.

      A second opinion is always good when you’re unsure!!

      Check out the site I linked and scroll down to the chart where it says “What does the test result mean?” section and “Is there anything else I should know?

      Good luck hun! I hope you get the treatment you need!

  41. QUESTION:
    I got a blood test and my TSH is 0.86?
    Is this a sign of hypothyroidism? I’m feeling the symptoms such as hair thinning and eyebrow thinning along with random palpitations, but the doctor said that it falls within the normal range.

    *is male and 19*
    Sorry I meant hyperthyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      A TSH that low is not indicative or suggestive of Hyperthyroidism. It is acceptable however.

      By that I mean with the symptoms you have described, that level of TSH correlates with Hyperthyroidism. If you did not have any symptoms, then it would be acceptable as “normal.” By standard lab values, doctors are told to call that normal (unless they understand that thyroid labs are inaccurate and are better used to correlate with the patients symptoms and family history).

      If your doc did not already, s/he should see if there are any antibodies present, since most cases of Hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disorder. That would be the next step.

      I put a couple of links to my blogs that talks more about hyperthyroidism and hair loss.

  42. QUESTION:
    Can hypothyroidism lead to cause syncope? fast HR?
    I was told that my TSH is at a level of 9, higher than the normal range (.5 – 4.0 or whatever is the normal). This was about 2 weeks ago, and I haven’t received any treatment yet until tomorrow when I have a scheduled appointment. I had a stress and echo done and they were fine. However I’ve become more symptomatic that past few weeks. My only true symptom is my heart enduring short episodes of tachycardia and palpitations. Last night I noticed that it was almost as if a “drug” went through my body and as though I could tell my heart was gonna go out of wack again. My hands got clammy, a little dizzy, then the fast heart rate. It almost feels as if I’m gonna pass out. This was all while I was just sitting doing homework (studying cardiovascular technology, go figure).

    I’ve only had 2 episodes of this. It seems I have more symptoms of HYPERthyroidism than HYPOthyroidism.

    Kinda confused and a little scared.
    Interesting enough, this happened when I became a vegetarian (about a year ago). I never drink soda or caffeine. Until about a month ago, I was running very regularly, about 10 miles a week.

    • ANSWER:
      It will cause fatigue but I don’t believe it would cause syncope.

      I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis which is an autoimmune disorder. I started without tests but having symptoms of Hyperthyroid. Lost weight & appetite; nervous; antsy; etc. Then after about 6-7 months my thyroid became low & has been low ever since. It’s been about 15 years.

      I take Synthroid(T4) & since mt MD thought I wasn’t converting the T4 to T3, he put me on Cytomel (T3) also.

      I get my levels checked about every 4 months. It’s been very stable for about 3 years.

      You may also be having anxiety attacks having to wait 2 weeks! & reading about the cardiovascular system.

      I usually do get my TSH & Free T4 & Free T3 tested. MDs get lazy. So ask for them to be tested when you have your TSH retaken. You ought to ask for antibody tests to be taken also.

      Google: mayo clinic>>diseases>>Hashimoto’s disease
      >>Hypothyroidism

      Best of luck

  43. QUESTION:
    Thyroid issues or something else?
    I just recently discovered that I am hypothyroid. After years of complaining of cognitive issues and being diagnosed with depression, add, and a sleep disorder (idiopathic hypersomnia), I finally requested to see results from the 2 latest blood labs I had done. The numbers were indicative of hypothyroidism, even though my doctor said I was in “normal” range. TSH was 4.5 on the last test (GP also checked T3 and T4).

    I’ve had some major cognitive problems for quite some time. It’s so bad that I thought I was getting dementia even though I’m only 25 years old. I know being hypothyroid can cause that but I think my problems are so bad, that they could be more than just thyroid issues.

    I have a really bad memory.

    My main problem is brain fog. These are my symptoms:
    -have trouble forming complete thoughts
    -can’t keep up in conversations/can’t think of anything to say EVER. I’m very awkward (this resulted in me having social anxiety)
    -problems with critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making
    -always making dumb mistakes
    -slow thinking
    -not very many thoughts go through my head (feel like my mind is blank all the time)
    -no opinions, creativity, or personality
    -when I do talk, I don’t think it makes sense a lot of the time and it’s not very fluent
    -verbal communication skills are not very good
    -written communication skills are not that much better

    Basically I feel like someone kidnapped by brain. I’m sure everyone who knows me probably thinks I’m a dumb@ss. Everything I do and say is wrong. I feel so stupid all of the time. It affects my job performance and personal life. I feel like I’m failing at work because I never have anything to say about anything and it takes me forever to grasp and understand what other people are doing. I hardly even talk to my friends because my mind is so cloudy, I can’t think of what to say or do. This is making me very depressed at the moment. Is this more than just a thyroid problem or is this common? Does it ever get better?

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    I have been getting the following symptoms…please help?
    I have been diagonised with being borderline hypothyroidism (my TSH = 5.2mlU/L while normal range is (0.3 -4.0). That was a month ago and I only had few of the sympotoms such has having cold hands and feet, feeling moody. My symptoms are becoming worse, ie. I am finiding it difficult to concentrate in my studiesfeel like quitting, I feel tired all the time even if i sleep 9hrs, I feel as if i need more sleep. I have gained a few kg’s. I’m getting mood swings, get depressed at any little issue, also have shortness of breath at times. I just feel as if i need all that sleep in the world. My doctor has not given me any medication. All he said was to eat regularly. However, i find it difficult to sleep sometimes, as a result of this my sleeping times has been all screwed up.

    Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      because your borderline and not in the throws of it, your doctor is avoiding medication as he knows meds are hard on other organs in the body i.e. the liver. The more our own bodies cope the better….. your doctor is better than most who just give out prescriptions like candy. However, if your symptoms are getting worse you need to go see your doctor again and most likely then you will get some meds. did you know that iodine defficiency is the leading cause of hypothyroidism? Maybe you need to start adding more iodized salt to your diet, see if that helps… most disease are caused by lack of vitamins and minerals… and you doctor is correct on eating regular but you also need to eat right. You might want to look into seeing a naturopathic doctor as they have a lot more traing in nutrition and how diet affects the human body. This is a hormone problem that can be brought by what I mentioned earlier. good luck! BTW, no drug out there is doing a very good job with this problem, another reason hes probably hesitant to prescribe anything.

  45. QUESTION:
    Can hypothyroid with a high TSH cause high blood pressure?
    I’m 25 yrs old female & diagnosed with having hypothyroidism. I started taking synthroid meds when I was about 12 yrs old…now I am up to 150 mcg. The lab results always come back saying that my TSH is very high, but that the thyroid itself is in normal range. I even had an ultrasound done on my thyroid, nothing seems to be irregular/enlarged…for the past 2 years I have been suffering from horribly high blood pressure & my blood test results dont indicate any causes (& no, I don’t have high cholesterol). My doctor also checked my kidney functions (blood, urine, ultra sound) which came out ok & they checked for pheochromosytoma (was ok). My doc gave me different forms of blood pressure meds, beta blockers, & aspirin to control my blood pressure, but none are working. Because the high TSH on my lab results are the only thing that comes out off, I’m thinking that it might be correlated to my high blood pressure…but I can’t find anything to support my theory. Anyone have any ideas???

    • ANSWER:
      The synthroid is a terrible drug. Did your doctor ever examine you for a deficiency in iodine before putting you on synthroid or did he just take a TSH test and prescribe it for you?

      High blood pressure is a vitamin deficiency. Synthroid basically destroys your thyroid’s ability to make the hormones T4 and T3. If you are on a low fat diet, this will contribute heavily to this problem. If you are exposed to fluoride in ANY way, this will deplete your body of iodine. If your diet is deficient in iodine, this will also impact your thyroid.

      It took me one year to get my thyroid function back from the destruction of taking synthroid for 5 years did to me. My doctor told me that I would have to take it for the rest of my life and that if I stopped taking it, I would get very sick.

      I’ve been off of it for 1 year now, I’m not very sick. In fact, I have lost weight, my skin is not dry, my hair is thick and I have lots of energy. He was wrong!

      I found out that I was simply deficient in iodine. The reason your TSH is high is because the Hypothalamus Gland senses that your metabolism needs to be raised so it sends the TRH to the pituitary gland to raise the metabolic rate of the body. So the Pituitary gland sends the TSH hormone to the thyroid telling it to produce T4 and T3 hormones. The T3 hormones are 4 x more powerful than the T4 hormones. If the thyroid does not have enough iodine to mix with the tyrosine amino acid to make thyroxin, the pituitary gets the signal that the thyroid is not producing enough T4 and T3 hormones. So it increases the amount of TSH hormone to try and stimulate the thyroid to produce more.

      Since the thyroid is deficient in iodine, it can’t perform and you have the high TSH hormone issue. The test used to establish the TSH hormone level is not a good one and can be not very accurate.

      Now, if your thyroid function is weak, then there is another function it is responsible for. The parathyroid glands (you have 4 of them) sends a hormone to the thyroid to produce calcitonin. This hormone is responsible for regulating the blood calcium levels. It does this by causing the kidneys to hold onto calcium when the diet is deficient in calcium and it also sends the same signal to the small intestines where calcium is absorbed from the food you eat to allow more calcium to be absorbed. Calcitonin also effects the way osteoclasts in your bone deal with calcium to preserve the calcium in the blood. If your thyroid is not functioning properly, you can see that all these functions will be compromised.

      All these meds are going to take a toll on the body and play havoc with your endocrine system.

      I would strongly suggest you start by testing yourself for an iodine deficiency. Go to the Legal Drug Pusher store and get a small bottle of “tincture of iodine” and paint a 2″ x 3″ patch on your forearm. Note the time of day. Then watch the patch throughout the day and note the time of day when you cannot see it anymore. If it takes just a few hours, you are severely deficient in iodine. You should be able to see the patch after 24 hours.

      Realize that it will take several months to build up your iodine supply in your body. You will have to eliminate all things that have fluoride in them. Toothpaste, drinking water with fluoride in it, soda pop is loaded with it, beer has it in it, and yes, if your municipal water district puts poisonous fluoride in your water supply, you will need a very high quality shower filter.

      There is a very good source of a very safe iodine product that I can advise you to use if you find yourself deficient.

      The next thing I would do is FIRE YOUR DOCTOR. For him to recommend high blood pressure medications without informing you of the alternative of using nutrition to work in conjunction with the medications to solve your problem and to keep you on these drugs is ludicrous. It is not a drug deficiency that is causing the problem.

      You will need to have a good doctor monitor your progress and slowly take you off the drugs as you get healthy from the nutrition and slowly wean yourself totally away from the drugs.

      You are in a cascade of problems now due to the deficiencies and diet. If you continue to follow the drug route, I predict you will become a statistic like many other Americans.

      good luck

  46. QUESTION:
    hypothyroid w/ multinodular goiter and “out of whack” antibodies?
    I went to the doctor several years ago with hypothyroidism symptoms. My TSH was within the normal range, but my thyroid was enlarged so the dr sent me for a sonogram and thyroid uptake scan, which showed that I had a multinodular goiter but that it was fine and my thyroid was still working ok. Went to the dr a few months ago for something unrelated and she could see how swollen my thyroid was so she had my TSH tested again. This time it showed that I was hypothyroid so she started me on 50 mcg of Synthroid and told me to come back in about 6 weeks so they could retest and adjust my meds if necessary. I went in 3 days ago for the bloodwork and the nurse told me yesterday that my TSH is in the normal range but that my antibodies are “way out of whack” and that I should go see an endocrinologist, but that my dr wants me to come in on Monday and see her because she wants to talk to me first before I go to an endocrinologist. So that’s got me worried, what could be wrong and why would she need to talk to me before I’m referred elsewhere?

    • ANSWER:
      It’s really quite amazing how little doctors know about the thyroid and how lazy they are to give people synthetic hormone therapy to relieve the symptoms, but totally ignore the ROOT CAUSE of the problem, so you end up with the booby prize, taking medication for the rest of your life and living with the thing that caused the problem to start with that most of the time is affecting other parts of the body.

      It sounds like you are IODINE deficient. Taking that Synthroid will create side effects that are not good for you and end up damaging your thyroid so you will have to keep increasing the dosage most likely.

      There are two things I would do if I were you. First you need to determine if you have an iodine deficiency. The very easiest and best way to do this is to get some Tincture of Iodine from the local pharmacy and and paint a 2″ x 3″ patch on your forearm or on your chest somewhere. Do this in the morning and then watch it throughout the day. You should be able to see the patch after 24 hours. If it is gone in a few hours, you will know that you are severely deficient in iodine. Since the thyroid only uses 4% of the iodine you ingest, imagine how the rest of your body is suffering from that deficiency if you have one. The T3 and T4 hormones are made of iodine and tyrosine amino acid. Since the thyroid primary mineral it needs to function normally, if you are deficient in iodine, it will enlarge to compensate for the deficiency. That is a goiter.

      If your parathyroid is insufficient, this can cause these kinds of problems as well. Bad dental work is a major cause of these kinds of problems. If you have an infection or dead tooth, this is very commonly found to be the root of this problem.

      All these things are generally do to nutritional deficiencies and lots of toxins that need to be detoxed.

      good luck to you

  47. QUESTION:
    I ve been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism but i have no symptoms of it on the contrary i’ve hyperthyroid symptom?
    After blood test my TSH was found to be 10.3 which is far higher than the nomal 3. So it was confirmed that i was having Hypothyroidism. But after reading on the net abt Hypothyroidism, i found i have no symptoms of it whereas i have Heart racing(palpitations irregular beats), high blood pressure, sweating, dizziness, these symptoms which are for hyperthyroidism. My T3 and T4 value are in normal range.
    i did my VMA test for testing for pheochromocytoma ( adrenal tumor) cause it has the same symptoms that i have. but it did not show any signs of me having it.
    I have no clue what is my conditions and what i should get get treated for..can anyone help me.
    My wt is 67 kg and ht is 180 cm. i am 25 yrs old

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    My thyroid stimulating hormone test(TSH) results were high, now what?
    I requested that my doctor order a couple blood tests for me. One of which was the TSH test. My results came back, and my level was at 10.5. From what I’ve seen that looks to be above the normal range. Of course I get the results right before the weekend, and my doctor probably won’t get back to me until Monday. So I’m a bit nervous. What can I expect to happen next? Is the 10.5 level a definitive way of telling that I have hypothyroidism? Any info would be helpful. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You have hypothyroidism. You need further testing to confirm, and to see how bad it is. You need free t3 and free T4. And you need tests in order to arrive at a diagnosis. Hypothyroidism is only a symptom. It’s not a diagnosis. You need antibody testing to try to arrive at a diagnosis.

  49. QUESTION:
    What does a TSH level of .58 mean?
    Just had a full blood panel done. My result is as stated above. I have most of the symptoms related to hypothyroidism, and I also have a problem with cysts developing on my thyroid gland. But my DR says I am withing normal range, and I don’t need any medication. I just always feel so tired and lethargic, no matter how much I sleep. What’s your opinion?

    • ANSWER:
      Your TSH is perfectly normal. However, TSH is not a thyroid hormone, and measuring it it is only an indirect, second hand way to guess at what you thyroid hormone levels are.

      Go back and insist upon free T3 and free T4 tests.

  50. QUESTION:
    I’ve been taking medicine for hypothyroidism since infancy, can I just stop?
    My doctor says my TSH levels are too high and wants me to stop my medicine completly. Then retest in 8 weeks.

    My question is, can I just stop like that, or should she lower my dosage?

    I’ve been told I would always have to be on medication, so wouldn’t stopping completly be dangerous?

    My TSH reading was 0.009 and normal range is 0.450. But I was taking the same dosage I have been my entire adult life – .25 mg or 250 mcg. Why would my levels be too high all of a sudden?

    I’ve only seen this doctor 2 times and shes a GP. I have no insurance and can’t afford to see an endocrinologist.

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid is a very complex gland and the treatment of thyroid disease is complicated at best. I have been Hypo for 22 years and I still have trouble understanding. My medication has fluctuated throughout my life from .50 – 150. Last year it was impossible to stabilize…I went from high to low and back again. When my gynecologist could not regulate it by adjusting my medication, she sent me to an endocrinologist, because they are the experts. I was sent for a ultrasound, and a nodule was discovered. I then had to have a needle biopsy, and it came back “suspicious”. I had to have the whole left side of my thyroid removed by an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor, and dissected to find out that I did not have Cancer.

      I am telling you this because you need to find the money to go see an endocrinologist. Your thyroid dictates almost everything about you, and if it is out of sync, you are too. Stopping your medication does seem a bit strange. This has never happened to me, nor have I heard of it. I would follow your doctor’s orders, but in the meanwhile try to find another General Practitioner that specializes in Thyroid disease or ask your doctor for a referral to an Endo.


Hypothyroidism Normal Range

The symptoms of adult diabetes are symptoms that should be recognized. Recognizing a symptom or sign for diabetes is important because diabetes is a condition that can be life-threatening. Diabetes is a disease where high levels of sugar in the blood exist, creating a symptom or sign for diabetes. Diabetes can be caused by too little insulin in the body, by the inability to use insulin or both of these. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar levels. About 17 million persons in the USA suffer from symptoms of adult diabetes.

Diabetes consist of three main types:

* Type 1 Diabetes – is usually diagnosed in childhood. The body makes very little or no insulin, and daily injections of insulin are required to keep the person alive.

* Type 2 Diabetes – accounts for about 90% of all cases of diabetes and usually occurs in adults. The pancreas do not make enough insulin to keep blood glucose levels normal, frequently because the body does not use the insulin produced very well. Symptoms of adult diabetes and Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common with the increasing number of elderly Americans, with the failure to exercise and increasing obesity rates.

* Gestational Diabetes – is high blood glucose that develops during pregnancy in a woman who does not have diabetes.

Here are the most common Type 2 symptoms of adult diabetes:

1. Blurred Vision
2. Fatigue
3. Impotence In Men
4. Increased Appetite
5. Increased Thirst
6. Infections That Heal Slowly
7. More Frequent Urination

How does one know if symptoms of adult diabetes that are being experienced are actually indicating diabetes? The best way is to do a blood test called the fasting blood glucose level test. Diabetes is diagnosed if this test shows blood glucose is higher than 126 mg/dL on two different tests. If levels are between 100 and 126 mg/dL, this condition will be referred to as impaired fasting glucose or prediabetes and should be considered a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes.

What does one attempt to do for stabilizing blood sugar levels and diabetes? While there is no cure for diabetes, the immediate objectives are to stabilize blood sugar and eliminate any symptom or sign for diabetes and high blood sugar. Long-term, the goals of treatment are to prolong ones life, to relieve symptoms of adult diabetes and prevent long-term complications that may result such as heart disease and kidney failure.

A person with symptoms of adult diabetes should work closely with their physician to keep blood sugar levels within acceptable ranges. In addition, the more you understand a symptom or sign for diabetes and how to treat it, the more proactive you can become in making lifestyle changes that will improve your health. Besides oral medications, the good news is that Type 2 diabetes may respond to treatment with exercise, diet improvements and weight management.

Copyright 2005 InfoSearch Publishing

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can you have Hypothyroidism and have normal test results?
    I’d swear I have hypothyroidism, but my labs always come back normal range. Should I see and endocrinologist anyway? Or would that be a waste of time/money?
    My mother had a goiter and had to take thyroid medicine so it’s in my family history.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, they can, especially if all was done was a TSH and if it was done the wron time of day. I swore I had a thyroid problem and asked for testing. All they did was a TSH and they tested me in the afternoon. Of course it came back in range and I was told I did not have a thyroid problem. TSH was tested again in about 10 months when symptoms of more severe and I finally got diagnosed. TSH is a lousy test because TSH changes throughout the day and quite often it doesn’t get elevated above range until hypothyroid symptoms are severe. If possible, get another test making sure to test first thing in the morning. Also get a free t3, free t4, and an antibody test. They will show more info.

      Do you happen to know what your TSH was? Many doctors are now saying a TSH over 2.0 shows a slowdown in the thyroid gland. in 2003, AACE lowered the TSH range to 0.3 to 3.0, yet most labs still have the range at 0.3 to 5.5. Because of this outdatd range, many people don’t get the treatment until their TSH goes above the 5.5.

      Below are some thyrod and testing links.

  2. QUESTION:
    My thyroid tests were within normal range but I still have most of the hypothyroidism symptoms?!?
    I had TSH and T3 and T4 tests…they all were within the normal range but I still am intolerant to cold,often sleepy, depressed,constipated ….dose anyone know why? I also find it difficult to lose weight even though my calorie intake is low…

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, some of the answers you got above mine are not correct. Yes I know why you have those problems.. Because being in the ‘normal’ range does not mean you are without hypo. For one, the TSH test is the most stupid test created. My brother’s wife had a “normal” TSH for about 9 years with hypo symptoms like yours. It took a really neat doc to move here and explain to my s-in-law that she did have hypo and that the TSH was not showing it correctly. Also the T3 and T4–its ‘where’ your results fall that tell the story, not the fact that they are in that ‘normal’ range. I learned from Stop the Thyroid Madness that if you have a FREE T3, and make sure it was the free T3 you had and not just T3, and if that result was midrange or lower with those symptoms, you do have hypo. Good grief, your symptoms are hypo symptoms. Go to the Stop the thyroid Madness site and read it all over. It is you. Look at the ‘long and pathetic’ page which shows symptoms, too.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is considered too low a range for basal cell temperature? Is it always a sign of hypothyroidism?
    I’ve been doing bbt tracking, and I’ve noticed that my highest basal cell temperature in the morning was 36.8F. It’s most often between 36.1-36.5.
    I believe I’ve had a thyroid test, and it was normal. I first realised my body temperature might too low when I was using a fertility chart and had to change the range since my waking temperature has never even reached 37 degrees C. I sleep pretty normally, and usually wake up naturally around the same time every day.
    The thing is, I don’t tend to feel cold, and although I weigh more than I did when I was younger and can’t seem to lose it, I’m still pretty slim. I do have some symptoms that appear to be consistent with hypothyroidism, but some are not. For example, I don’t have any throat problems and I rarely ever feel cold even with a low body temperature.
    Is it within a normal range, or are can it be a symptom of something besides thyroid disorders?

    • ANSWER:
      You can be hypothyroidic (sp?) for years before it manifests itself. My best advice is to have your doctor do thyroid testing of the blood to make sureyour levels are all right. The number should be near 5. When my hypothroidism was diagnosed, I was having headaches and insomnia. It may be that your levels are fluctuating, or that it is off. If there is a history of it in your family, you have probably some sort of thyroid disorder which can be easily helped by a small dose of medicine. You should definitely see your doctor. As far as basal cell tempuratures being, I am not sure what you mean, the problem will be shown for thyroid in the blood. Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism and started on Nutrisystem but can’t lose weight is this normal?
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism last week and started on medicine? I just started Nutrisystem and weighed myself today but I didn’t lose an ounce. I would have thought on my first week I would have lost something. I stuck to the plan and started walking. Could it be that I have to get my thyroid levels in a normal range before I’m going to be able to lose any weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism can certainly cause someone to gain weight or fail to lose weight as in your case. If you started the Nutrisystem not too long ago, then you may not notice results this quickly. Do not let it discourage you. I am assuming you are being treated for your hypothyroidism with thyroid hormone replacement and this will help return your thyroid levels to normal. When your thyroid levels are normal it will hopefully easier to lose weight. Weight loss is not easy and it requires a combination of dietary modification and regular exercise. It is good that you are walking. If you want to lose weight, then consider increasing your aerobic exercise which could be fast walking, running, swimming, or biking. Good luck.

  5. QUESTION:
    earlier suffering with hypothyroidism, now FT3, FT4 ranges are normal and I am pregnant?
    TSH is also in normal range. How these effect the pregnancy

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism TSH normal?
    I have been tested for thyroid. My TSH came back Normal and My antibodies where 356 and the normal range is <34 so I tested positive for the antibodies. I do have some of the symptoms like i feel tried and exhausted, I want to sleep alot, I feel I dont have as much energy as i use to...I have mild deppression and anxiety and I get easily irrated at times. I also have lichin on the lips of my vagina which the gynocolgist said alot of thyroid patiants have. I also find it hard to consentrate, cant think straight at times and some im forgetful. I do not have brittle nails and i dont think my hair is falling out but I do feel very tired and weak. I also have shoulder and back pain. and sometimes my feet with get numb and tingly. Is it possible that I could have hypothyroidism because my Antibodies are postive?? The last doctor i had would not give me the medication for thyroid due to normal TSH. I heard alot of ppl suffering from this dieseas has this problem. So I switch to a new doctor and will be seeing her Tuesday. so what do you think??

    • ANSWER:
      TSH is elevated in primary hypothyroidism, but not in other thyroid problems. Also, there are different antibodies associated with different thyroid diseases. Though you have lots of partial information here, there isn’t enough to tell you much, at least with any degree of certainty.
      My guess, and it’s only a guess, is that you’ve been tested with the idea that you have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Hashimoto patients do indeed sometimes have low thyroid function, and may benefit from thyroid supplementation (more to prevent goiter than for the symptoms you describe), but you’re simply going to have to rely on a doctor you trust to do the right thing with the information at hand.

  7. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism – TSH back to normal?
    Was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in january when I was screened for lithium for my depression. Now my TSH levels are back in the normal range but I still feel unwell – fatigue etc. Have asked doc to refer me to a endcrinologist but he says that I a cured. Should I push for a referral? Also can I go onto lithium with my condition?

    • ANSWER:
      Your TSH can be in the normal range and you can still be hypothyroid. You need to be tested for antibodies, as well as T-3 Free and T-4 Free. A great website with lots of info is www.stopthethyroidmadness.com.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can you have hypothyroidism but have normal ts4 levels?
    I was hyperthyroid for seven years I was treated with PTU and now my thyroid levels test in the normal range. However, I have hypothyroid symptoms now. My hair fell out, I gained 50 lbs. I suffer from the fatique and have dry skin and am tired all the time. sometimes I can feel my thyroid speed up and I am a bag of nerves but by the time I get to the doctor the episode is over again. I still have the insomnia. But my doctor will not remove my thyroid or refer me back to an endocrinologist because my t4 and t3 say normal uptake. Is it possible that my body feels hypo because i no longer am hyper and can still have my thyroid removed and put on synthroid based on my history and symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think they would remove your thyroid, particularly if you have more hypothyroid symptoms than hyperthyroid symptoms. The fact that you’re having both is worrisome. Generally when you display hyperthyroid symptoms, your heart rate speeds up unnaturally, so perhaps they could give you one of those take-home heart monitor things to track it (they gave my mom one once). They certainly aren’t going to want to mess with any kind of medication if they don’t know what they’re dealing with.

      As far as hypothyroidism goes, the scale is a guideline and “normal” levels really can differ from person to person. Most general practitioners go strictly by the scale, which can cause problems. I had hypothyroid symptoms for years, but my levels tested at the very bottom of the normal range, so several general practitioners ruled out hypothyroidism and tried treating me for depression instead.

      I finally went to a good endocrinologist who let me know that the normal range is just that–a typical range. Different people have optimal levels within that range. So he put me on a low level of thyroid hormones–it moved my thyroid levels more into the middle of the normal range and the symptoms went away. Even better: no more antidepressants. For me, the bottom of the normal range was just too low.

  9. QUESTION:
    I have sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Should I consider treatment?
    I have had my thyroid hormone levels tested for the past 3 years. There has been a constant increase in the TSH level and slight decrease in T4 level. My TSH level is currently 6.34 while T3 and T4 are within the normal range. Hypothyroidism runs in my family. My father, sister and a paternal cousin have it. I have had excessive hair-loss, weight gain and signs of laziness for the past 3-4 years now. My doctor suggests therapy. Should I consider it? Thank you in advance for all those who care to answer.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaanya … if it were me, I would definitely start therapy ! Chip

  10. QUESTION:
    Anyone have pain and numbness in shoulder and arm due to hypothyroidism?
    For 2 weeks I have had horrible pain in my rotator cuff. A week after that the numbness set in. Its only on the right side. I was wondering if this could be due to my hypothyroidism. I am not on Synthroid but I am on Raw Thyroid. My levels are all within normal range.

    • ANSWER:
      I do not think there is a spot on my body that I have not had some pain at some time. I was not on anything (Synthroid or Armour) until recently due to not having funds.

      This may be something new however so you may need to have it checked.

      Blessings

  11. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  12. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism at 17, I just want to be normal.?
    I hate having hypothyroidism, I hate eating REALLY healthy low carb life style and exercising to only gain weight, I hate that I have anemia and get judged for not eating a cookie a friend may offer me.

    Doctors won’t help me cause im in a normal weight range (im only in a normal range cause I try my hardest every day to eat and exercise perfectly)

    Does anyone else have hypothriodism? =/ Id really like to know im not alone.

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps you could take a kelp tablet every day (rich in iodine) to help your hypothyroidism.

  13. QUESTION:
    thyroid TSH My last Tsh test was 2.73..is this a normal, healthy range?
    I feel that I have many symptoms of hypothyroidism but my doctor made no comments about the test results, only that it was normal. I know that the new normal range is 0.3 – 3.00. Thanks for any input.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep, it is normal. If you have symptoms like being cold or very tired, talk to the doc. These could be from other causes. Hve questions ready, and be assertive when you talk to the doc, let him/her know you need answers.

  14. QUESTION:
    “normal” range TSH but symptoms?
    I have always had “weird” things going on with my body. Since I was young I have always been hotter than most others even during the winter. Hot water is not uncomfortable to me and I am capable of taking showers on even the hottest setting. Starting in high school I began having panic attacks but never went to the doctors about it (I just tried to use breathing techniques to calm myself down). I am 20 years old and had a son at age 17. Once pregnant, my panic attacks went away. Recently they just started coming back. Racing heart, shaking hands, sweating, dizziness, and irritability were my panic attack symptoms. I have also had an enlarged gland in my neck for the past 3 weeks that hurts when I swallow or talk too loudly. I went to the doctors with the concern of the lump and also told her my symptoms (without labeling them as panic attacks). She asked if anyone in my family had thyroid problems and I told her my aunt has hypothyroidism. She did a blood test and my TSH level is 0.9 with her stated range as 0.1-5.0. I understand that my number is technically in the normal range but because I have symptoms of hyperthyroidism and a relatively low TSH level should I ask her to test my T3 & T4 or just accept that it’s in the normal range? I do NOT like these “panic attack” symptoms I have been getting though. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      That normal range you state is quite low. I know Endocrinologists usually like to stay around the .4-4.0 range. Anyways, you should ask for your Free T4, Free T3, and antibodies test since they are the most accurate at telling if there’s a thyroid problem.

  15. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Antibodies: What is the normal range?
    Hi there
    I am 29, and have had symptoms of hypothyroidism, tiredness, cold, weightgain etc for about 4 years despite (trying) to lead a healthy and active lifestyle, the tiredness is crippling.
    My TSH is 1.8 and my thyroid antibodies are 604. Because of this I am to be referred to an endocrinology unit. Family history is sister with goiter (Now removed) and mother had a pituitary tumor when she was about 20 years old and later developed an underactive thyroid. Please could you tell me whether medication is likely and / or what is the normal range for thyroid antibodies? THANKS

    • ANSWER:
      The antibodies may indicate Hashimoto’s. Your TSH looks good, but the antibodies are high. Hashi’s is usually an inherited disease, I have it. The Endo, if they know what to check for, will also look at T4 free, and T3 free. If they don’t suggest testing these make them do it. You may need a little thyroid hormone replacement.

