Hypothyroidism Help Groups

By hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is producing too less hormones to stimulate the metabolism or the body is not able to utilize the hormones. The lack of thyroid hormones slows down the metabolism and thus all the activities in the body, giving a combination of many symptoms related to slowness of bodily processes.

Hypothyroidism is common, but the frequency of the condition is not well determined. Some authorities estimate that 0.5% of the total American population have the disease to some degree. The frequency is much greater among people over 50 years of age than among young people.

THE SYMPTOMS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

The most common early symptoms are: Mental and physical fatigue, weakness, weight gain or over-weight, and depression.

One or more of these symptoms also use to appear early: Constipation, sensitivity to coldness, cold hands and feet, thick tongue, decreased sweating, dry hair, thin brittle hair, thin brittle nails, muscle and joint pain, pale or yellowish skin.

One or more of these symptoms usually appear later: Poor memory, slow thought process, drowsiness, slow speech, thinning of eyebrows, hoarseness, poor circulation, dry and flaky skin, decreased taste and smell, menstrual irregularities, skin thickening, puffy face, puffy hands and feet, swelling of extremities, overall swelling, muscle spasms, muscle atrophy, joint stiffness.

In children or young persons hypothyroidism may give developmental problems, like disturbed tooth development and short stature.

Hypothyroidism increases the risk of elevated cholesterol levels, heart disease and diabetes (diabetes mellitus). This occurs even by moderately decreased thyroid production.

THE THYROID GLAND AND ITS HORMONES

To understand the hypothyroidism, some knowledge about the thyroid gland and its hormones is essential.

The thyroid gland produces hormones that accelerate and in other wise regulate metabolism. A part of metabolism is the process of breaking down energy containing nutrients, and using the energy to produce molecules that all the processes and activities in the body use as fuel. Another part is the production of molecules that the body use as building materials.

The thyroid makes four hormones: Thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), diiodothyronine (T2) and monoiodothyronine (T1). The hormones contain iodine, and the figures tell about the number of iodine atoms in each hormone molecule. T3 is not made directly, but is produced from T4. T3 is a more efficient hormone than T4. Therefore this conversion is important.

The pituitary, a gland under the brain, produces a hormone called thyrotropin or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) that enhances the activity of the thyroid gland. If the body has too less thyroid hormone in the blood, the pituitary produces more thyrotropin. This makes the thyroid gland speed up its own production. By a too heavy thyroid hormone concentration, less thyrotropin is produced by the pituitary, and the thyroid gland slows down. This feed-back mechanism regulates the metabolism of the whole body.

THE MECHANISMS AND CAUSES OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

By hypothyroidism the body does not get enough thyroid hormone, or the hormones do not work effectively in the body. This causes the metabolism to slow down. When the metabolism decreases, the processes in the body do not get enough fuel and building materials, and all the body activities will therefore slow down. Energy containing nutrient will also be stored as fat, since they are not broken down.

Serious variants of hypothyroidism are called myxedema. This is a rare condition. However, less serious, but painful variants are common. There are several reasons for hypothyroidism, each giving a variant of the disease:

* An autoimmune reaction against the thyroid tissue can destroy the capability of the thyroid gland to produce hormones (for example Hashimoto’s disease).

* Sometimes the production of T3 by conversion from T4 is impaired. The total amount of hormones may be normal in these cases, but the body is still lacking T3, and gets the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

* Iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, since the thyroid hormones contain iodine. In Europe and America the food is seldom short in iodine, but bad nutrition may result in iodine deficiency.

* Surgery or radiation at the thyroid area can destroy enough tissue to cause hypothyroidism.

* Injury or disease in the pituitary or of the part of the brain controlling the pituitary may cause a decrease in secreted thyrotropin, and then the thyroid will respond by producing less of its own hormones with hypothyroidism as a result.

* Some people have symptoms of hypothyroidism even though the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood is normal. One of the symptoms is raised levels of thyrotropin, indicating that the body signals need for more thyroid hormones. This variant may be caused by conditions elsewhere in the body that make it difficult for the hormone to reach their destination in the cells. In many of these cases the immune system produces anti-bodies against the thyroid hormones. This variant is called sub-clinical hypothyroidism, and responds to the same treatment as ordinary hypothyroidism.

* Some types of food can contribute to a depressed thyroid function or aggravate hypothyroidism when eaten raw in great amounts: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy and turnips. By cooking these vegetables, the depressing effect is decreased.

* Factors suspected for causing hypothyroidism are: The artificial sweetener aspartame, mercury pollution, dental fillings containing mercury, fluoride and heavy metal pollution.

HOW CAN HYPOTHYROIDISM BE TREATED

For serious hypothyroidism caused by tissue destruction, external supplement of thyroid hormones is necessary.

When the condition is caused by lack of iodine in the diet, dietary changes and iodine supplements will be a part of the treatment.

Less serious, but painful hypothyroidism is sometimes also treated with hormone supplements. In these cases it is difficult to find the right dose, and treatment may result in hormone poisoning.

You can sometimes alleviate hypothyroidism by reducing the amount of food suspected for depressing the thyroid function: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy, soy products and turnips. However, these food types are valuable in many ways, so it is probably not wise to cut them out totally. Also try to avoid artificial ingredients like the sweetener aspartame, conserving additives and fluoride.

Changing out mercury dental fillings and avoiding mercury or heavy metal exposure may help to ameliorate the condition.

You may also alleviate the condition by eating food that stimulates the thyroid function according to practical experience: Chia seed, dulse, fish from the ocean, flax seed, pumpkin seed, seaweed, coconut and brewer yeast.

You can find nutritional supplements to help for hypothyroidism. The compositions of these products vary:

* They may contain building materials that the thyroid uses to make its hormones, for example: iodine, acetyl-L-tyrosine or L-phenylalanine.

* They may also contain vitamins and minerals that stimulate the mechanism of hormone production by being a part of necessary enzymes, or by helping the absorption of the ingredients that hormones are made from, like: Magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper and vitamin E.

* They may furthermore contain constituents that stimulate tissue regeneration by being part of tissue building enzymes, and thus helping to restore a degraded thyroid, for example: Folic acid or folate, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cyanocobalamin) and molybdenum.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Please help, I have Hypothyroidism and cant gain any weight, even by working out.?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about a year ago. I am 18 yo and a male 5 feet 11 inches (between 136 and 140 pounds) and I guess what is called a hard gainer. I eat a lot of food and work out correctly but cant seem to put on a pound of anything.. I take a great multi vitamin, work out certain muscle groups per day, and eat more than my body burns, or so I think. I am extremely physically fit person and can more than max my Army PT Test. I will do anything to gain weight including supplements. i Just find it strange that I have been the same weight for a year now after having worked out for near a year. please help.
    No, im 100 percent sure The doc diagnosed me with Hypo… I do know the difference between the 2 though and it is rather odd…

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    Congenital Hypothyroidism?
    Are there any parents out there whose children have been diagnosed and have found a support group? I would desperately like other parents to talk to about this, but all I’ve found in support groups.. well the pages are littered with people trying to sell things… Please help

    • ANSWER:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Congenital-Hypothyroidism/

      That is the CH group I belong to. In addition I posted an answer on your other question and sent you an email.

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism treatment and weight loss?
    Right now I have subclinical hypothyroidism. I’m about to have my T3, T4, T3 Free, T4 Free, and TSH tested again, so it may be clinical now. I have most of the symptoms, even some of the uncommon ones such as inability to concentrate, memory problems (such as walking up the stairs and forgetting why), etc. I didn’t realize how many of the symptoms I had until a few weeks ago. I know that I have this and I do need treatment. Most days I can barely concentrate, absolutely cannot study, and I feel like the human sloth. I have absolutely no energy most of the time. Most days, I wish I didn’t exist because I cannot function as I should be able to. I lack the concentration to read casual books now (most of the time).

    Quick note. Two months ago my TSH was at 4.06 and is expected to be higher now. For those who don’t know, anything below a 5.5 is subclinical. Anything above is clinical. 1 is normal.

    I live very healthily. I take a lot of vitamins as suggested by my doctors. I also exercise everyday and I have a very good diet. I’m very knowledgable when it comes to diet and exercise. I don’t overwork myself, I utilize muscle confusion, and I allow my body to rest. I never work the same muscle group two days in a row. Lots of stretching and yoga. As far as my diet goes, it’s tailored to help me with my acute onset inflammatory arthritis which I am in the process of conquering. Making progress everyday.

    However, and this is extremely frustrating, I have the hardest time losing weight. I had A LOT of medical issues this past year and I learned a lot about my body. Deficiencies, conditions, etc. I also learned a lot about hypothyroidism and I know that weight gain, or the inability to lose weight is a symptom. I also know that weight loss is common when treating hypothyroidism.

    What should I expect after starting treatment? I know that it takes about 4-8 weeks to have results, but how soon can I expect to lose weight. Also, how soon could I expect to feel normal again (normal concentration, energy, no depression, no insomnia, etc)?

    I know that it varies from person to person, but a rough estimate would be nice. I’m a 22 yr old male, 5’10 at 160 lbs.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    How to cope with Hypothyroidism?
    Is there any hypothyroid patients out there especially guys who can give advice on how they have over come this disease….i am a 20 yr old male, and i was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism last month. My doctor hasn’t been to helpful as to what i should do now to take care of myself, i guess he was hoping that once i take the medicine everything would be fine. I should have probably posted this on a website dedicated to thyroid patients but i have yet to find a support group online dedicated to male patients. So basically i would like to know how to cope with the disease especially the anxiety disorder i have been experiencing, and i have also read that it is harder for hypothyroid patients to lose weight, so if anyone has any advice on what they did to help them lose weight would also be helpful, and i have lost some hair so i am wondering if i can do anything to help it grow back, can it grow back, and any other little details that i might not know about would be helpful!!!!
    I have been referred to an endocrinologist but ive been told its gonna be awhile before i see him so i want to know what i start doing now to help myself get better

    and i have been diagnosed with hashimoto’s disease
    and i know i put my question in the diabetes category, i wasn’t paying attention lol

    • ANSWER:
      As soon as your meds are sorted out your hair will grow back and for anxiety i have been put on betablockers which also help the palpitations when my thyroid goes overactive so try suggesting that to your GP. As for the weight gain all i can say is at least you have an excuse, however i found that a low fat diet and execise really helps to keep it off. I took up karate and as well as losing weight i can now defend myself, my next belt is black. The confidence i got through karate helps with the anxiety too.
      I was diagnosed with Graves Disease 11 years ago then i had radioactive iodine which killed my thyroid so now i am on levothyroxine for the rest of my life and will be battling with my weight and all the other side effects too for the rest of my life. Regular blood checks will help keep your levels maintained which in turn will keep the side effects at bay.

  5. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and severe Reflux?
    Hello
    I’m 16 years old and was diagnosed with a failed thyroid about 5 months ago. Treatment was great at first and I went from 50mg to 150mg in a couple of months . Since I went up from 100 to 150 I developed acid reflux so my gp put my dose back down To 100 so I am now suffering with all the symptoms of having an under active thyroid . Going down made no difference to the reflux so he put me on 125 after another 2 months ( 150 is the correct dose for me ) the reflux is worse than ever and I feel like I’m the only one out there that has had reflux this bad , I can’t go out in public as it’s so embarrassing to make gagging noices at people . So being 16 is not fun at the moment I have no friends Left as I’m not in the group anymore, luckily I have the most amazing boyfriend but even though he won’t admit it , it’s starting to annoy him
    Too .. Please help if you had the same thing or know anything Thankyou xxxx

    • ANSWER:
      Are you taking anything for the reflux (at least until the thyroid gets straightened out then you may no longer need it)? Prilosec generic is good. Maybe try that and also get doctor to increase back to 150.

      I take it and also Phillips Probiotics. We have to often take meds for all these symptoms that go along w/ thyroid at least til the thyroid is corrected.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  6. QUESTION:
    please help me with these questions i really need help asap?
    Which scientist believed that life had a common beginning with new forms branching off from earlier forms?

    A. Lamarck
    B. Darwin

    C. Luria

    D. Malthus

    2. If a person is so unfortunate as to lose the posterior pituitary gland, he or she would no longer be supplied with the hormone that works with the kidneys to maintain the body’s water balance. This hormone is called

    A. oxytocin.
    B. antidiuretic hormone.

    C. TSH.

    D. ACTH.

    3. Which one of the following sexually transmitted diseases is transmitted by a strain of virus?

    A. Chlamydia
    B. Syphilis

    C. Nongonoccal urethritis

    D. Genital warts

    4. The process of using heat to destroy bacteria that produced vinegary, unpalatable acids was developed by

    A. Gregor Mendel.
    B. Charles Darwin.

    C. Louis Pasteur.

    D. Robert Hook.

    5. The hormone that stimulates an increase in the size and the number of cells is

    A. gonadtropin.
    B. prolactin.

    C. growth hormone.

    D. releasing hormone.

    6. The olfactory bulb is related to the sense of smell as papillae are related to the sense of

    A. touch.
    B. taste.

    C. sight.

    D. hearing.

    7. The process by which microorganisms convert sunlight to sugar is the process of

    A. photosynthesis.
    B. fermentation.

    C. glycolysis.

    D. respiration.

    8. Which one of the following groups correctly identifies the order in which light enters the eye from any light source?

    A. Cornea, iris, retina
    B. Cornea, retina, iris

    C. Pupil, cornea, lens

    D. Pupil, lens, cornea

    9. The kind of reproduction that leads to large populations lacking genetic diversity and consisting of genetically identical organisms is

    A. cytokinesis.
    B. sexual reproduction.

    C. fission.

    D. meiosis.

    10. Air, depleted of _______ by fire, can no longer sustain fire or life because these processes require this element.

    A. nitrogen
    B. carbon

    C. hydrogen

    D. oxygen

    11. The breaking down of sugar to make ATP is the process of

    A. photosynthesis.
    B. fermentation.

    C. respiration.

    D. glycolysis.

    12. Which part of the brain coordinates muscle contractions?

    A. Brain stem
    B. Hypothalamus

    C. Cerebellum

    D. Sensory cortex

    13. Insulin is to the pancreas as _______ is to the adrenal medulla.

    A. glucagon
    B. glucocorticoids

    C. cortisol

    D. noradrenaline

    14. If a small pool of genes becomes separated from a larger pool of genes, the genes in the small pool will change rapidly and eventually will become a new species. This idea is known as

    A. geographic separation.
    B. selective breeding.

    C. population genetics.

    D. natural selection.

    15. Respiration takes place in which organelle within the cell?

    A. Golgi apparatus
    B. Endoplasmic reticulum

    C. Mitochondrion

    D. Nucleolus

    16. If you could control your brain with a remote device, a bit like the way you change channels on your television receiver, what part of your brain would you control to feel more emotionally calm and less angry?