  16. QUESTION:
    How long until your hormones even out after hypothyroid is back to normal range?
    I was diagnosed with having hypothyroidism about 6 months ago…recently I was retested and my levels are back to normal. I had begun to notice excessive shedding of my hair but that seems to be back to normal range as well. I have been extremely emotional, however, almost to the point of tears several times today when it would not be normal. I am NOT pregnant, although I can almost guarantee that someone will suggest so even though I am clearly stating that there is no possible way. :) Was just wondering if the thyroid evening back out could be affecting my hormones, if there are any physicians/specialists out there or even people who have personal experience with the issue…thanks!
    I never stopped getting my period…it was just irregular…

    • ANSWER:
      That is going to depend on what the rest of your hormone levels are, with hypothyroidism that is just the thyroid and most of the time the meds you take for that is just to treat it!

      Now if you have not had it done it might be a good idea to have the same doc do a hormone check as well, just to make sure that they are in balance as well, your body will heal itself on its own and get things back to normal but if your worried about it have it checked. A past girl friend had the same thing and it was 6 months after the med were done that she started her periods again, it bothered her but yet it didn’t’ as she didn’t have to deal with it …. SO ya.

      Take it easy and give it some time, in a few months if your still not showing sings that your period is coming back on its own…. Please have the rest of the hormone level vs checked out OK.. Good Luck..!!

  17. QUESTION:
    Please help me !!Normal Range for TSH levels? Is 4.470 very high, or just a little?
    My brother was born 2 months ago. He had a blood test.
    Last week, Doctor doubted he has Congenital Hypothyroidism because his TSH is 4.470.
    If it’s a problem, how to cure? PLease help me.
    I don’t feel comfortable these days. My brother was born when my mon was about 40 years old. Many people said it was not good to get a baby at this time. I hope my brother will be okay.

    • ANSWER:
      This TSH does fall in the “normal” range as far as most lab’s go. If your brother’s physicians are not concerned with this value then do not worry about it at this time. I am wondering if he is experiencing any other symptoms that are making you doubt this physician’s determination. One problem with the TSH results can be this – there are lab ranges in place to show what is “normal” and what is “not normal”. However, a thyroid patient who had a borderline TSH (either way – high or low) could feel good or bad even if their levels are technically in the opposite range. For example, I know someone who is HYPOthyroid, but feels her best when her TSH is just slightly elevated. Look at any other symptoms your brother may have to see if you, your parents & physicians feel there is a need to re-test him at a later time. I would also check for pituitary function. Things to keep an eye out for are a puffy face, swollen tongue, and extreme sleepiness.

  18. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to turn into being hypothyroidism from hyperthyroidism?
    My last blood test ( last week of May) my TSH is below the normal range, my FT3 is in normal, and my FT4 is below the normal range. I am still taking PTU 50 mg. 2x a day. I wonder if i am turning into hypo now because my hair is falling out. I don’t experienced any symptoms except that I feel tired sometimes.

    • ANSWER:

  19. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight with hypothyroidism and you are currently taking 112mcg of Synthroid?
    I was on a dosage of 125 mcg, but that was found to be too high of a dosage. Now that it’s been lower, it appears as though I’ve gained weight overnight. But my T3 and T4 levels were in the normal range with my TSH only being considered slightly elevated by .08. I feel sluggish, blotted, and my face feels funny all the time. Also, my heart skips irregularly frequently. I live in the south and cannot bear the heat. I start sweating the minute I walk outside.

    • ANSWER:
      I think I have hypothyroidism…the doctor said that my thyroid gland just wasn’t working altogether. So far I’ve lost 25 lbs. in 2 months and I’m on 75 mcg of Synthroid. He is pondering upping the doseage to which I hope would help me lose even more weight…and faster. I stay hot even in cold places and used to be totally cold natured. You may need to be checked for diabetes. I also have that. The sluggish feeling could be associated with low blood sugar! Hope my answer helped you! Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    My blood tests show that i m not in the normal ranges of thyroid harmone production.Its 6.27.IS IT CURABLE?
    blood reports show that i m prone to hypothyroidism.My range is not normal it is 6.27 and the range of hypothyroidism is >7.I have noticed the begg stages of thyoidism like putting on weight and loss of hair.Doctors say that the reason for abnormal secretion of the thyroid harmone is due to depression and tension.I have had both in the past few months as i had to appear for many competetive exams.I havent got my periods from the beggining of my exams.(4 months).I got an ultra sound scan done and the test shows positive for cists in the ovaries.Is this all inter realted? Are all this curable?I m also always tensed for small things and very very short tempered.Can i find a cure for this?Is it possible that i can ever get mensus?Can i ever have children? I feel my life is a disaster.Please help me.

    THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t stress yourself out over what you can’t change. You can treat hypothyroidism, but you can’t cure it. If you are not producing enough thyroid hormone, then you can be prescribed something to raise it so that you can feel normal. I had thyroid cancer and my thyroid was removed. I take a little thyroid pill every day, and for the most part I am regular. Other medicines can interfere with the medicine, but if you stay stable doing the same thing day after day and go periodically for a blood test you should be fine.
      I also have polycystic ovary syndrome, so yes, it seems like your endocrine system is out of whack like mine. Having a low thyroid often leads to depression, because your body is sluggish. I don’t think depression causes hypothyroidism, hypothyroidism causes depression. But it also seems like you are having problems dealing with everyday stress as well. So I think it’s a combination of lifestyle which you can change, and then the physical symptoms will need to be helped with medicine and/or therapy. You just need to find new tools to handle your life. But maybe once you get your thyroid levels normal, you will feel much better.
      PCOS does affect fertility, but don’t worry about it until you are ready to get pregnant. You should go on birth control pills to regulate your cycle and preserve your eggs, if you aren’t ovulating then those eggs will be saved. That is the only real defense against the cysts. You will be okay. There are many chronic conditions that are worse.

  21. QUESTION:
    Anyone treated for hypothyroidism but still have symptoms?
    I have been on levothyroxine for 15 years now and never have any energy…my blood levels are are in the normal range but I just recently had dosage increased so we can lower tsh to a 1 or 2, its at 3.4 now. Anyone else still symptomatic with normal levels?

    • ANSWER:

  22. QUESTION:
    Can thyroid be the problem even if the tests came back normal?
    I’ve searched and studied on my symptoms. I have all of them that are listed on www.webmd.com under hypothyroidism.

    All of my symptoms point to it, so I went to my doctor. He did fasting bloodwork. It came back in the normal range. He’s convinced it’s my thyroid, too and was concerned because it’s slightly enlarged. He did an ultrasound of it and nothing looked abnormal, other than the size.

    I’m considering getting a second opinion from another doctor. Does anyone know if there is something else that the doctor should be looking for?

    • ANSWER:
      It’s funny you should ask this question, because I have a most bizarre answer.

      About 3 years ago, a very close female friend told me she thought she was hypothyroid, so I instructed her to go to her doctor and get a simple blood test. Everything came back normal.

      The symptoms got worse. So I suggested she go back and have it checked again. Again, everything came back normal.

      A month later, she called me on the phone crying because she didn’t understand what was wrong. I told her to go to the doctor yet again, and do NOT accept the answer that everything is normal.

      7 days later, her doctor called her to inform her she had Graves’ Disease. It was absolutely the last thing she was expecting, because Graves’ Disease generally shows symptoms of hyperthyoidism, not hypo.

      In the end, she was quickly and successfully treated for her Graves’ disease, and was her old chipper self in two months.

      It’s a long shot, I know. But has your doctor consider this?

  23. QUESTION:
    Anyone else with Hypothyroidism? Does your meds help you?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism during my recent pregnancy and the doc put me on Synthroid 100miu. Even though my blood test are back in the normal range, I’ve suddenly gained twenty pounds, feel exhausted, depressed and many other low thyroid symptoms. Can your medicine just not be working even though blood test are ok? Clearly my body says otherwise! Despite eating right and exercising, I am still gaining weight, losing hair and feel miserable! What other medications are there and what works for you?

    • ANSWER:
      Most cases of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (autoimmune hypothyroidism).

      “New research has shown that Hashimoto’s patients with high thyroid antibodies report more symptoms than patients with low thyroid antibodies, even if their thyroid function test is normal. In other words, thyroid replacement is not enough to ameliorate symptoms of autoimmune thyroid disease.”

      Effective strategies for addressing the autoimmune aspect of Thyroid disease include:

      Avoid wheat.
      Correct vitamin D deficiency
      Improve gut flora
      Reduce stress
      Correct underlying adrenal issue, such as DHEA or cortisol imbalance.
      Correct oestrogen dominance. Consider using Natural progesterone.
      Detoxify mercury and other toxins. (Testing for mercury toxicity is available at Sensible-Alternative Clinic).
      Supplement selenium to lower thyroid antibodies. Also helps with conversion of T4 to T3.
      Correct an iron deficiency.
      Herbal medicine Bupleurum, Turmeric, Rehmannia and others.
      Other Naturopathic treatments for thyroid.

      Herbal medicines Withania or Coleus to increase production of thyroid hromone. (See Best Herbs for Women article.)
      Iodine (not kelp). Use with caution in Hashimoto’s disease.
      Amino acid tyrosine which is the building block for thyroid hormone.
      Vitamin B6 and Vitamin A to improve function of the thyroid gland.
      Selenium and zinc to ensure conversion of T4 to T3.
      Coconut milk/ coconut oil provides medium chain fatty acids to normalise gut flora and stimulate metabolic rate.
      Exercise
      Sleep

      Thyroid disease >>>

      http://www.sensible-alternative.com.au/metabolic-hormones/thyroid-article

      Selenium lowers TPO >>>

      http://www.drdach.com/Selenium_Hashimotos.html

      Vitamin D and Hashimotos >>>

      ***

      “In the vast majority of thyroid patients, if not all, Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothyroxine, Unithroid, Eltroxin, Levaxin, Norton, Eutrosig, Oroxine and any other “T4-only” medications are NOT doing the job as a sole treatment, according to the worldwide experience of patients and certain observant doctors… unless you think that an elevator that goes up to the 5th-floor-only on a 50 story building is “doing the job.

      Yes, you might feel better than before you got on, and your symptoms may be “improved”. Some do report that. But most all patients on T4 medications are left with their own degree of symptoms due to an inferior treatment.”

      “the TSH RARELY corresponds to how a patient feels. There is a large majority of patients who have a “normal” TSH, even in the “one” area of the range, and have a myriad of hypo symptoms.”

      “So what’s the solution? Patients and their wise doctors are returning to a medication that was successfully used from the late 1800’s onward: natural desiccated thyroid hormones, more commonly known as Naturethroid, Erfa’s Canadian “thyroid”, Armour, etc. They are made from pig glands, meets the stringent guidelines of the US Pharmacopoeia, and gives patients EXACTLY what their own thyroids give them—T4, T3, T2, T1 and calcitonin.”

      T4 only meds do not work >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/t4-only-meds-dont-work/

  24. QUESTION:
    Does hypothyroidism cause periods to stop?
    I am 19. I started my period when I was 11. The only time I bleed is when I take birth control or provera. About 2 months ago, I just found out I have hypothyroid and started taking synthryroid. When my levels are in normal range, could my periods come back?

    • ANSWER:
      hypothyroidism does cause your period to stop, it’s called secondary amenorrhea.
      this is because hypothyroidism alters your prolactin level, this in turn affects your hypothalamus, hence causing a hormonal imbalance.
      wen u have a hormonal imbalance your reproductive system can’t function normally; u won’t be able to ovulate, your uterine muscles wont be able to grow and then shed resulting your period.
      that’s why wen u take birth control pills u get your period; u r getting external hormones into your body and wen u stop the course of birth control pills u get what is called withdrawal bleeding.

      hope this information helped =)

      Don’t worry everything will be ok when your hormone levels get back to normal (estimation: about 7 months)

      Please don’t forget to consult your doctor and get your hormones checked regularly

  25. QUESTION:
    levothyroxine-how will it help my Hypothyroidism?
    I have Hypothyroidism, and I have to take Levothyroxine. How will the Levothyroxine help my thyroid get better and working in the normal range again?

    • ANSWER:
      It helps bring the thyroid up to the right level. Your TSH level should get down to < 2.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  26. QUESTION:
    Serious Answers only: Can you have Thyroidism if your blood work is within range?
    Waiting for follow up Dr. visit…I have an enlarged thyroid according to my ultrasound but my T3, T4, and TSH blood work is within range could this mean I still have a thyroid problem? or that it fluctuates from normal to perhaps hypothyroidism? Please note I doubt it would be a deficiency but rather genetic since I do have this in my family.

    • ANSWER:
      Serious answer. All humans are different, so they can have different levels of T4, or indeed of anything else, while still being entirely normal. It may seen a bit arbitrary, but the reference ranges for “normal values” have been established over a long period of time, and if all your thyroid results are within this normal range then you can leave things well alone, because, by definition, you are not hypothyroid. The enlargement of your thyroid is a separate issue, which may need a surgical, rather than medical, review. There are other causes of enlarged thyroids than hypothyroidism.

  27. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what ‘normal’ levels of TSH and T4 would be?
    I have hypothyroidism and my doctor always reads the numbers out to me and says this is high or low, but I’d like to know what the normal range is.

    • ANSWER:
      TSH 0.40 – 5.5

      T4, FREE 0.8 – 1.8

  28. QUESTION:
    T3 is low, Free T4 and TSH are normal – should I be on T3 replacement Rx?
    I have been feeling unwell for over a year. I’m extremely fatigued, my body aches, I have concentration/memory problems, and feel feverish then freezing, among other symptoms. The doctors had thrown around several possibilities, including fibromyalgia, mono, lupus, and arthritis.
    Yesterday my doctor ordered several blood tests, including a thyroid panel.
    It came back with all as fine, except my T3, which was low. Here are the thyroid test results:

    T3 value – 62 (normal range 87-167 ng/dL)
    Free T4 value – 0.76 (normal range 0.6-1.6 ng/dL)
    TSH value – 0.97 (normal range 0.34-4.82 uIU/mL)

    My doc put me on synthetic T3 medication, which I started today.
    My question is – how is it that I have hypothyroidism, with normal T4 and TSH levels? From what I’ve read, T3, T4 and TSH all go hand in hand. Only my T3 is low.

    The diagnosis came from my general practitioner. Should I perhaps see an endocrinologist for a second opinion?
    I’ve been feeling unwell for quite some time, so I’d really like to make sure I have the right diagnosis, before I put medication in my body for potentially the wrong illness.

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated, as I’m entirely new to how the thyroid and related disorders work. Everything I’ve read thus far has provided conflicting information.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem and saw an endocrinologist, who then referred me to a rheumatologist. I was diagnosed with lupus with (hyper) thyroid involvement. Hope that helps and hang in there!

  29. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and received a treatment that worked well? If so what was the?
    the treatment and dosage. I’m asking this because I have been battling this and doctors for 7 yrs without relief. I was under the impression that the synthetic or natural supplement would restore life to normal. But normal seems to get further and further away. My blood tests have always been within normal range since I started treatment, so getting them to up or alter my treatment is next to impossible. Better yet, has anyone had success with a natural remedy used in combination with the prescribed treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      More than likely it is rooted in liver malfunction. I know it can be frustrating going to doctors and finding little help with conventional treatment. There is tons of information out there for anyone willing to do the research. I tend to stay away from the conventional med. sites. They usually have the same answer –throw drugs at it and hope the symptoms are suppressed. Google some of your symptoms such as, Liver and Hyporthyroidism, Liver weakness and thyroid imbalance etc. Not sure if sensiblehealth.com will have anything on thyroid but it is a great place to start. Terrific articles and you can rabbit-trail from there. God Bless.

  30. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Blood Test: Low T4 Free & Normal TSH Plus Symptoms of Hypothyroidism?
    Hi! I am a 25 yo female who has experienced unexplained weight gain (30 lbs before stabilizing), constipation, fatigue, amenorrhea, dry skin, etc., for the last several years. I have visited a GP, a nutritionist, an endocrinologist, a GYN, and a gastroenterologist, without any resolutions.

    Last week I visited a Naturopath and she was amazing. We are investigating blood sugar, adrenal, and food intolerance problems and meeting again in 3 weeks.

    I just received back my latest blood work and it shows my free T4 below normal at 1.42 (reference range is 1.53-3.85 units). My TSH showed up normal as it has on countless other tests. I had never been tested for free T4 before.

    Basically, I have almost every basic symptom of hypothyroidism and now I actually have a test result to back this up. As my past blood work has always been normal, doctors have seemed to disregard my very real concerns. This makes me nervous that they will overlook the free T4 results as well. Should I just wait to share the results with my ND (I am in NY but she can make diagnosis and write prescriptions because she is licensed in CT)? Or, should I see my general practitioner about this issue now? I really appreciate the advice!
    Thanks for your helpful answer af!! When I went to my endocrinologist she didn’t include the free T4 on the comprehensive blood panel. The ND I have gave me prescriptions for other blood work because she is licensed in CT.

    • ANSWER:
      I will suggest you to go to a good endocrinologist .

      Thyroid function test should be done at a good lab and your TSH should be measured by 2nd or 3rd generation assay method (also called sensitive and ultra-sensitive method ,respectively) not the first generation one.

      TSH is usually first line thyroid function test because it is most sensitive and specific indicator of thyroid dysfunction then free T4 (measured by equilibrium method not direct assay method as direct free T4 can have significant inter-assay variations).

      In almost all cases normal TSH indicates euthyroid (normal thyroid) status,
      except when there is problem with hypothalamo-pituitary axis. or when there is chronic starvation or severe illness which is rare and very much obvious if present .

  31. QUESTION:
    I think I have hypothyroidism?
    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, but my doctor won’t put me on medicine. My tsh levels were high for the normal range, but still “considered” normal. I have chronic symptoms of hypothyroidism such as: constant fatigue, weight gain, constipation, depression, missed periods, brittle fingernails. What should I do? I am on birth control, does that change the results?

    • ANSWER:
      Get a new doctor

  32. QUESTION:
    i have hypothyroidism is there any alternative or treatments?
    I can use besides are along side thyroxine to help the symtoms I have? i.e trouble loosing weight normally, dry skin etc. The doctors say my th levels are within the normal range but I still am tired etc

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism
      Alternative Medicine
      The following information is specific for alternative and complementary medicine. For additional evidence-based information on diseases, conditions, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and wellness issues, continue searching the Healthwise Knowledgebase.

      Overview
      What you need to know

      Get a handle on hypothyroidism. When the thyroid gland fails to function adequately the result is reduced hormone levels. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful:

      Find the cause
      See your healthcare provider to consider underlying health issues that may be causing your hypothyroidism
      Check your iodine intake
      Consult with a nutritionist to learn whether you are getting too little or too much iodine from food, medications, and supplements
      These recommendations are not comprehensive and are not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or pharmacist. Continue reading the full hypothyroidism article for more in-depth, fully-referenced information on medicines, vitamins, herbs, and dietary and lifestyle changes that may be helpful.

      About hypothyroidism

      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to function adequately, resulting in reduced levels of thyroid hormone in the body. Cretinism is a type of hypothyroidism that occurs at birth and results in stunted physical growth and mental development. Severe hypothyroidism is called myxedema.

      There are many causes of hypothyroidism. One common cause is Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Another common cause of hypothyroidism is medical treatment, such as surgery or radiation to the thyroid gland, to treat hyperthyroidism (over-activity of the thyroid gland). Some drugs, such as lithium and phenylbutazone, may also induce hypothyroidism. Extreme iodine deficiency, which is rare in the United States, is another possible cause. Failure of the pituitary gland or hypothalamus to stimulate the thyroid gland properly can cause a condition known as secondary hypothyroidism.

      Some people with goiter (an enlargement of the thyroid gland) also have hypothyroidism. Goiter can be caused by an iodine deficiency, by eating foods that contain goitrogens (goiter-causing substances), or by other disorders that interfere with thyroid hormone production. In many cases the cause of goiter cannot be determined. While natural therapies may help to some extent, thyroid hormone replacement is necessary for most people with hypothyroidism.

      Check list
      Product ratings for hypothyroidism

      Rating Nutritional Supplements Herbs
      Iodine
      Selenium (if deficient)
      Thyroid extract
      Vitamin A
      Vitamin B3 (niacin)
      Zinc Bladderwrack
      Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
      Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
      An herb is primarily supported by traditional use, or the herb or supplement has little scientific support and/or minimal health benefit.

      Symptoms
      What are the symptoms?

      The symptoms of hypothyroidism vary from person to person, but commonly include several of the following: fatigue, lethargy, intolerance to cold, constipation, weight gain, depression, excessive menstruation, dry skin, hair loss, and hoarseness. The onset of these symptoms may be so gradual as to evade detection by patient or physician.

      Diet
      Dietary changes that may be helpful

      Some foods, such as rapeseed (used to make canola oil) and Brassica vegetables (cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cauliflower), contain natural goitrogens, chemicals that cause the thyroid gland to enlarge by interfering with thyroid hormone synthesis.1 Cooking has been reported to inactivate this effect in Brussels sprouts.2 Cassava, a starchy root that is the source of tapioca, has also been identified as a goitrogenic food.3 Other goitrogens include maize, sweet potatoes, lima beans, soy, and pearl millet.4 While some practitioners recommend that people with hypothyroidism avoid these foods, none has been proven to cause hypothyroidism in humans.

      Lifestyle
      Lifestyle changes that may be helpful

      Preliminary studies have found an association between multiple chemical sensitivities and hypothyroidism.5 One study found a correlation between high blood levels of lead, a toxic heavy metal, and low thyroid hormone levels in people working in a brass foundry.6 Many of these people also complained of depression, fatigue, constipation, and poor memory (symptoms of hypothyroidism).

      Occupational exposure to polybrominated biphenyls and carbon disulfide has also been associated with decreased thyroid function.

      Supplements
      Vitamins that may be helpful

      The relationship between iodine and thyroid function is complex. Iodine is required by the body to form thyroid hormone, and iodine deficiency can lead to goiter and hypothyroidism.7 Severe and prolonged iodine deficiency can potentially lead to serious types of hypothyroidism, such as myxedema or cretinism. It is estimated that one and a half billion people living in 118 countries around the world are at risk for developing iodine deficiency.8

      Today, most cases of iodine deficiency occur in developing nations. In industrialized countries where iodized salt is used, iodine deficiency has become extremely rare. On the other hand, iodine toxicity has become a concern in some of these countries.9 Excessive iodine intake can result in either hypothyroidism10 or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid).11 Sources of iodine include foods (iodized salt, milk, water, seaweed, ground beef), dietary supplements (multiple vitamin-mineral formulas, seaweed extracts), drugs (potassium iodide, amiodarone, topical antiseptics), and iodine-containing solutions used in certain laboratory tests. Many nutritional supplements contain 150 mcg of iodine. While that amount of iodine should prevent a deficiency, it is not clear whether supplementing with iodine is necessary or desirable for most people. Those wishing to take a nutritional supplement containing iodine should consult a doctor.

      Laboratory animals with severe, experimentally induced zinc deficiency developed hypothyroidism, whereas moderate zinc deficiency did not affect thyroid function.12 In a small study of healthy people, thyroid hormone (thyroxine) levels tended to be lower in those with lower blood levels of zinc. In people with low zinc, supplementing with zinc increased thyroxine levels.13 One case has been reported of a woman with severe zinc deficiency (caused by the combination of alcoholism and malabsorption) who developed hypothyroidism that was corrected by supplementing with zinc.14 Although the typical Western diet is marginally low in zinc,15 additional research is needed to determine whether zinc supplementation would be effective for preventing or correcting hypothyroidism.

      Selenium plays a role in thyroid hormone metabolism. Severe selenium deficiency has been implicated as a possible cause of goiter.16 Two months of selenium supplementation in people who were deficient in both selenium and iodine was shown to induce a dramatic fall of the already impaired thyroid function in clinically hypothyroid subjects.17 Researchers have suggested that people who are deficient in both selenium and iodine should not take selenium supplements without first receiving iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation.18 There is no research demonstrating that selenium supplementation helps people with hypothyroidism who are not selenium-deficient.

      Preliminary data indicate that vitamin B3 (niacin) supplementation may decrease thyroid hormone levels. In one small study, 2.6 grams of niacin per day helped lower blood fat levels.19 After a year or more, thyroid hormone levels had fallen significantly in each person, although none experienced symptoms of hypothyroidism. In another case report, thyroid hormone levels decreased in two people who were taking niacin for high cholesterol and triglycerides; one of these two was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.20 When the niacin was discontinued for one month, thyroid hormone levels returned to normal.

      Desiccated thyroid, also called thyroid extract (e.g., Armour Thyroid), is used by some doctors as an alternative to synthetic thyroid hormones (such as thyroxine [Synthroid® or other brand names]) for people with hypothyroidism. Thyroid extract contains two biologically active hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine), whereas the most commonly prescribed thyroid-hormone preparations contain only thyroxine. One study has shown that the combination of the two hormones contained in desiccated thyroid is more effective than thyroxine alone for those with hypothyroidism.21 One doctor reported that thyroid extract worked better than standard thyroid preparations for many of his patients with hypothyroidism.22 Glandular thyroid products, which are available from health food stores, have had most of the thyroid hormone removed and would therefore not be expected to be effective for people with hypothyroidism. Intact desiccated thyroid is available only by prescription. Hypothyroidism sufferers who want to use desiccated thyroid must first consult with a physician.

      People with hypothyroidism have been shown to have an impaired ability to convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.23, 24 For this reason, some doctors suggest taking supplemental vitamin A (approximately 5,000-10,000 IU per day) if they are not consuming adequate amounts in their diet.

      Are there any side effects or interactions?

      Refer to the individual supplement for information about any side effects or interactions.

      Herbs
      Herbs that may be helpful

      Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) is a type of brown seaweed that contains variable amounts of iodine.25 Hypothyroidism due to insufficient intake of iodine may possibly improve with bladderwrack supplementation,

  33. QUESTION:
    I take levothroid shouldn’t my blood tests be normal?
    I take Levethroid for hypothyroidism. I took blood work, and while my freeT4 came back fine my TSH came back way below normal range. It is supposed to be between .4-4.0 and mine was .02.

    I emailed my Dr. he is not in today and the nurse wasn’t concerned because the T4 was fine. Does anyone have any insight on this subject.

    • ANSWER:
      They might need to decrease your thyroid medication just a little bit. It isn’t an emergency though, so just speak with your doctor when he’s back in the office.

  34. QUESTION:
    My TSH is 3.6, I have high cholestrol & triglycerides- could I still have hypothyroidism?
    I read up that hypo thyroidism normal range has been changed. It also affects cholestrol and triglycerides. Do u think I may still have hypothyroidism. I have classic symtoms- fatigue, lot of weight gain, puffed up face. I exercise for 45 minutes – 200 calories 3 times a week. No weight loss. I have fruits and veggies.

    • ANSWER:
      You sure could have hypothyroidism. In fact, by AACE standards you do. Back in 2003, they changed the TSH range to 0.3 to 3.0. Unfortunately most labs still have the range at 0.3 to 5.5 and doctors don’t realize its outdated. Plus, TSH changes throughout the day, so depending on the time you had it the result could be totally different. TSH should always be done first thing in the morning.

      Below are some thyroid links that should help.

      My first TSH was 2.6. Within a year, it rose to 6.8 and I got diagnosed. Was I hypo at 2.6? probably. The TSH is a lousy test and its not actually a thyroid test. It’s a pituitary test. Better tests are the free t4 and free t3

  35. QUESTION:
    Tender nipples, and sore breasts on day 19 ,past AF?
    Normal cycle for me is 29-31 days til next cycle. Most recent AF was 4/6/10 (lighter, lasted longer & on day 27) took test because of cycle difference BPN.
    4/26 started getting tender nipples w/n 2 days both breasts are tender. Now they are swollen? TTC for 2+yrs, No DRUGS, hypothyroidism (normal range).. any advice is welcome :)
    **Please be mature when responding**

    Baby Dust to All:)

    • ANSWER:
      I am in the same boat. I had what I think was a period at the begining of the month. But now it is 14 DPO and my breasts have been painfully sore for a few days now. Not the annoying kind of pain like before I start AF but actually painful to the touch and sometimes for no reason. I dont want to get hopes up because it happens every month and when I get BFN it is depressing. So I would say take a test because that is the only way you will know. I wish you much luck and baby dust!!

  36. QUESTION:
    can hypothyroidism cause lower LH, FSH and testosterone?
    I have hypothyroidism and my LH, FSH and testosterone were all normal but low in the range.

    Can hypothyroidism cause this?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you may have primary hypothalamus malfunction and the other issues are simply symptoms of this. It is not all that uncommon.

  37. QUESTION:
    What is a “normal” range number for thyroids?
    I went to the ER this past summer (I have mild heart rythm problem- but was throwing symptomatic pvc’s) and after a long night, the doctor told me that my bloodwork came back, and I have “extremely” low thyroid level- hypothyroidism. My number was 22. Is that really low? I’m just now going to the doctor to get a check up for my thyroid this month, but was wondering if someone could tell me what my number means. (I would have gone sooner, but we don’t have insurance, and it costs a ton to see my doctor)

    • ANSWER:
      Is that 22 or .22? There is a huge difference. It’s probably a 22 if the doctor is saying you have hypothyroidism. The range for TSH at Quest is 0.3 to 5.5. AACE recommeds that it should be 0.3 to 3.0 and some doctors believe the range should be 0.3 to 2.0 because changes happen in the body once the TSH is over 2.

      Remember every time you have a TSH to test first thing in the morning. TSH will be higher in the morning verses an afternoon reading and you ant to have medication adjusted by its high point.

  38. QUESTION:
    Being treated for hypothyroidism?
    I initially started out with my TSH level being 420! Now, it is in normal range. I will, of course, continue medications to control levels. Will I still have a healthy pregnancy, even being treated? Will I have trouble conceiving?

    • ANSWER:
      There’s no contraindication.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is tsh irrelevent/important in diagnosing hypothyroidism?
    If your free t3 and t4 are in the normal range, but your tsh is 5.828 and you are having symptoms, what does the high tsh indicate? doesnt tsh fluctuate depending on how abnormal your t3 and t4 are? I trying to understand all this thyroid stuff…

    • ANSWER:
      TSH is pretty irrelevant in gauging thyroid function. if t3 and t4 are within normal limits than it’s not likely that it’s a thyroid disorder.

      i had hyperthyroidism and was treated. my t3 and t4 are completely normal but my TSH hasn’t been in range since i was diagnosed. my endocrinologist assures me that it’s normal for TSH to fluctuate.

  40. QUESTION:
    HypoThyroidism query. Please answer if somebody knows about it.?
    My primary care physician she found out that I’ve hypothyroidism 3 years back and range for “Highly Sensitive TSH” was below 0.350, whereas normal range is 0.350 — 5.500 uiu/mL now, my recent test shows 9.400. So, I don’t understand if its hypo or hyper? Does anyone faces same kind experince. I’ve to see the doctor but can’t appointment before monday and I’m very curious.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypo is underactive, Hyper is overactive.Hypothryroidism occurs when the thyroid stops or makes very little thyroid hormones.
      In Hypothyroidism, the body can experience side effects such as:
      Hair loss, excess in facial hair, fatigue, weight gain, intolerance to cold or hot, mitral valve prolapse, depression, infertility,goiter,e.t.c.
      The thyroid gland is a very important gland for it plays a role in almost every glandular function.
      Hyper is a condition where the thyroid makes too much thryoid hormones and carries its own side effects, which can be life threatening if the condition is left untreated.

  41. QUESTION:
    if you have the symptoms of a hypothyroidism…?
    i have 6 out of 7 symptoms of hypothyroidism. i had it checked years ago because of these symptoms and it was within normal range. so i was never treated for anything and i still have the same symptoms several years later. is there anything else that would have these same symptoms?

    weight gain
    sensitivity to cold
    fatigue
    dry rough skin or hair
    irritability
    memory loss

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. You need to have your thyroid levels checked again. Sometimes in the early stages of a thyroid problem, you can have lots of symptoms, but your level can still be normal. Also, thyroid levels can change from day to day ( high one day, low the next ). It’s always a good idea to get retested a month or two later, if you have a lot of symptoms, yet your levels look good. You need to make sure to get a TSH, T3,T4, and a antibody test done. Those are all the tests needed for a proper disagnosis ( not just a TSH test, which is the only one a lot of doctors do ). It’s also a good idea to always get a second opinion when dealing with a thyroid problem. A lot of doctors will not treat you until your levels are way too high, which is wrong, because the longer you wait, the worse your symptoms will get ( not to mention, the new ones that usually will develop ). When i was diagnosed, the only symptom i had was peeling finger nails, and dry skin and hair ( that was falling out in handfuls ). A good doctor will check your thyroid levels, and do a CBC ( complete blood count ), to check for anything else that might be going on ( that’s what they did for me ). Good luck. I hope it’s not a thyroid problem, it’s not a fun thing to live with. Take care :-)

  42. QUESTION:
    Hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism?
    my test results T3 T4 normal. TSH 0.005 normal range 0.350-5.500. Any one know is hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperthyroidism is when the food gets digested too quickly, causing weight loss. Hypothyroidism is when the food digests too slowly causing weight gain. There should be medications to take care of either. Call your doctor and ask him to explain the results to you.

  43. QUESTION:
    My thyroid level is 0.4, I have almost all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, doctor says no, can he be wrong?
    I have read that your thyroid level can be in the “normal” range and still be to low for your body. Does anyone know anything about this? I have talked to my doctor, but am not getting anywhere. The lowest level in his reference range is 0.3, mine is 0.4. Could a thyroid supplement help?

    • ANSWER:
      Like you, I have all the symptoms and thyroid runs in my family. Unfortunately, without a test to back up hypothyroidism, you can’t be treated for it. My tests are always borderline or low normal.

      I have not tried any supplements as I have been told that it is just throwing your money away…and, being truthful, that is really how it is with these homeopathic remedies. I have never used any that worked for other issues. Maybe you will have better luck than me…all you lose by trying them is your money.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does any one have hypothyroidism and their meds aren’t working?
    I was on synthroid now on thyronine which is a T3 med. I just still fill tired and slugish all day and still gaining weight.My levels are what they say in “normal range” but looked a liile high on the paper.They won’t change my meds.

    • ANSWER:
      If you’re not already, you need to see an endocrinologist. Many regular doctors will try to manage this condition and sometimes they cannot always get a handle on what’s going on even though the numbers are within normal range. What’s normal for me may not work for you. An endocrinologist has way more expertise in this field and will run other tests and try other things. If you are seeing an endo, find another one. Good luck.

  45. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, constipation, intolerance to cold, and muscle cramps
      Later symptoms include mental clouding diminished appetite, and weight gain.

      Some other signs may be brittle fingernails and dry hair.

      You need tests to confirm, but it sounds like you have it. However, the prognosis is great. You may have to undergo hormone relacement therapy, but that is easy. But if you experience hypothermia and stupor, you require immidiate medical attention.

      Have your doctor test your T4 and T3 levels.

      By the way, I’m not a doctor. So dont take my advise over any real medical professionals. I’m just a high school freshman who wants to be a doctor one day.

      Get well. Let me know if I was correct,
      Jake P

  46. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven’t changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don’t wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  47. QUESTION:
    What happen when your TSH hormone is very very low?
    My 3-year-old son was diagnosed with Central Hypothyroidism. Both his TSH and T4 hormone are lower than normal range but whenever he is sick, his TSH hormone will drop to very low level (0.005). Have everyone heard of cyclic THS? If yes, what does that mean to your health?

    • ANSWER:
      “It is common to see a transient minor suppression of TSH into the 0.02 – 0.2 mIU/L range during the acute phase of an illness, followed by a rebound to mildly elevated values during recovery.”

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/452667_5

  48. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism UK T3 and T4?
    My TSH level is 1.62

    A few months after my first child was born in 2007 I was diagnosed with an under-active thyroid and was told I would need to be on medication for life, this was distressing for me but I felt much better after taking a small daily dose of levothyroxine and regular check up’s with my endocrinologist.

    I became pregnant with my second child, the symptoms vanished and the bloods went back to normal so I was unusually taken off my medication and postpartum hypothyroidism was blamed. Shortly after my daughter was born in january 2009 I started to feel ILL again really really ILL like DYING ILL. I knew it was my thyroid as I had suffered with the same symptom’s in 2007-2008 for which I was successfully treated with levothyroxine.

    I also moved to a different area and only recently discovered that there are different lab results meanings for different area’s, this has been distressing for me as I know if I still lived in my previous area I would most likely be treated, however because I live here I will not get treated. I tick almost every symptom of hypothyroidism yet my blood work for THIS AREA is within the normal range.

    The doctor only tested my TSH levels??? Why wouldn’t he check my T3 and T4??? Yes my TSH levels are within the normal range, I understand this, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the illness and many people are going undiagnosed for 20 or 30 years, suffering for years whilst waiting for there TSH levels to rise enough to be treated..

    My TSH level is 1.62 very normal in most people’s eyes but I feel terribly ill and they wont do anything for me. I would rather DIE than suffer like this for the next 20 years, it could take years for my TSH levels to rise, yet I have RAGINGsymptom’ss.

    My doctor has said if the results come back as normal then there is nothing they can do other than rule an illness out and try to find out what the real problem is.

    There is NO other problem, I know what is wrong with me and I know what I need to feel better.. I need levothyroxine. But you know DOCTORS KNOW BEST… What am I supposed to do? I am at a loss with myself, I want to live a normal happy productive life and have been held back for 3 years, I have missed 3 years of my life. we only live once and I cant suffer like this any longer.. Can anyone help me please?? What should I do?? Who should I see?? Should I self medicate. I was considering buying levothyroxin from the internet and taking them to prove to my doctor that taking them WILL make me better.

    I am thankful for any responses which I get.

    Sorry this has taken so long to read and thank you for your time. :- (

    • ANSWER:
      Number one. Doctors do not always know best.
      Two. Do not self medicate.
      You need to go back to the doctor and say what you have said on here, that you need T3 and T4 checked.
      They will do it if you ask for it.
      ]For any one, Doctors see so many patients in a day, that your case is not unique. Make sure you say something to him/her while still in the surgery if you think something is not right. There is no use stewing on it at home. It is your body. Ask questions and discuss things. Only you know all your symptoms and lifestyle.
      Good luck.
      Please do not self medicate. especially if breast feeding

  49. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism treatment is making me sleepy, am I alone?
    Last fall I had some blood work done and found out I have hypothyroidism. My level is 4.75 and my doctor said the normal range is 3. She started me on Synthroid 100mcg. I took it in the morning and it made me so sleepy that I could not function and had a hard time staying alert to care for my daughter. I spoke to my doctor and she said I could take it at night. I was still getting sleepy though so I stopped taking it after a few weeks with no improvement. I had blood work done at the end of February and my level is still off so I saw my doctor about trying a different medication. She put me on Levoxyl 25mcg and I am taking my first dose in the morning. I have heard that once you are on the medication you will have an increase in energy and that if you are getting sleepy that the dose is too low or high. Has anyone else had this problem with the medication? I know it can be hard to pinpoint the exact dose but my level is just barely off, some people have a level 50. I just want to get my level in the normal range to prevent any other conditions. Right now my plan is to try my best to stay on the Levoxyl for two months straight so I can see where my level is with the medication. Any help is greatly appreciated!
    Let me correct myself. I am suddenly sleepy from the medication. I had no fatigue before I began the medication. The medication is what made me sleepy. And I understand that Synthroid and Levoxyl are basically the same but my doctor suggested trying a different medication to see if there was something in the Synthroid causing me to become sleepy.

    • ANSWER:
      Synthroid and Levoxyl are the same thing. Neither are what is making you sleepy. The medication helps you stay awake. I think you may be falling prey to a propter hoc logical fallacy.

      You are hypothyroid. Therefore you are sleepy.
      You are hypothyroid. Therefore you take synthroid.

      So the sleepiness and the synthroid are correlated. But one does not cause the other. They are both caused by the hypothyroidism. Saying that the synthroid is causing you to be sleepy is commiting cum hoc ergo propter hoc.

  50. QUESTION:
    My TSH now is .056, do I still have hypothyroidism?
    I’ve been taking medication for my hypothyroidism for years now and on my last visit, my doctor advised me to reduce the dosage. I’m taking Synthyroid 88mcg daily. Just wondering how come my TSH is low and still taking the meds and also, how do I meet the normal TSH range. Thanks much.

    • ANSWER:


Hypothyroidism Normal Range 2009

If you are thinking that you may be having thyroid problems, but are not sure what the symptoms are, you should be aware that there are different kinds of thyroid problems and different symptoms for each one. There are two main conditions of the thyroid that affect the levels of hormones in the gland, and can cause a lot of symptoms. One is having an over active thyroid and the other is having an under active thyroid. Each of these two main conditions carries with it a variety of different symptoms that can range in severity and you should be familiar with them to know what to watch out for.

Some of the most common symptoms that people experience when having an overactive thyroid include loss of weight, thinning hair, sweating, nervousness, and increased body temperature. If you are experiencing these kinds of symptoms and seem to feel like you can not eat enough to keep from losing weight, you should consider talking to your doctor about getting tested for normal thyroid levels. There are tests that can be done to determine what the thyroid levels are, and doctors can then prescribe the proper treatments or medication that can help keep it regulated.

Symptoms that you may have an under active thyroid can include coarse or thinning hair, dry skin, brittle nails, yellowish look of the skin, slow body movements, cool skin, inability to tolerate cold, feeling tired, sluggish, weak, memory problems, depression or difficulty concentrating. The degree of symptoms that you may experience with an under active thyroid depend on your age, how long you have had the problem and the seriousness of the condition.

Sometimes, the symptoms may be very mild and go on for some time before you notice them. Because there is such a variety of symptoms with an under active thyroid, it may be common to have it diagnosed as another kind of condition like depression. The symptoms can also come on gradually, which makes it more difficult to diagnose the problem early on. Sometimes, people may have slight symptoms for a long time before they are actually diagnosed with having an under active thyroid.

It is important that you go see your doctor if you begin to experience any of those symptoms over time and if you notice that you are experiencing extreme weight fluctuations and changes in your energy levels. Most conditions of the thyroid can be treated by a combination of medication and diet. Most people can keep their thyroid levels regulated with treatment and keep their symptoms of thyroid problems under control. Watch for any changes in your weight, temperature and energy levels to report to your doctor.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism UK T3 and T4?
    My TSH level is 1.62

    A few months after my first child was born in 2007 I was diagnosed with an under-active thyroid and was told I would need to be on medication for life, this was distressing for me but I felt much better after taking a small daily dose of levothyroxine and regular check up’s with my endocrinologist.

    I became pregnant with my second child, the symptoms vanished and the bloods went back to normal so I was unusually taken off my medication and postpartum hypothyroidism was blamed. Shortly after my daughter was born in january 2009 I started to feel ILL again really really ILL like DYING ILL. I knew it was my thyroid as I had suffered with the same symptom’s in 2007-2008 for which I was successfully treated with levothyroxine.

    I also moved to a different area and only recently discovered that there are different lab results meanings for different area’s, this has been distressing for me as I know if I still lived in my previous area I would most likely be treated, however because I live here I will not get treated. I tick almost every symptom of hypothyroidism yet my blood work for THIS AREA is within the normal range.

    The doctor only tested my TSH levels??? Why wouldn’t he check my T3 and T4??? Yes my TSH levels are within the normal range, I understand this, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the illness and many people are going undiagnosed for 20 or 30 years, suffering for years whilst waiting for there TSH levels to rise enough to be treated..

    My TSH level is 1.62 very normal in most people’s eyes but I feel terribly ill and they wont do anything for me. I would rather DIE than suffer like this for the next 20 years, it could take years for my TSH levels to rise, yet I have RAGINGsymptom’ss.

    My doctor has said if the results come back as normal then there is nothing they can do other than rule an illness out and try to find out what the real problem is.

    There is NO other problem, I know what is wrong with me and I know what I need to feel better.. I need levothyroxine. But you know DOCTORS KNOW BEST… What am I supposed to do? I am at a loss with myself, I want to live a normal happy productive life and have been held back for 3 years, I have missed 3 years of my life. we only live once and I cant suffer like this any longer.. Can anyone help me please?? What should I do?? Who should I see?? Should I self medicate. I was considering buying levothyroxin from the internet and taking them to prove to my doctor that taking them WILL make me better.

    I am thankful for any responses which I get.

    Sorry this has taken so long to read and thank you for your time. :- (

    • ANSWER:
      Number one. Doctors do not always know best.
      Two. Do not self medicate.
      You need to go back to the doctor and say what you have said on here, that you need T3 and T4 checked.
      They will do it if you ask for it.
      ]For any one, Doctors see so many patients in a day, that your case is not unique. Make sure you say something to him/her while still in the surgery if you think something is not right. There is no use stewing on it at home. It is your body. Ask questions and discuss things. Only you know all your symptoms and lifestyle.
      Good luck.
      Please do not self medicate. especially if breast feeding

  2. QUESTION:
    Adult hypothyroidism and neurological deterioration/mental function?
    I’ve had hypothyroidism since the age of 16, and though it has been treated since very early on in the development of the condition, it has been under-treated; as I have lost no weight associated with the stabilization of the TSH and other thyroid-related hormone levels i.e. T3, T4 and TCO anti-bodies.

    The numbers come to around boderline levels, but somewhere around the year 2009, the General Medical Council in my country that treating TSH levels of about 10 and above were acceptable while anything below that was to be alone — before, it was about 2. I know the normal ranges in the US and Europe are higher again.

    My own TSH levels I know to have hovered around 4 or 5 since stablization but have probably lowered as the thyroid gland is being attacked all the time by anti-bodies, if I recall correctly, and under-treating the condition exacerbates this. However, my question is related more to a symptom of hypothyroidism than the conditon itself.

    I know leaving hypothyroidism untreated will cause brain damage and even retardation in children and young adolescents. I didn’t develop this however until my mid-late adolescence and had it treated, albiet under the levels I was supposed to be, since 2 months after the condition started; never ceasing the Levothyroxine medication since.

    Is under-treatment as I’ve described above known to cause permanent neurological damage and retardation of mind? I’m quite worried about this prospect as I did reasonably well in school, and this possibly explains my difficulties in college. Does anybody have any knowledge in this field, even if it is an amateur opinion (my doctor is an incompetent cunt that can’t even give a frank honest diagnosis, never mind an assuring opinion; neither is it like I can change them in my system.)

    • ANSWER:
      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      A person needs testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      God bless

  3. QUESTION:
    Hyporthyroid & just found out I’m pregnant! YAY! Qt. about current TSH level..Help!?
    First off, thank you all who are taking the time to respond to my qt. Well, I’ll give the main details first. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism back in August 2009. Had my levothyroxine medication adjusted twice so far. When I was just diagnosed, my TSH level was 4.1, probably the reason why I had a very early miscarriage months before, in May.. My endo. started me on 50 mg. of levothyroxine. It wasn’t working, so she increased it to 75 mg, and I started to feel the difference, in a good way. About 2 1/2 wks ago, my levels were checked again, & now I am at TSH of 2.373 (normal range supposedbly is from 0.5-6.0), so I am right on track, and levels on FREE-T3= 2.87 (normal range of 1.5-5.5), and FREE T-4= 1.19 (normal range of 0.8-1.8)… Now, it all seems to be right on track. Because my endo. is on maternity leave (won’t see her till end of March, beg. of April*), my primary physician has been the one checking my levels. Before finding out I am pregnant, he said that he’ll keep me on the 75 mg. of levothyroxine. Now…. I just found out about my pregnancy, which Hubby and I have worked very hard for, last week (Feb. 11th).. If all goes well, this will be our 2nd child.. I was told by the nurse at my endo’s office that since my endo. is out, that I can have my OBGYN monitor, and if need be, increase the dosage of levothyroxine. The prob. is, I won’t be seeing her until March 1st.. Would that be waiting too long to have my dosage increased?! I had already planned to contact either my OB or my primary in order to have them increase the dosage, because after extended research of mine, I found out that the IDEAL TSH level to conceive and have a pregnancy go smoothly is between TSH of 1-2… I am at 2.37… Does this mean that I am bound to have complications before I get in to see my OBGYN??? Anyone had this level before, and had a healthy pregnancy/baby??? I need all the help I can get.. If need be, I will be be persistent with my OB’s office, so they can squeeze me in alot earlier than March 1st… I really want everything to go well with this pregnancy.. I cannot bear having another miscarriage… We’ve been trying for almost a yr. now after our first miscarriage, & def. don’t want to take a step back again.. Thanks for the help in advance! =)

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmm It probably would be fine until march 1 , but why take a chance and you know you’ll worry until then. Try to get in earlier.

      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/pregnancy.htm


Hypothyroidism Normal Levels

The thyroid gland is a small organ in the neck, which produces a hormone called thyroxine. This hormone is involved in regulating your dog’s metabolism, and affects most organs of the body in some way.

Hypothyroidism is, as the name suggests, a condition where the thyroid gland isn’t producing enough thyroxine, so the body systems slow down. The result is a range of symptoms including lethargy, depression, obesity and a loss of interest in activities that are usually enjoyable. Affected dogs also have changes in their skin and coat, including hair loss and dry scaly skin, and they are usually much more sensitive to cold. Many affected dogs have a very characteristic “hang dog ” appearance, which is a hint that they are suffering from hypothyroidism.

There are several causes of hypothyroidism in dogs: inflammation, cancer and medication can be responsible, but in some cases, there is no obvious cause.

This condition has a very slow onset, so the appearance of symptoms is gradual, and easily missed by a dog’s owner. Not only that, but the symptoms of hypothyroidism also occur with other medical conditions, so working out the cause of your dog’s problems isn’t always straightforward.

Blood tests can measure the amount of thyroid hormone in your dog’s blood, and confirm the diagnosis. Thyroxine is available in tablet form, so you can replace their missing hormone with medication, and their metabolism will return to normal. Your veterinarian will recommend blood tests on a regular basis to make sure that your dog’s thyroid hormone levels are kept at the right level. You will need to give them thyroxine tablets for the rest of their life.

When your dog is on the right amount of thyroid hormone medication and their metabolism is back to normal, you can then start to tackle the other health problems that come with this condition. Diet and exercise can help with obesity, and there are treatments available which will help to improve their skin and coat.

In Summary – Hypothyroidism is a manageable disease, and when treated, dogs can enjoy life as much as they always did.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are normal levels of thyroid hormones ?
    What are normal levels of thyroid hormones tsh, t3 and t4? and at what level do they start treating for hypothyroidism? My levels have been borderline for years and I have all the syptoms but my DR doesn’t want to put me on medication…. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      The normal level for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) according to the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinology the normal range is from 0.3-3.0

      If one gets to that higher level of beyond 3.0 the endocrinologist may start to treat.

      I also have the link to a site that may help you find even more information:

      http://thyroid.about.com

  2. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism? even with normal TSH levels?
    hi guys so im a 24 yr old male in good health except for this

    ive been having these symptons for a few months and finally decided to go to the doctor to get checked out, basically i have;

    shaky hands,
    fast heart beat,
    sweating of palms,
    trouble sleeping,
    nervous,
    moody (quietness)

    so basically the doctor did a bllod test for TSH levels and the results came back normal 4.46, but he wreckons that i still may have hypothroidism so hes done more blood tests and ive to go to a radiologist this week for ultra sound on the thyroid.

    my question is is it possible to have hypothroidism even with normal TSH levels ? and also all my symptons seem more related to hyperthroidism not hypothyroidism.

    Another thing is that the doctor is doing a blood sugar level test to test for diabities can this also be a sympton of hypothyroidism?

    anyone got any info?

    • ANSWER:
      4.46 is not normal. It indicates hypothyroidism.

      But your symptoms indicate hyperthyroidism.

      Yours is a very perplexing case, and you need to make sure you have a very good doctor who is able and willing to get to the bottom of this. You need more blood tests for a definitive diagnosis. Then you need to have the TSH vs. symptoms conflict explained. You need free T3, free T4, TSI, TPO.

      You may find that you have something completely unrelated to your thyroid going on.

      Diabetes is not a symptom of hypothyroidism.

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism with normal TSH levels?
    I am 18 years old, 5’1”, and about 119 pounds. About 2 years ago, I was more like 107 pounds (and the same height). I assumed that the weight gain was my fault and so I began writing down everything I ate. I realized (and was shocked) to find that I only ate about 1000 calories and that this kept me full all day. I’m short which means that my stomach is smaller but this number seems really low. Especially for my age, the fact that I run about 12 miles per week, and lift weights. This number seems more like what someone who is severally underweight would be eating. I eat this much (and it keeps me full) and I still seem to continue to gain weight. Not only is the number on the scale increasing but my jeans feel tighter and tighter…if it wasn’t for this last part, I would assume maybe I was gaining muscle.

    My grandmother was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when she was my age and I asked my doctor to test me for it. My TSH came back normal but my bad cholesterol was high. I’m a vegetarian who is eats tons of fruits, vegetables, and low fat protein (greek yogurt is my favorite) every day. I don’t get it. Growing up with two parents in the Sciences has turned me into a bit of a geek and so I’ve become my own google doctor. I googled Hypothyroidism until I couldn’t google anymore. I’ve also been feeling especially tired (even though I get at least 8 hours of sleep each night) and this makes me even more certain that something is going on with my metabolism. I feel like my doctor doesn’t listen to me and assumes that I must be overeating. I don’t want to cut calories because I know that any lower would be very unhealthy. Living in Canada, I am free to go to the doctor anytime and demand (though I’m not very good at being demanding) that he listen to my symptoms. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      TSH is not the hormone level your doc should be looking at.
      TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is made in the pituitary gland, and simply tells the thyroid to make T4 and T3. T3 is the big hormone that makes one hypo/hyper thyroid… but it’s such an expensive test that most insurance doesn’t want to cover it. Therefore docs test TSH, which has nothing to do with it!
      90% of “normal” TSH readings have nothing to do with the fact that the patient is or is not hypothyroid!
      If the thyroid gland is either unable to uptake TSH, or unable to make T4/T3, then metabolic rates suffer. But the level of TSH in blood does not affect how much T4/T3 you have unless your thyroid already has a defect.

  4. QUESTION:
    Can you have hypothyroidism but have normal ts4 levels?
    I was hyperthyroid for seven years I was treated with PTU and now my thyroid levels test in the normal range. However, I have hypothyroid symptoms now. My hair fell out, I gained 50 lbs. I suffer from the fatique and have dry skin and am tired all the time. sometimes I can feel my thyroid speed up and I am a bag of nerves but by the time I get to the doctor the episode is over again. I still have the insomnia. But my doctor will not remove my thyroid or refer me back to an endocrinologist because my t4 and t3 say normal uptake. Is it possible that my body feels hypo because i no longer am hyper and can still have my thyroid removed and put on synthroid based on my history and symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think they would remove your thyroid, particularly if you have more hypothyroid symptoms than hyperthyroid symptoms. The fact that you’re having both is worrisome. Generally when you display hyperthyroid symptoms, your heart rate speeds up unnaturally, so perhaps they could give you one of those take-home heart monitor things to track it (they gave my mom one once). They certainly aren’t going to want to mess with any kind of medication if they don’t know what they’re dealing with.

      As far as hypothyroidism goes, the scale is a guideline and “normal” levels really can differ from person to person. Most general practitioners go strictly by the scale, which can cause problems. I had hypothyroid symptoms for years, but my levels tested at the very bottom of the normal range, so several general practitioners ruled out hypothyroidism and tried treating me for depression instead.

      I finally went to a good endocrinologist who let me know that the normal range is just that–a typical range. Different people have optimal levels within that range. So he put me on a low level of thyroid hormones–it moved my thyroid levels more into the middle of the normal range and the symptoms went away. Even better: no more antidepressants. For me, the bottom of the normal range was just too low.

  5. QUESTION:
    Still have some symptoms of hypothyroidism despite normal TSH , T3 and T 4 levels?
    I am on replacement thyroxine since 2002 and have normal TSH,. T3 and T 4 yet still have some symptoms of hypothyroidism
    mainly,
    1) Heavy prolonged periods which are sometimes irregular.(late or early)
    2) Memory loss
    3) Unable to lose weight
    4) Tiredness
    5) Low iron levels
    6) Sore joints
    7) Foggy mind
    8) Depression

    Why is this so?
    Ive even had my meds increased(still withiin good rang in blood levels)

    • ANSWER:
      This is something you need to take up with your endocrinologist. I urge you to do so.

  6. QUESTION:
    TSH Levels-Hypothyroidism?
    A few days ago I received some test results from a routine blood test and my TSH levels were 5 above normal with a normal T4. I have no prior medical conditions though lately I can not tolerate heat to the point I pass out if I do not leave the room. (Other than that I haven’t felt sick at all) Is it possible to still have Hypothyroidism with a normal T4? And isn’t one supposed to be intolerant to cold?

    Thanks, Goodyear

    • ANSWER:
      A high TSH and normal or even low T4 are found in transitory hypothyroidism. A less common symptom is heat intolerance instead of cold sensitivity. Your doctor may want to follow up with a retest in the near future. I strongly suggest that you discuss this with your doctor.

  7. QUESTION:
    When hypothyroidism is under control, so fertility levels return to normal?
    I was diagnosed wth Hypothyroidism at the very beginning (4 weeks) of my first pregnancy. I was treated with Levo and tested throughout the pregnancy and had a healthy, beautiful baby boy in March of this year. I am now undergoing testing to readjust my medication since my pregnancy is over. I am wondering if this condition will cause fertility problems when my husband and I make a go at Baby # 2 (which we’re not planning to do until Sept. 2009). Has anyone successfully conceived multiple children after being diagnosed with this? If so, was it difficult to achieve? hare your experience. We feel 100% blessed to have our son, but would love to have 2 or 3 more children. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Great question! I was diagnosed as hypothyroid in April and started on Levo. We’re STILL trying to get pregnant. So it’s great that you were able to get pregnant despite your thyroid situation. I would say that as long as you stay on your meds and regulate your thyroid, that’s the same as having a working thyroid. I mean the meds are doing the job for you. So I would be surprised if you had issues trying for #2.

  8. QUESTION:
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism and started on Nutrisystem but can’t lose weight is this normal?
    I was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism last week and started on medicine? I just started Nutrisystem and weighed myself today but I didn’t lose an ounce. I would have thought on my first week I would have lost something. I stuck to the plan and started walking. Could it be that I have to get my thyroid levels in a normal range before I’m going to be able to lose any weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism can certainly cause someone to gain weight or fail to lose weight as in your case. If you started the Nutrisystem not too long ago, then you may not notice results this quickly. Do not let it discourage you. I am assuming you are being treated for your hypothyroidism with thyroid hormone replacement and this will help return your thyroid levels to normal. When your thyroid levels are normal it will hopefully easier to lose weight. Weight loss is not easy and it requires a combination of dietary modification and regular exercise. It is good that you are walking. If you want to lose weight, then consider increasing your aerobic exercise which could be fast walking, running, swimming, or biking. Good luck.

  9. QUESTION:
    how long does it take to achieve normal thyroid levels?
    Recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Been placed on medication for past two weeks. Still showing symptons of hypothyroidism. I’m a type two Diabetic and have not been able to control my blood sugar even though I follow diet, exercise daily and take medications.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve been taking Synthroid for 13 weeks, and I still have HypoT symptoms. The first 6 weeks, I took 25 mcg a day. After that I increased to 75 mcg., and within two weeks, my hair started to fall out! I spoke to my MD a few days ago, and I told her how frustrated I’m getting. She told me that I need to be patient until we find the right dosage, but I can’t help but wonder if I’ll ever feel good. She told me that the first year of treatment will be frustrating…and so far she’s right. I’m trying to be optimistic about this whole thing.

      I’ve been reading about HypoT ever since being diagnosed, and from what I’ve read, the average dosage that most people seem to stablize on is 100 or 125 mcg.

      I don’t know what type of diet you have, but I know I look and feel my best when I keep my carbs low.

  10. QUESTION:
    TSH levels are normal…?
    Ive had my TSH levels tested and came back with the results of 1.170 and my T3/T4 levels were 0.94. Now in the lab that is considered normal. However my sodium levels were low at 132 out of the range of 135-146. Basically in a nutshell to the Dr. My levels are normal. BUT, I am losing my hair, Im weak, always tired, Im always cold, I always have severe migraines, my skin has become a disaster and Ive gained 10lbs in 2 months but havent changed my diet at all! The ultra sound of my thyroids showed 2 nodules which they now want me to get scanned, which I am set for that appointment. My question is though… Is it possible that I have Hypothyroidism with these levels? I have ALL of the symptoms of it EXCEPT that my levels run in what is considered the normal levels… Has ANYONE had this issue? And if so, what was done and how do I approach this?

    • ANSWER:
      Did you get your FT4/FT3 done? Those are more sensitive in detecting subclinical hypo or hyperthyroidism.

  11. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism connected to fibromyalgia? long time lithium user and starting to suffer.?
    been taking lithium for 15 yrs. and my body is starting to suffer.All symptoms lead to hypothyroidism, no one listens due to normal levels. i realized i was suffering from fibromyalgia also, no one listens. high cholesterol, Is it all connected? maybe someone will hear.

    • ANSWER:
      Go to an endocrinologist and get their opinion on the thyroid levels. Sometimes I have read about people taking thyroid pills when the levels are borderline possibly..

      Fibromyalgia is linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and that is linked to family history of it. Also may be a link to CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome. And to restless leg syndrome and to depression. (see the fibromyalgia links below).

      High cholesterol can be dietary sources or from genetics or both. You could try soluble fibers (oats, rice,etc) to see if that absorbs cholesterol in the gut and cutting down on animal based foods (meat, cheese, lard, animal shortening, eggs, etc). But the kind that is hereditary, you have to take medicine to lower that kind.

      As for the lithium, to see side effects of it, go to a library and look in the PDR in the reference section (physician’s desk reference) or in a Davis’ Drug Guide book (is more in layman’s terms for nurses).