    A. Hypothalamus
    B. Brain stem

    C. Limbic system

    D. Reticular formation

    17. Which one of the following symptoms is related to hypothyroidism?

    A. Increased mental activity
    B. Fatigue

    C. Accelerated heart rate

    D. Loss of weight

    18. Where in a human long bone would you find the connective tissue that’s heavily laced with blood vessels?

    A. Within the marrow cavity
    B. In sheets over compact bone

    C. Lining the marrow cavity

    D. Running through spongy bone

    19. If you could do what was needed to improve your night vision, what part of the eye should claim most of your attention?

    A. Photoreceptors in the iris
    B. Retinal cones

    C. Retinal rods

    D. Photoreceptors in the optic nerve

    20. Among the hormones related to the menstrual cycle, progesterone levels are highest during

    A. the first half of the cycle.
    B. ovulation.

    C. the last three days of the cycle.

    D. the second half of the cycle.

    • ANSWER:
      the first one is darwin

  7. QUESTION:
    Case study on endocrine system?
    Jane Doe began to experience unusual physical symptoms in 1979, but did not find a definitive answer for their occurrence for approximately nine (9) years. Her symptoms included ankle edema, irregular menses, frequent crying, and marked weight loss. She had been taking birth control pills but switched to using a diaphragm soon after the symptoms began. Although the symptoms continued, Jane endured them for two (2) years before finally seeking attention from her family physician.

    After routine thyroid studies, Jane Doe’s physician attributed her symptoms to hypothyroidism and she was started on levothyroxine at 0.2 mg daily in January of 1982. During March of 1983 her hair began to fall out in small but consistent amounts, she suffered amenorrhea, and she began to gain weight. She returned to her physician for repeat thyroid studies. At this point the physician decided that she was not hypothyroid and discontinued the levothyroxine.

    For the next several years, Jane Doe was disturbed by these physical and mental changes. She had the persistent feeling that something was just “not right”. Jane Doe sought medical attention for the continuance of these symptoms from 1983-1986. She was examined by a dermatologist, a gynecologist, and two endocrinologists in addition to her family physician, and was generally considered to be a hypochondriac by the medical profession and her husband.

    Jane Doe was depressed. She felt that her problems were being minimized by the healthcare professionals she went to for help. She was embarrassed to keep visiting different physicians and it was quite expensive to do so. From 1986-1988 some additional symptoms developed. They included the gradual enlargement of her breasts and occasional galactorrhea, as well as right visual field deficit and a significant drooping of her right eyelid. Again, she was determined that an underlying problem existed.

    Out of desperation, Jane Doe made an appointment with an endocrinologist at the University of Washington Medical Center, and this specialist has asked you to consult with him/her on the diagnosis of this case, as well as a possible course of treatment. Your group may ask for the results of a few specific tests through the group-specific discussion board. For example, you may want to ask for the serum level of a specific hormone, a specific aspect of the physical exam that you think may be helpful, or a test application of a drug or hormone followed by a measured output. Results of an MRI or CT scan may also be requested, but you must be specific when selecting a region of the body to investigate. Consider that in the real world this information costs money, and therefore, please only order tests and/or radiology information when you are convinced (as a group) that the information obtained is likely to assist you in your diagnosis. Finally, considering all of the information you are able to gather, please respond to each of the following questions:

    Are you going to agree with Jane Doe’s husband that she is a hypochondriac? If not, what is likely her underlying problem? Support either diagnosis with as much evidence as possible.

    [she doesn't have hypochondriac for sure. I know I'm suppose to ask for one type of blood test that will knock it down right away for me]
    I’m not sure if it’s her pituitary gland because when I asked the teacher for her TSH, t3, and t4 levels they were normal. Also she has no thyroid antigens.

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    Does this Blood-Type Diet WORK?! I have link…please help?
    My mom and I have A blood types. She eats and exercises like an O though. She is think and muscular….I am not. I just ear varied but would like to use weight. Should I follow my mom’s thing or should I try this? She excerices insane and I do not. Do you think this will work??

    http://www.wellness.com/reference/diet/blood-type-diet/practice-theory-and-evidence

    THANKS!

    Blood type A:
    In this diet, group A is called the “cultivator”.or this blood type, D’Adamo emphasizes a more vegetatian diet, omitting red meat. He recommends a high carbohydrate, low fat diet, consisting of a lot of fruits and vegetables. D’Adamo states that type A’s have thicker blood and a sensitive immune system, and should avoid dairy and animal products. They have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

    Blood type O:

    D’Adamo classifies blood group O as “the hunter” and the earliest human blood group, thought to be muscular and active. He suggests that type O’s include an abundance of meat in their diet, and a low amount of carbohydrates. He suggests enriching this diet with fruits and vegetables, limiting wheat germ, whole wheat and corn, and avoiding dairy products and most nuts. He states that Type O’s are commonly afflictes by hypothyroidism, high stomach acid, and thin blood.

    P.S
    I LOVE carbs and sweets
    and my mom loves meats and cheese.

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t follow the blood type diet, it is pseudoscience.

      Just consider for a moment how likely it is that a single extra acetyl galactosamine (the A antigen) on red blood cells is going to make a switch between these 2 cartoonish types. All the complexity of the digestion and musculatory system switched neatly from one stereotype to another? The evidence for that would need to be astounding and it just doesn’t exist. No proper scientists take it seriously.

      You can ‘prove’ it works by putting people on blood type diets and then later asking them if they feel better. This is the equivalent of ‘proving’ voodoo by getting a witchdoctor to throw curses at Haitians and asking them how they feel.

      http://www.owenfoundation.com/Health_Science/Blood_Type_Diet_FAQ.html

      http://www.skepdic.com/bloodtypediet.html

      To lose weight, concentrate on aerobic exercise, ie exercise that you can do comfortably for long periods without getting bored. Dancing to music, for example.

  9. QUESTION:
    What do you make of the fact that my college teacher is ignoring me?
    im 23 and im a senior in nursing school. one of my instructors bullied me. she refered to me to another teacher as “hypothyroidism girl” because i have hypothyroidism disorder. I ate a brownie at an orientation in a room full of people and she screamed at me “those brownies were meant for freshman and sophomore students only, then she took the plate and threw it in the trash and said now no one will have any!” she also asked me if i was on drugs and needed detox because i have shaky hands as a result of taking my thyroid med (synthroid)
    i complained to the school and they said “if she bullies you then why dont you just stay away from her, theres nothing we can do” she continued to harass me on a personal level and even asked me if i had an eating disorder..the school refused to help me because there are no laws to protect college students from bullying. i went all the way to the senator who asked her herself to stop.
    i cant stay away from her because shes one of my teachers.i have a senior presentation project due in may and she got assigned as my advisor for the project!!! i emailed her with questions and she blatantly ignored me its now business day 3 with no answer. Yet other people in my group emailed her just today and got responses.
    what do you make of this? where do i go from here?

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    Hair Loss And Thyroid?
    Hey all,
    First off I am a 17 year old female, I’m not sure if that helps the answer or not. Anyways a while back I had to go get numerous blood tests for hypothyroidism, all those tests later turned out I did not have it. Now I’m just fed up with my freaking hair. I know it is normal to shed but I am going to go crazy. I cannot take a shower without strands of hair coming out and then when I go to brush, more comes out. Even if I just group my hair and run my fingers through it more hair comes out. My towel needs to be washed all the time because hair is all over it and I just want to stop having people tell me “you have hair on your shirt”.

    Ok enough with the fluff. Someone told me that if my hair is falling out a lot over a period of time I should get my thyroid checked out. Why? What does hair have to do with the thyroid? Does my concern with thyroid in the past increase something now? Should I get it checked out?
    Thank you for answering! (and reading the long question lol)
    My hair is naturally very thin. I have always had thin hair so I don’t know if that helps. Thank you for all the help

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid imbalance is just one of many possible causes of hair loss. Teenage hair loss is becoming more and more common. Some of the more common causes include medication, recent vaccination, trauma, infection, major life change, birth control, extreme diet/weight loss, nutritional deficiency etc. Any change, disturbance or imbalance can disrupt the hair growth cycle causing more hairs than usual to retreat to the telogen (resting) stage where they will then be shed 1-3 months later. It may be helpful to think back to the months prior to hair loss for clues. Essential oil scalp massage is very helpful. The links below have information on the types and causes of teenage hair loss.


Hypothyroidism Help

In the United States, more than 20% of the women in menopause are diagnosed with hypothyroidism – a sluggish thyroid. Women need to understand the consequences of menopause on the thyroid, as with the increase in age, more women are affected by hypothyroidism. Menopause and hypothyroidism have common symptoms, such as depressed mood, decreased energy and decreased memory, among others. Often these symptoms are taken to be due to menopause, leading to delayed diagnosis of hypothyroidism.

Hormones in women’s bodies are balanced delicately and hormonal imbalance occurs during pregnancy, perimenopause, and menopause. In the time leading up to menopause, the clockwork menstrual cycles may begin to become erratic. This could be because of highs and lows in estrogen and progesterone.

Hypothyroidism, which is seven times more often associated with women than with men, also occurs because of hormonal imbalance. Certain doctors feel that estrogen dominance – excess of estrogen combined with low progesterone – typically occurs in early perimenopause. They feel restricting estrogen dominance prevents complications in perimenopause, including hypothyroidism. In fact, estrogen is required to be counterbalanced with progesterone to avoid hypothyroidism.

Treatment Options of Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism – the under-active thyroid is primarily due to the underproduction of the thyroid’s main hormone – Thyroxine (T4). This hormone has to be converted to the active thyroid – the Triiodothyronine (T3), by the liver. Then only it can be effectively utilized by the body. Different practitioners have their own ways of tackling hypothyroidism.

Most prescribe Synthroid, Levoxyl or Levothyroxine – the synthetic T4 – for hypothyroidism. This is fine, if women are capable of converting this T4 into T3. For others, who are poor converters, Cytomel – a synthetic T3 – is prescribed to covert their low T3.

Many women do not believe in synthetic hormones for treating their hypothyroidism, and relieve their symptoms with nutrition, exercise, stress-relieving techniques and such natural treatments. Rich nutrition is the basis of hormonal balance. Rich nutrition should consists of:

·Multivitamins and/or minerals
·Essential fatty acids
·Calcium and/or magnesium

Such essential nutrients, when supplementing a healthy eating plan, support the body’s endocrine, immune and other vital systems.

Some doctors recommend using a progesterone cream for treatment of hypothyroidism. Progesterone, which is essential for building many of your body’s most important hormones, is also vital in offsetting estrogen dominance, which is one of the most common conditions in perimenopause and hypothyroidism. Application of progesterone cream gives an immediate relief to the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Women in menopause or perimenopause are required to massage about half a teaspoon of progesterone cream into their hands and body. It is advisable to use twice daily for 21 days, to discontinue for 7 days, and repeat the procedure. The cream is required to be massaged on the thighs, stomach, inner arms, and the buttocks. It is recommended that you increase your water intake to avoid dehydration.

Many doctors recommend against prolonged use of progesterone cream after menopause. Short-term use is recommended after menopause, especially when weaning off Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT).

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism please someone help me?
    I think I have it. I’m 17 going to be 18 in two months, and I have been saying this forever. I have looked into it and have the symptoms. I have brittle nails, am always tired and depressed, and the biggest sign is my inability to lose weight and the fact that I haven’t had my period in a year.
    I don’t know what to do. Everyone thinks I’m overreacting, but these are symptoms. Right?
    I broke down crying a few times when I found out about it, and people are like she’s overreacting. Im happy that there is a reason behind all the things i find wrong with me, but this also means bad things as well. Im worried about not being able to have children, having thyroid disease in the future.
    Please someone just tell me anything and everything. I need someone to listen to me.

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism help!!?
    I have been experiencing hypothyroidism symptoms lately. In the past 2 or 3 months. Well I would really like to talk to someone who has hypothyroidism or knows alot about could someone maybe email me or something. Kinda worried never really been sick other than the normal stuff everybody gets at some point flu, common cold, stomach virus. Thanks in advance, and yes I’ve looked at all the sites, but I want to talk to someone with personal experience.

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about eight months ago, and I have spent tons of time finding out all I could about it. I didn’t talk to anyone about it, but I wish I had. So if you want to talk, you can email me from my profile page.

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism Help…?
    Does anybody know of specific diets or food that are good for people with this condition?
    Also, what can I do to stop the pain my knees, the thyroxin was supposed to help but it hasn’t subsided and it’s been ages.

    • ANSWER:
      5 top supplements essential for good thyroid health – iodine, selenium, vitamin D, zinc and vitamin E. A gluten free diet is recommended but it’s tough! :) 200mcg of selenium (500IU of vitamin E to maximise absorption) will lower TPO antibodies if you have hashimoto’s thyroiditis. To check if your are iodine and zinc deficient, you can purchase iodine tincture and a zinc sulfate at a pharmacy. If you are lucky, the pharmacy will give you the test for free :) ….i had a free zinc taste test and was deficient! Vitamin D is almost guaranteed to be low. Test for this with a blood test – optimal 200nmol/l or 80ng/ml. 5000IU is usually needed to maintain if you are not in the sun but test your levels every 6 months. Take a good multi vitamin as well. A recommended book is Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal by Dr. Kharrazian.