      Here are some links also..
      PDR online
      http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/rxdrugprofiles/alphaindexa.shtml (rx)
      http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/otcdrugprofiles/alphaindexa.shtml (OTC)
      http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/herbaldrugs/index.shtml (herbal)
      http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/nutsupdrugs/index.shtml (nutritional supplements)

      Fibromyalgia links

      http://www.copays.org/ (Patient Advocate Organization..copay assistance with autoimmune diseases)
      http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/search;jsessionid=FDF10157F68CCB9E79F9747FDDF1FB7D?term=fibromyalgia&submit=Search (clinical trials for fibromyalgia..hit map button for local trials..don’t forget to turn pages if necessary)
      http://www.fmaware.org/fminfo/brochure.htm#whatCausesFM (what is fibromyalgia)
      http://fmaware.org/fminfo/research.htm (fibromyalgia study results)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/related/fmcfsrelatedb.htm (fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome overlap)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/related/depression.htm (fibromyalgia and depression overlap)
      http://fmaware.org/fminfo/research.htm (finding the right doctor for you)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/related/rls.htm (fibromyalgia and restless legs overlap)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/nutrition/applied%20_nutrition1.htm (applied nutrition for fibromyalgia)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/nutrition/diet_nutrition.htm (diet and nutrition in pain management)
      http://www.fmaware.org/patient/coping/treatmentoption.htm (fibromyalgia treatment options)
      http://www.dcdoctor.com/pages/brimhall/pdf/antiinflammatorydiet.pdf (Anti-inflammatory diet…need adobe reader)
      http://nutrition.about.com/od/dietsformedicaldisorders/a/antiinflamfood.htm (anti-inflammatory foods)
      http://www.cidpusa.org/diet.html (Anti-inflammatory diet)
      http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QA/QA252779/ (Anti-inflammatory diet and omega 3s)
      http://www.new-horizons.org/ (organization to help the disabled..resource)
      http://www.new-horizons.org/faqcat.html (frequently asked questions about disability help)

      Genetic Disorders
      http://www.sbhsd.k12.ca.us/sbhslib/science/gendisorder.htm (link list and scroll down for specific disease links)
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?call=bv.View..ShowTOC&rid=gnd.TOC&depth=2 (genes and disease)
      http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/units/disorders/whataregd/ (genetic disorders library)
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/geneticsbirthdefects.html (medline plus)
      http://www.noah-health.org/en/genetic/ (new york online access to health)
      http://www.ygyh.org/ (your genes, your health)
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=gnd.TOC&depth=2 (genes and diseases)
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=gnd.chapter.86&ref=sidebar (genes and metabolic or nutritional diseases)
      http://www.genome.gov/10001204 (genome.gov)

  12. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven’t changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don’t wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  13. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism: TSH Levels?
    I recently got the results of some blood tests back. One of them was for my Thyroid my TSH level was at 3.5. My doctor said this was normal and that I didn’t have a problem with my thyroid. Infact the only thing that showed up was quite bad anemia with hemoglobin and 10.2, No stored levels of ferritin and also low red blood cell count and the red blood cells are also too small.

    I feel I have many of the symptoms of Hypothyroidism such as :
    feeling tired and sleeping a lot
    feeling the cold easily
    dry and/or pale skin
    coarse, thinning hair
    sore muscles, slow movements and weakness
    a hoarse or croaky voice
    depression
    problems with memory and concentration
    fairly dramatic weight gain
    constipation
    heavy, irregular or prolonged menstrual periods
    light sensitivity, dizzy spells, palpitations
    I could go on. Is it possible that I could be Hypothyroid and still have TSH levels in the normal range?

    • ANSWER:
      symptoms

      Sudden weight loss, even when your appetite and food intake remain normal or increase
      Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) — commonly more than 100 beats a minute — irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) or pounding of your heart (palpitations)
      Nervousness, anxiety or anxiety attacks, irritability
      Tremor — usually a fine trembling in your hands and fingers
      Sweating
      Changes in menstrual patterns
      Increased sensitivity to heat
      Changes in bowel patterns, especially more frequent bowel movements
      An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), which may appear as a swelling at the base of your neck
      Fatigue, muscle weakness
      Difficulty sleeping

      is your thyroid gland inflammed

      Thyroiditis. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis).

  14. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what ‘normal’ levels of TSH and T4 would be?
    I have hypothyroidism and my doctor always reads the numbers out to me and says this is high or low, but I’d like to know what the normal range is.

    • ANSWER:
      TSH 0.40 – 5.5

      T4, FREE 0.8 – 1.8

  15. QUESTION:
    can you have thyroid problems and normal levels ?
    Please correct me if I’m wrong.
    Free T4 is how much thyroid hormone my thyroid is producing ? (mine is .8 – on the low side of normal range)
    TSH is what the hypothalmus is telling the pituitary to produce in order to stimulate the thyroid ? (mine is also .8 which is normal I guess) But, I have had many symptoms of hypothyroidism. My question is if you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto’s can you still have these “normal range” levels ? Also, I read it runs in families and my mom has hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      You are at the low end of the “normal range”, and if you are experiencing symptoms of hypothyroid, you should demand to be put on a low dosage of synthroid or levoxyl (10-20 mcgs) because normal for one person might be a .8 while someone else needs to be 1-2 to feel well. Most endocrinologists like to see patients towards the middle of the range and will prescribe, especially in women because your thyroid function decreases with age. Because of your family history especially, you are a good candidate. I know that my TSH needs to be around 2 to feel good. Be sure that you get your TSH tested every 4-6 weeks initially to find the right dosage for you. It can be a long process in finding the right dosage and reaping the full benefits of medication, so be patient.

      If your doctor doesn’t take you seriously, change doctors or ask for a second opinion. If you have a good HMO and are able to go directly to a specialist, see an endocrinologist. Endocrinologists specialize in endocrine diseases and I assure you will take your symptoms very seriously.

      Another suggestion is to have an antibody test. If your antibodies are elevated, it could be Hashimoto’s causing hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s causes antibodies to attach your thyroid. It’s rare, but the antibody test is the best way to diagnose if TSH doesn’t.

  16. QUESTION:
    Is my iron levels low or normal?
    My iron level showed on my blood test it was 20 ug/dL.
    ive also got hypothyroidism and im on thyroxine but at the same time he prescribed me 100mg ferrous sulphate he said that would help with hair loss but my iron levels were normal.. ive been taking it for now 3 months should my iron levels be checked again?

    Btw im a female 17 yr old.:)

    • ANSWER:
      I have low iron levels too. My doctor said I can stop taking tablets when it reaches 100. It was 13 when I started (and I was 17 too). It was 30 six months later. I’d say that 20 is pretty low (unless I have different measurements to you, I didn’t take notice of the ug/dL part). Are you tired all the time? Do you seem pale? I got my iron checked again a couple of months ago after six months, so maybe you could wait a bit longer, or if you’re concerned you could probably do it now. Just ask your doctor.

  17. QUESTION:
    I have many symptoms (getting worse) of hypothyroidism but, my blood test are normal…what can I do?
    A few years ago, I had a tumor on my thyroid and had 1/2 removed. Before haveing it removed I had many symptoms of hypothyroidism (hair falling out, very dry skin, weight gain, foggyness, constipation, always feeling tired even first thing in the morning) but, blood test always came back normal. Most doctors did not even feel my neck to notice I had a goiter. Now several years later my symptoms have increased I now have bumps all down my arms, I am growing hair on my navel & chin, my weight is continueing to rise. I have tried everything. I even fasted for 3 weeks and was shocked to see my weight unchanged. I go to the doctor and my blood levels are still normal and I just feel like I can not get help. I have an appointment tomarrow to check the blood test again…What should I be asking or telling my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a mild thyroid problem which had started during my puberty years, more than 20 years ago. The thyroid lump was so small, it
      was not visually perceptible. I could only feel it as a small solid bone, when I touch the front of the throat , and also had to chew a good number of times, before swallowing food, and became
      a slow eater. The doctors were then dismissive about my problem for 2 main reasons — one, thyroid tests were were quite dicey and so was thyroid treatment; two, during puberty years, many undergo hormonal changes which take a little time to stabilize. However, the fallouts of having thyroid ( I realized only in recent years), had led to very severe
      gumpain, and hair loss, though I did not have any weight problems, and having endured these persistent stresses for very many years, led to chronic fatigue and stiffness
      in the neck. It was in the process of using yoga to relieve my
      stiffness problems, that I discovered that my neck muscles
      were squeeze dried over the years gradually due to the
      frontal compression of the persistent (although, mild) thyroid problem (in fact, my blood test showed the thyroid hormones were within the statistical limits and were pronounced ‘normal’,
      though I felt like having a small pebble in the middle of the throat).
      I undertook yoga seriously, to stretch all parts of the body
      (not just my neck) very sloooooowly for several hours
      everyday (it is 4 years now), and I found with improved blood circulation,
      I was able to relieve the tensions in the neck and my
      thyroid functioning has stabilized very well, so much so
      I dont have any lump and feel my throat has been emptied out. My body is much lighter.

      People suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome often
      have carried thyroid problems for long, and yoga has been
      found to be extremely beneficial, recent research suggests. It sloowly, but very
      surely restores the body to get back to its comfortable state.
      Very sloooooow stretching, with spinal twists will immensely
      help.

  18. QUESTION:
    There seems to be controversey over “Normal” Thyroid TSH levels…What is normal?
    Is 1.63 considered normal? Do T3 and T4 make a difference in determining Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Different people/doctors/labs consider different ranges of TSH to be normal. Some say .3 to 3 is normal. Some say .5 to 5 is normal. Etc.

      1.63 is a normal TSH level.

      OK, now that we have that out of the way, TSH is irrelevant. TSH isn’t a thyroid hormone. It doesn’t determine your symptoms. It’s only used as a second hand, indirect way to make a guess at what your T3 and T4 levels are.

      Your free T3 and free T4 levels are the ONLY measurements that determine if you have hypothyroidism.

  19. QUESTION:
    My doctor said my thyroid levels are higher than normal?
    I went to the doctor a few days ago. They got some blood from me and sent it to be tested. Today my doctor called and said my thyroid levels are a little high. He is going to send me to a endocrinologist. What will they do to get my levels back to normal? The strange thing is I gained weight and have been unable to lose it. So I thought I had hypothyroidism. But my levels are high instead of low. This has me a little confused. If by chance you are someone who has hyperthyroidism, tell me about your experience with it. Thanks for your help :)

    • ANSWER:
      The high ‘level’ most likely is TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and does mean hypO rather than hypER and you will most likely be prescribed Synthroid to bring it down (.2 – 3 hopefully)…..go to Yahoo Groups & you will find some excellent ones there to join and get good answers. Members will tell you HOW to take the meds and WHEN to….of course your doctor should too. Prayerfully yours…many blessings

  20. QUESTION:
    My brothers TSH levels!! ( Hypothyroidism )?
    My brother has a TSH level of 700, the doctor said that the normal is like 1!! is he going to die!! they said he has hypothyroidism and they have never seen it that bad in 20 years, he is only 9!!!!

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism, What can the effect of really high TSH levels have?
    The last time I got a blood test my TSH level was at 287!!! And normal thyroids function between 1 and 5! The doctor said that she had never seen thyroid levels in someone who was still walking and talking. But they did not even increase my Synthroid. All i know is that I am tired all the time. I am sick all the time. I don’t eat anything but still am gaining weight like crazy and bounce back in forth from being catatonic to an insomniac. I know these are all normal for hypothyroidism, but I am really scared. I go to college and take care of my grandmother but if something doesn’t change, I will not be able to do either anymore. I barely have the ability to shower every couple of days and makes sure I don’t starve myself.
    Yea, i went to an endocrinologist when I was 9, after my initial diagnosis. But now because of my insurance, they will not send me unless htey have “exhausted traditional methods” first. I think that after taking the medicine and still having such high levels, That traditional methods are obviously not working.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow go to an endocrinologist, mine was 27 right after I gave birth and they sent me to my endocrinologist. I am tired all the time, how are you functioning are you gaining weight, that normally is the first side effect I see. Good luck they need to up your synthroid how much do you take?

  22. QUESTION:
    High CK levels with Hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism in June of 2005. I ahd the radioactive Iodine 131 treatment done in October of 2005. They never started me on any meds, for hopes that my thyroid would “kick-start” itself into producing the right amount of hormone. Well, that never happened. I was put on synthroid in Jan 2006 and have been up and down since then. Once they realized I needed meds my levels were: TSH >110.00 (normal 0.50- 6.00) and my Free T4 was <0.1 (normal 0.8- 1.5) and they checked my creatine kinase level which was 585 (normal is 0-165). Does anybody know exactly what your CK level is? Should I push to have more done about it? My levels still arent right, I think now Im getting to much meds. My hair is starting to fall out again and Im feeling sleepy all the time. Before I couldnt move and I got cramps in places I didnt know you could have cramps in. Thats when they realized I was so Hypothyroid. Any serious anwsers, please.
    By the way, I am currently taking
    200 mcg Synthyroid.

    • ANSWER:
      CK is creatin kinase level. It is released into the bloodstream when damage to a muscle occurs. The lab is usually drawn when looking for heart damage. Other types of injuries occur to other muscles. If you had an intense strenous workout causing injury to some muscles this lab could be elevated as well. Lipitor and other statins can also cause an increase in CK. If you are taking these medications, make sure you let your doctor know.

  23. QUESTION:
    Anyone treated for hypothyroidism but still have symptoms?
    I have been on levothyroxine for 15 years now and never have any energy…my blood levels are are in the normal range but I just recently had dosage increased so we can lower tsh to a 1 or 2, its at 3.4 now. Anyone else still symptomatic with normal levels?

    • ANSWER:

  24. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s and normal tsh levels? Possible to feel hypo?
    Any tips from others dealing with this would be greatly appreciated and would make me feel like I’m not crazy. :)
    I had doctors telling me my thyroid gland felt enlarged since January 2010,they’d test my tsh and everything was normal. Finally this May a different doctor ordered an ultrasound of my thyroid gland, radiologist and my doctor agreed it is “mildly enlarged”, they also found that 2 of my parathyroid glands are also enlarged. I was sent to an endocrinologist late May and she ordered a load of labs, parathyroid function, kidney function,tsh, metabolic panel, vitamin d and tested for thyroid antibodies.My tsh was .93 (late may), my last tsh was this january and was 1.9. I tested positive for thyroid antibodies and my level was 69, my vitamin d is also low and is the supposed reason for my parathyroid glands being enlarged,am now taking 1000 units of vitamin d daily now.
    At my initial appt. with my endo she talked to me mainly about hyperthyroidism because of they way my level dropped, I told her I have none of those symptoms. She called me at work to tell me I have Hashimoto’s and low vit d levels, take vitamin d daily and she will recheck my tsh and vit d in 6 months. She had no time to answer any questions and said absolutely no to any medication.. so I did my own research. I have just about every symptom of HYPOthyroidism and have had them for years. My mother had hashimotos and no longer has a thyroid gland, almost every one of her siblings is hypo and a few are hyper (there are 9 total). I called her back w/my concerns and still said absolutely no to treating it.
    I’ve had pain in the joints of my fingers x 3 years
    pain/swelling in my knees x 8-9 yrs (i do not have lymes or arthritis, mri and xray done on my knees show nothing wrong at all) I’ve seen orthopedic doctors for this.
    my muscles ache all the time in all sorts of places, legs,arms, back.
    my skin is very dry and seems to be bad yr round, am now using a prescription scalp solution for my horribly dry scalp that seemed to come out of no where 2 yrs ago.
    I cannot get pregnant again (5 yrs of trying-finally gave up and decided it was’nt meant to be), i missed 2 days of birth control 9 yrs ago and got pregnant instantly.
    I could sleep all day if I did’nt have a life, I am tired all the time and feel like I’m in a fog. I have been on 3 antidepressants (over 5 yrs) the doctors threw at me and nothing really worked so I just stopped them.
    I used to be someone who never really got nervous or scared about things..over the past few yrs I have anxiety over many stupid little things that shouldnt bother me,even meeting w/friends for dinner and sometimes break out in hives on my chest and back when my anxiety is bad.
    my weight fluctuates every couple months w/ no change in diet. I gain about 10 lbs and a month or so later I lose that plus maybe some more. (i am not a large person, so this usually goes unnoticed by most people)
    I have and have had bad menorrhagia for many yrs. but usually don’t get anything to stop the bleeding because I have a clotting disorder already and extra hormones puts me at higher risk for a clot.
    the list goes on…
    If my tsh was only .93 in May, why do I feel like someone with hypothyroidism? Maybe it’s just coincidence? I have a very slim neck and my enlarged thyroid is a tiny bit noticeable (by my endo and now me since she showed me) Why is this a “wait and see” disease? Why would they allow your thyroid gland to get bigger? It does’nt make sense.I would rather feel hyper than hypo any day, I have felt like crap for way too long.
    (fyi- i am 28 yrs old..going on 80) I have an appt with a new endo on Thursday but he works alongside with the last one I saw so I’m guessing he wont be of any help either and just a waste of another copay.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, the TSH test as the only thyroid test, and no treatment? ugh
      This is NOT a wait-and-see disease. The thyroid is one of the most
      important glands in the body. It regulates the entire metabolism, and when
      the thyroid is not functioning properly it can affect everything from
      adrenals, sex hormones, bones, circulation, hair, and weight, to energy,
      mental acuity, eyesight, and so on…

      Here is an article that might help you find a better doctor:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

      Here is the Hashimotos article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos

      Lots of great thyroid treatment info:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      Recommended tests:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      What the test results mean:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      There are a couple of thyroid groups that I think will benefit you:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones/

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless (co-mod has Hashis)

      I sincerely hope this info helps you.

  25. QUESTION:
    What is the normal TSH levels?
    I have hypothyroidism. Bloodwork came back0.09.

    • ANSWER:
      the normal TSH levels for a newborn are generally 3-20mIU/L and for an adult 0.4-4.5mIU/L.
      AACE (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists) set the new normal range to 0.3-3.0mIU/L

      It is usually done along with other thyroid tests like T4 test, T3 test and thyroid antibodies.
      to decide whether the patient has…. hyper (excess) or hypo(lower) thyroidism

  26. QUESTION:
    Normal Thyroid Levels?
    I was diagnosed with Grave’s Disease in January of this year. I underwent the radioactive iodine treatment I-131 to kill my thyroid in February. After a visit to the doctor this last week I found out that I am now hypothyroid with a TSH level of 36. They tell me that normal is .2 to 5.0. I have gained nearly 23 lbs in one month but they say that it is water retention.

    I’m assuming I still have the Graves Disease as I believe it never goes away. What are some of the symptoms of the hypothyrodism? My endocrinologist isn’t much help and tells me to research the internet for help instead of getting answers from her. How frustrating.

    My question is, my level seems awful high? How long does it take to get regulated once you are on synthroid? What are some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through the same thing about ten years ago. You still have Grave’s disease. I found that out for sure when I had serious eye problems from it years later. Most people end up hypo active after radio iodine. They’ll adjust your medicine to make your levels normal. I gained weight, had water retention, sleep a lot, and was crying over nothing until my dosage was straightened out. I was also cold, cold, cold. I still seem to have some mild symptoms of both conditions. I don’t know if it’s in my mind. I feel much more sane and healthy with normal thyroid levels. Be sure to let your doctor know any symptoms you’re having as they are adjusting the medicine. Don’t let them go by the “numbers” alone.

  27. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism – TSH back to normal?
    Was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in january when I was screened for lithium for my depression. Now my TSH levels are back in the normal range but I still feel unwell – fatigue etc. Have asked doc to refer me to a endcrinologist but he says that I a cured. Should I push for a referral? Also can I go onto lithium with my condition?

    • ANSWER:
      Your TSH can be in the normal range and you can still be hypothyroid. You need to be tested for antibodies, as well as T-3 Free and T-4 Free. A great website with lots of info is www.stopthethyroidmadness.com.

  28. QUESTION:
    What levels of TSH and t4 indicate a thyroid problem?
    I have had symptoms of hypothyroidism for several years that have recently been getting worse and want to know if my levels are normal or not. I am a young adult on birth control and my recent t4 level was 1.0 and my tsh level was 1.75. is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      As far as your levels are concerned they are considered “normal”. I have been going through getting diagnosed with hypothyroidism also. I suggest first of all go to stopthethyroidmadness.com and learn all you can about the disease, I am still researching. As of 2003 they changed the levels for diagnosis, but most labs and doctors still go by the old levels. The new levels are TSH 0.3-3.0, free T4 0.7-2.0 and free T-3 should be 2.3-4.2. I would suggest that you have your free T4 and free T3 checked along with your TSH. Also ask to have your ferritin levels checked. I was low on ferritin which is the protein in your blood and can lead to anemia if not corrected. Low ferritin levels can also make you very tired and experience hair loss. My ferritin was at 11 and most people feel good at 70-90 range. Make sure and find a doctor who does not just treat you by what the lab reports say, but will also treat you for your symptoms, because a thyroid problem can be hard to discover and many go left untreated because of so called “Normal” lab results.

      Wish you all the luck and hope this helps.

  29. QUESTION:
    Does hair grow back after it falls out from hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and i’ve lost almost all of my hair, it’s devastating, it upset me so much. Apparently my thyroid hormone levels are normal now and my tablets should be working but they aren’t. I’m taking evening primrose oil, bioton, and i’ve just using certain shampoos, nothing is working, and i’ve had no new hair growth :(

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    Are my TSH levels normal?
    I had hypothyroidism for two years, but my doctor says that it seems to have gone away. My TSH levels are 0.97 mIU/L. Is this really a healthy range? I am always tired, gain weight easily (I eat very healthy and work out for an hour every day). My hair is also very dry and brittle, and I have an enlarged pituitary glad without a tumor. I also have high levels of anxiety, as well as mild vertigo. Anyone have any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Normal values are 0.4 – 4.0 mIU/L.

      However, those without signs or symptoms of an underactive thyroid who have a TSH value over 2.0 mIU/L but normal T4 levels may develop hypothyroidism in the future. This is called subclinical hypothyroidism (mildly underactive thyroid) or early-stage hypothyroidism. Anyone with a TSH value above this level should be followed very closely by a doctor.

      If you are being treated for a thyroid disorder, your TSH level should be between 0.5 and 3.0 mIU/L.

      Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

      *What are your T3 and T4 values?

  31. QUESTION:
    Thyroid levels all out of wack please help me someone?
    I am 22 year old female who had a child 5 years ago and was diagnosed with lupus 5 years ago my ANA was 2000 points high and I have also test positive for those 4 qualifying things the RNA DRNA and whatever else but I did not have one of the four…. anyways I have chronic fatigue, arthritis, mouth and nose ulcers, and my hair falls out in a lot… But my ana last time it was tested was back in normal range but haven’t had it tested again in 2 years… but now to the thyroid… the doctor says i don’t have hashimoto and i don’t have the normal hypothyroidism or the hyperthyroidism… Is the lupus causing my body to attack my thyroid? I can’t get into a endocrinologist for 3 weeks and I am freaking out… Some suggestions please Thank You
    TSH reads 0.372 normal levels 0.400 – 5.500
    T3 is 1.67 normal range is 0.70 – 1.79
    T4 is 1.5 normal range 0.8 -1.8
    thyroglob ab 133.0 normal range 0 -60
    thyr perox ab is 217.0 normal range 0-60
    ultrasound- normal

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t know the answer but I hope someone else can, this sounds very worrying for you. Good luck.

  32. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism symptoms, normal tsh?
    I am 20 years old and have dealt with hypothryoid-type symptoms for the past 3 years. Symptoms started appearing about a 6 months to a year after a series a very bad nose bleeds so I’ve always felt that my problems stemmed from these nose bleeds. My symptoms include imparied cognitive ability (concentration/focus/memory/foggyness), dry skin, sensitive to cold weather, inability to gain weight/muscle mass, brittle hair, heart palpatations, sensitivity to light, and knee/joint pain (diagnosed tendonosis), and some other symptoms. Over the past six months, I have tried to figure out what is wrong with me because originally I didn’t percieve these symptoms as a problems. When I told the doctor about my symptoms, particularly the cognitive issues, he recommended I got so a psychologists for ADHD analysis.
    Well, since then I haven’t bothered with my GP because of frustration and have had several blood tests to hopes of finding something. Initially, I didn’t suspect or know about hypothryoidism. I’ve had my tesosterone and IGF levels checked and both came back normal, although testosterone was alittle low. Lately, after looking at possible underlying causes of dementia, I’ve read about hypothryoidism and can really relate to most if not all of the symptoms I read about. However, my TSH has been checked with all of my other blood work because I assume it is protocol these days. It came back at 1.5 which seems to be optimal. There is, however, other descrepancies in my blood work. My Neutrophil % is low, Lympocyte % high, low HDL (24, 19, 30, respectivley) and a high bilirubin count which my doctor called Gilbert Syndrome.

    Should I get my free t3 and free t4 levels checked or is TSH pretty realiable for diagnosing hypothryroidism? Any suggestions are appreciated…

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you should have the T3, Free T3, T4, Free T4 tests done. Sometimes a thyroid problem can still occur even in spite of a normal TSH level.

      I would recommend getting an opinion from a hormone specialist called an endocrinologist as well to see what they think could be going on.

  33. QUESTION:
    I have all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, but had a ‘normal’ blood test?!?
    I went to the doctor a week ago complaining of fatigue/fogginess, constipation, confusion/ forgetfulness, dry skin/ hair, and extremely low libido…… i even had nipple discharge (from only one breast, almost like colostrum). they took my blood and concluded that my results were normal, they didn’t tell me what ‘exactly’ they tested for… just said they were going to check my metabolism. i don’t know what sliding scale they are using as normal. but they also said that i had elevated cholesterol. my numbers were TOTAL CHOLESTEROL:214 TRIGLYCERIDES:201 LDL (bad cholesterol):123. this concerns me b/c i eat healthy, i mean really healthy… practically no red meat, rarely drink milk or eat cheese(constipation), barely any empty carbs, and i only cook using ‘healthy’ oils (i.e. canola and olive) and watch my trans fats and hydrogenated oils. i’ve read that hypothyroidism can cause elevated cholesterol levels….. my doctor seems to think my symptoms are just from being a mother of 2 toddlers, and hesitant on believing that i do indeed eat healthy…. WHAT CAN IT BE? i am tired of being tired, confused, and constipated. please help. BTW I am only 25. (and have no other medical conditions other than depression)
    okay, first off i am medicated for my depression; i take wellbutrin sr 150 twice daily. i was told it helped with low libido, but not on me. i have had these symptoms for about 3 months now; i get between 8-10 hrs of sleep a night; i watch what i eat, i eat oatmeal instead of sugary, processed cereal, basically the healthy option over the alternative,1% milk on occasion, and i exercise regularly (5-6 days a week) my doctor has since ordered a CBC, a guess it’s a complete blood test. i’ll update as i get more info.
    my hair has actually changed in texture…. it used to be poker straight now it’s wavy?! i used to never have to use any product in it, now i have to use a leave -in conditioner, frizz serum, and detangler. and it doesn’t have any body to it anymore. i have changed moisterizers too, i used to just apply cocoa butter and have a great complexion. now it seems as if my skin is paler and drier, i now use pure mineral oil on my skin. and it helps alot, i just have to keep applying often. oh and my anti-depressant is the only medicine that i am on, and i am not pregnant. i’m thinking of getting another doctor for a second opinion. thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Depression can absolutely cause fatigue, fogginess/confusion and low libido. Other than that, you have dry skin/hair and constipation, which are very common problems, and not necessarily symptoms of disease. Cholesterol is partly hereditary, it’s not just from your diet. Your body produces cholesterol on its own, and this depends on the activity of certain enzymes which are genetically variable. Because of the cholesterol and constipation, did your doctor talk to you about high-fiber foods to add to your diet?

      1. How long have you had these symptoms?
      2. What are the foods you eat the most?
      3. How much sleep do you get per night?
      4. How many calories would you say you eat daily?
      5. Are you being treated for your depression? If so, how?
      6. Describe your hair – texture, color, treatments. What do you do for dry skin?

      People in medical school learn from the newest versions of books that incorporate the latest understandings of scientific processes.

      I do not believe the poster below me has a firm grasp on endocrinology. There are multiple adrenal hormones, and they don’t all function the same. Beyond that, if they weren’t functioning properly, ACTH would be released from the pituitary, not TSH. Beyond that, TSH would only serve to increase thyroid hormones, not decrease. I don’t quite see how low thyroid function would cause inflammation, but regardless, inflammation would increase release of cortisol, not decrease. If you couldn’t convert cholesterol to pregnenolone, you’d die from lack of mineralocorticoid activity (you would lose huge amounts of fluid, your cardiac output would decrease, and you’d go into a shock-like state). Lastly, cortisol INHIBITS the conversion of T4 to T3 during times of stress. This is a problem in people who have elevated levels of cortisol.

      If you answer my questions I’ll be happy to try to help further. Do you happen to know the results of your thyroid screening tests?

      EDIT:
      Our TSH and thyroid hormone levels vary during the day and from day-to-day during the week. It’s possible that when you were tested, your TSH and T4 levels were within the normal range, but that the levels are abnormal at other times. As a result, on average, your tissue may have too little stimulation by thyroid hormone. Also, recent evidence suggests that the so-called “normal” ranges may be too wide. As a result, some people’s doctors may believe their test results are normal when in fact the patients are hypothyroid.

      In addition, you might have central hypothyroidism. In central hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is underactive. As a result, the blood level of thyroid hormone is too low, at least part of the time. But the cause of the underactive thyroid gland and low thyroid hormone level is not an abnormality of the thyroid gland. Instead, the cause is a dysfunction of the pituitary gland or hypothalamus. When a patient’s standard thyroid test results are normal, the doctor should always consider the possibility of central hypothyroidism. The best way to test for this form of hypothyroidism is the TRH stimulation test. With this test, we identify many patients who’re hypothyroid, although their standard thyroid test results are normal.

      2nd EDIT: A CBC is just a complete blood count, it counts all the types of cells in your blood (red blood cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils, etc). It’s mostly used to check for anemia, infection, blood cancers, and other diseases that affect the relative numbers of different types of cells in your blood.

      Based on what you’ve said, I agree with getting another opinion. I think at this point your doctor should be testing for more than a CBC. Before you do this, you should obtain a copy of all your lab tests so you know exactly what you were tested for. Sit down with your doctor and ask him clear, direct questions – “What could be causing my symptoms?” “What have we tested for?” “What else are you going to do to find out what’s wrong with me?” If you get answers like “It’s probably nothing” “We tested your metabolism and blood counts” “There’s nothing more to do” then it’s DEFINITELY time to get another doc.

      Good luck.

  34. QUESTION:
    Can you have thyroid problems even if your blood levels check normal?
    I am asking this because I am a 19 year old girl who has had horrible fatigue for years but no one has ever been able to find out why. I have always very swollen glands around my neck, and even had a few cysts on my thyroid at one point, but my blood level checked out to be normal. When I looked up the symptoms of hypothyroidism I had so many of the symptoms, except that I am a thin girl. Is it possible to have hypothyroidism and not to have it appear in blood tests? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You sure can. My first thyroid test came back as normal too, but 9 months later I finally got diagnosed. There are reasons for this. The standard test is called a TSH test. Unfortunately TSH is always changing throughout the day. TSH is highest while we sleep and lowest around 2PM. When you have TSH tested, do so first thing in the morning only while its still at its high point. That way if you are hypothyroid, there’s a better chance of catching it with the TSH test. Anothe problem with the TSH test is the range. Labs like Quest have it at 0.3 to 5.5. AACE recommended years ago that the range should be 0.3 to 3.0. If you are getting tested by Quest, the doctor may say you are fine with a TSH of 4 or even 5.

      I suggest next time you test, do it first thing in the morning and see if the doctor will also do a free t4, free t3, and an antibody test along with the TSH.

      Usually the conditio will show in a blood test, sometimes not the TSH. For some reason the TSH takes a long time to show you have hypothyroidism, but it eventually will show it in most people. I had almost every textbook symptom before my TSH went above the 5.5 at Quest.

  35. QUESTION:
    What TSH level is REALLY high as opposed to an average TSH level for Hypothyroidism?
    I realize that there isn’t really a average TSH level for someone with hypothyroidism, since everyone is different, but there must be some kind of scale.

    I know the ‘normal’ levels are 0.3-5 but what, roughly, is the highest you can have? Is it 20 or 40 or 100?

    I was tested and got a TSH level of 16, which seems like a ridiculously high number in comparison to .3-5.

    So, I want to put it in perspective as to what actually is really high, or the highest TSH levels for someone with hypothyroidism.

    It would be nice to know if I’m a severe case or just a ‘standard’ hypothyroid case.

    • ANSWER:
      yours is not really high at all, mine was 708 and i think thats about the highest anyones had but after a while on the meds i was fine so u will be too =D

  36. QUESTION:
    i have diagnose hypothyroidism couple of months and i am TTC of many years then my tsh level becom normal i am?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t really understand your question but there is often a link between hypothyroidism and difficulty conceiving. How that your thyroid levels are normal, it may be easier for you to conceive. Good luck!

  37. QUESTION:
    Anyone have pain and numbness in shoulder and arm due to hypothyroidism?
    For 2 weeks I have had horrible pain in my rotator cuff. A week after that the numbness set in. Its only on the right side. I was wondering if this could be due to my hypothyroidism. I am not on Synthroid but I am on Raw Thyroid. My levels are all within normal range.

    • ANSWER:
      I do not think there is a spot on my body that I have not had some pain at some time. I was not on anything (Synthroid or Armour) until recently due to not having funds.

      This may be something new however so you may need to have it checked.

      Blessings

  38. QUESTION:
    Can some symptoms of hypothyroidism remain while taking medication?
    I’m taking 125mcg thyroxine everyday, and blood test results show that thyroxine levels are normal while taking the tablets. I have a blood test every four months.

    The main symptom that I wanted to ask about were boils because, being a very hygienic person, I wondered if the thyroid problems could be the cause even with the tablets, because I know the two have been connected.

    • ANSWER:
      I am still having them although I am now on the meds. You said ‘normal’ … that would be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2).

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  39. QUESTION:
    Does adderall increase TSH levels in a blood test?
    I recently went to the doctor and she did some blood tests to check if I showed signs of hypothyroidism. The tests showed that my TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) levels are higher than normal. When these tests were done I was under the influence of adderall which I am not prescribed. Is adderall the reason for my increased TSH levels, or are these two things unrelated? Thanks.

    P.S. Please save any comments about adderall abuse. What goes into my body is my decision.

    • ANSWER:
      No comments on the adderall use except that it it is more likely to cause a decrease in TSH

  40. QUESTION:
    thyroid levels, are these normal?
    I’ve been dealing hypo thyroid issues since i was 19, I am now 41. My levels have never been out of normal before but when I began losing my hair and totally stopped having periods at age 26 I began taking meds for it. I’m currently taking levothyroxine 112.

    The past 6ish months I have been having symptoms of hypothyroidism. I gained 10 lbs in 3 months, I joined a gym and cut out some calories and fat but after 6 weeks of 4-5 one hour workouts a week I gained 5 more lbs. I’m tired all the time and don’t use the bathroom w out drinking large amounts of sugar free metamucil. I had my levels checked last week, TSH came back at .043, T4 was 1.16, and T3 was 92.

    The Dr. said my levels are right where he wants them. I think the TSH seems to be Hyper, but the others Hypo? I’m really frustrated and I can’t get into the endocrinologist until October. I don’t want to feel like crap for three more months. Has anyone else experienced this?

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    TTC w/ hypothyroidism, clomid?
    My husband and I have been TTC for over a year, since I found out about my hypothyroidism. My levels are now within a healthy range of 1.08-2.08 TSH anytime that I have been tested. I know I want to be closer to 1, but the meds are a little touchy to get just right. Anyway, I am going to get on clomid this cycle. I was wondering if anyone has been successful using clomid along with hypothyroidism, when your levels are normal. I have a friend that is in a similar situation to me and she got preggers the first try. I would love some more support to keep me positive. I keep hearing, “it will happen when it is suppose to.” I just wish that was sooner rather than later. I am 24 and we have been together for 5 years, married for 2. We would love to add to our already happy family. Any advice or experience would be greatly appreciated. I am currently on 75mcg of levothyroxine and we DTD every other day during CD 7-25, but then whenever we feel like it the rest of the month. :)
    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      This is the perfect community for support. I’m not sure about the hypothyroidism, but I used Clomid to conceive my first child and needless to say it was successful! I hear and read more sucess stories than I do ones that aren’t.

      I really didn’t have any side effects from Clomid first time around. I took it cycle days 5-9 and took ovulation prediction kits days 11- until I got a positive and have sex that day and the next 2 days…

      We are trying for no.2 right now, its a little more challenging with no. 2 though..

      Hope this helps! Good luck!

  42. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any information about hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism as a child, but grew out of it during my teenage years. Unfortunately, I grew out of it just enough to not be medicated anymore, but my hormone levels are still below normal. This is all the information I have from approximately ten years ago. How might I know if I should be retested? Furthermore, might this have any affect on my voice, as I am a professional singer? I am concerned about the reoccurance of the condition due to some of the typical symptoms (fatigue, unexplainable weight gain, etc….). Thank you so much!

    • ANSWER:
      The only sure way to see , is to have a COMPLETE thyroid panel done. If you think your levels are already below normal, you would need meds. And keep in mind that everybodys’ “normal” is not the same. My sister has a low “normal and shes not on meds. I have NO thyroid now, and don’t do good unless my levels are in the UPPER range of normal.

  43. QUESTION:
    I have been on Synthroid for a month, and now my thyroid levels are normal. why don’t i feel different?
    i feel the same as i did a month ago when i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism
    the tiredness is way more than normal; i sleep for at least 12 hours a day.
    also, i teach martial arts and watch what i eat, so weight loss should not be a problem

    • ANSWER:
      Two possible reasons:
      1) A month isn’t very long – it often takes several months for the thyroid medication to take full effect.
      2) I don’t know what your symptoms are, but they are usually things like tiredness, difficulty losing weight etc. A lot of people feel like this! It may be that the hypothyroidism was found by chance – i.e. it showed up in a blood test but it wasn’t the reason you’re not feeling great.

  44. QUESTION:
    Can I become pregnant with hypothyroidism?
    My TSH level is 5 , I am on Levothyroxine , how long will it take for the TSH level come to the normal level?

    • ANSWER:
      with a slight adjustment of the dose you will be fine and there will be no hindrance in getting pregnant.

  45. QUESTION:
    Please help me !!Normal Range for TSH levels? Is 4.470 very high, or just a little?
    My brother was born 2 months ago. He had a blood test.
    Last week, Doctor doubted he has Congenital Hypothyroidism because his TSH is 4.470.
    If it’s a problem, how to cure? PLease help me.
    I don’t feel comfortable these days. My brother was born when my mon was about 40 years old. Many people said it was not good to get a baby at this time. I hope my brother will be okay.

    • ANSWER:
      This TSH does fall in the “normal” range as far as most lab’s go. If your brother’s physicians are not concerned with this value then do not worry about it at this time. I am wondering if he is experiencing any other symptoms that are making you doubt this physician’s determination. One problem with the TSH results can be this – there are lab ranges in place to show what is “normal” and what is “not normal”. However, a thyroid patient who had a borderline TSH (either way – high or low) could feel good or bad even if their levels are technically in the opposite range. For example, I know someone who is HYPOthyroid, but feels her best when her TSH is just slightly elevated. Look at any other symptoms your brother may have to see if you, your parents & physicians feel there is a need to re-test him at a later time. I would also check for pituitary function. Things to keep an eye out for are a puffy face, swollen tongue, and extreme sleepiness.

  46. QUESTION:
    I took 25 mcg of synthroid a day not knowing my thyroid levels were back to normal!?
    I was on synthroid because a blood test said I was hypothyroid. The thing is that it was months before I got the results because they sent the results to the wrong house. In the mean time I stopped taking a medicine that was (I know now) the cause of the hypothyroidism.

    He gave me 25 mcg. Now this was after so my t4 levels had returned to normal. which leaves me 25 mcg a day for 6 weeks overdosed.

    Anyways I feel really dizzy and tired all the time and I stopped taking the meds on the 30th of march. SO thats 9 days without it and I still feel dizzy and lethargic.

    Is it going to go away?

    What’s happened to me?
    @ curious : The half life of synthroid can be up to to 10 days.

    • ANSWER:

  47. QUESTION:
    Can i get pregnant with Hypothyroidism and irregular periods ?
    I have been having irregular periods since teenager. Moreover recently found that i have Hypothyroidism, im taking Thyroxine. Its been a year since im married and I love to have a baby. The Thyroid level is never normal, im struggling hard to keep it normal. Doctor said that the Hormones and Ovaries are normal. She said that the Ovarie is not releasing at the correct time. Please kindly give me an answer for this question

    • ANSWER:
      My wife is 37 and has had Hypothyroidism since age 8.

      She said that Hypothyroidism is a non-issue concerning getting pregnant. They are not related.

      However, the fact that you are stressed over keeping your thyroid levels in check plus the fact that weight gain and loss can be so unpredictable may explain some of the reason your cycle is out of sync.

      Good Luck and try to Relax…..God knows when that little one should get here….even if it takes some medical help from your doctor.

  48. QUESTION:
    Can prolonged crash dieting cause hypothyroidism?
    I am only 15 years old.Last year,I tried to lose weight by eating only very little calories and skipping meals.Months ago,my blood test result showed that I have hypothyroidism with borderline normal T4 and very low T3 level.I feel so regretful for screwing up my own body.Can I reverse the effects?please help me.thx

    • ANSWER:
      Low T3 is not necessarily a sign of hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests can be abnormal in people who have other illnesses, or who have something else major going on with their body, such as a lot of weight loss. This doesn’t mean there is actually something wrong with the thyroid – it’s just something you see when someone is ill. A big percentage of people in hospital, for example, would have abnormal thyroid tests if you tested them all. Once you get better and get back to a normal, healthy weight and lifestyle, the results will probably get back to normal. (hypothyroidism is almost always diagnosed using a TSH test – not T4 or T3)

  49. QUESTION:
    tsh level of 3.47…….. hypothyroidism?
    I’m 23, and hypothyroidism runs all through my family. I started having some symptoms…. sensitivity to cold, being tired all the time, hair loss, and mood change. Got my tsh level tested and it came back at 3.47. My doctor said she usually doesn’t prescribe medicine for it unless your levels are above 4. I don’t understand. I feel like maybe a small dose of something like synthroid would make me feel better. Is anyone with a tsh level around the same as mine being treated for hypothryoidism or is 3.47 a pretty normal level?

    • ANSWER:

  50. QUESTION:
    Can being on the low side of normal with hypothyroidism be too low for some?
    I recently had an blood test and my thyroid levels were abnormal. They didn’t say low but that is what I have been expecting. I have always been on a very healthy diet and exercise nearly everyday but I have gained nearly 30 pounds in two years. I have to stay below 1200 calories a day to not continue gaining. I have absolutely no energy and have no tolerance for cold, as well as other symptoms, dry skin, legs swelling, brittle hair and nails. My real question is, if my doctor determines that I am just on the low side of normal and doesn’t put me on meds, can normal still be too low for some?
    another detail, I have been on high cholesterol meds for over a year, and I just turned 23.

    • ANSWER:


Hypothyroidism Normal Blood Levels

Hypothyroidism is an endocrine disorder characterized by low production of thyroid hormone. This is sometimes called thyroid hormone deficiency. It greatly affects women more than men, usually at ages between thirty five and sixty; however, it can occur in all ages at different stages of life. Women sometimes develop hypothyroidism after pregnancy, a condition called postpartum hypothyroidism, and is believed to be associated with postpartum depression.

Thyroid hormone is produced by thyroid gland. It circulates throughout the human body, and it plays an essential role in developing and differentiating all cells of the body. There are different types of thyroid hormones, all of which function mainly in regulating the metabolism.

Postpartum hypothyroidism develops within 4 to 12 months after childbirth and typically resolves without treatment. However, when symptoms are persistent, you must consult your doctor for proper medication. There is no need to worry though as this condition is not life threatening. The signs and symptoms to watch for include goiter or swelling of the thyroid gland, weight gain, hoarseness of voice, constipation, increased cold sensitivity, muscle cramping, fatigue, and depression.

During pregnancy, human gonadotropin (hCG) and estrogen levels increase. The hCG produced as the conceptus implants into the uterine lining rises in the early stage of pregnancy. This hormone stimulates the thyroid gland to generate more thyroid hormones. On the other hand, estrogen produced mainly by the placenta also increases, which in turn generates higher levels of thyroid-binding globulin. This protein acts as a carrier of the thyroid hormone into the bloodstream. This mechanism normally happens during pregnancy to aid in the babys development.

One to eight months after delivery, the mother is said to be in the preliminary hyperthyroid state wherein there is very high level of thyroid hormones in the blood. The normal functioning of the gland usually goes back to normal after this. However, in the case of lymphocytic thyroiditis, the gland enters into a hypothyroid state. Lymphocytic thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease wherein there is inflammation of the thyroid gland due to the lymphocytes infiltrating into the gland. It then alters the function of the gland, thus producing less thyroid hormones.

Since the main function of the thyroid hormone is to regulate metabolism, less amount of it leads to low energy among women who just gave birth. Thus, they may be sleeping too much but still wake up feeling unrefreshed. Hypothyroidism after pregnancy also causes the new mothers to gain more weight even with proper diet and exercise because their bodies are no longer able to process the extra calories. As a result, their moods may be affected. Due to the degree of mood change and fatigue experienced by women after delivery, they may end up being in a depressed state characterized by feelings of sadness and hopelessness, sense of worthlessness and guilt, lack of interest in taking care of the baby, appetite disturbance, mood swings, and anxiety.

Women experiencing the aforementioned signs and symptoms of postpartum hypothyroidism should consult their doctors to undergo diagnostic testing such as blood tests. In some cases, they may undergo an ultrasound to determine the presence of an enlarged thyroid gland. The treatment depends on the underlying cause and the severity of the condition. In mild cases, it would just resolve on its own after 4 months to a year. However, hormone replacement therapy may sometimes be needed. In severe cases, permanent hypothyroidism after pregnancy may occur if the thyroid gland is too damaged to regain its normal function. Therefore, ongoing monitoring and lifelong treatment will be required.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have many symptoms (getting worse) of hypothyroidism but, my blood test are normal…what can I do?
    A few years ago, I had a tumor on my thyroid and had 1/2 removed. Before haveing it removed I had many symptoms of hypothyroidism (hair falling out, very dry skin, weight gain, foggyness, constipation, always feeling tired even first thing in the morning) but, blood test always came back normal. Most doctors did not even feel my neck to notice I had a goiter. Now several years later my symptoms have increased I now have bumps all down my arms, I am growing hair on my navel & chin, my weight is continueing to rise. I have tried everything. I even fasted for 3 weeks and was shocked to see my weight unchanged. I go to the doctor and my blood levels are still normal and I just feel like I can not get help. I have an appointment tomarrow to check the blood test again…What should I be asking or telling my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a mild thyroid problem which had started during my puberty years, more than 20 years ago. The thyroid lump was so small, it
      was not visually perceptible. I could only feel it as a small solid bone, when I touch the front of the throat , and also had to chew a good number of times, before swallowing food, and became
      a slow eater. The doctors were then dismissive about my problem for 2 main reasons — one, thyroid tests were were quite dicey and so was thyroid treatment; two, during puberty years, many undergo hormonal changes which take a little time to stabilize. However, the fallouts of having thyroid ( I realized only in recent years), had led to very severe
      gumpain, and hair loss, though I did not have any weight problems, and having endured these persistent stresses for very many years, led to chronic fatigue and stiffness
      in the neck. It was in the process of using yoga to relieve my
      stiffness problems, that I discovered that my neck muscles
      were squeeze dried over the years gradually due to the
      frontal compression of the persistent (although, mild) thyroid problem (in fact, my blood test showed the thyroid hormones were within the statistical limits and were pronounced ‘normal’,
      though I felt like having a small pebble in the middle of the throat).
      I undertook yoga seriously, to stretch all parts of the body
      (not just my neck) very sloooooowly for several hours
      everyday (it is 4 years now), and I found with improved blood circulation,
      I was able to relieve the tensions in the neck and my
      thyroid functioning has stabilized very well, so much so
      I dont have any lump and feel my throat has been emptied out. My body is much lighter.

      People suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome often
      have carried thyroid problems for long, and yoga has been
      found to be extremely beneficial, recent research suggests. It sloowly, but very
      surely restores the body to get back to its comfortable state.
      Very sloooooow stretching, with spinal twists will immensely
      help.

  2. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism? even with normal TSH levels?
    hi guys so im a 24 yr old male in good health except for this

    ive been having these symptons for a few months and finally decided to go to the doctor to get checked out, basically i have;

    shaky hands,
    fast heart beat,
    sweating of palms,
    trouble sleeping,
    nervous,
    moody (quietness)

    so basically the doctor did a bllod test for TSH levels and the results came back normal 4.46, but he wreckons that i still may have hypothroidism so hes done more blood tests and ive to go to a radiologist this week for ultra sound on the thyroid.

    my question is is it possible to have hypothroidism even with normal TSH levels ? and also all my symptons seem more related to hyperthroidism not hypothyroidism.

    Another thing is that the doctor is doing a blood sugar level test to test for diabities can this also be a sympton of hypothyroidism?

    anyone got any info?

    • ANSWER:
      4.46 is not normal. It indicates hypothyroidism.

      But your symptoms indicate hyperthyroidism.

      Yours is a very perplexing case, and you need to make sure you have a very good doctor who is able and willing to get to the bottom of this. You need more blood tests for a definitive diagnosis. Then you need to have the TSH vs. symptoms conflict explained. You need free T3, free T4, TSI, TPO.

      You may find that you have something completely unrelated to your thyroid going on.

      Diabetes is not a symptom of hypothyroidism.

  3. QUESTION:
    Can you have thyroid problems even if your blood levels check normal?
    I am asking this because I am a 19 year old girl who has had horrible fatigue for years but no one has ever been able to find out why. I have always very swollen glands around my neck, and even had a few cysts on my thyroid at one point, but my blood level checked out to be normal. When I looked up the symptoms of hypothyroidism I had so many of the symptoms, except that I am a thin girl. Is it possible to have hypothyroidism and not to have it appear in blood tests? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You sure can. My first thyroid test came back as normal too, but 9 months later I finally got diagnosed. There are reasons for this. The standard test is called a TSH test. Unfortunately TSH is always changing throughout the day. TSH is highest while we sleep and lowest around 2PM. When you have TSH tested, do so first thing in the morning only while its still at its high point. That way if you are hypothyroid, there’s a better chance of catching it with the TSH test. Anothe problem with the TSH test is the range. Labs like Quest have it at 0.3 to 5.5. AACE recommended years ago that the range should be 0.3 to 3.0. If you are getting tested by Quest, the doctor may say you are fine with a TSH of 4 or even 5.

      I suggest next time you test, do it first thing in the morning and see if the doctor will also do a free t4, free t3, and an antibody test along with the TSH.

      Usually the conditio will show in a blood test, sometimes not the TSH. For some reason the TSH takes a long time to show you have hypothyroidism, but it eventually will show it in most people. I had almost every textbook symptom before my TSH went above the 5.5 at Quest.

  4. QUESTION:
    Still have some symptoms of hypothyroidism despite normal TSH , T3 and T 4 levels?
    I am on replacement thyroxine since 2002 and have normal TSH,. T3 and T 4 yet still have some symptoms of hypothyroidism
    mainly,
    1) Heavy prolonged periods which are sometimes irregular.(late or early)
    2) Memory loss
    3) Unable to lose weight
    4) Tiredness
    5) Low iron levels
    6) Sore joints
    7) Foggy mind
    8) Depression

    Why is this so?
    Ive even had my meds increased(still withiin good rang in blood levels)

    • ANSWER:
      This is something you need to take up with your endocrinologist. I urge you to do so.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, but had a ‘normal’ blood test?!?
    I went to the doctor a week ago complaining of fatigue/fogginess, constipation, confusion/ forgetfulness, dry skin/ hair, and extremely low libido…… i even had nipple discharge (from only one breast, almost like colostrum). they took my blood and concluded that my results were normal, they didn’t tell me what ‘exactly’ they tested for… just said they were going to check my metabolism. i don’t know what sliding scale they are using as normal. but they also said that i had elevated cholesterol. my numbers were TOTAL CHOLESTEROL:214 TRIGLYCERIDES:201 LDL (bad cholesterol):123. this concerns me b/c i eat healthy, i mean really healthy… practically no red meat, rarely drink milk or eat cheese(constipation), barely any empty carbs, and i only cook using ‘healthy’ oils (i.e. canola and olive) and watch my trans fats and hydrogenated oils. i’ve read that hypothyroidism can cause elevated cholesterol levels….. my doctor seems to think my symptoms are just from being a mother of 2 toddlers, and hesitant on believing that i do indeed eat healthy…. WHAT CAN IT BE? i am tired of being tired, confused, and constipated. please help. BTW I am only 25. (and have no other medical conditions other than depression)
    okay, first off i am medicated for my depression; i take wellbutrin sr 150 twice daily. i was told it helped with low libido, but not on me. i have had these symptoms for about 3 months now; i get between 8-10 hrs of sleep a night; i watch what i eat, i eat oatmeal instead of sugary, processed cereal, basically the healthy option over the alternative,1% milk on occasion, and i exercise regularly (5-6 days a week) my doctor has since ordered a CBC, a guess it’s a complete blood test. i’ll update as i get more info.
    my hair has actually changed in texture…. it used to be poker straight now it’s wavy?! i used to never have to use any product in it, now i have to use a leave -in conditioner, frizz serum, and detangler. and it doesn’t have any body to it anymore. i have changed moisterizers too, i used to just apply cocoa butter and have a great complexion. now it seems as if my skin is paler and drier, i now use pure mineral oil on my skin. and it helps alot, i just have to keep applying often. oh and my anti-depressant is the only medicine that i am on, and i am not pregnant. i’m thinking of getting another doctor for a second opinion. thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Depression can absolutely cause fatigue, fogginess/confusion and low libido. Other than that, you have dry skin/hair and constipation, which are very common problems, and not necessarily symptoms of disease. Cholesterol is partly hereditary, it’s not just from your diet. Your body produces cholesterol on its own, and this depends on the activity of certain enzymes which are genetically variable. Because of the cholesterol and constipation, did your doctor talk to you about high-fiber foods to add to your diet?

      1. How long have you had these symptoms?
      2. What are the foods you eat the most?
      3. How much sleep do you get per night?
      4. How many calories would you say you eat daily?
      5. Are you being treated for your depression? If so, how?
      6. Describe your hair – texture, color, treatments. What do you do for dry skin?

      People in medical school learn from the newest versions of books that incorporate the latest understandings of scientific processes.

      I do not believe the poster below me has a firm grasp on endocrinology. There are multiple adrenal hormones, and they don’t all function the same. Beyond that, if they weren’t functioning properly, ACTH would be released from the pituitary, not TSH. Beyond that, TSH would only serve to increase thyroid hormones, not decrease. I don’t quite see how low thyroid function would cause inflammation, but regardless, inflammation would increase release of cortisol, not decrease. If you couldn’t convert cholesterol to pregnenolone, you’d die from lack of mineralocorticoid activity (you would lose huge amounts of fluid, your cardiac output would decrease, and you’d go into a shock-like state). Lastly, cortisol INHIBITS the conversion of T4 to T3 during times of stress. This is a problem in people who have elevated levels of cortisol.

      If you answer my questions I’ll be happy to try to help further. Do you happen to know the results of your thyroid screening tests?

      EDIT:
      Our TSH and thyroid hormone levels vary during the day and from day-to-day during the week. It’s possible that when you were tested, your TSH and T4 levels were within the normal range, but that the levels are abnormal at other times. As a result, on average, your tissue may have too little stimulation by thyroid hormone. Also, recent evidence suggests that the so-called “normal” ranges may be too wide. As a result, some people’s doctors may believe their test results are normal when in fact the patients are hypothyroid.

      In addition, you might have central hypothyroidism. In central hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is underactive. As a result, the blood level of thyroid hormone is too low, at least part of the time. But the cause of the underactive thyroid gland and low thyroid hormone level is not an abnormality of the thyroid gland. Instead, the cause is a dysfunction of the pituitary gland or hypothalamus. When a patient’s standard thyroid test results are normal, the doctor should always consider the possibility of central hypothyroidism. The best way to test for this form of hypothyroidism is the TRH stimulation test. With this test, we identify many patients who’re hypothyroid, although their standard thyroid test results are normal.

      2nd EDIT: A CBC is just a complete blood count, it counts all the types of cells in your blood (red blood cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils, etc). It’s mostly used to check for anemia, infection, blood cancers, and other diseases that affect the relative numbers of different types of cells in your blood.

      Based on what you’ve said, I agree with getting another opinion. I think at this point your doctor should be testing for more than a CBC. Before you do this, you should obtain a copy of all your lab tests so you know exactly what you were tested for. Sit down with your doctor and ask him clear, direct questions – “What could be causing my symptoms?” “What have we tested for?” “What else are you going to do to find out what’s wrong with me?” If you get answers like “It’s probably nothing” “We tested your metabolism and blood counts” “There’s nothing more to do” then it’s DEFINITELY time to get another doc.

      Good luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    can hypothyroidism cause high blood pressure?
    i have not been diagnosed by my endocrinologist yet (i’m going at 12pm today) but my blood work has shown a high TSH level that suggests hypothyroidism and i have had thyroid issues in the past so i probably do have hypothyroidism.

    i have been tracking my BP lately and it seems like its been extremely high. (yesterday it was 140/103!) but my pulse is fairly normal and even just slightly low for me personally. its between 70-80.

    so can hypothyroidism cause high BP and normal pulse?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m heading to the doctor tomorrow, but I was at the emergency room Friday night with extremely high blood pressure, as high as 214/109. Very unusual for me. Of course, they thought some of it was caused by anxiety from being upset about my high blood pressure. Then they checked my thyroid and called me two days later and said it is elevated and that could have a cause towards the high blood pressure, not that high blood pressure, but it can contribute to it. I’ll find out more about it tomorrow.

  7. QUESTION:
    Does adderall increase TSH levels in a blood test?
    I recently went to the doctor and she did some blood tests to check if I showed signs of hypothyroidism. The tests showed that my TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) levels are higher than normal. When these tests were done I was under the influence of adderall which I am not prescribed. Is adderall the reason for my increased TSH levels, or are these two things unrelated? Thanks.

    P.S. Please save any comments about adderall abuse. What goes into my body is my decision.

    • ANSWER:
      No comments on the adderall use except that it it is more likely to cause a decrease in TSH

  8. QUESTION:
    TSH Levels-Hypothyroidism?
    A few days ago I received some test results from a routine blood test and my TSH levels were 5 above normal with a normal T4. I have no prior medical conditions though lately I can not tolerate heat to the point I pass out if I do not leave the room. (Other than that I haven’t felt sick at all) Is it possible to still have Hypothyroidism with a normal T4? And isn’t one supposed to be intolerant to cold?

    Thanks, Goodyear

    • ANSWER:
      A high TSH and normal or even low T4 are found in transitory hypothyroidism. A less common symptom is heat intolerance instead of cold sensitivity. Your doctor may want to follow up with a retest in the near future. I strongly suggest that you discuss this with your doctor.

  9. QUESTION:
    Anyone treated for hypothyroidism but still have symptoms?
    I have been on levothyroxine for 15 years now and never have any energy…my blood levels are are in the normal range but I just recently had dosage increased so we can lower tsh to a 1 or 2, its at 3.4 now. Anyone else still symptomatic with normal levels?

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    What to make of my Blood Glucose Levels?
    So I went in for testing to see if i had hypothyroidism and I ended up being told I have Hypoglycemia. It was a bit of a shock to say the least, but not too much. They said the test results showed my levels were at 59 (I did have a little to eat but not much due to it had to be fasting).

    Last night I was having fun at a party, drank like 6 sodas straight in a row, had a 2 shots of hard liquor and had tons of heavy greasy bad unhealthy foods. While I was having fun I started actually feeling extremely faint and unable to walk and uncoordinated and was hardly able to communicate. I thought i might have been drugged, but a girl happened to be there was an in-home nurse and she checked my blood glucose levels. After all that food, it was at 90. She said it was a little low ( I just found out the diagnosis hours ago today so she didnt know) and I went home and she said to have something to eat and drink and go to sleep.

    So after I got home from being diagnosed, I was given a blood glucose monitor thing and I decided to check my levels since it had been 2 hours since I ate a frozen tv dinner of shrimp scampi. It was at 95. Im like “Cool, not 59.” so I go about my day for 2 more hours and I get a headache and dizzy and I check it again just to see and it went all the way up to 112. Without having ate or drank anything. So How can i be Hypoglycemic if its going up to normal levels? Im confused whats going on? Should I be worried i get more ill when they are higher than they are lower? I mean the day they tested and it was 59 I felt better than today when its 112. And last night I was completely out of it (and it couldnt be the alcohol since it was only 2 shots at most) it was at a level of 90.

    They say to be eating every 3 hours , but should I eat if its higher? Is this a bad or good sign? I know when its lower i need to eat something but if its high should I skip a meal? What does this all mean? My blood glucose levels are CONFUSING with my diagnosis!
    My doctor has not put me on any medication, they want me to regulate it by dietary changes and exercise and hope that helps, and if not, then they will do medications
    And fyi the first two responses have got to be the same person, and spammers that want my computer infected. Signed up on the same date, almost same amount of questions answered, no best answers. So shut it.
    Now i found out why they were skyrocketing when i wanst eating or drinking anything

    I have a cold.

    Apparently colds affect blood sugars.

    No, ive definitely been diagnosed with hypoglycemia because theyve done fasting and non fasting tests, its in my family history and i developed gestational diabetes with my child.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Brandee W,

      I feel you were hypoglycemic when you were tested. I do not feel you are hypoglycemic now. When we fast we all become hypoglycemic. If we eat a large amount of sugars we excrete the excess of sugar through the kidneys (when this happens we do not get classified as diabetics). High blood sugar is called hyperglycemia. It can result in excess sugar being excreted through the kidneys in normal people because the renal threshold is passed. Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia – this can happen to non-diabetics when they have not eaten. This is what happened to you.

  11. QUESTION:
    how long does it take to achieve normal thyroid levels?
    Recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Been placed on medication for past two weeks. Still showing symptons of hypothyroidism. I’m a type two Diabetic and have not been able to control my blood sugar even though I follow diet, exercise daily and take medications.

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve been taking Synthroid for 13 weeks, and I still have HypoT symptoms. The first 6 weeks, I took 25 mcg a day. After that I increased to 75 mcg., and within two weeks, my hair started to fall out! I spoke to my MD a few days ago, and I told her how frustrated I’m getting. She told me that I need to be patient until we find the right dosage, but I can’t help but wonder if I’ll ever feel good. She told me that the first year of treatment will be frustrating…and so far she’s right. I’m trying to be optimistic about this whole thing.

      I’ve been reading about HypoT ever since being diagnosed, and from what I’ve read, the average dosage that most people seem to stablize on is 100 or 125 mcg.

      I don’t know what type of diet you have, but I know I look and feel my best when I keep my carbs low.

  12. QUESTION:
    Is my iron levels low or normal?
    My iron level showed on my blood test it was 20 ug/dL.
    ive also got hypothyroidism and im on thyroxine but at the same time he prescribed me 100mg ferrous sulphate he said that would help with hair loss but my iron levels were normal.. ive been taking it for now 3 months should my iron levels be checked again?

    Btw im a female 17 yr old.:)

    • ANSWER:
      I have low iron levels too. My doctor said I can stop taking tablets when it reaches 100. It was 13 when I started (and I was 17 too). It was 30 six months later. I’d say that 20 is pretty low (unless I have different measurements to you, I didn’t take notice of the ug/dL part). Are you tired all the time? Do you seem pale? I got my iron checked again a couple of months ago after six months, so maybe you could wait a bit longer, or if you’re concerned you could probably do it now. Just ask your doctor.