      Top 5 supplements for hypothyroidism>>>

      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/topsupplements.htm

      Zinc taste test >>>

      http://www.diabetesexplained.com/zinc-diagnostic-test.html

      Iodine tincture test>>>

      http://www.naturalhealthtechniques.com/healingtechniques/iodine_patch_test.htm

      Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal>>>

      http://thyroidbook.com

  4. QUESTION:
    What’s the difference between cretinism and congenital hypothyroidism?
    Is congenital hypothyroidism a TYPE of cretinism? Or vice-versa?

    I’m doing a research project and I’d appreciate anyone who can help! Thank you in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Cretinism is caused by extreme hypothyroidism during fetal (congenital), infancy or childhood.
      So congenital cretinism is the same as congenital (severe) hypothyroidism.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about a year and a half ago. I have since been trying to find a stable dose of synthyroid with my endocrinologist. He believes that the 100 mg dose I am on now may be suffienct. I only have to see him twice a year now, instead of blood work every 6 weeks and an office visit every three months. I still don’t feel like my old self. I will admit that I feel about 80% better than I did, but the feelings of anxiety and depression are still lingering, worse sometimes than others. I am looking for your experineces with the illness, how you coped with it all, and how long after you were stable on your medication that you felt like your old self again. I have thought this whole time that something more serious is wrong with me, only my doctors can’t find out what it is. Did any of you feel this way? Thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      My husband and my daughter have hypothyroidism. Both of them are stabilized with 1.25. My daughter has different symptoms than my husband. My daughter does get depressed, weight gain, etc. Not being able to take most over the counter medicine she suffers with allergies and cold. Stay with synthroid. I have used generic med on her and it was like she wasn’t taking any medicine at all.
      My husband has the mood swings. They are the worse. He also had weight loss that was very low. That was before the medication. If your test show you are stable them from there you will be able to cope with anything. My husband’s blood work is good. I wish mine was as good. My daughter is pregnant. This mess with your medication. The baby needs more than you realize. My daughter has had this since 8 years old. It interferred with her growth. My husband had it for years but wasn’t diagnosed until last year. He didn’t think anything was wrong. I was the one that had to deal with his mood swings. He was about to go into a coma when the dr. finally found what was wrong. Take your medicine and do your tests regular and you will be fine.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are the syntoms of hypothyroidism ?
    My mom is getting over weight. She had two liposuction and she tried every diet she have heard. We know she has an hormone disorder, but she went to the doctor and didn’t help, she heard that probably is hypothyroidism. Her legs and arms are huge and she feels discomfort , burning, tingling, tired, and not even before to go to bed. Also she is retaining water.

    • ANSWER:
      early symptoms of hypothyroidism include:
      energy loss, sensitivity to cold, unexplained weight gain, fatigue, constipation, forgetfulness..

      as the disease progresses, the patient may have:
      loss of appetite, numbness, prickling or tingling, joint stiffness, muscle cramping

  7. QUESTION:
    What exactly do the meds for hypothyroidism do?
    I have had trouble losing weight forever. I finally went to the doctor to see if there was something wrong with me. It turns out, i have hypothyroidism. I just started the medication today. Will it help me lose weight? or what exactly do the meds do? I don’t really know anything about hypothyroidism except that my thyroid isn’t producing enough hormones to keep my metabolism working at a steady rate. any information about hypothyroidism would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment for hypothyroidism restores your metabolism back to normal. However regular check up of the hormonal levels, TSH, T3, T4, etc., are very important to regulate your treatment. Please consult your Doctor if you have any symptoms like palpitations, tremors, too much increase in apatite, loss of weight etc., to enable him to control the dose.

  8. QUESTION:
    What are risks for pregnant women with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering if someone could give me sights to explain what hypothyroidism is.? The doctor said I was perfectly healthy other than that. I know weight loss is an issue, but can it cause infertility or the inability to concieve right away? I really love my doctor but he did not explain what it was. I am 10 weeks and 4 days pregnant and wanted to know if it could cause any complications in pregnancy. I know this is alot to ask but I wanted to know whether other than tyroid medication whether there was anything in my diet I needed to change. Any help would be appreciated. I only would like advice. I know that you are not doctors but any helpful sites or input would be useful.

    Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Just do everything that they tell you too and keep taking your medicine. My cousin has that and she has had 2 perfectly healthy baby girls, but did have a very hard pregnancy. Here is a link about pregnancy and thyroidism.

  9. QUESTION:
    How to lose weight with type ONE diabetes and hypothyroidism?
    Ive been trying extremely hard to lose weight but the scale reads the same number. I have type ONE( not adult on set diabetes you get from poor lifestyle) and hypothyroidism which I think is the problem. I’m so tired of bring in twice the effort as a normal person and not seeing ANYTHING change(not a decimal number, nothing) so does anyone out there know of a diet and exercise plan or trick to help a person with my glitches lose weight? Thanks for the answers!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey there! I am in the same boat as you. I also have hypothyroidism and type ONE. While weight loss has been excruciatingly hard, I can offer some tips that I have been doing that have helped me slowly but surely get on the fast track to losing some weight.

      1. Take a multivitamin: Our bodies are always fighting off so much. If you take a vitamin, you will ensure that your body will be getting the vitamins and minerals it needs to fight off infection and allow your body MORE energy to do other things, such as losing weight. Look for multivitamins that promote a health heart and strong bones, as well as a good immune system.

      2. Count your calories: This is hard, but when there is a will, there is a way. Ever look on the nutrition facts of food and note the servings? Follow that! Record your total calories, fat, sodium, etc. Keep a journal and do this. I started out by just recording what I ate in a normal day, evaluating it (weaknesses: eat too big portions, not enough meat, too much bread/sugar, etc) and then seeing what I can do to improve it. Try to keep your calories to about 2,300 per day, and then whittle it down. I’m currently at 2,245 at the most per day, and I’m noting a change in my energy.

      3. EXERCISE: Speaking of energy, hypothyroidism simply kills your metabolism with an AK-47. :( RIght here, you just need a little more willpower. Think of living longer. At least that’s what I do. Don’t use elevators: instead, use the stairs. Walk a little more than you need to. Have Nintendo Wii? Do WiiFit. It works out muscles you never thought you could work out! Walk around your neighborhood every day. Go to a track at a school and walk the curves and jog the straights for thirty minutes to an hour. I totally understand taht your energy will deter you from doing this, but even a little effort should help.

      4. Stay happy! SOmething you love to do that doesn’t compromise your health or well being? Indulge in it! I like to draw and sew among other things. If you keep your feelings and personality up, then you can do all i have listed above and more.

      5. Go to sleep on time. Yes this is very important. Your sleep helps regulate SO much.

      While ALL are important, the integral plan is to choose a method and STICK WITH IT! Watch your portions, and work out every day for at least thirty minutes. Take that vitamin, get some sleep, and remember to do something you enjoy.

      From one hypobetes dealer to another, I HAVE FAITH IN YOU!

      And a last note: I’ve been doing this very method for the past week and a half, and I lost four pounds. Just keep going, and with a little patience you’ll get there!

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it true people loose weight with hypothyroidism medication? If so how does it work?
    I am a 22 year old female with hypothyroidism and am being referred to an endocrinologist. I am not sure what to expect. For a little over a year now I have not changed my diet or exercise and I slowly gained weight. With hypothyroid hormone treatment will it help or make it easier to loose weight? How does that work?

    • ANSWER:
      The answer to your question is yes. Hypothyroidism is caused by the thyroid’s inability to produced a hormone. By replacing the hormone with a synthetic one it will speed up the body’s metabolism and thus burn off more calories. This will result in weight loss, although not quickly.
      Hope this helps.

  11. QUESTION:
    How can I lose weight when I have hypothyroidism?
    I am a youngish person, and I am tired of weighing 200 pounds. I just reached that weight yesterday, and it is depressing. I wanted to know what kinds of exercise should I do that would be most effective, and what kind of diet plan would be best. None of the pills for hypothyroidism will work fo rme, so please do not suggest those. Thanks, and any help is greatly appriciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I know exactly how you feel! I also am youngish and suffer from hypothyroidism. I gained weight like crazy and could not get rid of it no matter what I did. Plus, the side effects are you’re tired all the time and it leads to depression.

      I’ve been losing weight recently (20 lbs over the past year) through a combination of ways to break the metabolism curse that is hypothyroidism. Firstly, you need to see an endocrinologist to see what replacement thyroid drug you need, they come out with new ones every so often. I’m on Synthroid and it works, but it takes at least two weeks to kick in. You take those every morning before you eat! This is important because anything you eat/take will interfere with thyroid pills!

      Also, you may be deficient in vitamins, most of us are. I take a multivitamin and vitamin D, and trust me IT HELPS. Just take them 2-4 hours after your pills because they will block absorption.

      I suggest seeing a nutritionist as well, a lot of endo offices have one or two that work with the patients. Once you get the vitamins and the thyroid pills right, it should be easier to lose weight. Unfortunately, losing weight for us is not just a numbers game (calories in vs calories out), it’s a chemical equation.

      As for exercise, try earlier in the morning right after you take your pill. Aim for 30-60 minutes of moderate-to-high intensity cardio four times a week. Normal people can get away with less, but for us it takes more effort. I would suggest going most days and alternating days of weight training. The weight training is just as important as the cardio because muscles will burn 20X more calories than fat tissue does, thus revving the saggy metabolism.

      As for type of cardio, just make sure you crosstrain to avoid muscle memory. Try jogging one day, the bike the next. It’s important to keep your body guessing because if you can’t adjust, you’ll burn more calories with effort.

      And finally, water. Drink lots of water to keep your body flushing out the toxins.

  12. QUESTION:
    Will kelp really help with the symptoms of hypothyroidism?
    Can I take kelp pills if I’m already on medication?Will it help with my hypothyroidism?*Thanks
    Have you had any experience with it?
    I don’t have a “goitre”..I was asking if it would relieve some of the symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      The Thyroid Foundation says not to, as does Mary Shoman (an expert in the field):

      “Is goitre due to lack of iodine in our diet? Should I eat kelp to get rid of this goitre?

      ANSWER:
      Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of goitre in the world but NOT in this country. We have had iodized salt for two generations, and there are many other sources of iodine now in our diets so that, if anything, we are receiving more iodine than in most places in the world. There is no point whatsoever in adding more iodine to the diet and that includes kelp, a form of seaweed high in iodine often sold in health food stores. The problem is that too much iodine is just as dangerous as too little iodine. Excess iodine can also cause goitres and can either cause a low thyroid state, (hypothyroidism) or excess output of thyroid (hyperthyroidism). It also aggravates Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. In Canada it is a mistake to ingest kelp.”

      Mary Shoman said:

      “While some herbalists and vitamin proponents recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements (which are high in iodine) for people with thyroid problems, you need to be extremely careful about any decision to take iodine or kelp supplements if you are on thyroid hormone replacement therapy.”

      Read more: http://thyroid.about.com/cs/drugdatabase/f/kelp.htm

      Hope that helps!

  13. QUESTION:
    Is there a meal plan that’s benefical to hypothyroidism that can improve weight loss?
    I have hypothyroidism, and as a result have trouble upon trouble losing weight. I’m beginning to think it’s a no win situation and it’s very frustrating. Is there a meal plan that can help?

    I said MEAL PLAN not pill, fake diet fad, or advertisement, thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Most people have hard time losing weight on synthetic hormones, but do much better on natural hormones (Armour brand)

      I advocate a low carb way of eating for optimal health. One thyroid specialist, Dr. Broda Barnes who did the metabolic studies on carbs/calories ratios, found that treated hypothyroid patients (not untreated) tended to lower their conversion of T4 to T3 when under 30grams of carbs per day or under 1500 calories. So would suggest keeping carbs over 30 grams per day (less than 9 grams per hour though) and calories greater than 1500 (low carb way of eating requires calories to be MUCH higher than 1500 for most people)

      You can lose more body fat eating protein & fat (don’t eat protein alone) than not eating AT ALL. To lose weight fast, eat all you want, but nothing but meat, eggs, healthy oils, mayo, butter & half an avocado a day (for added potassium). Keep the calories high & the fat percentage high, at least 65% of calories. Green vegetables & some cheese will continue weight loss but at a slower pace.

      The first 2 weeks eat several cups a day of (mostly) lettuce & celery, cucumbers, radishes, mushrooms, peppers & more variety of vegetables thereafter – add 5 grams per day additional every week (30 grams day first 2 weeks, 35grams 3rd week, 40grams 4th week etc) til you gain weight, then subtract 10grams. That will be your personal carb level (everyone is different & depends on how active you are.)

      Start with meat, fats & salads for 2 weeks and then slowly add in more green veg, wk4 fresh cheeses, wk5 nuts & seeds, wk6 berries, wk7 legumes, wk8 other fruits, wk9 starchy veg, wk10 whole grains. You will learn how your body reacts to different foods.

      The first week is just water weight but fat is lost thereafter if you keep your calories high enough. Otherwise the body will strip it’s own lean tissue for nutrition. Although that may look great on a scale it will make it MUCH easier to accumulate fat in the future (since all that pesky lean tissue burning up calories will be gone). The body won’t release fat stores if you lower calories below what it needs. It will slow metabolism to compensate & store every spare ounce as fat. If you continue lowering calories, it will continue lowering the set point, til it can survive off nothing & store fat on anything. The body will only release it’s fat stores if it knows there is plenty of nutritious food.

      Eating carbs while trying to lose body fat is terribly inefficient. When in glycolysis (burning glucose as fuel) you have to lower your calories (which slows your metabolism) & exercise heavily to deplete your glycogen stores before burning body fat.

      The core of Atkins program is converting the body from glycolysis (burning glucose as fuel) to ketosis (burning fat as fuel). Dietary fat levels need to be at >65% of total calories, if not, the body will still remain in glycolysis by converting 58% of excess protein into glucose (via gluconeogenesis).

      It takes minimum of 3 days to convert a body to ketosis, (but only one bite to convert back to glycolysis). People feel sluggish the first week but most feel better than ever thereafter.