  13. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism: TSH Levels?
    I recently got the results of some blood tests back. One of them was for my Thyroid my TSH level was at 3.5. My doctor said this was normal and that I didn’t have a problem with my thyroid. Infact the only thing that showed up was quite bad anemia with hemoglobin and 10.2, No stored levels of ferritin and also low red blood cell count and the red blood cells are also too small.

    I feel I have many of the symptoms of Hypothyroidism such as :
    feeling tired and sleeping a lot
    feeling the cold easily
    dry and/or pale skin
    coarse, thinning hair
    sore muscles, slow movements and weakness
    a hoarse or croaky voice
    depression
    problems with memory and concentration
    fairly dramatic weight gain
    constipation
    heavy, irregular or prolonged menstrual periods
    light sensitivity, dizzy spells, palpitations
    I could go on. Is it possible that I could be Hypothyroid and still have TSH levels in the normal range?

    • ANSWER:
      symptoms

      Sudden weight loss, even when your appetite and food intake remain normal or increase
      Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) — commonly more than 100 beats a minute — irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) or pounding of your heart (palpitations)
      Nervousness, anxiety or anxiety attacks, irritability
      Tremor — usually a fine trembling in your hands and fingers
      Sweating
      Changes in menstrual patterns
      Increased sensitivity to heat
      Changes in bowel patterns, especially more frequent bowel movements
      An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), which may appear as a swelling at the base of your neck
      Fatigue, muscle weakness
      Difficulty sleeping

      is your thyroid gland inflammed

      Thyroiditis. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis).

  14. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism, What can the effect of really high TSH levels have?
    The last time I got a blood test my TSH level was at 287!!! And normal thyroids function between 1 and 5! The doctor said that she had never seen thyroid levels in someone who was still walking and talking. But they did not even increase my Synthroid. All i know is that I am tired all the time. I am sick all the time. I don’t eat anything but still am gaining weight like crazy and bounce back in forth from being catatonic to an insomniac. I know these are all normal for hypothyroidism, but I am really scared. I go to college and take care of my grandmother but if something doesn’t change, I will not be able to do either anymore. I barely have the ability to shower every couple of days and makes sure I don’t starve myself.
    Yea, i went to an endocrinologist when I was 9, after my initial diagnosis. But now because of my insurance, they will not send me unless htey have “exhausted traditional methods” first. I think that after taking the medicine and still having such high levels, That traditional methods are obviously not working.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow go to an endocrinologist, mine was 27 right after I gave birth and they sent me to my endocrinologist. I am tired all the time, how are you functioning are you gaining weight, that normally is the first side effect I see. Good luck they need to up your synthroid how much do you take?

  15. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven’t changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don’t wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  16. QUESTION:
    Is there a correlation between low blood sugar and hypothyroidism?
    I have a non-functioning thyroid (had hyperthyroidism and the radioactive iodine treatment and am now hypothyroid) and my TSH levels are in the normal range. It was 1.25 My blood pressure was 90/53, and I usually run lower than the “norm”

    I keep having symptoms of low blood sugar and had a bunch of tests done by my doctor. I have a daughter who is a Type 1 Diabetic, so I also check myself on her meter when I am not feeling well. My numbers are usually between 61-68 when I am feeling low. My doctor says 65 is in the normal range. I know for my daughter, her range is 70-100 and lower than 70 is considered too low.

    The doctor originally suspected an insulinoma when I saw him 6 months ago and the testing then came back normal. A week ago, they did a fasting and PP insulin test on me, along with InsW and C-Peptide. I still haven’t gotten the result of the fasting (checked on daughter’s meter and it was 67 about 30 minutes before I had my blood drawn) and the PP was 80. My C-Peptide was 0.8 (lowest normal on the reference range) and the InsW was 2.5. They also did an A1C on me which was 4.8.

    I’m not sure if the blood sugar issues have anything to do with the hypothyroidism, as they are both autoimmune. My doctor doesn’t seem to be worried, but I have been experiencing what are low blood sugars to me (including all of the hypo symptoms) for about six months. Should I request other tests to be done as well to try to figure out why I keep having lower blood sugar?

    I’m really confused and want to be sure there isn’t something more serious going on. Thanks in advance for any help!

    • ANSWER:
      Connection between thyroid disease and diabetes:

      “To counteract this lack of awareness, and encourage Americans to uncover their family health history to discover their at-risk medical conditions, AACE is launching a new campaign, “The Neck’s Generation: Thyroid Genealogy,” to educate the public about the genetic links associated with thyroid disease. Research shows that there is a strong genetic link between thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases including certain types of diabetes, anemia and arthritis (2). In fact, thyroid disease affects more than 13 million Americans, yet more than half remain undiagnosed.(3)”

      and…

      “The Diabetes-Thyroid Connection

      AACE’s survey found that 79 percent of Americans did not know there is a connection between diabetes and thyroid disease(6). In fact, fifteen to 20 percent of diabetics and their siblings or parents are at a greater risk of presenting with thyroid disease compared to 4.5 percent of the general population(7).”

      http://thyroid.about.com/library/news/blneckgen.htm

      and…

      “Diabetic patients have a higher prevalence of thyroid disorders compared with the normal population (Table 1). Because patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that up to 30% of female type 1 diabetic patients have thyroid disease. The rate of postpartum thyroiditis in diabetic patients is three times that in normal women. A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder.” http://journal.diabetes.org/clinicaldiabetes/v18n12000/Pg38.htm

  17. QUESTION:
    People with hypothyroidism; does treatment work for you?
    I have been diagnosed with an under active thyroid for about 7 years now and I am still really tired. I am on 150mg thyroxine daily and my blood levels are normal. Is being tired just a part of having hypothyroidism even with the correct treatment and something you just have to put up with? I sleep 12 hours most nights (before medication I was practically hibernating) and I am tired during the day. I have been waiting and putting things on hold so I can get back to how I was before with a normal thyroid. Do you feel like your life is not the same since having an under active thyroid? Is there anything that helps you get more energy? Thanks, all advice appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same and i went through 2 horrific years before i finally felt myself again.. Its a long hard road being in range means nothing as it might not suit your body my dr wants to keep me on 150mcgs but it makes me VERY overactive i still stay in range (just) but i can not tolerate it so im back to 125mcgs, it took a while and you have to be on the same dose for ages and finally your body will catch up and heal… mind dont take any other pills with your thyroxine as it interferes with the thyroxine, dont eat till at least 1 hour after taking it,and stay away from all goitrogens… Also its better to slowly work your way up the dose like 25mcg at a time, Hope you feel better soon, i feel like i was robbed those 2 years but it does get better..

  18. QUESTION:
    My doctor said my thyroid levels are higher than normal?
    I went to the doctor a few days ago. They got some blood from me and sent it to be tested. Today my doctor called and said my thyroid levels are a little high. He is going to send me to a endocrinologist. What will they do to get my levels back to normal? The strange thing is I gained weight and have been unable to lose it. So I thought I had hypothyroidism. But my levels are high instead of low. This has me a little confused. If by chance you are someone who has hyperthyroidism, tell me about your experience with it. Thanks for your help :)

    • ANSWER:
      The high ‘level’ most likely is TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and does mean hypO rather than hypER and you will most likely be prescribed Synthroid to bring it down (.2 – 3 hopefully)…..go to Yahoo Groups & you will find some excellent ones there to join and get good answers. Members will tell you HOW to take the meds and WHEN to….of course your doctor should too. Prayerfully yours…many blessings

  19. QUESTION:
    Can some symptoms of hypothyroidism remain while taking medication?
    I’m taking 125mcg thyroxine everyday, and blood test results show that thyroxine levels are normal while taking the tablets. I have a blood test every four months.

    The main symptom that I wanted to ask about were boils because, being a very hygienic person, I wondered if the thyroid problems could be the cause even with the tablets, because I know the two have been connected.

    • ANSWER:
      I am still having them although I am now on the meds. You said ‘normal’ … that would be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2).

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  20. QUESTION:
    Thyroid blood levels?
    Okay here they are:
    TSH, 3rd generation: 5.39 (Ref range: 0.40-4.50)
    T4, Free: 1.0 (Ref range: 0.8-1.8)
    T3, Free: 308 (ref range: 230-420)

    I have hashimotos, now it looks like it has turned into hypothyroidism. My question is how much synthroid do you think i should be on?
    Also I am extremely concerned about infertility. So as long as I keep the thyroid levels controlled with meds I should be able to reproduce right? (well given that everything else is normal)

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    Thinning hair and severe fatigue help!?
    I have always had thick hair that grew
    quickly and lots of energy, but ever since the summer things have been bad I’ve been experiencing abnormal fatigue and no matter what I take or do, it never goes away. My hair has thinned substantially, and my hair falls out frequently just when I touch it. I’m irratable to cold and my memory and concentration have gotten bad, I’ve been taking GNC hair skin and nails treatment And using less heat on my hair, but nothing. I’ve been to the doctor five times and she diagnonsis it as “commen stress” and diet and exercise will make it better. well I’ve been doing trust for a bit And nothin rlle has changed. I think I might have hypothyroidism, although my blood levels were normal, is it still possible? I really hope it’s just stress because I’m going into the military and they might not take me if I have a chronic problem. Please someone help me possibly diagnose what I have. Ten points!

    • ANSWER:
      you seem to have all the symptoms of hypothyroidism. many of my tests were normal for quite a while before i was actually diagnosed. you could have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. my TSH was normal, as was the T3, but my T4 was too low. once i started taking medicine for it, the tests were all abnormal.

      you should have repeat tests to check again. also, stop taking the GNC stuff. supplements are not regulated by the FDA, so there is really no way to know what exactly is in them, or the amounts. if you are not eating a healthy, balanced diet, start to. not getting proper nutrition can also cause severe fatigue and hair loss.

      your symptoms are classic for hypothyroidism though.

  22. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism symptoms, normal tsh?
    I am 20 years old and have dealt with hypothryoid-type symptoms for the past 3 years. Symptoms started appearing about a 6 months to a year after a series a very bad nose bleeds so I’ve always felt that my problems stemmed from these nose bleeds. My symptoms include imparied cognitive ability (concentration/focus/memory/foggyness), dry skin, sensitive to cold weather, inability to gain weight/muscle mass, brittle hair, heart palpatations, sensitivity to light, and knee/joint pain (diagnosed tendonosis), and some other symptoms. Over the past six months, I have tried to figure out what is wrong with me because originally I didn’t percieve these symptoms as a problems. When I told the doctor about my symptoms, particularly the cognitive issues, he recommended I got so a psychologists for ADHD analysis.
    Well, since then I haven’t bothered with my GP because of frustration and have had several blood tests to hopes of finding something. Initially, I didn’t suspect or know about hypothryoidism. I’ve had my tesosterone and IGF levels checked and both came back normal, although testosterone was alittle low. Lately, after looking at possible underlying causes of dementia, I’ve read about hypothryoidism and can really relate to most if not all of the symptoms I read about. However, my TSH has been checked with all of my other blood work because I assume it is protocol these days. It came back at 1.5 which seems to be optimal. There is, however, other descrepancies in my blood work. My Neutrophil % is low, Lympocyte % high, low HDL (24, 19, 30, respectivley) and a high bilirubin count which my doctor called Gilbert Syndrome.

    Should I get my free t3 and free t4 levels checked or is TSH pretty realiable for diagnosing hypothryroidism? Any suggestions are appreciated…

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you should have the T3, Free T3, T4, Free T4 tests done. Sometimes a thyroid problem can still occur even in spite of a normal TSH level.

      I would recommend getting an opinion from a hormone specialist called an endocrinologist as well to see what they think could be going on.

  23. QUESTION:
    TSH high, T3 & T4 normal, trying to get pregnant – meds or no meds?
    I am 35, and as part of a normal blood work up as part of a physical, my family doctor found my TSH to be high. They redid the test to confirm, and the TSH was high again, 6.23. My T3 and T4 levels were normal.

    My family doc diagnosed me with hypothyroidism and started me on 25 mcg of Synthroid. I asked for a referral to an endocrinologist, and I went to see him today. The endo says there is no need for medication at this point. I don’t have symptoms and since my T4 was normal, my TSH level is not high enough to warrant medication.

    The thing is, I’m trying to get pregnant, and currently seeing a fertility doctor. The fertility doctor feels it’s important to get TSH level down for pregnancy and thinks I should be on medication. When I mentioned that to the endo, he just brushed it off, saying, ‘he doesn’t know about the thyroid.’

    So the endo says I should stop the medication and I don’t know what to do. Can anyone help me? Should I see another endocrinologist? Listen to the endo and ignore the other two? Ignore the endo and listen to the two who “don’t know about the thyroid?”
    Thanks, everybody! So my hunch seems to be right – I shouldn’t stop the medication necessarily.

    No, he’s not a reproductive endocrinologist. When I talk to my fertility nurse tomorrow, I will ask her if they have one in the practice.

    I don’t have PCOS, all of my testing has come back perfectly normal other than the TSH.

    Thanks for all the help/advice/comments!

    • ANSWER:
      1. That endocrinologist needs to go back to school if they think they know anything about thyroid, and go to a school that understands that dosing the thyroid is more about how the patient feels and their fertility/BBT than lab values. (Which is how they used to take care of thyroid patients before they messed things up with terrible synthetic thyroid like synthroid).

      Now to appease the lab values that doctors for some reason rely on now, onto…

      2. Free t3 and free t4 are the numbers that matter, but at any rate your TSH is way way way too high. Did they check your free t3 and free t4 levels at all? Those are the numbers that they need to look at.

      A Hypothyroid patient TTC should try for a TSH under 1.5 – you’re well above that and that means something isn’t working. Also see if you can get on dessicated thyroid, synthroid may fiddle with your tsh numbers but it doesn’t do much for your health in terms of how you feel, your fertility etc.

      I was on synthroid for a while and it really didn’t do anything for me whatsoever, didn’t even make my tsh values change. I started to do some research and found out about dessicated thyroid – and people who were prescribed it instead of the fake stuff. They felt monumentally better, had more stable BBTs, and fertility was much better as well as their weight maintenance. There’s many different brands of dessicated thyroid and it seems to be less expensive than synthetic thyroid. At any rate, thise type of thyroid is usually from porcine or bovine sources and includes all types of thyroid hormone while synthroid is only t4 which isn’t what your body is really needing in the first place.

      Your fertility doctor is right though, your thyroid needs to be under control to achieve pregnancy and maintain it.

      I’d added a website below which has a ton of information and other sources of info about thyroid problems.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can being on the low side of normal with hypothyroidism be too low for some?
    I recently had an blood test and my thyroid levels were abnormal. They didn’t say low but that is what I have been expecting. I have always been on a very healthy diet and exercise nearly everyday but I have gained nearly 30 pounds in two years. I have to stay below 1200 calories a day to not continue gaining. I have absolutely no energy and have no tolerance for cold, as well as other symptoms, dry skin, legs swelling, brittle hair and nails. My real question is, if my doctor determines that I am just on the low side of normal and doesn’t put me on meds, can normal still be too low for some?
    another detail, I have been on high cholesterol meds for over a year, and I just turned 23.

    • ANSWER:

  25. QUESTION:
    Do I have hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism earlier in the year, and they scheduled an MRI scan for me, but I was too afraid to attend due to my agoraphobia. I had a second blood test a few weeks ago, and my TSH blood results for hypothyroidism returned as normal, but they were also the same results as I received earlier in the year. A friend of mine said that different doctors think of different TSH levels as normal; for instance, a 3.5 may be excessive to 1 practice but average for another. Is that slight difference possibly the reason to my excessive weight gain, or it too slight to matter? I went on a 1300 cal diet with healthy food and regular exercise for a month, and lost 7 kilograms. I continued it for a second month and lost 0 kilograms.
    I’ve used 3 scales, all of which give me the same results; I fluctuate from gaining 0 to 5 kilograms every day. For example, yesterday I could weight 70 kilograms but today I could weigh 75. If it isn’t hypothyroidism, could this abnormal body activity be something else? I’m a 17 year old female if it helps. I’m so sorry for asking so many questions! I’m just so worried.

    • ANSWER:
      No

      TSH : Normal ————-> no hypothyroidism

  26. QUESTION:
    No meds for Hashimotos?
    is there meds for just Hashimotos disease? That’s not hypothyroidism caused by hashimoto? Blood levels all normal (t3, t4, tsh) but the TPo cam high with antibodies. The doctor said there is no treatment until its in hypothyroid cause by hashimotos? ( i have symptomss of hypo, but the dr.s said its not hypo yet).. anyone ever get meds just for the hashimotos? (no hypothyroidism?)

    • ANSWER:
      That’s correct. There is no treatment for the Hashimoto’s itself. There is only treatment for the symptoms (hypothyroidism).

  27. QUESTION:
    Can prolonged crash dieting cause hypothyroidism?
    I am only 15 years old.Last year,I tried to lose weight by eating only very little calories and skipping meals.Months ago,my blood test result showed that I have hypothyroidism with borderline normal T4 and very low T3 level.I feel so regretful for screwing up my own body.Can I reverse the effects?please help me.thx

    • ANSWER:
      Low T3 is not necessarily a sign of hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests can be abnormal in people who have other illnesses, or who have something else major going on with their body, such as a lot of weight loss. This doesn’t mean there is actually something wrong with the thyroid – it’s just something you see when someone is ill. A big percentage of people in hospital, for example, would have abnormal thyroid tests if you tested them all. Once you get better and get back to a normal, healthy weight and lifestyle, the results will probably get back to normal. (hypothyroidism is almost always diagnosed using a TSH test – not T4 or T3)

  28. QUESTION:
    Please help me !!Normal Range for TSH levels? Is 4.470 very high, or just a little?
    My brother was born 2 months ago. He had a blood test.
    Last week, Doctor doubted he has Congenital Hypothyroidism because his TSH is 4.470.
    If it’s a problem, how to cure? PLease help me.
    I don’t feel comfortable these days. My brother was born when my mon was about 40 years old. Many people said it was not good to get a baby at this time. I hope my brother will be okay.

    • ANSWER:
      This TSH does fall in the “normal” range as far as most lab’s go. If your brother’s physicians are not concerned with this value then do not worry about it at this time. I am wondering if he is experiencing any other symptoms that are making you doubt this physician’s determination. One problem with the TSH results can be this – there are lab ranges in place to show what is “normal” and what is “not normal”. However, a thyroid patient who had a borderline TSH (either way – high or low) could feel good or bad even if their levels are technically in the opposite range. For example, I know someone who is HYPOthyroid, but feels her best when her TSH is just slightly elevated. Look at any other symptoms your brother may have to see if you, your parents & physicians feel there is a need to re-test him at a later time. I would also check for pituitary function. Things to keep an eye out for are a puffy face, swollen tongue, and extreme sleepiness.

  29. QUESTION:
    What could cause low ferritin levels (20) but normal iron saturation levels (35.1%)? This seems impossible.?
    I’ve had hypothyroidism for 8 months because my body is not responding well to a compounded T3/T4 medication. The extended hypothyroidism has negatively affected all of my blood counts, my kidney function, production of blood cells, & my liver function. An oncologist recently tested my ferritin and found it to be low, but my iron saturation is normal. How is that possible? I’m supplementing with an autoimmune balancing agent, iron (ferrous bisglycinate), B12 (10000mcg/day), B6 & Folic, & other condition-specific supplements. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks very much!

    • ANSWER:
      You can easily have low ferritin and normal iron. You may find as the months go by, your iron saturation will drop and you can become anaemic.

      In addition, your kidney function will affect your iron saturation and red blood cells as well. If your kidney function is low or impaired in anyway, so is your ability to produce red blood cells. This will in turn affect your hgb levels, including your iron saturation.

      Ask your physician if ferrous gluconate would be a better supplement.

  30. QUESTION:
    I took 25 mcg of synthroid a day not knowing my thyroid levels were back to normal!?
    I was on synthroid because a blood test said I was hypothyroid. The thing is that it was months before I got the results because they sent the results to the wrong house. In the mean time I stopped taking a medicine that was (I know now) the cause of the hypothyroidism.

    He gave me 25 mcg. Now this was after so my t4 levels had returned to normal. which leaves me 25 mcg a day for 6 weeks overdosed.

    Anyways I feel really dizzy and tired all the time and I stopped taking the meds on the 30th of march. SO thats 9 days without it and I still feel dizzy and lethargic.

    Is it going to go away?

    What’s happened to me?
    @ curious : The half life of synthroid can be up to to 10 days.

    • ANSWER:

  31. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and TSH levels?
    hypothyroidism runs in my family. My grandmother has it and a few other family members on my moms side. I think I have it to. I have some of the symptoms. I feel tried all the time like I have no energy and I sleep alot. I also feel weak and slugish, sometimes dizzy when I get up from bed. Another symptom is deppression and I have been feeling deppressed and sad lately. Also they said you may have trouble thinking or be forgetful and lately its been hard to think..sometimes Its hard to say what im thinking and I jumble my words. I notice that I have been a little forgetful. Like I’ll tell myself to remember to do sumthing then when I go to do it I forget what I was going to do. forgetfullness is a sign of it. I also have heavy periods and some consitipation which are other symptoms. and my feet and hands get tingly at times. I’m pretty sure I have it what do you think??

    I went to the Doctor and got a blood test for it and my TSH is 2.32 could this mean I have it what is the range. I also been reading that patiants who really have it sometimes get misdiagnosed. The Doctor will say they are fine an in the normal range but they have all the symptoms. Is this true that they you could have it but be misdiagnosed??

    I just dont have alot of energy and want to feel better cuz I notice when I go to the park with my friends im not as energised as I use to be. Like running around going on the swings… tires me out easily now where as before it did not. Advice and help would be appericated thanks! ^__^

    • ANSWER:
      You could be HypOthyroid.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      My doctors goal is to get mine down to < 1.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have elevated tsh and normal t3 and t4? does it need any treatment?
    I have recently received my blood test and it showed elevated tsh(9) and normal t3 and t4 and my prolactin levels are slightly elevated and my testesteron levels are slightly elevated too for the doctors surfing the net can you help me. I am going to repeat the tests anyway because I don’t have the specific symptoms of hypothyroidism I only have dry hair a bit of fatigue

    • ANSWER:
      That is hypOthyroidism (possibly even Hashimotos).

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  33. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have elevated tsh and normal t3 and t4?
    I have recently received my blood test and it showed elevated tsh(9) and normal t3 and t4 and my prolactin levels are slightly elevated and my testesteron levels are slightly elevated too for the doctors surfing the net can you help me. I am going to repeat the tests anyway because I don’t have the specific symptoms of hypothyroidism I only have dry hair a bit of fatigue

    • ANSWER:
      Obviously not,dear.

  34. QUESTION:
    Taking supplements as well as prescribed meds for hypothyroidism?
    Hello there, I need a little advice about the supplements I take as well as my prescribed levo-thyroxine and liothyronine. I started to take several supplements after months of still feeling extremely fatigued even when my endo said my blood levels were “normal” and that I was on the correct dosage of meds also – which I feel is utter trash!
    I’m wondering, do any of the following supps effect the medication or thyroid, and if not, are there any other recommended supplements I could take that work for yourselves? I’m still feeling so tired and run down, and I am continuing to put on weight. I’m totally desperate! I currently take selenium, manganese, co-enzyme q10, omega 3 capsules, l-tyrosine, green tea extract (seems to curb my cravings and I eat less because of it but however still put on weight!) and chelated zinc. Please let me know of any experiences of these supps or any others that would help! Thanks so much xx p.s. Just in case you wondered, I am using my husband’s account as I don’t have one!
    Thanks for the advice, very helpful! I will indeed get a second opinion from another endo. I am just so desperate, this has taken over my whole life, I don’t even see my friends anymore, simply because I have not got any energy and feel awful all the time. There are so many times I have been called fat and lazy and it hurts so much. Yeah, I agree, if only they knew….. :( xx

    • ANSWER:
      You can always go to a new endo for a second opinion. Also find out if your doctor is basing “normal” on the old or new lab guidelines. In around 2004 or so the new “normal” levels for hypothyroid is .5-3.0 which is considerably lower than the previous standard of .25-5.0. Good luck. I was on a merry go round with my doctors for almost a decade. I KNEW I was hypothyroid based on my symptoms and family history but I was given anti depressants, birth control, weight loss drugs, fertility drugs, you name it but I never felt better. No one would test me because it’s “an old lady disease” and they were skeptical… Now I am finally feeling better but it took way too long to diagnose. I can see why so many think they’re “going crazy” with it – it’s so easily dismissed. Unless you’ve had it you have NO idea what someone who does is going through. I wouldn’t self medicate. There are so many herbs, foods etc that interfere with absorption of the medication, I wouldn’t risk making it worse…

      EDIT: Same here… oh, you don’t feel well… AGAIN? Maybe it’s all in your head.. Maybe you’re a hypocondriac… Maybe you need a new doctor… Maybe… UGH lol… There are so many of us out there! Hang in there! I got a book called Living Well with Hypothyroidism by Mary Shoman, check it out sometime – it has more than enough information for you to decide if your doctor is helping you or not… there is no “one size fits all” treatment.

  35. QUESTION:
    T3 is low, Free T4 and TSH are normal – should I be on T3 replacement Rx?
    I have been feeling unwell for over a year. I’m extremely fatigued, my body aches, I have concentration/memory problems, and feel feverish then freezing, among other symptoms. The doctors had thrown around several possibilities, including fibromyalgia, mono, lupus, and arthritis.
    Yesterday my doctor ordered several blood tests, including a thyroid panel.
    It came back with all as fine, except my T3, which was low. Here are the thyroid test results:

    T3 value – 62 (normal range 87-167 ng/dL)
    Free T4 value – 0.76 (normal range 0.6-1.6 ng/dL)
    TSH value – 0.97 (normal range 0.34-4.82 uIU/mL)

    My doc put me on synthetic T3 medication, which I started today.
    My question is – how is it that I have hypothyroidism, with normal T4 and TSH levels? From what I’ve read, T3, T4 and TSH all go hand in hand. Only my T3 is low.

    The diagnosis came from my general practitioner. Should I perhaps see an endocrinologist for a second opinion?
    I’ve been feeling unwell for quite some time, so I’d really like to make sure I have the right diagnosis, before I put medication in my body for potentially the wrong illness.

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated, as I’m entirely new to how the thyroid and related disorders work. Everything I’ve read thus far has provided conflicting information.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem and saw an endocrinologist, who then referred me to a rheumatologist. I was diagnosed with lupus with (hyper) thyroid involvement. Hope that helps and hang in there!

  36. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism UK T3 and T4?
    My TSH level is 1.62

    A few months after my first child was born in 2007 I was diagnosed with an under-active thyroid and was told I would need to be on medication for life, this was distressing for me but I felt much better after taking a small daily dose of levothyroxine and regular check up’s with my endocrinologist.

    I became pregnant with my second child, the symptoms vanished and the bloods went back to normal so I was unusually taken off my medication and postpartum hypothyroidism was blamed. Shortly after my daughter was born in january 2009 I started to feel ILL again really really ILL like DYING ILL. I knew it was my thyroid as I had suffered with the same symptom’s in 2007-2008 for which I was successfully treated with levothyroxine.

    I also moved to a different area and only recently discovered that there are different lab results meanings for different area’s, this has been distressing for me as I know if I still lived in my previous area I would most likely be treated, however because I live here I will not get treated. I tick almost every symptom of hypothyroidism yet my blood work for THIS AREA is within the normal range.

    The doctor only tested my TSH levels??? Why wouldn’t he check my T3 and T4??? Yes my TSH levels are within the normal range, I understand this, but there is a lot of controversy surrounding the illness and many people are going undiagnosed for 20 or 30 years, suffering for years whilst waiting for there TSH levels to rise enough to be treated..

    My TSH level is 1.62 very normal in most people’s eyes but I feel terribly ill and they wont do anything for me. I would rather DIE than suffer like this for the next 20 years, it could take years for my TSH levels to rise, yet I have RAGINGsymptom’ss.

    My doctor has said if the results come back as normal then there is nothing they can do other than rule an illness out and try to find out what the real problem is.

    There is NO other problem, I know what is wrong with me and I know what I need to feel better.. I need levothyroxine. But you know DOCTORS KNOW BEST… What am I supposed to do? I am at a loss with myself, I want to live a normal happy productive life and have been held back for 3 years, I have missed 3 years of my life. we only live once and I cant suffer like this any longer.. Can anyone help me please?? What should I do?? Who should I see?? Should I self medicate. I was considering buying levothyroxin from the internet and taking them to prove to my doctor that taking them WILL make me better.

    I am thankful for any responses which I get.

    Sorry this has taken so long to read and thank you for your time. :- (

    • ANSWER:
      Number one. Doctors do not always know best.
      Two. Do not self medicate.
      You need to go back to the doctor and say what you have said on here, that you need T3 and T4 checked.
      They will do it if you ask for it.
      ]For any one, Doctors see so many patients in a day, that your case is not unique. Make sure you say something to him/her while still in the surgery if you think something is not right. There is no use stewing on it at home. It is your body. Ask questions and discuss things. Only you know all your symptoms and lifestyle.
      Good luck.
      Please do not self medicate. especially if breast feeding

  37. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, constipation, intolerance to cold, and muscle cramps
      Later symptoms include mental clouding diminished appetite, and weight gain.

      Some other signs may be brittle fingernails and dry hair.

      You need tests to confirm, but it sounds like you have it. However, the prognosis is great. You may have to undergo hormone relacement therapy, but that is easy. But if you experience hypothermia and stupor, you require immidiate medical attention.

      Have your doctor test your T4 and T3 levels.

      By the way, I’m not a doctor. So dont take my advise over any real medical professionals. I’m just a high school freshman who wants to be a doctor one day.

      Get well. Let me know if I was correct,
      Jake P

  38. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have hypothyroidism? or know enough about it? PLEASE read if you do :(?
    Sorry this is alot to read but i really would like somebody who knows about this to help me :(

    I am almost positive i have it, but i think my doctor is just blowing it off as high blood pressure. Because symptoms of high blood pressure can mimic a few of hypothyroidism, the only thing is that High blood pressure is also a symptom of hypothyroidism..

    But i have alot more symptoms of hypothyroidism. Including feeling weak, sore, tired, confused, very dry skin. I could probably go on but it is really getting worse. When my daughter is in daycare i come home and sleep literally all day i need an alarm to wake me up. I have to drink like 3-4 cans of diet coke a day so i can be awake and able to take care of my daughter. I do feel fine sometimes but the majority i feel like crap. And I feel like if i didnt set an alarm i wouldnt wake up, it sucks because i go back to school on monday and i know it is going to be extremely hard with how bad i feel. I never felt like this until i was pregnant and after i had my daughter but it has been 3 months since she was born :(

    My moms boyfriend is a pediatrition and thinks my doctor is being an idiot and is trying to help me out, i am just trying to get all my test results from the doctor so he can see them. My doctor told me that one of my tests showed i had low thyroid levels and he said it was fine.. obviously it isnt. I am on high blood pressure medication which IS making my blood pressure go down, because it gets water out of my bloodstream to make the pressure go down, it is still above the normal blood pressure though, it probably averages about 125/185 which isnt bad but not as low as it should be. but i still feel like crap! i am going crazy i really wish somebody could help me figure out what to do to make myself feel better. I have already asked a few questions about this and got some answers that pretty much assured me this really is the problem i am dealing with.

    I just want to know what i can do to feel better in the meantime? Especially with starting school on monday. And i plan on seeing another doctor but i just dont have time right now i dont know what to do

    I dont expect to get alot of answers i am just hoping somebody will be able to help me out a little bit? i probably sound pathetic but i feel awful.

    Not to mention i am a pretty young mom so it is hard enough as it is, i do not need another thing like this added on top of it . I want to be healthy for my daughter, and for myself i just dont know what to do :(

    • ANSWER:
      If you have an under active thyroid, there is nothing you can do to feel better until you are diagnosed and being treated. That silly little gland helps regulate just about every system in your body, and the only treatment for hypothyroidism is replacement hormones. You should try to get daily exercise to help keep your metabolism from taking a complete nosedive, and make sure you’re not dehydrated, which can cause/worsen those symptoms as well.

  39. QUESTION:
    Hashimotos & Hypothyroidism?
    I am 26yr old female and was diagnosed with Hashimotos about 9 yrs ago. I have been on Synthroid since then, and now am trying to workout about 4-5x a week. I am having great difficulty with my energy levels, and cant keep up. Moreover, i have symptoms such as lightheadedness, nausea, tingling in my extremities, memory trouble, heavy head especially my frontal sinuses and temples, and weakness in my chest muscles especially sternum — as is someone is pressing on my chest. My TSH levels are perfectly normal, but I feel like crap — this shouldnt be the case, and I am thinking of switching to Armour Thyroid–has anyone experienced the same? and tried Armour — the docs just say as my blood levels are fine, i shouldnt worry — i am not quite convinced….any feedback would be much appreciated. Thanks !!!

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of people with hypohyroidism also have adrenal fatigue. You sure sound like that is the case for you.

      And yes, it might be advisable to switch to Armour, it might work better for you.

      Have yourself tested for adrenal problems. If your adrenal glands aren’t working right, then your thyroid meds can’t work properly. And just your TSH levels are a poor indicator of how well your thyroid is working.

  40. QUESTION:
    Anyone have experience with horses with hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease, or insulin resistance?
    Sorry in advance that this is so long! I started to suspect my 7 y/o paint mare was showing signs of what I thought would be hypothyroidism. I called out my vet, he has to see her for her allergies anyway and I ordered some blood work that he suggested. His initial impression was that she was hypothyroid or insulin resistant, but he made it seem like it was more of a thyroid problem than anything and didn’t even suggest that I get her tested for insulin resistance. I’m still waiting on the results of the blood work, it has been about a week and a half. I have another veterinary clinic that I trust to get a second opinion if I need to but this vet that I currently use is extremely well respected and knowledgeable so I will see what he suggests first.

    When I did a little research on the subject, I found a couple of medical studies and articles that said that the normal blood panel for thyroid problem testing for T3 and T4 levels is not accurate enough to fully diagnose a horse as hypothyroid. They also go on to state that most horses that have been diagnosed as having thyroid problems are actually insulin resistant or are in early stages of Cushing’s disease and that confirmed cases of thyroid problems are extremely rare.

    So…I’m not quite sure what to think now. She does show a few of the signs of Cushing’s: cresty neck, easy keeper (even though I manage her weight she does sometimes get fat deposits but they are not in strange areas on her body), sometimes lethargic (this may be related to the heat here), and has a slightly decreased immune system. I was told that vertical ridges in her hooves, weak hooves, and her mane and tail rubbing are also signs of these diseases by a friend of the family. I don’t know if there is any truth to the hoof ridges but the mane and tail rubbing also can tie in to her skin allergies and fly/mosquito allergies. She’s on antihistamines for that. She however does not drink an excessive amount (I usually have to make sure she has extra salt to encourage her to drink), does not have a thick shaggy coat or slow shedding, or abnormal urination.

    Does anyone have a horse with any of these diseases who could give me any insight on if any of this sounds familiar to you and what treatments your horse is on and the cost that I would be looking at here? Any vets, vet techs, anyone with medical experience, etc that could offer some help would be greatly appreciated as well.

    *Selling her is not an option because I am very afraid she would end up in the kill pen if she is diagnosed with this disease combined with her other health problems. She is very well taken care of here.*
    Thank you all for your answers!

    She doesn’t have the coat of Cushing’s horses. Her coat is extremely short and thin, even in winter.

    I realize that the mane and tail rubbing is most likely from her allergies and fly and mosquito hypersensitivity, I had just heard that it was also related to these other diseases and was wondering if there was any truth to that. She is currently treated for the itching twice daily plus the antihistamines and for the mane and tail re-growth. The lethargy is unrelated to the antihistamines, she has always been kind of pokey (especially in summer) but she has a shiny coat and bright eyes. I wasn’t sure if this was related either.
    She has access to several salt/trace mineral blocks at all times and I see her frequently licking them several times a day.
    Thank you all so much for the info and links, so many great answers :) The fly and mosquito allergies are actually quite common where I live in southern Louisiana but she has other allergies as well. The climate here is horrible for animals and people with allergies, myself included. I’m miserable so I can only imagine how she feels. I’m still waiting to her from the vet on the rest of the results and from what it sounds, she doesn’t have hypothyroidism but that isn’t a surprise. I will have him come out and draw blood to do the test for the insulin resistance. He couldn’t do it from the blood he drew the other day because she hadn’t been fasting. Hopefully each problem will improve together, it seems when one disorder is off, it throws the whole body out of whack. I’m researching diet changes now to see what I can do to make small adjustments until I find out for sure if this is the problem. I don’t want to do anything major based on my hunch alone.
    I also forgot to mention that I would consider selling her to someone in the Midwest or Northwest (she originally came from Iowa) where there are not so many nasty bugs, allergens, heat, and humidity as there are here. I don’t want her to suffer so it would be unreasonable for anyone to tell me that I am selfish for keeping her here because of her allergies. However, with her other health issues and that she is still relatively green broke and needs an advanced intermediate and up rider…I have valid reason to be concerned that she’d be sent to the kill pen because healthy horses are these days. Selling is not an option unless I can no longer manage her care and until I get the health concerns straightened out to where I can at least educate potential new owners on how to manage them. And to avoid that, I would rather relocate from Louisiana because I’m sick constantly and I really can’t stand the weather here either!

    • ANSWER:
      I have a gelding with Cushing’s and a mare with insulin resistance. The gelding was diagnosed after the vet noticed a slight crest forming on his neck. He never exhibited any shedding problems or other of the typical signs. But when he was tested, his hormone levels were all over the place. He has done so well in the years that followed, that we have retested several times, still showing the same hormonal abnormalities. My point is, a horse doesn’t necessarily exhibit all of the signs, but may still have the disease. My gelding has had the disease for several years now, and still has no coat or shedding abnormalities. He is managed with diet and Evitex (chasteberry extract). He has not needed Perolide to maintain him in good condition. Pergolide can’t be used if the horse also exhibits insulin resistance, though.
      I have read the same research on diagnosing hypothyroid or hyperthyroid conditions in horses. My gelding’s thyroid levels are always off, but his diagnosis is Cushing’s. Early on he was tried on Thyrol, but it was later determined to be unnecessary. These days, I don’t think it is used very often.
      You probably need further testing to come up with a diagnosis. Be aware that in the fall there is more risk of false positives since the hormone levels are altered normally during the transition to shorter periods of daylight.
      In the meantime, it doesn’t hurt to restrict soluble starches in her diet, which is indicated in either condition.

      One more thought on thyroid insufficiency…..I did have a hypothyroid horse decades ago, that was treated successfully by adding iodized salt to her diet. Iodine is needed to make thyroid hormones. Iodine deficiency in today’s feeds are probably rare, but could occur if the feed is grown in areas where iodine is deficient, and the feed is not fortified. If a horse was fed only hay and pasture, and both were deficient, it might be the problem. I doubt that it is the case in your situation, but is something else to consider.

      My insulin resistant mare is a whole other story, and I am posting an excellent article on it that you should read before you proceed. It will give you a very good overall knowledge base for decisions on what comes next. I hope it helps.

      http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12588

  41. QUESTION:
    Is it hypothyroidism or something else?
    I have alot of symptoms that point to hypothyroidism, but I’ve had two seperate blood tests done, and they both said my thyroid levels were normal. I did have a blood test done a few years ago that said my levels were slightly low, but since then I’ve had the other 2 tests that came back normal. My symptoms are unexplained weigh gain, its nearly impossible for me to lose weight no matter how much I diet and exercise, my eyebrows are thinning, I’m always tired, fatigued and sluggish, I am frequently cold when others are not, and I have dry itchy skin, mostly on my legs. I do not have the symptoms of constipation or a puffy face. Maybe I have something that mimics hypothyroidism, but is something else? Oh yeah, I also had an enlarged thyroid on the right side that has been recently removed to check for cancer, which it was not. And I had all my symptoms before the surgery. Any info would be helpful!

    • ANSWER:
      Sure sounds like you were hypothyroid. Did they do an antibody test to check for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis? Are you currently taking thyroxine? Have your symptoms disappeared or are they persisting?

  42. QUESTION:
    Should i see a doctor for thyroid problem?
    I feel all the symptoms of Hypothyroidism. My last blood test showed my TSH levels at 1.6. this is consider normal but what about my symptoms. Can i take pills to regulate? Can it be a hormonal problem?

    • ANSWER:
      i have a dead thyroide and i have to be on a pill for it and get blood test few times in the year to check the lev it is at so they know to up my pill or down it. I found out I had a dead one when I was around 16/17. I see alot has changed on me when i started these pills. A thyroid can do many things. it never hurts to go see a doctor and ask things about it and get another blood test so they can see it. So yes. go see a doctor. just think how many problems i could of haved if i didnt find out i had a dead one.

  43. QUESTION:
    Is there any point in even trying to lose weight if I have an underactive thyroid?
    My thryoid levels come back normal, but I have the symptoms of hypothyroidism. I am overweight, cold all the time, have dry skin, feel sluggish, have a “full” feeling in my throat…I desperately want to lose weight but don’t know if that is even a possibility if I have a thyroid problem and my doc won’t treat it because my blood results are normal.

    What could I do to lose weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmmm do not take this the wrong way but… All those “symptoms” you talk about can also be “caused” by being over weight.
      Losing weight is hard…. Really hard if you are a really large person.
      But after losing your first few pounds and after a couple weeks of exercise and proper eating, you will notice you have alot more energy and getting out and doing the work will be alot easier.

  44. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism treatment is making me sleepy, am I alone?
    Last fall I had some blood work done and found out I have hypothyroidism. My level is 4.75 and my doctor said the normal range is 3. She started me on Synthroid 100mcg. I took it in the morning and it made me so sleepy that I could not function and had a hard time staying alert to care for my daughter. I spoke to my doctor and she said I could take it at night. I was still getting sleepy though so I stopped taking it after a few weeks with no improvement. I had blood work done at the end of February and my level is still off so I saw my doctor about trying a different medication. She put me on Levoxyl 25mcg and I am taking my first dose in the morning. I have heard that once you are on the medication you will have an increase in energy and that if you are getting sleepy that the dose is too low or high. Has anyone else had this problem with the medication? I know it can be hard to pinpoint the exact dose but my level is just barely off, some people have a level 50. I just want to get my level in the normal range to prevent any other conditions. Right now my plan is to try my best to stay on the Levoxyl for two months straight so I can see where my level is with the medication. Any help is greatly appreciated!
    Let me correct myself. I am suddenly sleepy from the medication. I had no fatigue before I began the medication. The medication is what made me sleepy. And I understand that Synthroid and Levoxyl are basically the same but my doctor suggested trying a different medication to see if there was something in the Synthroid causing me to become sleepy.

    • ANSWER:
      Synthroid and Levoxyl are the same thing. Neither are what is making you sleepy. The medication helps you stay awake. I think you may be falling prey to a propter hoc logical fallacy.

      You are hypothyroid. Therefore you are sleepy.
      You are hypothyroid. Therefore you take synthroid.

      So the sleepiness and the synthroid are correlated. But one does not cause the other. They are both caused by the hypothyroidism. Saying that the synthroid is causing you to be sleepy is commiting cum hoc ergo propter hoc.

  45. QUESTION:
    Normal TSH level, but enlarged thyroid… what’s the problem?
    I’ve had an enlarged thyroid for a few years now, it’s somewhat noticeable. I also feel uncomfortable if I wear close-neck shirts or necklaces, I keep pulling it away from my neck.

    I have some symptoms of hypothyroidism, so I had a thyroid ultrasound which shows a nodule. I then had a needle biopsy which showed it was benign.. but every time I have a blood test, my TSH level is normal. (My test about a week ago showed a TSH level of 1.64 uIU/mL).

    What should I do to reduce the enlargement when hormone therapy is obviously not needed? What could the problem actually be if not hypothyroidism? Please help me understand what’s going on..

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest a test for antibodies. I had hashimotos, which is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid. sometimes it was big, and I was a bit hyperthyroid and sometimes it shrunk back and I was hypo. It took years to get the correct diagnosis….but when I look back at old photos, I can see it! Also, at one point, my daughter had thyroiditis, which is an inflammation of the thyroid.
      as to nodules, when they do your blood work, you should keep track of your tg levels, if they are going up, it could be a time for more tests. If your nodules and thyroid are making you uncomfortable, at some point your doctor may suggest a removal. I am giving you my thyca web site (which is for thyroid cancer), not because I think you have it, but because of all the resources…endos, surgeons, studies, etc. The recovery was so much easier than you would think! I also learned alot from the mayo clinic (look under nodules) and there is a book called the complete thyroid book by dr. ain which was pretty good. Learn all you can about nodules and hashimotos etc…and if your endo is mostly diabetes, you may want to look for a specialist. there is a thyroid chat group in the yahoo health groups…not cancer, just about thyroid and maybe they would be able to help as well. good health.

  46. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome, What are my chances of having children?
    I was diagnosed with PCOS about 1 1/2 years ago. I also have hypothyroidism and currently take levothyroxine 50 mcg every day, and my OBGYN has put me on Metformin(glucophage) which is a medication used to lower blood sugar levels, I am NOT diabetic but she put me on the metformin to help dissolve some of the cysts. Cysts can be caused by higher than normal blood sugar levels.

    My husband and I have been trying for 3 years to get pregnant and nothing we do to try and increase our chances has worked thus far, is there something I’m missing here?

    I don’t have the money for any of the fertility options out there…what can I do? Are there maybe programs out there that would help pay for fertility treatment? I have health insurance but they don’t cover any of that stuff either. Has anyone else out there been diagnosed? Are there tricks or tips I could be missing?

    By the way, I am 23 years old so for anyone who may have thought age could be a factor…that’s just not the case.

    Please don’t reply with the “you’re not ready” or “really think about it” because I AM ready and I have thought about it. I’m not your average “tee hee” “lets go party” 23 year old. I am highly intelligent and pretty wise beyond my years, so please…advice only. I would also like to thank (in advance) for any advice and helpful tips that may be given. Thank you all.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is what I have been told, and I have seen it happen.

      The Metformin helps dissolves the cysts, allowing natural ovulation to occur. Taking it faithfully will also help with the treatment of sugar resistant PCOS.

      Loosing 25% of your body mass is also helpful as well. (I’m a chunky chick).

      Eat right, don’t stress, and find a balance.

      If all else fails, seek out the advice of an OB GYN. Chlomid is the most common form of a fertility medicine, and ten years ago it was 60.00 a month. Within two months, I had conceived my beautiful daughter.

      Good luck!

  47. QUESTION:
    can hypothyroidism cause anxiety?
    My anxiety has gotten worse since I developed an underactive thyroid. I know hypothyroidism can cause depression but could it also be causing panic and anxiety? And if so how long does it take to settle down? I’ve been on thyroxine since Jan this year and a blood test showed my levels are now normal.
    My anxiety has gotten worse since I developed an underactive thyroid. I know hypothyroidism can cause depression but could it also be causing panic and anxiety? And if so how long does it take to settle down? I’ve been on thyroxine since Jan this year and a blood test showed my levels are now normal. I’m 37, not menopausal. Have tried lorazepam but am now on buspirone and mirtazapine. Had anxiety since a child but worsened dramatically this year which coincided with hypothroidism, am on 25mg thyroxine. Have also started having painful periods and my anxiety is worse just before and during period where’s they were trouble-free before.
    Thanks to everyone who’s replied so far, I really appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      Michelle…. best site ever for thyroid related questions, see below in the source section.
      I’ve had this condition for almost 30 years, and none of the ‘side effects’ have disappeared completely, or forever. It’s like they go into remission depending on what is going on in my life at any given time, or not going on for that matter. At least they are just bouts of it now, as opposed to them being there constantly!!

      Good luck, the whole condition sucks on so many levels.

  48. QUESTION:
    Are these symptoms I’m having associated with hypothyroidism?
    Last year my doctor did blood tests and found that I have hypothyroidism. A few weeks later, I went in for a second blood tests and my levels had returned to normal (no hypoT) I have not returned to the doctor since then and am not taking any thyroid meds or anything, but I’ve had these continuing symptoms for close to two years now.

    I’ve had the typical symptoms associated with hypoT-low energy,depressed mood, slowed metabolism, dry skin, cold hand and feet, etc. but I’ve also had some other symptoms that I’m not sure are due to a thyroid issue. At times I feel extremely hot (like i’m having hot flashes) and I have tingling sensations throughout my body. Heart palpitations/fast heart beat,can feel my pulse/blood pumping, feeling lightheaded and dizzy. My eyes also look puffy and dark a lot of the time and it seems like I have trouble focusing my vision. I was just at the eye doctor and had them dilated and everything and they said my eyes are extremely healthy, so I don’t know.

    Can these symptoms be a part of having a thyroid issue as well, or do they indicate something else?
    Yeah, I know I should be going to the doctor and asking her these questions, but I wont have the money to go back for another couple of months.

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    is it possible for hypothyroidism to switch to hyperthyroidism?
    hey folks i was just wondering if anyone could help me out with this, i,ll check with my gp but any advice would greatly appreciated, i was diagnosed about 4 years ago with hypothyroidism but my last blood check which was a few months ago came back a normal thyroid level, now i,m not sure if i was supposed to keep taking the thyroxine medication but anyways i did keep taking it as normal and i have now developed all the symptoms of hyperthyroidism does anyone know if thats possible and do you think its a result of the medication as now i imagine my body is producing sufficient amounts of thyroxine and i,m adding more as i said any advice would be greatly appreciated thanks so much

    • ANSWER:
      1st question:
      OH YES! That is called Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis where we, at the START, cycle between hypO & hypER.

      As I read on & see that you have been on the thyroid meds for a few yrs:
      It could be that your dose is too high and needs lowered! I say this because, w/ Hashi’s, if we get on the meds, the body allows the meds to take over in regulating the levels.

      Here is other info:
      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  50. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to still have an underactive thyroid even if the TSH level is normal?
    I was dignosed in 2008 with hypothyroidism for which I was successfully treated, my thyroid gradualy got better with time and I was taken off Levothyroxine. Medical proffesionals put it down to pregnancy. I had another child in 2009 and started to feel terrible again, I also moved to a new area with different doctors, I requested a new blood test and it came back with a TSH level of 2.11 (this is considered normal) though at the high end of the scale. She did not test my free T3′s and T4′s. Can someone please tell me why this is? and also does anyone know if it is still possible to have an underactive thyroid with a normal level of TSH?

    I am from the UK… I know different areas have different result meanings. ( this is STUPID) why cant every lab have the same result meanings?

    • ANSWER:
      The problem is that your testing has been inadequate. TSH alone is no more than a screen test. If disease is suspected or has been previously identified, T3, T4 and thyroid antibody also need to be checked. Most thyroid disease is due to an auto immune condition, previously known as Hashimoto’s auto immune thyroiditis. It can produce both over and under activity and requires constant monitoring.


Hypothyroidism Natural Treatments

Our thyroid gland situated in front part of neck, just below thyroid cartilage is shaped like a butterfly and wraps the wind pipe or trachea. The gland produces hormones T3 or triiodothyronine and T4 or thyroxines that affect cellular metabolism, growth and brain development. The hypothalamus of brain releases TRH or thyrotropin releasing hormone which urges the pituitary glands to release TSH or thyroid stimulating hormones which in turn stimulate or activate thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4.

Abnormally low production of thyroid hormones can lead to a condition called hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can have widespread consequences for the body. The common causes of hypothyroidism are as follows: hashimoto’s thyroiditis, lymphocytic thyroiditis, thyroid destruction due to surgery or radioactivity, disease of pituitary glands, certain medications, severe thyroid deficiency etc. The symptoms of hypothyroidism include fatigue, weight gain, cold intolerance, excessive sleepiness, dry and rough hair, dry skin, constipation, depression, muscle cramps, rising levels of cholesterol, poor concentration, aches and pains and leg swelling.

Hypothyroidism symptoms can be managed through sensible fat free and fiber rich diet, increased water intake, exercises and intake of dietary iodine. But this switching over to healthy life-style is not enough; it has to be backed by medications. Synthetic, chemical drugs are not free from unwanted side-effects. So it is better to opt for products composed of natural ingredients, for they would take care of hypothyroidism in a safe and secure way. Thyromine is one such incredible product composed of potent herbs that supply the body with necessary nutrients, thereby enhancing the performance of thyroid gland.

Thyromine treats an under-active thyroid gland effectively and increases thyroid hormone production to match the body’s requirement. Thyromine promotes overall health of body, by improving thyroid gland malfunctioning and health deterioration due to it. By speeding up thyroid gland and correcting metabolism process, the supplement works amazing in helping to lose the weight you had put on. It helps you to look slim, smart and taut once more, giving you a good feeling altogether. One month’s supply of Thyromine comes in a bottle of 30 capsules. The supplement, being natural, is quite safe to use.

The ingredients of Thyromine include Nori, Bovine, ginger, Guglipid, Piper longum, L-Tyrosine. These ingredients supply the necessary vitamins and minerals, stimulating thyroid gland to produce more hormones. Thus Thyromine, helps to lose weight with hypothyroidism and solves hypothyroidism the natural way! Try this natural supplement and lose weight with hypothyroidism.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Are there any natural treatments for Hypothyroidism?
    I tried synthroid but it didnt help and really screwed up my hormones. I have tried some herbs and supplements, and am now taking melatonin.

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any natural treatments for Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi “meeeohmyyyy”,
      Reduce soy consumption. Soy can depress thyroid function and has been shown to cause goiters (an enlargement of the thyroid gland) in healthy individuals.

      Alkalinize the body! This may help to prevent thyroid dysfunction in the first place.

      Get rid of the saturated fats from your diet. Saturated fats have been found to inhibit thyroid function.

      Work to balance your estrogen levels. Estrogen slows down the thyroid gland.

      Eat organically raised meats to avoid meats that are loaded with added hormones that have been introduced to increase the weight of livestock prior to sale.

      Begin a hormonal balancing program using progesterone cream to help bring your body back into balance.

      Vitamin B3, (niacin), which is often taken to reduce cholesterol levels, has been shown to also lower thyroid hormone levels.

      Gentian is known to normalize the function of the thyroid gland.

      Incorporate kelp and other sea vegetables that are high in iodine. Iodine is needed by the body to produce thyroid hormone.

      Radishes have historically been used to treat thyroid problems and have been known to keep the levels of thyroid hormones balanced.

      If depression due to hypothyroidism is a problem, try taking St. John’s Wort to help elevate your mood.

      Chronic constipation can be addressed by adding additional dietary fiber such as psyllium to your diet. Herbal laxatives, such as cascara sagrada or Nature’s Sunshine’s LBS II can also be used as required.

      Try supplementing with zinc and selenium. Studies indicate that severe zinc or selenium deficiencies can cause decreased thyroid hormone levels.

      Coconut oil stimulates the thyroid gland and is a good choice for those suffering from an under active thyroid.

      One of the most effective supplements for hypothyroidism is desiccated thyroid gland that comes from pigs. It was used long before synthetic forms of thyroid medications became available and is processed by the body more naturally.
      Please look full text article: http://www.askedweb.com/askedweb/Are_You_Suffering_From_Hypothyroidism/
      Jason Homan

  3. QUESTION:
    Are there any natural treatments for hypothyroidism?
    When I went to the doctor recently, she told me that my blood tests showed high TSH. No other markers for thyroid disorder were high or low (i.e. my T3 and T4 were normal). My doctor thinks that I’m developing hypothyroidism. I REALLY don’t want to have to take supplemental hormones for the rest of my life, so if anyone knows a natural way to balance out my thyroid again, please let me know.

    I am a 20 year old female. I eat healthy, most of the time, and I exercise regularly. I am a healthy weight (5′ 8″, 130lbs). I take a multivitamin every day. I’m on birth control pills, as well.

    • ANSWER:
      change your diet avoid goitrogens in foods which blocks/inhibits thyroid hormones (T1, T2, T3, T4) can lead to HYPOthyroid conditions=low thyroid AVOID:
      Cabbage, broccoli, rutabaga, cauliflower, kale,
      Brussels sprouts, watercress, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, millet, turnips, turnip greens,
      cassava root (tapioca), spinach, peach, pear, grape,
      mango, pea, and all soy (the worst) products.
      Peanut butter has had the goitrogens killed off
      because the making of it requires such high heat, BUT
      eating too much leads to the production of oxalic
      kidney stones.
      SOY products elevate T4 without modifying T3=weight
      gain, low ch’i, low fertility=early menopause, PLUS
      the plant based estrogens in soy can inhibit
      absorption of zinc and other essential minerals, cause
      stomach and intestine distress, AND is highly harmful
      for children whose sex organs and immune systems are
      still in the developmental stages.
      MILK: if you are hypothyroid, then avoid milk as the
      protein casein in cow’s milk is 300% more potent than
      human breast milk and also disrupts thyroid function,
      try rice milk instead, not soy milk. A nice cup of hot
      milk before bed for calming the nerves is even worse
      than cold raw milk.
      FLUORIDE: avoid toothpaste and water which contain
      fluoride, as well as iodine (table salt and seaweeds)
      as both compounds irritate the thyroid gland=auto
      immune non functioning and it attacks itself. Too much
      iodine can result in hyperthyroid conditions such as
      weight loss, rough skin, acne, mental and emotional
      problems, and a ‘spacey’ feeling.
      SUGAR: refined sugars burn out the thyroid gland as
      well as the adrenal glands.
      If the thyroid is ‘off’, so, more than likely will be the parathyroid
      glands that cluster on the thyroid like little grapes,
      everyone has between four and eight of them. If they
      are not working properly, then calcium will not be
      assimilated or distributed properly=weak sagging
      muscles, loss of elasticity, heart attacks, and the
      muscles will then suck calcium from the
      bones=osteoporosis problems of ‘aging’ women, as
      muscles get calcium first in the food chain within the
      human body. AND if you have Adrenal gland
      insufficiency, it will affect your thyroid. So…treat
      adrenals first, then thyroid, then parathyroids in
      that order for any type of thyroid Rx to work, or your
      own gland without medication, via the foods you eat …

      In terms of Traditional Oriental Medicine, the thyroid
      gland is associated with Heart energy and a
      GallBladder flow imbalance can lead to thyroid
      tumors… working acu-points Stomach 9 (on either side
      of the Adam’s Apple), Conception Vessel 22 (base of
      throat dent), Large Intestine 4 (in each hand:
      Forbidden Point during/desiring pregnancy), and
      Bladder 15 (between the shoulder blades)…will all
      help to balance out HYPOthyroid problems and the
      energetic atomic weight gain, associated with thyroid
      disease.
      Blueberries, strawberries and virgin coconut oil rev
      up a slow metabolism, and are great for the desired
      weight loss by fat HYPOthyroid people.
      DEMAND a Reverse T3 blood test, it shows how much T3 your body can use out of what is made FOR use. often a big difference showing you are not normal but clinically hypo. good luck

  4. QUESTION:
    Natural / holistic treatment for Hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism. Are there any natural / holistic treatements for it? Any supplements that would help??

    • ANSWER:
      If a mainstream protagonist tells you not to worry about iodine, that would be one of the first things I would look at. First of, the tiny amount of iodine added to iodized salt may be enough to provide most of us with the measlely RDA of iodine, but it comes nowhere near the optimal amount of iodine. The fact is that supplemental iodine can be very healthy and can help address or prevent a number of health problems. Maybe that is why we are told there is need to take it?

      Secondly, contrary to the mainstream line, iodine deficiency has not been wiped out in the U..S. While iodine deficiency was not common in the U.S. in years past, it is again on the rise. The first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I), which took place between 1971 – 1974, found that just 2.6% of US citizens had iodine deficiency. The followup NHANES III survey, conducted between 1988 – 1994, found that 11.7% are iodine deficient. The October, 1998 issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism reported that over the previous 20 years, the percentage of Americans with low intake of iodine has more than quadrupled.

      As others have correctly posted, there are indeed natural alternatives that can be effective against hyperthroidism. They just aren’t mainstream patented medicines and of course they are naysayed here.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is a natural OTC cure for hypothyroidism?
    I recently lost my insurance and I have been taking Levo-thyroxine for my hypothyroidism but am unable to get it refilled this next month does anyone have this and use al alternative drug? Preferably something OTC? or a cheaper treatment through a pharmacy? any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Diagnosis pl check this link. according to my opinion the another way if u want to go for alternative medicine. su jok is the best. so if u can contact a su jok therapist it will be cheaper. if u can’t u may write to me for further suggestion.

  6. QUESTION:
    I suffer from hypothyroidism. I am treated with synthroid, are there any more natural treatment i.e. no pills

    how about ways to lessen the appearance of my goiter….. I am wondering if as I lose weight, if my goiter does not get smaller, if it will become more visible. I have been on treatment for a few years now (3 or 4) and have consistently gained weight (30 lbs within the past 2 or 3 months) and I am now consuming even less calories (only 1,020 today) and exercising even more.

    • ANSWER:
      My mom added iodized salt (sea salt) to her diet. She also did take a pill, but it was thyrolate – a natural thyroid supplement. Avoid all antibacterial soaps and cleaners as they trigger thyroid symptoms and are hard on your thyroid.

      All I can think of right now. My mom was nearly killed by MDs treating her thyroid issues – literally. A chiropractor got her off the drugs and onto a natural treatment plan. That was before there were many naturopaths. I’d check with a naturopath if wanting a doctor’s help with your thyroid. That was when she was in her 40′s. She is now 68 and DRUG FREE!!! She also works to support herself, lives alone and manages her thyroid naturally.

      You are turning onto the right road. Keep heading down it. :-)

  7. QUESTION:
    Homeopathic treatments for Hypothyroidism?
    Does anyone know, or have experienced, success in using “natural” methods of regulating/curing Hypothyroidism? If so, what did you do? I read something about Iodine, but I’m not sure how to go about using it, or what dosage to use. I’d appreciate any info. on vitamins or anything that works.
    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathy Treats the patient what and how the patient feels is how homeopathy goes about treating and curing him so just giving your disorder or disaes name is not enough to prescribe a homeopathic medicine for any disorder or disease the patients individual specific symptoms and details are needed to prescribe successfully. So please post your complete details and symptoms for a homeopathic treatment.
      Take care and God Bless .

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for hypothyroidism in women?
    Are there any natural remedies or herbs for hypothyroidism out there? Or is the only solution to be on synthetic drugs the rest of your life?

    • ANSWER:
      There are two articles that I suggest you checkout…

      #1 – Natural Remedies for Hypothyroidism

      http://www.hypothyroidismexposed.com/natural-remedies-for-hypothyroidism.html

      #2 – Herbs for hypothyroidism

      http://www.hypothyroidismexposed.com/herbs-for-hypothyroidism.html

      These should give you a basic understanding of some natural things you can do for treatment of hypothyroidism. I also suggest checking out the “Eliminate Hypothyroidism Problems Report” that is available in those articles.