      Simple carbohydrates (sugar, flour, bread, cereal, pasta, potatoes, rice) trigger insulin which can store the calories eaten into fat. The more protein the more the fat burning hormone glucagon is released. The more carbohydrate the more the fat storage hormone insulin is released.

      Simple carbs are addictive & can be disastrous to health. The best way to break the addiction is NO carbs for 3 days. Make a huge batch of deviled eggs, eat one every time you want “something” – have huge omelets with bacon, sausage, peppers, mushrooms & cheese. Pork chops smothered with peppers, mushrooms & cheese – pork rinds & dip or tuna/chicken/turkey/egg salad – steaks – a huge sugar free cheese cake. Eat so much you won’t feel deprived of anything. By the 4th day, the addiction will be gone & you can start making healthy choices.

      High insulin levels promote inflammation, weight gain, hunger & unbalance other hormones. Controlling insulin levels will balance out other hormones & allow human growth hormone (HGH) to be produced naturally so lean muscle will be gained even without exercise. Any exercise will greatly increase muscle mass with high HGH levels.

      Ground flax seed (2 Tbsp) 1/4 cup water, artificial sweetener, mix in a raw egg – let sit 10 min. to absorb liquid, put some cream cheese in the middle & nuke 2 minutes. Suggested for daily fiber needs.

      As long as you have <9grams carbs per hour, you will maintain insulin control & shouldn't gain weight, no matter the calories. Many people gain weight on high carb, do low carb to lose weight & then are shocked when they return to high carb & gain weight. Many people can return to moderate carb levels but very few can really eat all they want of sugar & maintain weight or health.

  14. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have a very bad hormonal and thyroid issues so I need to get this under control immediately so I appreciate anyone w/ HYPOthyroidism to give me any advice or foods that help

    Thank you so MUCH!!!

    • ANSWER:
      If you indeed do have a thyroid problem you need to see your doctor for synthetic thyroid replacement. First, your doctor will do a simple blood test to find out how low your thyroid actually is. There is no diet which will fully get your thyroid back to normal. Many women take synthetic thyroid. I have for 8 years.

  15. QUESTION:
    How long after bein diagnosed with hypothyroidism do you need pills?is is hereditAry? Can my daughter be test?
    I’m 17 with a 6 month old and i’m a stay at home mother. I’ve just been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and I wanted to know how it could have possibly came on and how soon after bein diagnosed do I need pills? And can my daughter be tested this young? Any answers would really help I’m scared out of my mind for my daughters sake.

    • ANSWER:
      As soon as you are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, your physician should begin Synthroid. Although most patients taking thyroid supplementation need it forever, a few, especially those who developed hypothyroidism following a pregnancy might need it for a shorter period. Your physician needs to order a test called an anti-thyroid antibody test. If this test is positive, then you should be supplemented with thyroid hormone, in some amount, for the rest of your life. If the test is negative, the possibility of discontinuation at a later date exists.
      Yes, hypothyroidism and other thyroid diseases can and does run in families. You need to mention your recent diagnosis to your child’s pediatrician who can decide whether your child requires any testing at this time. Most do not, although your daughter should be tested again at 12 or 13, as thyroids in susceptible individuals tend to decompensate or fail during periods of hormonal upheaval. Best wishes.

  16. QUESTION:
    Would growth hormones be effective to grow taller for somebody who has hypothyroidism?
    I am a 21 year old who has been taking thyroid pills for about 3 1/2 years now (I have hypothyroidism). I haven’t grown taller since I started taking the pills. I’m still 4’11″.

    I heard recently that taking growth hormones would help people who have an under active thyroid to increase their height. At 21, do you think it would have any effect on me if I took those growth hormones – or do you think it’s too late for me?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately , at your age artificial or human growth hormone (hgh) that injected into your body will not be effective. What it is that can be effective at your age is Super-Growth .This product will regenerate your fused bones and boost your natural growth, without side-effects, besides It is during deep sleep that growth hormone does its job of thickening and lengthening your bones. So appropriate sleeping time (not the longer, the better) and correct sleeping posture is very important for your body to grow. Sleep is defined as a natural periodic state of rest for the mind and body, in which the eyes usually close and consciousness is completely or partially lost, so that there is a decrease in bodily movement and responsiveness to external stimuli.

      During deep sleep, growth hormone produced by your pituitary gland is released into your blood stream and travel through your body and causes the thickening and lengthening of your bones. Therefore, you should achieve “deep level” sleep on a daily basis in order to coordinate your affords of exercises and proper diet. The following are some helpful tips on how to easily achieve deep level sleep.

      Sleep in a comfortable and firm mattress.
      Sleep in a room that is dark, quiet and fresh smelling.
      Sleep with clean, soft, and comfortable clothes.
      Keep your hands and feet warm. Scientific studies have shown that warm hands and feet will help induce REM (rapid eye movement) deep sleep. Cold hands and feet will keep you from deep sleep.
      Drink a big glass of water before going to bed and when you wake up; this will help clean out your system.
      Practice total relaxation and deep breathing for a few minutes before you go to bed.
      Relax from head to toe. Close your eyes and relax every part of your body.
      Maintain a habit of sleeping at the same time everyday, including weekends.
      Sleep on your back with a flat pillow under your knees. This will align your spine properly and prevent any back aches caused by sleeping in a bent position.

      Undoubtedly, the quality, quantity, and type of food we eat affect our height, growth, and health. We cannot emphasize enough how important your food intake is in determining how much growth you can possibly obtain. The types of food you eat will either improve or decrease your growth potential.
      After careful consideration and research, the daily content of protein, carbohydrates, fats and water can be achieved if the following items were taken regularly. Please take note that this is a guideline and you are free to your own thoughts.

      Carrots Fish Liver
      Egg Yolk Beef Red Meat
      Milk Cheese Apples
      Green Vegetables Potatoes Nuts
      Yellow Vegetables Almonds Bananas
      Peanuts Chicken Beans
      Peas Salt 6-8 glasses of water per day

      If you eat a lot of peanut butter, your height will not necessarily stop. Neither does masturbation stop height.
      What might stop you from growing is smoking, drugs, alcohol, lack of sleep, stress, digestive problems, or lack of exercise.

      Height Growth Products : The first approved natural product for height increase is Super-Growth wwww.super-growth.info with this product it is possible to gain additional height growth even after puberty.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to oxyelite pro with hypothyroidism?
    I take synthroid for hypothyroidism and would like to take oxyelite pro to help lose some excess weight. Would it be safe to take the fat burner even though I have thyroid issues?

    • ANSWER:
      I’d really check with your physician. These products have those kind of disclaimers for a reason.

  18. QUESTION:
    Can a more serious disease by mistaken for hypothyroidism?
    I was just wondering if anybody knows if there is something worse that could be mistaken for hypothyroidism. I am a 24-year-old male and I know quite a few people who have been diagnosed with it, but they are all older women. Is it odd that I have been diagnosed with it? Could it be mistaken for another, more serious, disease. Any feedback would help. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Guys get it too haha, my dad has it

      its not a gender disease, it can hit anyone
      its not even a big deal

      best thing you can do is get it treated early so it doesnt affect your growth bro

      relax a little :D

  19. QUESTION:
    What meds are safe to take with Hypothyroidism disease?
    I am 18 and just got diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. I know it’s not a HUGE deal, but I am on Synthroid for it and on 40 mg of Adderall for ADD… but my adderall doesn’t work anymore since I’ve had hypothyroidism! I used to just take 20mg and I would work like crazy and I couldn’t go to sleep for days on it, but I tried taking 60mg and I was still tired, sluggish, and unfocused! Does anyone know why? Or if it is safe to even mix these drugs?! I am also on Zoloft for anxiety. Please help!
    My doctor KNOWS all the meds I am on. Im not retarded. Im just asking if anyone else has had this happen with Adderall.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of possibilities of what may be happening based on my experiences:

      1) if you were just diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, it may not be regulated yet and it’s the Hypothyroidism that is making you tired, sluggish, and unfocused; afterall these are major symptoms of the disease.

      2) Your drugs may be interacting with each other. I’m only guessing, but perhaps the Adderall is preventing the Synthroid from working.

      There are quite a few drugs that interact with Synthroid and keep it from working (and doctors and pharmacists don’t always know about them). There is quite a list of drugs on my Pharmacy info sheet that say they may interact with Synthroid. I’ve taken Synthroid for a few years now and have discovered that there are even more medications than what’s listed on my info sheet that prevent the Synthroid from working.

      I don’t know if you take all your medicines at one time, or not, but if you do…stop! Take the Synthroid by itself, and take your other medications about 2 hours later. Sometimes you may have to wait longer, but 2 hours is what works with my meds. Don’t ever take Calcium or magnesium within 4 hours of taking the Synthroid. So if you take a multi-vitamin or take calcium and magnesium alone, don’t do it within 4 hours of the Synthroid.

      And remember Synthroid needs to be taken on an empty stomach and at least 1/2 to 1 hour before eating.

      From now on, keep in mind that just about every pill/medication and supplement you can swallow may interact with the Synthroid when taken at the same time and you need a 2-4 hour time space between them. I learned the hard way a couple times and made myself quite ill. When the Synthroid isn’t working, it makes you feel so ill and run-down, and you just can’t figure out what’s wrong.

  20. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  21. QUESTION:
    What would happen if I took medicine for hypothyroidism and didnt really have it?
    I have tried everything to lose weight excersize and dieting dont help,last year a friend of mine was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism he lost alot of weight if I take hypothyroidism medicine will I get hyperthyroidism what are the possible side effects?

    • ANSWER:
      If you try this method of losing weight you run a very strong risk of causing permanent damage to your heart.
      Severe damage to the thyroid gland itself.

      It’s a very dangerous way to try and lose weight

  22. QUESTION:
    What tips can you give me, a woman, for being with a man that has Hypothyroidism?
    I am in a very serious relationship with a man that has hypothyroidism and it is hard to deal with his actions and his symptoms. I just want to learn more and find ways to make his life easier and mine as well. I just want us to get along beautifully. And if I understand more I can make us better. Plz Help

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    Why is soy bad for someone with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering why so is so bad if you have hypothyroidism and are there things that can help counteract the hypothyroidism besides medicine?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is one article about it:

      http://www.westonaprice.org/soy/thyroidproblems.html

  24. QUESTION:
    Can non-virgin coconut oil aid in weight loss and help hypothyroidism?
    I couldn’t find virgin coconut oil near me so I bought the non-virgin type instead. Is it just as good as the virgin ones? Does it work exactly like the virgin ones for weight loss and hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      i doubt very seriously if there is enough difference between the two that they wouldn’t have similiar results. whether even virgin coconut oil aids in weight loss and helping hypothyroidism i have no idea. if you don’t get the desired results i wouldn’t blame it on your oil being non virgin.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is a rash a common symptom of hypothyroidism?
    I have a red raised rash on my upper left leg. It covers most of my thigh in the front. I first noticed this about 4-6 months ago and at that time it was the size of a quarter. I switched soaps and lotions and it went away. Within the last week it has redeveloped and is much bigger. I hesitate to call it a rash because it seems to be more like dry skin but it does have a rash like appearence to it. I am wondering if my medication needs to be adjusted for my hypothyroidism or what is going on. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      A rash isn’t a symptom but dry skin is…If it does look like dry skin try an oatmeal bath or some oatmeal lotion and see if that helps…But don’t use the lotion if you have been scratching…it will burn…If you have thyroid problems and you haven’t been tested in a while go ahead and get a test it can’t hurt to have one and find out if you are on the right dosage.

      Good luck.

  26. QUESTION:
    Can the hypothyroidism be a cause of hiv infection?
    recently I in one incident I got symptoms of hypothyroidism like headache, bulging eyes when I am hungry, weight loss and a little heat always in my body. I am feeling something on my thyroid glands also. That incident is that I had sex with a girl. But I used protection. But we had tongue kiss. I am afraid if I suffered from hiv now. Am I guessing right. Please somebody help me. I am afraid to go for hiv test. At this situation what I need to do?

    • ANSWER:
      You lose weight when you have hyperthyroidism. If you have hypothyroidism then you gain weight or have trouble losing weight. “Left untreated, the symptoms of hypothyroidism will usually progress. Rarely, complications can result in severe life-threatening depression, heart failure, or coma.” Even if you are scared, the best thing to do is to get tested for both hiv and thyroids disease.

  27. QUESTION:
    can treating hypothyroidism with medicine get rid of the headache sympotm?
    I have early stages of hypothyroidism… I also have chronic daily headaches that we think it’s related to the thyroid levels- but there are many other reason’s for my headaches so it’s complicated. Anyways does anyone else have this combination of problems (hypothyroidism and headaches) AND does taking the thyroid medicine help the headaches???

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. But you need a good doctor that knows what s/he is doing. Read this book http://www.amazon.com/Living-Well-Hypothyroidism-Doctor-Doesnt/dp/0380808986
      It is abundant with important and useful information that will explain how to handle the symptoms of thyroid disease. Many doctors don’t (usually because they don’t know about it) adjust the medicine to help eliminate all the symptoms, so you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable of how to do so.

      I wish you the best of luck!

  28. QUESTION:
    I’m 19 years old and want to join the military, the problem is I have hypothyroidism. Can I still join?
    I have hypothyroidism(controlled by medication) I can run, jump, do pull ups, sit ups, whatever needs to be done. I already took the ASVAB and scored an 86. The problem is of course the hyperthyroidism does anybody know what my chances are? Will a waiver help my cause? I don’t want to go to MEPS and be shut down. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m 19 years old and want to join the military, the problem is I have hypothyroidism. Can I still join?

      AR 40-501
      Chapter 2
      Physical Standards for Enlistment, Appointment, and Induction

      2-8. Endocrine and metabolic disorders
      h. Thyroid disorders.

      (1) Current goiter (240) is disqualifying.

      (2) Current hypothyroidism uncontrolled by medication (244) is disqualifying.

      (3) Current or history of hyperthyroidism (242.9) is disqualifying.

      (4) Current thyroiditis (245) is disqualifying.