      I hope this helps…

  9. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and received a treatment that worked well? If so what was the?
    the treatment and dosage. I’m asking this because I have been battling this and doctors for 7 yrs without relief. I was under the impression that the synthetic or natural supplement would restore life to normal. But normal seems to get further and further away. My blood tests have always been within normal range since I started treatment, so getting them to up or alter my treatment is next to impossible. Better yet, has anyone had success with a natural remedy used in combination with the prescribed treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      More than likely it is rooted in liver malfunction. I know it can be frustrating going to doctors and finding little help with conventional treatment. There is tons of information out there for anyone willing to do the research. I tend to stay away from the conventional med. sites. They usually have the same answer –throw drugs at it and hope the symptoms are suppressed. Google some of your symptoms such as, Liver and Hyporthyroidism, Liver weakness and thyroid imbalance etc. Not sure if sensiblehealth.com will have anything on thyroid but it is a great place to start. Terrific articles and you can rabbit-trail from there. God Bless.

  10. QUESTION:
    Herbal Treatment for Hypothyroidism?
    Are there any herbal treatment for hypothyroidism options available? We are looking for some natural solutions / supplements for this condition and any help would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      There are natural items out there that can assist in your herbal treatment for hypothyroidism goal. Here is a list of the top 7 herbs for hypothyroidism as listed by http://www.HypothyroidismExposed.com:

      #1 – Gugulipid
      #2 – Nori
      #3 – Piper Longum
      #4 – L-Tyroisine
      #5 – Ginger
      #6 – Black Cohosh
      #7 – St John’s Wort

      You can learn more about these herbal treatment options by reading the entire article via the link below… Hope this helps.

  11. QUESTION:
    how to treat hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism?
    what natural or alternative treatments available

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.bcdex.com/herbalremedies/thyroid.html

      http://www.thyromine.com/

      http://www.nativeremedies.com/thyroid-assist-treatment-hypothyroidism.shtml

      Hope these help!!

  12. QUESTION:
    Switching from synthyroid to natural desiccated thyroid or just add a T3?
    I have hypothyroidism. I’ve been taking synthyroid for 5 months. Doc. says my TSH is normal. I still have symptoms. I’ve had a mysterious case of tendinitis (tennis elbow) that has persisted for over a year. It goes from one elbow to another and makes a crunching sound when I bend it palm down. I’ve read that hypothyroidism can cause inflammation and that treatment should relieve the tendinitis. I am still tired, mood swings, and experience symptoms of hypoglycemia(not sure if it’s related) after eating foods high in carbs (palpation’s, lose of sight when I stand up, falling asleep and extreme irritability), despite a normal blood glucose after eating. Anyone out there have any insight? Should I use the natural thyroid or try to get a rx for a T3 in addition to my T4? I’m batting my brains out looking for an answer.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi James,

      I personally would just continue the Synthroid medicaition,especially if your doctor told you your TSH is normal. I think your other symptoms are absolutely unrelated to hypothyroidism. You should discuss these with your doctor and maybe he/she would like to check some tests to further evaluate.

      In regards to thyroid supplements, Levothyroxine (Synthroid) is the preferred treatment. I don’t know if you realize that Levothyroxine is T4 and the body converts it to the active form of T3. T3 supplementation is only used in rare circumstances and is not superior to T4 supplementation in 99.9% of patients. T3 also leads to fluctuating levels during the day. So no, I don’t think this is an appropriate option for you. In regards to natural thyroid, I do not know a single doctor that has ever prescribed or recommended this. The problem with natural thyroid is that we don’t know the potency or strength of it. Therefore we don’t know exactly how much T4 (thyroid hormone) you are actually getting. So basically the best treatment for hypothyroidism is Levothyroxine aka T4 aka Synthroid. I do not think changing your hypothyroid regimen will change your symptoms, because I very much doubt they are related to your thyroid disease. You should of course discuss this with your personal physician. I hope this helps you.

  13. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism In Dogs?
    My dog has Hypothyroidism. He is otherwise completely healthy aside from some hair loss. Throughout his life he has had illnesses related to immune deficiency. We feed him well (Natural Balance Limited Ingredients Sweet Potato and Duck). I just want to know if there is any way that we can treat his condition without hormone treatment? Is there anything I can give him to support his immune system?

    • ANSWER:
      You can feed him a good quality food with a sprinkle of iodized salt on it or other iodine supplement. But he will still probably need hormone support for his thyroid.

  14. QUESTION:
    I need some advice on how to help treat hypothyroidism?
    When I first met my fiancee, he was 21, quite a thin guy, healthy though, except for the smoking part. After he quit smoking, he suddenly gained a lot of weight (I mean, like… 30 pounds in a few months). At first I thought it was because he wasn’t smoking anymore, but a year goes by and more symptoms appear… after a visit to a doctor, looks like he has an under-active thyroid.

    I’m in a holistic health program right now, and I’m just learning, so I don’t know much about how to treat this. I have an idea of a homeopathic treatment, I have the idea that a weak liver could cause hypothyroidism… so I’m just wondering, is there any natural ways that I can help him? I don’t want to put him on drugs, or have him popping a pill for the rest of his life. Is there something we could do to, maybe, help his thyroid for good? Any diets or anything?

    Thanks for any insight!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article might be of some help:
      “…One of the key amino acids involved in the manufacture of the thyroid hormones is tyrosine. This nutrient, by the way, has been used to help cocaine addicts kick the habit by helping them avoid the worst of the withdrawal symptoms, including tiredness, depression, and irritability. It is also one of the active agents in a new formulation called Thyro Boost, which will help too. It includes kelp, which provides iodine (the other nutrient needed to make thyroid hormones) in the form of iodide and energy-boosting Co-Enzyme Q10. Thyro Boost is available by mail order from the Nutri Centre (0800 –587 2290)….”

  15. QUESTION:
    Treating Adrenal Exhaustion & Hypothyroidism?
    I would like to hear from others who have had to treat Adrenal Exhaustion (& hopefully have hypothyroid as well.)

    I esp want to know about which are the most effective, yet most affordable herbs/supplements/combos.

    I’ve been reading a lot of info from stopthemadness.com.

    I’m on a low dose of Armour for my thyroid. When I went up a bit on the dosage, had terrible reaction with all the symptoms of Severe Adrenal Exhaustion (which I knew I had a while ago but did not know how to treat.)

    I would like to avoid seeing an endocrinologist, simply b/c so many of them don’t even believe in Adrenal Exhaustion and IF they do, want to treat it with steroids. I want to go the NATURAL route.

    I’m also wondering how long it usually takes to feel a difference (when taking supplements.)

    Currently, I am taking The adaptogen herb, Rhodiola (200mg) and Eleuthero (1000mg)–Siberian Gingseng, I believe.

    All this came about due to diagnosis to “treatment resistant depression.” (And a lot of my own research.)

    I really appreciate anyone’s help with this! Thank you. (Any links to info or products will also be greatly appreciated.)

    • ANSWER:
      I treated mine with isocort.

      http://www.modernherbalist.com/products/isocort.html

      There are plenty of other places you can get it, just shop around for the best price.

  16. QUESTION:
    Anyone with thyroid disorder have luck with gluten-free?
    I found out a few months ago that I have Hypothyroidism and so I have been trying out some different natural forms of treatments, such as acupressure, adding coconut oil to my diet, and cutting out certain foods from my diet. I’ve been reading that gluten intolerance/Celiac disease has been “linked” to Thyroid disorders. It’s hard to know what to believe these days as far as what is good for you and what is the best treatments for this and that,etc. But I’ve tried various things and have noticed that cutting the gluten out of my diet seems to help with my thyroid symptoms the most.

    Just curious if anyone else out there with thyroid trouble has tried a gluten free diet and what kind of effects did you get?

    • ANSWER:
      That is good to know that you are seeing results from it. Thanks for sharing. That could help others out, because this disease can be hard as heck to deal with. I have been considering buying this book on this website I buy my supplements from, because it has a hypothyroidism cookbook that comes with it. I haven’t tried it yet but I think I am going to have to give it a go. I’m not sure if it is gluten free of not, but it would be nice to have recipes to follow.

  17. QUESTION:
    I am freezing all the time. I am especially cold at work. The environment that I work in is 61 degrees. help?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hypothyroidism after a long fight with Hyperthroidism and radioactive treatment 3 months ago. I am now trying to find a natural alternative to regulate my body temperature.

    • ANSWER:
      That is too bad that you went from one extreme to the other. Ask your doctor what the probable cause of your hyperthyroidism was. I would suggest you ask your doctor for thyroid antibody tests so that you know if your hyperthyroidism was from Graves disease, which is an auto-immune thyroid diseases. You may need a different thyroid medication or more thyroid medication. Keep working with your doc until you feel warmer and healthier. Some people are have a gluten (wheat protein) intolerance that really messes with their thyroid health. I suggest you do a trial 3 weeks off of all gluten (research what that includes) and see if your body temp and circulation raises.

  18. QUESTION:
    Chain rejection on Kidney Stones?
    I’m a kidney stone producing machine and just found out what triggers the deficiency on citric acids and overproduction of calcium in my body.
    Urologist prescribed a high blood pressure drug called Hydrochlorothiazide (I have low blood pressure) to reduce the production of calcium and a citric acid supplement I’m really not sure as if I should take this. I have to inject myself with B12 on a monthly basis which I need because I can’t produce it anymore myself and found out that this reduces the citric level. Then I came across Hypothyroidism and wonder if that is the reason for the high calcium production? Does anyone have suggestions on how I should approach the treatment or know about natural ways to get this in control? I do a low oxalate diet and avoid foods triggering my symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      Hydrochlorothiazide is a diuretic and is often the first step in lowering blood pressure in someone who is newly diagnosed with high blood pressure. I would follow your physician’s suggestions on care rather than trying to treat it yourself. You can also try holistic methods but in conjunction with your physician’s recommendations. Also, let your doctor know what herbs/supplements that you plan on taking so that he can verify whether there might be a problem with interactions between the substances. Sometimes, a low oxalate diet does not stop the kidney stones and medications may be needed. And, dehydration is a common cause of kidney stones so make sure your daily water intake is high.

  19. QUESTION:
    Pains 2 1/2 weeks after miscarriage – can anyone advise?
    I had a miscarriage that began very suddenly and quickly on Friday, May 15th 2009. At my doctors appointment on Monday, May 18th, I was advised that I would more than likely not need a D & C as this was moving rapidly and appeared that I would be okay with a natural miscarriage as long as it was ok with me – which it was as a D & C was not something I wanted to consider. I have Hypothyroidism which is in the early stages of treatment and my THS levels are still very high, which is what was suggested as the cause of this horrible event.

    Everything seemed to subside (pain, bleeding etc.,) by Thursday, May 21, although I was still quite weak and a little crampy and uncomfortable. Skip to today, Thursday, June 4th….

    I am showing no signs of infection, no bleeding, nausea, fever, discharge etc,. but I am starting to feel some discomfort from deep inside my pelvic area (ovaries more than likely). No severe cramps but a dull ache on either side that seems to shift from side to side and occasionally is felt on both sides simultaneously. I have slight lower back pain but nothing to run to the doctor about yet….

    My question is aimed at anyone who has experienced this terrible event and I would like to know if this is normal and how long it actually takes for all the aches to dissipate completely.

    I have read online that this pain could be the fact that I am ovulating, or that my body is trying to expel any left over tissue from the miscarriage.. Just for the record, when I started feeling better last week, I started working in my garden and think I may have over-done it as I haven’t felt great since….

    Each website I look at tells me different things about this experience and I need to hear from someone who has experienced this.

    Thanks and I hope to hear from you soon :-)

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry for your loss. I’ve had 3 miscarriages and only had pain a day after everything came out. You might have over did it working in the garden cuz I just was lazy for like 2 weeks didn’t feel like doing anything but sleeping to forget about it. You might want to call your doctor just to make sure that’s normal cuz sometimes half of it comes out and the other parts don’t. If thats the case you’ll have to have a D&C which is way better anyway. I did 2 of them naturally and the last had to do a D&C. They can also give you pain killers if it gets to bad.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to make thyroid pills?
    so this is probably a waste of points. but im a big “survive apocolypse” type person. I’m diagnosed with hypothyroidism… is it possible for me to produce my own natural thyroid meds kinda like Armour.

    I read somewhere that thyroid treatment has been available since the 1800′s… how did they make it?
    On the actual Armour website it basically says this:

    they take thyroid glands out of pigs.
    they dry the thyroid glands
    they crush the thyroid glands into a powder
    then they put the crushed glands into a pill format.

    seems easy enough. anyone out there who has some knowledge on this??

    • ANSWER:
      best resource might be someone like dr lowe (drlowe.com) who makes his own and others who makeit.
      BTW the herbalists already know the herbs you would need, talk to them
      also the vitamins andminerals you would need dearpharmacist.com suzie cohen is a renegade pharmacist telling people what drugs do to them and how to counter them and what vitamins /minerals they need

      best wishes, these thoughts i have had also.

      way to go medicine

  21. QUESTION:
    How do i get out of this terrible situation? please help?
    I’m 15 and i’ve had an under active thyroid (hypothyroidism) since March this year. I take tablets called Levothyroxine, and ever since i started them they’ve given me horrific insomnia, and it’s so bad that i only get 10 minutes sleep a night and i cant function normally because of it and i cant even stand up i’m so exhausted. So basically i got told by my doctor that there was no other alternative treatment and so i had to stay on them for all of this time, which meant 8 months of severe insomnia. I even had a sleep study done at hospital and they said it is the tablets causing it but they did nothing about it! Also, the Levothyroxine doesn’t even work! I still have all of my symptoms, like hair loss, freezing cold hands and feet,constipation etc.. So i ask myself WHY am i still taking them? But i know there are other brands of thyroxine but they will probably be exactly the same, so i heard of this natural thyroid hormone drug called Armour thyroid, but it’s not licensed in the UK and no doctor will prescribe it to me. How can i get it? i don’t really want to buy it off the internet its too risky. Please help, this is destroying my life and it will destroy my christmas if it continues.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you told the doctor that the tablets gave you insomnia ?

      I would seek a second opinion from another doctor, it sounds like you are getting too much thyroxine if you can’t sleep. Ask for a repeat thyroid function test.

  22. QUESTION:
    TSH levels in Infants?
    My 6 month old had a TSH level of 5.6, however, her t3 and t4 results were perfect. Her doctor actually called social services because I missed her wellness visit and he felt I was neglecting to give her medical treatment. Lately I have been researching and it seems other doctors say that 5.6 in a 4 month old(her age at the time of the test) is normal especially if the t tests were normal. Also, she shows none of the signs for hypothyroidism. She is extremely healthy and a very happy baby. Her skin is to die for and her nails(trust me and my scratched face when she grabs my nose) are perfect. I just want to know if I am right in thinking this guy is a quack. Also, can anyone show me a reputable website that confirms my information. I searched for hours but if I missed something I want to know. I need something to show him so that he doesn’t try to take my daughter away because of neglect.
    ps I love the natural way and I will be taking her to a nutritionist if she starts showing symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      Presuming the units of measurement for TSH are mIU/L (or mU/L), 5.6 is normal for a 4 month old. It would be borderline high in an adult, but infants have slightly higher TSH levels. The exact ‘normal range’ (reference range) depends on the method, but the expected values for babies are always higher than for adults.

      For example, here is some published scientific literature: This paper: http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/reprint/45/7/1087.pdf quotes a reference interval of 0.8 – 6.3 mIU/L for babies aged 1-11 months, with a mean of 2.2 (‘reference interval’ means 95% of people will have results in that range). They quote a range of 0.5 – 3.9 for people aged 16-20 years.

      This paper: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6823/8/15 quotes 1.12 – 8.21 mU/L for 1-12 months, compared to a range of 0.5 – 4.33 mU/L for 15-18 year olds.

      However, don’t be too harsh on the doctor – family doctors are unlikely to be very familiar with this, and the lab that issued the results may just have put the adult range, which would have made the result look as if it was abnormal. Hypothyroidism is serious in kids, so I wouldn’t blame the doctor for being cautious and worried if you missed a visit. I have to also say that the ‘natural’ way isn’t necessarily the best way, and I would stay well away from nutritionists (anyone can call themselves a nutritionist!).

  23. QUESTION:
    How do i get out of this terrible situation? please help?
    I’m 15 and i’ve had an under active thyroid (hypothyroidism) since March this year. I take tablets called Levothyroxine, and ever since i started them they’ve given me horrific insomnia, and it’s so bad that i only get 10 minutes sleep a night and i cant function normally because of it and i cant even stand up i’m so exhausted. So basically i got told by my doctor that there was no other alternative treatment and so i had to stay on them for all of this time, which meant 8 months of severe insomnia. I even had a sleep study done at hospital and they said it is the tablets causing it but they did nothing about it! Also, the Levothyroxine doesn’t even work! I still have all of my symptoms, like hair loss, freezing cold hands and feet,constipation etc.. So i ask myself WHY am i still taking them? But i know there are other brands of thyroxine but they will probably be exactly the same, so i heard of this natural thyroid hormone drug called Armour thyroid, but it’s not licensed in the UK and no doctor will prescribe it to me. How can i get it? i don’t really want to buy it off the internet its too risky. Please help, this is destroying my life and it will destroy my christmas if it continues.

    • ANSWER:
      I would go back and have a tlak with the Dr. – not all thyroid replacement pills have the same side-effects – you may respond better to another one — as far as the insomnia is concerned – your Dr. should be able to give you something for insomnia – or you could try OTC Sominex or Tyelnol PM for temporary use . If you have been taking the meds for 8 months – you should be accustomed to it by now –
      I would be leary of trying an uregulated drug — this is a condition that you will have to take meds for the rest of your life — not something that is going to go away —
      The symptoms you mentioned are not exclusive to hypothyroidism – and if the meds are not helping – you need to let your Dr. know —
      If your Dr. is no more help – get a second opinion — or go to an Endocrinologist —

  24. QUESTION:
    How do i get out of this terrible situation? please help?
    I’m 15 and i’ve had an under active thyroid (hypothyroidism) since March this year. I take tablets called Levothyroxine, and ever since i started them they’ve given me horrific insomnia, and it’s so bad that i only get 10 minutes sleep a night and i cant function normally because of it and i cant even stand up i’m so exhausted. So basically i got told by my doctor that there was no other alternative treatment and so i had to stay on them for all of this time, which meant 8 months of severe insomnia. I even had a sleep study done at hospital and they said it is the tablets causing it but they did nothing about it! Also, the Levothyroxine doesn’t even work! I still have all of my symptoms, like hair loss, freezing cold hands and feet,constipation etc.. So i ask myself WHY am i still taking them? But i know there are other brands of thyroxine but they will probably be exactly the same, so i heard of this natural thyroid hormone drug called Armour thyroid, but it’s not licensed in the UK and no doctor will prescribe it to me. How can i get it? i don’t really want to buy it off the internet its too risky. Please help, this is destroying my life and it will destroy my christmas if it continues.

    • ANSWER:
      To me sounds like you need a second opinion and a dosage adjustment and a Rx for a sleep medication such as Ambein or Lunesta


Hypothyroidism Natural Treatment Weight Loss

Have you been feeling under the weather recently, feeling drained, lethargic experiencing that worn out ready to drop feeling. a visit to your doctor followed by a blood tests revealed that you are suffering from Hypothyroidism also referred to as under active thyroid.

You are prescribed your synthetic medication which will supposedly improve your condition, bear in mind this is not an overnight recovery plan. The journey in restoring your health has just began, bearing in mind that it is still unknown what your correct drug dosage should be, so in a way you are at the trial and error stages until the correct dosage that will balance your thyroxin level can be identified, this could take anywhere from 3 – 6 Months. You Are Not Alone.. Millions of people are affected by this problem, equally many remain unaware of this problem and that there are natural products available that will help to kick hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism is really an underactive thyroid gland that produces thyroid hormones in much less quantity that affect the overall function of the body. Thyroid is a small gland which is located in the middle of the lower neck.

A blood test is required to confirm the problem of an underactive thyroid gland. Thyroid scans and blood test results can help to determine or identify an underactive thyroid.

Lets take a look at what Hypothyroidism really is all about, Symptoms of thyroid issues are responsible for a wide range of health problems:

Individuals will suffer from symptoms of thyroid in different ways, here is a list of some of the familiar problems:

-Fatigue, dry flaky skin

-brittle nails, infertility

-bloated stomach,low sex drive

-weight gain,depression, poor concentration

-exhaustion,aching joints and muscles

-heart palpitations, constipation, and many more

However a quick test will reveal whether the level of Thyroxin being produced by the thyroid is adequate to regulate the body hormone requirement.

The thyroid hormone is carried from the thyroid gland to various parts of the body and include every tissue in the body. It has the ability to ensure that the body cells, metabolism, tissues and organs are regulated functioning just right.

Activities such as energy generation strenuous exercises, the functions of the heart, brain, body muscles are all aided by good thyroxin levels.

So it is clear that thyroxin plays a very vital role in the overall well being of an individual. The tendency to gain weight when there is not enough secretion of the desired hormone –thyroxin being the desired hormone – the body functions are interfered with. As a result, processes like the breaking down of carbs and calories regulating good energy balance and weight gain control can be a difficult task for the individual.

Thyroid sufferers frequently feel very tired and worn out when they have hypothyroidism problems.

Another factor of hypothyroidism with the increased rate of tiredness, come weight gain. The individual constant feeling of Lethargy give the feeling of tireness to even exercise. This also coupled with the body’s inability to properly break down food components as a result increased weight gain. Take note as soon as you notice you are becoming more frequently tired and is gaining weight, see the doctor as soon as possible to determine the real cause.

What if I were to tell you there are incredible effective natural products available on the market today that will provide relief and cure your thyroid issues and associated problems.

What if I were to tell you there is one product which clearly stand out from the rest .. Imaging trouble free thyroid function – Imagine the feeling of restored energy and weight control.

It is stated that thyroid problems tend to affect the older more than the younger generation, actually thyroid problems can affect any age group. If you believe that a thyroid problem is behind your hair loss, it is always best to consult a medical professional at the earliest opportunity to be certain, a permanent hair replacement should be delayed as hair loss are usually temporary, a change in hair style will suffice.

If you had the choice of synthetic medication with its side effects and an all natural thyroid remedy with all the natural ingredients that include L-Tyrosine, an amino acid, adrenal powder, ginger extract, piper Longum extract that assists in better regulating the body metabolism and promoting healthy adrenal glands with improved regeneration of thyroid hormone production, I would hope you would chose the natural product of course..

Imagine how great it would be if individuals suffering from thyroid problems could once again enjoy life with restored energy and can perform their usual daily activities without having to worry about hypothyroidism or side effects of medication.

copyright© 2010


Hypothyroidism Natural Treatment Review

Thyroid disease symptoms and hypothyroidism symptoms afflict millions of adults in the USA alone. Thyroid disease symptoms are frequently misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. Approximately 10-20% of women and 1-2% of men have symptoms of thyroid problems. The most common type of thyroid dysfunction is the condition hypothyroidism, also called low thyroid or underactive thyroid.

When thyroid function slows too much, one of the consequences is that metabolism in the body slows down more than it should. When the body’s metabolism slows down due to underactive thyroid function, the result can be hypothyroidism symptoms such as fatigue, weight gain and depression. And other thyroid symptoms may be experienced as well, and these other symptoms may appear to be unrelated.

The most common thyroid disease symptoms and hypothyroidism symptoms include:

• Cold intolerance, cold hands and feet
• Constipation
• Depression
• Dry and coarse skin
• Fatigue and weakness
• Forgetfulness, dementia
• Hair loss
• Heavy menstrual periods
• High cholesterol
• Immune system problems
• Nervousness, tremors
• Sleep difficulties
• Weight gain

Having hypothyroidism symptoms is related to hormone imbalance. For a woman, three of the critical hormones are estrogen, thyroid hormone and progesterone. Understanding how these hormones work together helps one better understand how to approach treating thyroid disease symptoms.

Harvard-trained Dr. John R. Lee, women’s physician Dr. Jesse Hanley and Virginia Hopkins are co-authors of the best-seller What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Premenopause. Dr. Lee explains his observations over a twenty-year period when treating women having thyroid disease symptoms. Dr. Lee believed that elevated levels of estrogen interferes with normal thyroid function, while progesterone facilitates healthy thyroid function. As excess estrogen interferes with normal thyroid hormone function, progesterone helps the thyroid gland function more as it is supposed to.

He noticed that women who tested normal for thyroid function were often progesterone deficient. Dr. Lee found a clear pattern in his patients with a progesterone deficiency which was this – their thyroid disease symptoms lessened when natural progesterone supplementation was done and hormone balance was achieved.

Read more about hormone imbalance, how progesterone deficiency happens and how to have balanced hormones for better health. There is a free online womens hormone health test you can take to find out more about your health and symptoms you may be experiencing. After the test, you will receive physician-based recommendations based on your answers. If you feel you may have thyroid disease symptoms, learn more about the natural approaches recommended by naturopathic physicians for treating hypothyroidism symptoms.

Copyright 2005 InfoSearch Publishing


Hypothyroidism Natural Treatment Forum

Ugh the Bug!

They are everywhere Bed Bugs! – and they’re coming soon to a bed near you! At least thats the hype du jour. Unlike all the other predicted outbreaks and pandemics this is one bug we can actually see! And theres only one ‘vaccine’ I know of but first:

Here in North America the infestations appear to be confined to isolated pockets of communities, not unlike the head lice that periodically circulate within a school system, or the parasitical rumors that run amuck on myopic internet forums.
In this era of hyper linked transportation its probably just a matter of a few weeks before the Bed Bug outbreaks connect the rest of us with their little dots.

Time to open Bed Bug Hunting Season! No permits needed. No Bag Limits!

From my Native American Hunter/Gatherer perspective lets logically analyze our predicament.
Who is attacking us: A parasitical insect of the family Cimicidae.
What do they eat: Our blood – regardless type or quantum.
How big is this stalking prey: The size of a dog tick.
How could they harm us: Although built to hold and transfer over 20 and as many as 40 known pathogens harbored in the blood they ingest, thus far there are no known transmissions of disease. So far their bites merely irritate us and make us remember that everything on earth seems to have a natural predator including us.
Good News for urban dwellers: Bed Bugs natural enemy is the cockroach.
Bad News for the impatient: Bed Bugs can live dormant in your home for at least a year, except for a new pesticide-resistant variety that seldom lives past 2 months.

Enough known. Time to access my genetically implanted Indigenous Survive-All Guide and apply the following Hunter/Gatherer principles.

1.When the best Hunters in nature are being attacked by something much smaller, their answer is easy: EAT YOUR ENEMY. Ingesting Bed Bugs (toasted as a tasty tofu casserole topping for that anti-anticipated Parent-Teacher Potluck) doesnt whet your appetite? Then move to the next line of attack:

2.Hire Mercenaries: BRING IN THE CHICKENS everyone (now including you) knows that chickens eat bugs. Its what they do and with great gusto and most importantly with unerring precision and consistency. So whats a small flock of red-legged Banties fluttering around your Pottery Barn linens for a couple days its cheaper than an exterminator and with no chemically induced mutations for the bed bugs or you!

BONUS: When implementing Option #2 you also get FREE EGGS likely to be salmonella-free as well! Not as fond of fresh feather down pillows as you thought you were? Move to Option #3:

3.BECOME A BED BUG WARRIOR: Since the old Trader days, Indians have had a healthy appreciation for the white mans novelty goods. Enter the Scotsas in Scotch brand double sided sticky tape:

How to Catch a Bed Bug in Your Bed They come out in the dark so you will need a small LED light, preferably mounted on your head via hat or headband. You will also need two or more rolls of double sided sticky tape. (The first roll will fall onto the floor and end up under your bed, smothered by hungry Dust Bunnies stay tuned for upcoming manual on How to Catch, Skin & Tan Dust Bunnies (they make lovely slippers for Christmas gifts!).

With the second roll of double sticky tape peel off five 6 inch lengths, twirl them into loops and place the four loops at the edges of each quadrant of your mattress. The fifth loop remains stuck to your index finger of your dominant hand. (Good news Lefties double sided tape is for the semi-ambidextrous meaning those who use one hand welleven if its the left one.)

Did I mention, you need to be naked for this safari otherwise every piece of clothing becomes camouflage for the prey, not for you the hunter! If you are a novice at entomological bed bug tracking then use only solid white or pastel sheets until your skills are honed for the more advanced challenges of patterned percale.
Next, lie or sit naked in your bed, LED light on your head, sticky tape cocked and ready to fire.

When your prey mozies out to the buffet of your B-positive infused body, POUNCE with your tacky digits! Quickly repeat motion like a rapid firing Gatling gun.
When lint has coated your weapon rendering it useless grab your auxiliary arms the four remaining double sticky loops!!!! Go for it – NOW! This is no time for panic!
After the chaos subsides and the lint settles, pause to assess the body counts.
Now every hunter misses more often than he makes the mark. Do not be discouraged. Think of each missed attempt as practice.

After all your practice rounds, get out the third roll of double sticky tape and FOCUS.
Once you do catch a couple of these elusive little game-bugs, you may find you actually enjoy mounting the strips of sticky tape trophies along the wall above your bed. Its a modest form of self-congratulatory accomplishment.
You deserve it.

Soon you will be texting friends comparing bragging rites on nightly quotas captured!

And think of all the money you will have saved!
Plus, you took charge and proactively protected your health, yes, from bed bug bites, but more crucially from the litany of harmful effects both recorded and unknown from the use of deadly chemicals in your sleeping space. Eight hours of exposure every night to ANY chemical that can kill a lot of bugs, wherever they are hiding, has got to be less than healthful for your species too!

Inspired to imitate this Indian? Then please, enjoy my humble hunting chant as you do:

How many beds can a bed bug bug if a bed bug bugs all beds? How many bugs can a bed bug bed if a bed bug beds all bugs! How many bugs and how many beds can a bed bug bag, bed, bugand after the beds – how bout the rugs?

Happy Hunting.

Oh, and the ‘Vaccine’ referenced in paragraph one: I write from personal experience. Last year a stray cat deposited a herd of fleas in my bedroom. While I was tempted to just run the visiting feline through the house to re-collect them all, I ended up performing the very same sticky-tape hunting ritual as recorded above.

Every night, several times each night, I deliberately rendered myself a human target baited the little buggers with my naked body, armed with straps of sticky death. I caught literally hundreds. It took three and a half weeks and I caught them one and all. It has been 11 months flea-free and not a chemical was used.

I also fortified myself with my favorite brand of certified organic Native American based herbals, Her Native Roots. I rely on their Immune Boost, Anti-Plague Formula and their Super Tonic which made my blood unsavory to any and all would-be predators. It is my personal belief, based on 20 years of exclusive use, that these herbs keep me cold-free and flu-free and mosquito and tick-free all year round too without any harmful pesticides or chemical preventives here in the heart of West Nile Virus and Lyme Disease country!

IF my home were infected by Bed Bugs I would immediately ingest herbs that made my blood and skin distasteful while also keeping a bottle of Her Native Roots Nerve Calm on hand to use externally and internally; beyond its use as a nervine it calms the external itching and pain from anything Ive experienced including poison oak and ivy and a freshly fractured femur!

In the event of a full fledged infestation I would also use diatomaceous earth on my bedding and rooms as it pierces the insects exoskeletons and thus kills them over time while not harming humans and other mammals or birds sharing the space. Theres more than one way to bag a bed bug these are mine.

– Avis Bullrunner