  29. QUESTION:
    Any natural cures or natural meds for Hypothyroidism?
    I’m 18 and I have had Hypothyroidism for over 5 years. I have been on Synthroid since I’ve been diagnosed with it. It doesn’t seem to help with a lot of the issues plus I hate taking it. It’s such and inconvenience. Does anyone know anything natural that I could use in place of Synthroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes there are natural substitutes for thyroid medication. A lot of people find a good difference when they switch over from Synthroid to natural ones. The natural ones are: Armour Thyroid (also known as Naturethroid and Westhroid. They all basically have the same core ingredient, they just differ in the fillers and binders.) Like someone mentioned here, many pharmacies in US don’t have stock. You can find a lot more details about natural remedies (including Armour Thyroid) and potential places to buy them from the following site.

      http://www.healthandcures.net/hypothyroidism-treatment.html

      If you are successful at getting Armour or the other natural meds, don’t just abruptly change over from Synthroid to that. Ask your ND how to do it comfortably.

      You could also try “Raw Thyroid” which is usually available in good stock at most places. There are other things like iodine supplements, yoga and organic virgin coconut oil all of which help a good deal.

      You are just 18, all the best for a good active life! Hope the info (this answer and the website) helps.

  30. QUESTION:
    What ‘s the best way to treat hypothyroidism.?
    I have been diagnosed wth hypothyroidism over a year ago and put on 90 pounds. I’ve managed to lose 18 pounds in one year. Is there anything to help this go faster. I eat 1200 calories a day and do aerobics 1to 1 and a half hours 6 days a week and weight traing about an hour a day 6 days a week. HELP!!! I can’t do this anymore!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds to me that either you aren’t at the right thyroid levels or you aren’t on the right thyroid medication. I put on 60 pounds from being hypothyroid. I have lost 35 of the pounds. If one thing is out of whack with your hormones, weight loss will not happen.

      My suggestion is find out what your thyroid levels are. If you are on T4, your TSH should be around 1.0. This is a morning reading, not an afternoon reading. TSH should only be done in the morning. If you have the TSH around 1.0 and you still have hypo symptoms, then perhaps you need both T4 and T3. I started out on Levoxyl, which did nothing for my symptoms. I eventually moved to Levoxyl with Cytomel, which helped some. I have now been on Armour thyroid with my doctor adjusting dosage by Free T4 and Free T3 and almost every symptom is gone. I still had difficulty with losing weight, but that was because I developed insulin resistance because of the weight gain. Once I got treatment for that I started losing weight. Now you see how one thing can be off, an weight loss doesn’t happen.

      I have put some links below for you to check out. The more you know about being hypothyroid, the better care you will get. There’s no need to suffer with symptoms when there are so many options.

  31. QUESTION:
    If I had hypothyroidism, how much does the medicine help with sluggishness and inability to concentrate?
    For those of you in similar situations. I have been having some serious problems with concentrating, being cold, and being sluggish. I went to the doctor for irregular periods and she is testing me for it. Was the medicine a life-saver for you if you have hypothyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely a life saver for me. I could get up off my couch and feel human again. It takes a little while for it to kick in, but I highly recommend it.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for someone who has hypothyroidism and high cholesterol/triglycerides?
    I just got diagnosed with all three of these and need to change my diet. I already am on an exercise regime, but I need some guidelines for my diet. I’d appreciate any help I can get. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Did you know that high cholesterol is associated with having hypothyroidism? Talk with your doc about prioritizing the treatment of your thyroid problem over the other two. Once your thyroid level is brought back into line, ask about having the cholesterol checked. You may find that it is then at a level that makes the doc happy.

  33. QUESTION:
    Is there other options besides taking synthroid that can help my hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with Graves disease when I was 17 and had my thyroid removed my radiation. I went through many thyroid perscriptions for about 4 years and had a hard time finding a balanced level. I haven’t taken my synthroid medication for over 2 years. Over the past couple months, I’ve been experiencing sympthoms of hypothyrodism. Is there other options other than going back to the synthroid that I can take?

    • ANSWER:
      You could try ARmour. It contains both T4 and T3, where Synthroid is only T4. Many people don’t convert enough of the T4 to T3, so they still have some of the hypothyroid symptoms. Armour is a natural thyroid medication that has been around for over 100 years. Many who switch to it, feel so much better. Me included. Link below

  34. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight if you have hypothyroidism?
    I am hypothyroid and also bipolar for which I take lithium. Is there anything to help in this situation? No regular diet plans have helped.

    • ANSWER:
      hi :) am not sure whats available in the markets…but, this is what i did to lose weight… PLEASE DONT TAKE PILLS… pills are nothing but anorectic agents… they make you feel less hungry… there is no way to loose weight fast… though , sauna , steam and massages help slightly… it has to be combined with diet and excercise… pills are very bad in the long run… can lead to impotency and infertility…

      Also… short term diets are no good because , they terribly pull down your body metabolism rate since you dont eat much during that period … Because of this , once you break your diet , you’ll start putting on more weight, the reduced body metabolism will take longer and slower to burn the food you take in…

      They also dont work because once you break your diet and start eating normally, you will get back to your normal weight as you might not be cautious as to how many cals you take in per day…

      i lost 10 kgs in about 5 months time… i am getting married in august and i desperately needed to loose weight… i was 65 kilos when i started… according to my BMI , i was 10kgs + overweight… i stand 5’2.odd and 65 kilos is grossly overweight…

      just dieting wont help like i found out in my case… diet + exercise will do the trick…

      i’ll tell you what i did… it worked for me… hope it works for you too :)

      the trick is not to starve but to eat smart :) and stay healthy :)

      what you should cut down :
      oil , butter , cheese , margarine , mayonisse , sauces (depends , will get back to that a bit later), chips , crisps, nuts , chocolates , sugar , cola, fizz , areated drinks ,ice creams , chocolate , alcohol , cakes and everything else thats hi – cal… you’ll need to avoid everything thats sweet , oily and sticky… if you are not sure about what foods to avoid… check the net…loads of info available…

      vegetables / meat to avoid :
      potatoes – very very important , beetroot (its a root and has concenterated sugar in it) , all kinds of roots basically except carrot… avoid lamb, mutton , pork , beef, and prawns… all these put on weight… eat only lean meats… thats fish and chicken.. avoid eating egg yolk… eat just the egg white…

      fruits to avoid :
      mangoes , bananas , jackfruit

      now that we had a look at what foodstuff is to be avoided…you might be wondering if there is anythig at all that you can eat… thats how i felt… there is loads of stuff you can eat actually :)

      here they come :)

      fast foods are a big no no… you can order salads and special lo cal foods that are avaailable in most outlets…

      its best to eat at home for the period you are dieting and trying to lose weight…after those few months… once you’ve shed your load…you can get back to your usual lifestyle… of course with some caution…

      my diet…
      breakfast:

      skimmed milk (use skimmmed milk , is low in fat , other typer of milk are higher in fat content) , fruit… i am from India… am not sure where you are from and hence you might not understand certain food types we consume here… but let me tell you something… Indian food is very very oily and very difficult to diet…

      and try cereal in the mornings… oats, weetabix… etc… have a good breakfast…alwaays use brown bread… whole wheat brown bread is very good for weight reduction…

      for lunch , we are staple rice eaters… rice is bad for fat reduction… but i still took rice because its a habit tht cant be changed… everyone takes rice here… so… rice – one cup – 100gms and lots of veggies cooked in less oil.. and absolutely no coconut and curry with less oil… all in all keep your oil intake to 2 tea spoons everyday… that would be just for seasoning… also using olive oil helps a lot…

      then for dinner… compulsarily have wheat… pasta is a good option…but make sure you buy wheat pasta… check before buying… and of course in pasta absolutely no sauces… some varities of sauces are acceptable… as far as they dont have cheese , butter , oil ,mayonisse and fattening substances in general… you can use tomato spicy sauces etc… make sure your sugar intake doesnt cross 2 – 3 spoons per day… (not tablespoons) and no butter and ghee of course… eat a lot of fruits and vegetables… and all kinds of cereal… if you are hungry… eat a fruit… or you can eat stuff like puffed wheat and puffed rice… but no puffed corn… corn products again put on weight…

      eat sandwiches as much as possible… i dont know which part of the world you are from and hence cant suggest much for you in terms of recepies…

      and combined with dieting… you need to excercise for atleast an hour everyday… you’ll see the difference…defenitely… if you think gym is boring… take up dance classes… or run along the beach… if you have one… or skate… or just about any physical activity… brisk walking will also help…
      the key is to stay healthy while you diet and lose weight…

      drink loads of water…atleast 6 glasses per day… and do a lot of physical activity…. take the stairwy instead of the lift…. and small things like that…
      if you have any more queries…mail me… cheers :) and good luck :) its not difficult…you’ll get used to it in a few days… and of course the results are fab:) who doesnt want a great looking body…

      you can get back to your normal lifestyle once you slim down… after that… its just eating what you like and burning it out the next day with just a little bit of excercise :) also check your weight everyday… its a great way to motivate and monitor your progres :)

      Source(s):

      personal exp :)

  35. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i don’t take my medicine correctly. Can it make you lose your sex drive completely?
    I use to have a huge sex drive even when i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but maybe it’s gotten more out of whack i don’t know. It’s hard for me to even make out with my husband anymore and that makes me so upset. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      You are NOT alone my dear. Low fat, Low salt diets are a major contributor to this problem. A low thyroid is an indication of an endocrine problem and taking that medication is giving you “MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH” that is damaging your body, while not addressing the “root cause” of your thyroid problem is very likely causing endocrine problems as well.

      Have you ever known ANYONE to be deficient in drugs? Your doctor that prescribed the medication most likely took a blood test and saw that your TSH hormone was a little high, so he prescribed that junk for you and took the easy way out and left you with the booby prize.

      Don’t you think if your doctor knew what he was doing and was really concerned about your health he would find out what was causing the thyroid output to be low? Instead, he treated the symptom and whatever caused the thyroid to not be able to produce T3 and T4 hormones is still there. Your endocrine is a system of complex relationships much like a spider web where if you touch one part of the web, the whole web shakes. Your thyroid, adrenal glands, ovaries, liver, etc. are all part of that endocrine system.

      What typically happens with low libido in Americans especially, is that you get on a low fat diet, low salt and then abuse your adrenal glands with high carbs, sugars, and cause lots of cortisol to be produced. The precursor hormone, pregnenalone is limited in supply and is produced in the adrenal glands. This hormone is required to produce steroid hormones in the liver; sex hormones. When the body requires lots of cortisol, you get what is called the “pregnenalone steal” where the limited supply is used to produce cortisol, leaving the body deficient and NO steroid hormones get produced. Our genetics have only changed about 0.1% in the last 12,000 years, so our bodies are still operating like primitive people’s did. When a sabor tooth tiger is chasing you through the village, you need that cortisol to power up those muscles and give you quick instant energy. That’s what our adrenal glands were designed to do, but when you eat sugar, white flour, lots of carbs, your body has to produce lots of insulin to unlock the insulin receptor sites at each cell to allow glucose in. Excess consumption of these things cause this spiking. Now your body says, whoa, too much glucose, so the pancreas produces lots of glucagon and your liver goes to work changing the glucose into glycogen for storage. This drives your blood sugar down quickly and says, “EMERGENCY” and your body goes into stress and produces lots of CORTISOL. Now the liver is reprioritized to deal with the emergency and your ESTROGEN does NOT get reconjugated and you become DEFICIENT. Low Lidido.

      All this is a result of your diet and your lazy doctor or maybe just ignorance, who knows.

      The first thing is to decide which is more important, the thyroid issue or the libido issue. Both are related, but it’s important to understand your priorities. They are both very fixable and you may even get healthy during the process.

      Do a quick test on yourself and then e-mail me the results and I will help you. Get some “Tincture of Iodine” from the drug store and paint a patch 2″ x 3″ on your forearm. Do this in the morning. Then watch it during the day and note the time of day when it disappeared. Count the hours it took to disappear. It should be visible after 24 hours. If it goes away in a few hours, you are very deficient in iodine. Since your thyroid uses only about 4% of the iodine you have in your body, if you are deficient it takes time to correct this. A few months. Since the T3 and T4 hormones require iodine, if you are deficient, this is a major cause of the low thyroid issue, but ALL your organs and skin require iodine, so the deficiency is affecting not just your thyroid, if you are truly deficient.

      good luck

  36. QUESTION:
    where can i find a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    i would like any help i can get without having to take diet pills.. i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4 years ago. since then i have put on almost 40lbs. i would like some input on what foods to eat that would help speed up my metabolism. also a good workout regimen would help too. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      According to Dr. Todd Nippoldt of the Mayo Clinic, “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.”

      Question asked of Dr. Nippoldt: “Can iodine supplements help regulate thyroid function in a person with hypothyroidism?”

      Dr. Nippoldt: “No. Some alternative medicine practitioners recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements — which are high in iodine — for people with hypothyroidism. It is true that severe iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism. But iodine deficiency is extremely rare in the United States and other developed countries since the addition of iodine to salt (iodized salt) and other foods. If iodine deficiency is not the cause of hypothyroidism, then iodine supplements provide no benefit.

      “Hypothyroidism is safely and effectively treated with the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine.”

      Walking a couple of miles twice a day would help keep your metabolism revved up naturally. If your health is good enough, try it. My prayers are with you. The main thing is not to forget to take the synthetic thyroid hormone your doctor prescribes for you.

  37. QUESTION:
    How many of you women have HYPOTHYROIDISM?
    My mother is suffering from it.
    Sometimes she gets really depressed by the trouble in breathing.
    Are there any excercises or tactics to help relive from the suffering, any help will be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I have hypothyroidism and have trouble breathing because I have a goiter (swollen thyroid gland) and it is pressing on my wind pipe. The only way to fix it fast is to have part of it removed. Hypothyroidism itself causes deppression but I can see why she is depressed by this . It is horrible, all I wanted to do was lay around the house and not do anything. They didn’t figure out that I had it until I was almost in a coma. She needs to be on Synthroid. It is not expensive if you don’t have insurance. After taking it for a while the thyroid gland should start to shrink, mine has. Good luck.

  38. QUESTION:
    what is the best way, in additon to syntroid, to control your weight hen dealing with hypothyroidism?
    i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer in march of ’06. my syntroid(replacement thyroid hormone) has been upped numerous times but i am still plagued by the excess weight my condition causes despite controlling my diet and exercise. is there something else i can be soing specific to my condition that can help boost my metabolism?

    • ANSWER:
      Is the doctor keeping the TSH suppressed because of your recent thyroid cancer. This is very important, so that none of the cancer cells come back. Plus, having a lower TSH should help in weight loss. If it doesn’t, then maybe you need both T4 and T3 in the form of Armour. Synthoid is only T4.

      Thyroid links below.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have hypothyroidism at 23 yrs old?
    I’m a 23-year-old female and have been experiencing most of the symptoms for a couple of years now (fatigue, weakness, coarse and dry hair, constipation, irritability, pale skin, memory loss, decreased libido). The onset of some of the symptoms seemed OK a while back, but they have persisted for years. I am a normal weight, but I do find it harder to lose weight now, which I thought was just normal as I got older. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible. You’d better make an appointment to have it checked. In the meantime, get some Kelp supplements. The iodine they contain promotes a healthy thyroid (but it’s not a long-term solution for serious thyroid problems).

  40. QUESTION:
    what food should an infant with hypothyroidism not eat?
    My baby is about to start eating gerber, baby food. I don’t know if there is any food that I should avoid feeding her. She was born with Hypothyroidism. PLS help me

    What food should an infant with Hypothyroidism not eat??

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t know about babies, but you might want to ask your doctor about iodine supplementation. Iodine is necessary for the body to make hormones, including thyroid hormones. Chlorine, fluoride, and bromine compete for the iodine receptors. The body can’t use those elements, so deficiency of hormones developes.

      You might want to avoid soy. “SOY INFANT FORMULA — BIRTH CONTROL PILLS FOR BABIES

      Babies fed soy-based formula have 13,000 to 22,000 times more estrogen compounds in their blood than babies fed milk-based formula.

      Infants exclusively fed soy formula receive the estrogenic equivalent of at least five birth control pills per day.”

  41. QUESTION:
    Does taking medicine for hypothyroidism actually help with weight loss?
    I workout everyday and eat right but i find myself gaining weight that is not muscle. I was told I may have hypothyroidism but further investigation is needed. I was wondering what is the name of the medicine most commonly prescribed, and also does it help with weight loss? if so how much of an affect does it have?

    • ANSWER:
      The symptoms of hypothryoidism include weight gain due to slow metabolism. Hypothyroidism can only be diagnosed by a doctor from a blood test. There are three main types of thyroid medications given:

      Generic name – levothyroxine sodium (T4) Brand name – Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid
      Generic name – liothyronine sodium (T3) Brand name – Cytomel
      Generic name – liotrix (T3 and T4) Brand name – Euthroid, Thyrolar

      The T3 & T4 hormones will increase your metabolism and weight loss is likely. The amount of weight loss really depends on your own body chemistry and how much of your obesity has to do with a slow metabolism and how much has to do with genetics and lifestyle. Your doctor who prescribes the medications should be able to answer more specific questions.

      If you don’t have hypothyroidism, you should NEVER consider taking thyroid hormones to simply lose weight. Your normal thyroid production in combination with external thyroid hormone could combine to cause a myriad of health problems including arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, increased stroke risk, increased risk of heart disease and kidney disease. There are healthier ways to lose weight.

  42. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i want to know if there are any diet pills that I can take with synthroid?
    I want to know if there are any diet pills I can safely take with my synthroid medicine to help me to lose weight. Thanks!

    NO RUDE ANSWERS OR YOU WILL BE REPORTED!

    • ANSWER:
      i take the same medicine and was told by my doctor not to even think about iti cant have any of them please call your doctor the one who prescribed them to you and ask them.

      they all say on the bottle if you have a thyroid condition do not take

  43. QUESTION:
    How can Hypothyroidism affect my vision?
    Here’s the scenario: I’m 26 years old, female, no children, and I’ve had hypothyroidism related to pernicious anemia for about 5 1/2 years. I decided to do some research- just out of curiosity- and I’ve had trouble finding documentation of how hypothyroidism affects vision. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Mainly with dry eyes…which can make it difficult to focus and possibly lead to scratched/ulcerated corneas.

  44. QUESTION:
    Symptoms of hypothyroidism and the tests needed?
    For the past few years I’ve had an extreme problem with fatigue, insomnia, and being very sensitive to cold weather, along with low body temps all the time. Thyroid problems are hereditary in my family, and I’ve BEEN tested (TSH and T-4 which showed as “normal”) but I suspect there are tests they didn’t perform. What other blood tests should I get done? What other symptoms should I look out for? My body is beginning to malfunction right and left from these low body temperatures! Help!

    • ANSWER:
      You should get TSH, FT4, FT3, TPO, TgAB.

  45. QUESTION:
    Other than synthetic thyroid meds, is there any other ways to balance hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering if anyone knew any natural ways to help balance it out. Of course I’m still going to take my meds, I was just wondering if there was anything else I could do. Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      You can try natural meds. They have been around for years and most people state they feel better on them. I started out on synthetic meds, but 2 years into my diagnosis I switched to Armour thyroid. It was the best move I ever made. Almost every symptom went away. Armour thyroid is dosed by the Free T4 and Free T3 blood tests, not the TSH. The TSH was developed by the makers of the synthetic meds to dose their product. Unfortunately doctors only use this one test.

      Some links below

  46. QUESTION:
    How does the gastric intestinal bypass surgery could help patients who have hypothyroidism ?
    and or depression to lose weigh?

    • ANSWER:
      i doubt it. when you consider that you are not dealing with the root cause of the problem (hypothyroidism or depression), all that will occur is that the weight will come on again. remember, the surgery is reversible. you will get your stomach back. try to deal with the actual issue, of which the weight gain is only a symptom.

      if you do want to lose weight in the meantime, try the fullbar. it was created by a doctor who performs those surgeries, and according to him, it has the same effects, but is obviously non-invasive. you can get info at his website, fullbar.com.

  47. QUESTION:
    Anyone with hypothyroidism: What are the best foods to help thyroid function?
    Thank you in advance for your answers!
    While I appreciate all the info, seriously, all I’m asking for is a list of foods. Thank you! :)
    My doc has told me everything except foods and I keep forgetting to ask him. :(

    • ANSWER:
      Be careful if trying something other than the thyroid medicine a doctor prescribes. A lot of people will tell you to increase the iodine you get in foods, but that doesn’t work. Your thyroid is not making enough of the hormone, thyroxine, and other than the prescription pills do NOT take its place. Too much iodine, in addition, can actually make hypothyroidism worse.

      Exercise CAN increase your metabolism, but is still NO replacement for the hormone.

  48. QUESTION:
    Ovulation tests work with hypothyroidism ?
    I had sex 4 days ago.I got an ovulation test because It happened just on the day after my period.I used about 5 of the strips at different since yesterday and today times and they are coming out positive. Also I have hypothyroidism so I don’t know if that can affect the reading.Any help?
    I’m not sure if it was the last day or if it was just spotting because I have been bleeding on and off for about 2 months.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes hypothyroidism can alter the OPK test results. The negative, not the positive. Thyroid dysfunction can halt ovulation by upsetting the balance of the body’s natural reproductive hormone. If there is too much or too little thyroid hormone, ovulation might not occur. Hence affecting a negative result. If you are managing your thyroid with medication, and your levels are in normal range, you should be ovulating regularly. You said you starting testing the day after you started your period? With positive results? Does seem kinda strange………………

  49. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism & am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help me lose weight. Any suggestions?
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have lost more than 100 pounds and I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am also finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      A good hoodia product will definitely help your weight loss program, but I’d get a supplement that has a metabolism booster as well.

      I take a supplement called Herbalean, and it contains hoodia and the recently un-banned ephedra Ma Huang. It’s made by the people that originally made MetaboLife 356, and their new fomula works very well for me. I have a lot of energy, and have completely stopped snacking between meals.

  50. QUESTION:
    People who have hypothyroidism please help me?
    Ok so I am pretty sure I have hypothyroidism, I am tired allll the time, anemic, slow metabolism, overall just sluggish and several other symptoms. Anybody who has it can you tell me if the thyroid hormone pill made you feel “faster” and sped up your metabolism at all and made you feel less sluggish?

    • ANSWER:


Hypothyroidism During Pregnancy Symptoms Treatment

Pregnancy & Gallstones :How to treat gallstones in pregnant women

Home remedies or natural treatment is the best option to treat gallstones during pregnancy ,as they cause no harm to baby.Read more to find how natural remedies will help pregnant women to get rid of gallbladder stones.( Seek your doctor’s advice)

Are you searching for a particular gallstones remedy? Are you worried about indigestion problems and feelings of nausea and vomiting? Don’t worry, read this article which deals with symptoms, causes, diagnosis, types and remedy of gallstones.

Symptoms of gallbladder stones

Prolonged pain in the upper abdomen, pain in the back between shoulder blades, skin and white of the eyes turning yellow and clay-like stools accompanied by dark colored urine are also the symptoms of gallstones. Being of female species, excess cholesterol, obesity, excess estrogen, being over 60 years and fasting are the causes of gallstones.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone else been diagnosed as borderline Hypothyroid?
    I have been experiencing many symptoms of Hypothyroidism for the last 3 years. I have been checked for TSH levels 4 times now and the result is always that i am borderline and therefore no doctor will treat me.

    My symptoms have become worse during and following pregnancy as my weight rocketed 5 stone during and have only managed to lose 1 and half in past 9 months despite healthy eating and very regular exercises (running and fast walking).

    My TSH level recently has been 14.7 but this is apparently out of treatment guidelines. Does anyone else have this problem or are being treated at even this level please? Am getting desperate as feel i haven’t the energy and strength to look after my fast growing gorgeous boy!! Am so embarrassed of myself that i am ashamed to leave the house or take my son swimming which is very sad indeed. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I too am borderline hypo. I too cant get a dr who can really do anything about it. My weight has become an issue and no matter what I do or try the weight wont come off.


Hypothyroidism During Pregnancy Causes Symptoms

Pregnancy & Gallstones :How to treat gallstones in pregnant women

Home remedies or natural treatment is the best option to treat gallstones during pregnancy ,as they cause no harm to baby.Read more to find how natural remedies will help pregnant women to get rid of gallbladder stones.( Seek your doctor’s advice)

Are you searching for a particular gallstones remedy? Are you worried about indigestion problems and feelings of nausea and vomiting? Don’t worry, read this article which deals with symptoms, causes, diagnosis, types and remedy of gallstones.

Symptoms of gallbladder stones

Prolonged pain in the upper abdomen, pain in the back between shoulder blades, skin and white of the eyes turning yellow and clay-like stools accompanied by dark colored urine are also the symptoms of gallstones. Being of female species, excess cholesterol, obesity, excess estrogen, being over 60 years and fasting are the causes of gallstones.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and Low t4 during pregnancy?
    I am 28 weeks pregnant and have been experiencing rapid heart rate and shortness of breath. My OB tested my thyroid and my T4 levels came back low. He has referred me to an endocrinologist but my appointment isn’t for a week. They said this def. could be causing my symptoms (my pulse jumps to 130-150 for no apparent reason). Earlier in my pregnancy my hair would fall out. They told me it was just the hormones. I became frustrated with my OB because she would tell me everything was fine and I knew there was something wrong. I switched to my Doctor and in about 2 weeks he had the problem figured out. My concern is that I am already 7 months pregnant and I know that this condition can have some effect on the baby. Could this have been going on the entire pregnancy and the one before that? I did have a hard time with my weight every since I hit puberty. I joined the swim team in high school thinking it would help me. We were swimming 10000 yards a day and I lost no weight at all. Could this have harmed my baby? Anyone have any experience with this?

    • ANSWER:
      No, I’m sure your boy is fine. I didn’t have the same experience, but a friend of mine did and her baby turned out fine.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can smoking and drinking during pregnancy cause the baby to have hypothyroidism?
    I know that sounds like an awful question. I used to be a smoker and occasionally drank.. but i found out i was pregnant in october and i was 11 weeks. I quit smoking as soon as i found out and i drank 1 time after i conceived before i got a positive pregnancy test. I recently found out my son has hypothyroidism.. could this have been caused by me smoking and drinking? And please no nasty comments. I had no idea i was pregnant cause i had no symptoms.

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    I think I have Hypothyroidism?
    I am 5’3” and have always been between 120-125 lbs. I got pregnant, and despite exercising over six hours a week throughout most of the pregnancy, I ended up at over 200 lbs. it has been a year and hardly any weight has come off even though I have been eating relatively healthy and have continued to exercise.

    I am not an emotional eater and never had any cravings during pregnancy, so food was and has never been anything super special. The most I have weighed was 138, and that was when I was sitting around and eating crap.

    My mom also has an under active thyroid, so it might be genetic. I do fit a lot of the symptoms, but they could also be caused by other things. I am 20, so i know that the condition usually does not happen in people this young.

    Anyway, I was wondering if somebody could give me some input before I go to the doctor.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:


Hypothyroidism Diseases Causing

Graves Disease: Graves’ disease is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, affecting 13 million people and targeting women seven times as often as … more about Graves Disease.

Graves Disease: A form of hyperthyroidism where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroxine which results in various symptoms such as goiter, protruding eyes and skin disorders. More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Graves Disease is available below.

Causes Graves’ Disease

Graves’ disease is caused by a malfunctioning of the immune system. Antibodies that usually protect the body against infections, viruses and bacteria, attack the thyroid gland.

The thyroid gland, in turn, produces excess thyroid hormone. It is not known what causes the immune system to attack the thyroid gland. A combination of factors such as heredity, sex, age, stress, smoking, and radiation have been implicated as possible triggers for Graves disease.

Graves disease is an autoimmune disorder that is more common in middle-aged women than in any other group of people. The symptoms of Graves disease are caused by hyperthyroidism or overactive thyroid gland, which produces more thyroid hormones than the body can handle. It is not known how the thyroid gland becomes overactive, however. So the exact cause of Graves disease cannot be pinpointed.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism causes hair loss, medication for the disease causes hair loss, what do I do to stop going bald?
    Thyroxine, the medication, is a case of the cure being worse than the disease. It makes me feel horrible, and the doctor just tells me ‘to continue taking the medication’.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s another alternative….Armour thyroid. I switched to it 4 years ago when Levoxyl wasn’t doing anything for my symptoms. Armour helps with hairloss, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and muscle and joint aches. I will provide links below that should help you come to a decision. There’s no need to be suffering with symptoms. If your current med isn’t working, it may be time for a different one.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism a cause of autoimmune diseases….?
    or the opposite, a symptom of an uatoimmune disease?

    • ANSWER:
      You got it right with the second guess. Hypothyroidism can be a symptom of an autoimmune disease, but it’s not a cause.

  3. QUESTION:
    How can the following drugs and diseases cause depression?
    How can the following diseases cause depression:
    1. pernicious anemia
    2. hyperthyroidism
    3. hypothyroidism

    How can the following drugs cause depression:
    1. propanolol
    2. corticosteroids
    3. oral contraceptives
    4. alcohol
    5. isotretinoin

    • ANSWER:
      Any sort of anemia, pernicious or otherwise, can manifest as depression. You don’t have enough blood cells in your body, so you end up feeling tired all the time.

      Hypothyroidism also results in a significant lack of energy, so can have similar results. I honestly don’t know why hyperthyroidism can also result in depressive symptoms. It might be that patients have trouble sleeping or have problems with concentration and excessive psychomotor agitation.

      Propanolol slows your heart rate and decreases cardiac output. You basically get the same effect as with anemia–you just don’t have the energy that you would otherwise.

      Corticosteroids can cause a number of psychiatric changes that are often lumped together under the umbrella of “steroid psychosis”. This can include depression, mania, or overt psychosis. I don’t think it is understood why this happens.

      Oral contraceptives are hormones. If someone can explain to me why hormones cause mood swings in women, I would be indebted to him.

      Alcohol is well-known to be a downer, but I don’t think it is known how exactly it works. Some people argue that alcohol addiction is a *result* of depression, but I think the more common opinion is that it can be both a cause and effect.

      The evidence on isotretinoin is equivocal. The fact is that the group of patients who are most likely to be prescribed isotretinoin *already* have a higher risk of suicidality before they ever get the drug (the incidence of suicide is the same between kids who get isotretinoin for their acne and kids who get antibiotics for their acne). The reason isotretinoin is so tightly regulated now is because a Congressman’s son committed suicide and the Congressman blamed the drug–but there really is no reliable evidence behind it.

  4. QUESTION:
    Why is hypothyroidism more common in women than men?
    I know what hypothyroidism is, but what causes more women to have hypothyroidism than men? If a male has hypothyroidism what would be some causes to that? In general, what are some underlying causes of hypothyroidism? My dad told me he went to the doctors and has hypothyroidism and has to go back to find out the causes. I don’t know if their is a family history of hypothyroidism or other auto-immune diseases.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid activity fluctuates within the day in response to diet, stress, temperature, etc. In light of this knowledge, one can speculate or identify genetic, hormonal, lifestyle, & dietary factors as contributors to hypothyroidism.

      Since hypothyroidism often besets someone gradually, it is one of the degenerative diseases that gets noticed as lifespans increase.As you mentioned, autoimmune diseases can target the thyroid & cause dysfunction, either by elevating thyroid activity or decreasing it (sometimes it increases it first & then decreases it later). It’s hard to isolate this as genetic or hormonal, since women do tend to have more autoimmune disorders. Perhaps it’s both. Estradiol (an estrogen) can have an antagonistic effect on thyroid function by competing for binding sites. If estradiol binds first, then thyroxine/tetraiodothyronine (T4) & triidothyronine (T3) cannot exert their effects. Estradiol also limits other thermogenic (calorie burning) & potentially thyroid stimulating effects due to its functions in limiting muscular development & encouraging fat storage. Furthermore, estradiol does not limit the activity of the adrenal glands the way that testosterone does. The “fatigue” of the adrenal glands (not as pronounced or fatal as Addison’s Disease) due to insufficient curbing of their activity can decrease thyroid function. Lifestyle factors such as lack of stress reduction accelerate this process. Finally, women tend to consume less calories than men; more specifically, they eat less fat & protein. Whereas adequate fat consumption is essential for the production of certain hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, etc.), adequate protein consumption is essential for peptide hormones like thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones consist of the amino acid tyrosine combined with 1, 2, 3, or 4 atoms of iodine (hence, they have names such as tri – iodo – thyronine). In the hope of losing weight or keeping weight down, many women deprive themselves of the building blocks for healthy amounts of hormones. Some foods & supplements are goitrogenic (goiter inducing/reduce thyroid activity), such as soy. Sometimes, the cause is idiopathic (of unknown origin).

      Men with hypothyroidism may have similar causes, such as an insufficient diet, excessive stress, etc. Low testosterone may correlate with low thyroid hormones, but it’s hard to say which causes which, as there are thyroid receptors in the testes, yet testosterone may increase or decrease thyroid hormone production (without necessarily causing hypothyroid symptoms). Likewise, men may have idiopathic hypothyroidism.

      Most of the factors listed above still fall within two basic categories: primary (the organ itself) hypothyroidism or secondary (the organ[s] that instruct it to act) hypothyroidism. Both men & women may have hypothyroidism as a result of inadequate TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary gland or failure of the thyroid to respond properly to TSH.

      Sorry to make your eyes bleed from this lengthy response. As a final consideration, make sure your dad’s doctor tests for thyroid function thoroughly via blood tests. TSH standards for hypothyroidism have been drastically revised (from 5.0 or greater to 3.0 or greater), & TSH itself is insufficient to identify true hypothyroidism without accounting for symptoms. The pituitary often mismeasures need for thyroid stimulating hormone. T4, T3, free T4, free T3, & reverse T3 are vital for determining true thyroid function. The source listed below contains information from patients contending with hypothyroidism who seek the best, most up-to-date medical advice concerning their disease. I wish you & your father well, as this can be very difficult to treat without a good doctor *who listens*.

  5. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism caused by Autoimmune disease?
    My question is weird. I was brought up by a mother who’s over obsessive with health issues so now I have no real idea of what is serious and what’s not.

    I have previous history of hypothyroidism as caused by autoimmune disease. I am a single mother, full time student and a part-time worker. I barely have time to sleep let alone go to the doctor for a checkup. I need to know how serious this things is and if my symptoms are part of the disease or I’m most likely very stressed :)

    my symptoms:
    1. the thyroid is so big you can see it when I’m standing straight (it kind hangs out a bit)
    2. I’m constantly tired
    3. period is very irregular
    4. Gain weight EXTREMELY easily (my metabolism is extremely slow)
    5. nervous system goes haywire all the time
    6. lack of sleep
    7. constipation sometimes
    8. Slow thought process – I’m studying International Business and it’s a very competitive program and I know I’m not dumb but I do notice that to calculate something it takes me much longer than it used to. not because I can’t think of an answer, but because i just can’t think. I don’t know how to explain this. sorry

    I know that you wont’ have a medical advice but if someone ha previous experience with a similar disease and can guide me in the right direction that would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      You have Hasimoto’s Thyroiditis. You should get on Levothyroxine which could be prescribed by your internal med. doctor, or an endocrinologist. Once your levels are stable, all your symptoms should get better.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is anyone using PTU for Graves disease? What are the side affects? Does it cause hypothyroidism?
    I have Graves disease, my doctor is really rude and won’t answer questions for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Some possible side effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) include:
      skin rash,itching,abnormal hair loss,upset stomach,vomiting,loss of taste, abnormal sensations such as tingling, prickling, burning, tightness, or pulling,swelling,joint and muscle pain,drowsiness,or dizzyness.
      Rarely, propylthiouracil can affect the blood and cause decreased levels of red and white blood cells and platelets, which may cause an increased risk of infection, serious bleeding, anemia, or other problems. There have also been rare cases in which PTU has caused serious liver problems.
      These side effects are rare, but if you experience them you should consult a doctor immediately: sore throat,fever,headache,chills
      unusual bleeding or bruising,right-sided abdominal pain with decreased appetite,yellowing of the skin or eyes, or skin eruptions

      To answer your second question: no, PTU should not cause hypothyroidism.

      If your doctor won’t even answer some basic questions about a medication he/she is giving you, I would suggst finding another doctor. Any doctor that won’t even answer questions about the side effects of a medication doesn’t deserve your time.

  7. QUESTION:
    Lupron causing other diseases?
    I made the stupid decision to get Lupron injections for my endometriosis, it’s only been a month and a week since getting it, and i’ve gotten the side effect within DAYS of getting the shot. IMO Lupron is the worst drug ever and i’m not even myself. Doctor prescribed me Estradiol to help with the side effects, and it hasn’t helped AT ALL. So i had blood work done and he is pretty sure I have hypothyroidism, there is a chance I could have RA and fibromyalgia . I never had these kinds of problems before my surgery and given the shot, could Lupron caued me to have these diseases ?? Has anyone gone through this and ended up with a *surprise* disease??
    Well the shot last 3 months. I find out monday if i really do have a thyroid problem =p

    • ANSWER:
      One shot isn’t going to give you something like that THAT quickly. You don’t even have a diagnosis for those things! Hypothyroidism is common in people with endo. Trust me, I have both. I also have fibromyalgia and epilepsy. I’ve taken Lupron. I guarantee NONE OF IT was caused by the Lupron! Being in pain for a long time will make it to where your body just doesn’t know how to quit triggering the pain receptors. That could be part of your problem. Lupron is going to take about 4-6 months to fully wear out of your system. You’ll feel better after that. Just take your vitamins and keep contacting your doctor. I’m sure it’ll work out. Email me on my profile if you have anymore questions. I’ve been where you are.

  8. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a condition/disease that can cause hypothyroidism, gullstones …..?
    I have been doing alot of research lately on a few conditions i have developed. When i was about 17 i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. The Dr. that diagnosed me said at the time i was so underactive my thyroid was about to shut down. I have bee on synthroid to manage this disease. Early this year i was diagnosed with a gullstone. I had been having attacks for years before this unknown to the cause. Frequency of attacks lead to the diagnosis. Recently while talking with my mother she informed me that around the age of 10 i had blood drawn and “spun”. The Dr. at the time told her that the fat content in my blood was far to high. I do not have High cholesterol or high blood pressure.

    My worry is that i developed all of these symptoms at an early age. I am only 23. Does anyone know of a possible disease or condition that could tie all of these other symptoms together?

    Im going crazy trying to figure it out! Does anyone know where else i could look?

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    What happens if you have two illnesses that cause opposite symptoms…?
    I mean like if you had hypothyroidism which causes weight gain but at the same time you had celiac disease which causes weight loss then would your weight stay the same since it would balance out? Or would one kind of override the other one and cause a change in weight? If it balances out then would this also happen with two diseases where one causes diarrhea and the other causes constipation so that you had normal bowel movements?

    It’s kind of a weird question i know but i’ve always wondered haha. Thanks!

    =)

    • ANSWER:
      My guess in the example you gave is the celiac disease woulde prevail because it is a disease of absorbtion. You would never be able to absorb the food so you would lose weight. In the second example, I can only point out it is possible to have constipation intermitted with diarhhea.

  10. QUESTION:
    How much do these diseases contribute to cavities and bad oral health?
    I know bulimia affects teeth but what about Hypothyroidism and hypertension? Do these diseases cause more cavities than say an average healthy person would have? The reason i ask is i never had any cavities until i was about 22 years old and these days it seems i go 3-4 times a year for fillings in addition to my normal bi-annual cleanings.I became hypothyroid around 22 and since that time i have tons of cavities. I was bulimic from ages 13-26 and i know this didn’t help my teeth any. I just wondered what i can do besides twice daily brushings and flossings, plus Act fluoride rinse along with fluoride treatments at my dentists office? I still get cavities even with all of this preventative measures. Whats can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Your teeth should not be affected by hypothyroidism or hypertension.

      But bulimia can cause MAJOR problems for your teeth. The acid from your stomach will eat away the enamel on your teeth and can cause major gum problems, including gum diseases.

      You were not good to your body when you were bulimic and now you are paying for it. You are doing the right thing, though, by taking care of your teeth with the twice daily brushings, flossings, fluoride rinses, and fluoride treatments at your dentist office.

      Just keep your body healthy and eat the right foods and you may help your teeth from the inside out too.

      Good Luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s disease, which causes my hypothyroidism, or does it ever go into remission?
    3 years ago, at the age of 36, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. It totally came out of nowhere. I had also gained about 30 pounds and I’m wondering if there’s a connection. Plus, I’m a male, and Hashimoto’s is most common in women. I’m trying to get off of all prescription drugs, but my Endocrinologist has told me that I will need to be on my Synthroid medication for the rest of my life. I haven’t lost the weight either.

    My little sister had thyroid cancer and had her thyroid removed, and a female cousin and an Aunt of mine also have Hashimoto’s so it runs in my family. But the WOMEN in my family. So why me?

    I just don’t want to have to wake up and take a pill for the rest of my life.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, where your own immune system attacks your thyroid for an unknown reason. Since you have had damage to your thyroid, there is no cure. There is no other treatment other than to take the synthroid. I know it is inconvenient, but it is the same hormone that your thyroid is supposed to make. As to why you, that’s impossible to answer. I’m sorry I can’t give you a better answer. Good luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?

    And especially when caused by Hashimoto’s disease? I’ve heard is an autoimmune disease, which I imagine would affect one’s immune system.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it’s related to a poor immune system. I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism myself, and all my bloodwork was normal except for having a TSH level of 132. Other than my thyroid issue, I’m healthy as can be. I just hope the synthroid pills kick in soon :)

  13. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  14. QUESTION:
    I’m on 200 mg Levothyroxine for hypothyroidism and still feeling sluggish and having severe headaches.?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s Disease about 3 years ago. I am STILL trying to get my thyroid level back on track. My dr has continued to increase my dosage of Levothyroxine to no avail. I was on 175 mg of Levothyroxine up until 2 months ago and my bloodwork showed a TSH level of 20. So he upped my dosage to 200 mg saying that this is near the highest level normally prescribed. I have been taking it for 2 months and felt good for about 3 days and now am back to feeling very sluggish, having severe headaches, brain fog, weight gain (lots), mood swings, etc.
    It feels like I’m not taking anything…no effects whatsoever. (I’m taking it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with water. I don’t eat or drink for at least 1 hour afterwards…just like my dr instructed.)
    Has anyone experienced this difficulty of getting results from thyroid meds? What will the dr end up doing if this high dose doesn’t work? I just want my old life back…so does my husband…tired of the mood swings, I’m sure but he’s been really supportive!

    Thanks for any info or experiences you can share!

    • ANSWER:
      maybe you need to try b12 vitamins.. b12 is for your energy and such ppl use them to help lose weight as well and you medication might not be making you gain weight it could b from your hypothyrodism cuz it can cause weight gain

      ask your doctor if you can mix b12 vitamins (if you choose to try to) with your medication just incase it could do something to you

  15. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism, and my blood work had odd results…?
    I’ve visited a specialist (an endocrynologist) and understand completly what he told me. He said I had an autoimmune disease and I wasn’t sure if hypothyroidism is an autoimmune disease in itself or not. He also said hashimoto (sp?) may have been the cause for my hypothyroidism.
    He called me with the results of the blood work they did on me and said the couldn’t find hashimoto, but found something odd. He said there are two types of antibodies in my blood and I was missing one of them completely. I didn’t really understand the scientific talk, but I think one of the types of antibodies started with a “p” and that was the one I’m missing. What does that mean?! I’m not sure if I have an autoimmune disease or what caused it.

    I’m just confused in general. If you could shed ANY light on this matter, it’d be greatly appreciated! I want to know more about the limited info he told me so that the next time I visit I know the questions to ask! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with asking your doctor. I think this is an example of too much information, too little explanation (note to self: stop doing that!)

      Hypothyroidism is classified as an autoimmune disease if it is caused by the body’s attacking the thyroid gland with its own antibodies. From what you have said, it sounds as if your doctor thinks you don’t have the autoimmune type, or else that your tests for it have conflicting results.

      It sounds as if he didn’t get test the results he expected; maybe he jumped the gun a little in telling you that you had Hashimoto’s (can easily happen if you have classic symptoms). Don’t know what the “p” antibody might have been. Could it have been TSH (a hormone)? That would be unusual, but it’s not an antibody. Possibly anti-TPO? Most people with Hashimoto’s will have anti-TPO antibodies, so if these were negative, it might be surprising to him.

      The endocrine system is very tricky. One must be highly trained to interpret thyroid test results, and like any test, they results are not perfect. The point is, hypothyroidism is very common and easily treated, but difficult even for people in medicine to understand. :)

      Personally, I felt like H@LL when my thyroid was low, and it took MONTHS of waiting for test results and a referral before I could finally get that little pill that keeps me from feeling tired, depressed, even suicidal! (I am convinced the hypothyroidism happened because I was taking soy supplements, which have been linked with thyroid problems.)

  16. QUESTION:
    Help, have hypothyroidism and need some answers?
    I have had hypothyroidism for yrs and been on synthroid 1mcg , my current TSH level is 2.91 (.34-4.82) is normal, anyway, I feel far from “normal” my hair is falling out, I’m cold mostly in the evenings, I have elevated lipids, hypertension,anemia, elevated homocysteine level, insomnia, muscle aches that’s partly why I can’t sleep is the pain, I’m still 40 lbs over wt. I will go back to my GP in about a week anybody else have these problems ? I went to about.com and it’s all there about my symptoms my Dr. wants to treat me with Antihypertensives, Vit., Iron, Lipid lowering agents, I think since the thyroid disease causes these symptoms that’s what he should treat. There isn’t a thyroid Dr. within hundreds of miles where I live. Please comment

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, those are all hypo symptoms. Your TSH of 2.91 is too high. Most feel best with the morning TSH around 1.0. TSH needs to always be done first thing in the morning or you may not get the correct dosage.

      With your symptoms, there’s a chance that you are converting enough T4 into T3 and may be helped by adding T3. This can be done by adding a small about of Cytomel or switching to Armour or Thyrolar.

      I started out on Levoxyl. It did nothing for my symptoms. Eventually I added 5 mcg’s of Cytomel and it helped about 75% of my symptoms. I am now on Armour and it has helped about 95% of my symptoms. I only have ridged fingernails and cold feet at night.

      Below are links that may help. Getting your levels right should help with the symptoms. Being just in range is not enough.

      You don’t need a thyroid doctor. A good family doctor who s willing to work with yo should be enough. Thyroid doctors aren’t always the best. I had one who added the Cytomel, but refused to use ARmour. If I had of stayed with him, I’d still be having some symptoms because Armour was the best medicaton for me.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is there another cause of Hypothyroidism?
    I’m a young person and have been diagnosed with subclincial hypothyroidism. I have every symptom of hypo except for weight gain which they have told me will eventually come in my lifetime. I will become one of those fat middle aged women no one loves are cares about. They said I will get full blown hypo in 5,10,15,20 years. They can’t tell me exactly when, just ‘It will shut down eventually’

    And then there all the information abouot how treatment doesn’t work and they just stay fat for the rest of their lives even after treatment.

    The depression is very bad and I’m suicidal and have been under observation 2 times, and this diagnoses is the cause of it, the inevitable life long misery of weight gain and fatigue and depression.

    I may have cealics disease and someone said this can cause hypothyroidism, so if i am diagnosed and gluten free will my symptoms go? This is my last hope for a normal life.

    • ANSWER:
      When your thyroid doesn’t produce enough hormones, the balance of chemical reactions in your body can be upset. There can be a number of causes, including autoimmune disease, treatment for hyperthyroidism, radiation therapy, thyroid surgery and certain medications.
      Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the front of your neck, just below your Adam’s apple. Hormones produced by the thyroid gland have an enormous impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism.
      Two main hormones
      Your thyroid gland produces two main hormones, thyroxine (T-4) and triiodothyronine (T-3). They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate, and help regulate the production of protein. Your thyroid gland also produces calcitonin, a hormone that regulates the amount of calcium in your blood.
      The rate at which T-4 and T-3 are released is controlled by your pituitary gland and your hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a thermostat for your whole system. The hypothalamus signals your pituitary gland to make a hormone called thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Your pituitary gland then releases TSH – the amount depends on how much T-4 and T-3 are in your blood. Finally, your thyroid gland regulates its production of hormones based on the amount of TSH it receives.
      Although this process usually works well, the thyroid sometimes fails to produce enough hormones. Hypothyroidism may be due to a number of different factors, including:
      Autoimmune disease. People who develop a particular inflammatory disorder known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis suffer from the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Autoimmune disorders occur when your immune system produces antibodies that attack your own tissues. Sometimes this process involves your thyroid gland. Scientists aren’t sure why the body produces antibodies against itself. Some think a virus or bacterium might trigger the response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved. Most likely, autoimmune diseases result from more than one factor. But however it happens, these antibodies affect the thyroid’s ability to produce hormones.
      Treatment for hyperthyroidism. People who produce too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) are often treated with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications to reduce and normalize their thyroid function. However, in some cases, treatment of hyperthyroidism can result in permanent hypothyroidism.
      Radiation therapy. Radiation used to treat cancers of the head and neck can affect your thyroid gland and may lead to hypothyroidism.
      Thyroid surgery. Removing all or a large portion of your thyroid gland can diminish or halt hormone production. In that case, you’ll need to take thyroid hormone for life.
      Medications. A number of medications can contribute to hypothyroidism. One such medication is lithium, which is used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. If you’re taking medication, ask your doctor about its effect on your thyroid gland.
      Less often, hypothyroidism may result from one of the following:
      Congenital disease. Approximately 1 in 3,000 babies in the United States is born with a defective thyroid gland or no thyroid gland at all. In most cases, the thyroid gland didn’t develop normally for unknown reasons, but some children have an inherited form of the disorder. Often, infants with congenital hypothyroidism appear normal at birth. That’s one reason why most states now require newborn thyroid screening.
      Pituitary disorder. A relatively rare cause of hypothyroidism is the failure of the pituitary gland to produce enough TSH — usually because of a benign tumor of the pituitary gland.
      Pregnancy. Some women develop hypothyroidism during or after pregnancy (postpartum hypothyroidism), often because they produce antibodies to their own thyroid gland. Left untreated, hypothyroidism increases the risk of miscarriage, premature delivery and preeclampsia — a condition that causes a significant rise in a woman’s blood pressure during the last three months of pregnancy. It can also seriously affect the developing fetus.
      Iodine deficiency. The trace mineral iodine — found primarily in seafood, seaweed, plants grown in iodine-rich soil and iodized salt — is essential for the production of thyroid hormones. In some parts of the world, iodine deficiency is common, but the addition of iodine to table salt has virtually eliminated this problem in the United States.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why does hypothyroidism cause…?
    why does hypothyroidism produce the following symptoms:
    -coarse hair
    -sensitivity to cold
    -thick skin
    -husky voice

    i need the homeostatic malfunctions that could have caused these. I figured out why it causes weight gain and fatigue…but yea. I think the cold has to do with the autoimmune disorder hashimoto’s disease…but what about the husky voice? and the thick hair and skin?

    thanks!

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article from the University of Maryland is what you’re looking for:

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_causes_hypothyroidism_000038_2.htm

  19. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism-bleeding gums?
    Can hypothyroidism cause bleeding gums? please note that i do not have gum disease as i have been to two dentists who have both said my brushing is great.

    • ANSWER:
      The answer is, it depends. If it is just hypothyroidism and you are being treated, it shouldn’t be related.

      However, if you have hypothyroidism due to an autoimmune disorder (ie: lupus, rhumatoid arthritis, MS, etc.), it could be the autoimmune disorder that is causing your gums to bleed.

      You may want to see about going to your regular doctor or an immunologist or rheumatologist to find out if you have an underlying autoimmune disorder.

      Also, even if you don’t have gum disease, if you don’t floss regularly when you do floss, it may cause your gums to bleed. Or if you brush too hard.

  20. QUESTION:
    Chest pain associated with hypothyroidism?
    I have been on levothyroxine 100mcg for a few years now. Recently, I started getting bad anxiety attacks and my doctor cut back my dosage to 88mcg. I get on-and-off chest pains that sometimes happen throughout the day and other times they don’t happen at all. It seems to happen when I take dosages simultaneous (one day after another), so I started taking a dose each day for five days, then cutting one day out, and starting the cycle again. The pains aren’t as bad. Can hypothyroidism cause chest pain? Is this normal with this disease? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  21. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism????
    im 14 and i have hypothyroidism. i know what it is and everything but i just wanted to know is it really thyroid disease cause on the bottle for cold pills and tylanol it says ask a doctor if u have thyroid disease. so is it okay to take it?? and also i have a groiter in my neck….will it go away?? i’ve been on medication for more that 2 years now and it hasnt gone down. any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about four or five years ago. I’ve never had a problem with taking Tylenol, Claritin, Amoxcillin, ZPac. My doctors have always said that it was ok. You may want to check with your doctor just in case. I’ve never had a goiter, so I can’t answer your question about that. Just be sure to take your thyroid medicine everyday.

  22. QUESTION:
    Are American doctors & dentists even aware of the fraudulent science behind fluoride & fluoridated tap water?
    It’s based on a statistical illusion. It’s fraudulent science and it causes many health problems in both children and adults. Trendley Dean, DDS, (the “father of fluoridation”), the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his evidence purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    All Trendly Dean’s research showed was that fluoride delayed (or retarded), the eruption of individual teeth in children by six months to two years, therefore teeth are only delayed at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. To paraphrase Dean’s findings, “As children’s teeth disintegrate, they may have fewer cavities”. It’s good money for the dental industry. Fluoride is more toxic than lead yet they dump it in our tap water. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It increases a woman’s chances of having a Down’s Syndrome baby by 30%. It allows aluminum to cross the blood-brain barrier thus increasing one’s risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. It causes hypothyroidism. (once used to treat hyperthyroidism) It causes arthritis and bone fractures. It kills the protective enzymes naturally in your mouth which fight cavities. You absorb fluoride through your skin while bathing and under your tongue when using a fluoridated toothpaste. The fluoride being put in tap water is an industrial waste by-product…mostly from the fertilizer industry. Much of it is imported from China. Worse yet, no one is monitoring our levels of fluoride… not the medical profession or the dentists. There are over 500 peer reviewed studies showing the adverse effects of fluoride but not one double blind study showing it’s benefits. Most of the countries that at one time fluoridated tap water have now discontinued the practice and there has been no increase in cavities. The use of fluoride in tap water hasn’t even been approved by the FDA!

    Considering how over-fluoridated Americans are, do doctors ever use Ion Chromatograpy to diagnose a patient;s symptoms or diseases? Especially in the over weight population? Do doctors even know that bathing in fluoridated tap water causes hypothyroidism in adults and children? That’s why children’s teeth erupt later than normal… by up to two years later.

    Take a look at what the country of Ireland says about fluoride…

    http://www.thenhfireland.com/?p=454

    http://qualityassurance.synthasite.com/fluoride-and-the-atomic-bomb.php

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oX8ppB-wKEQ&feature=related

    • ANSWER:
      The popular and common belief is that fluoride levels of the order of 1ppm are beneficial for kids for their teeth even though there are no benefits for adults. At such low levels as 1ppm it is supposed to be harmless for adults.

      You have clearly demonstrated that fluoridated water is a dangerous health risk for kids as well as adults even at very low levels but it is unlikely that American doctors and dentists are aware of the fraudulent science behind fluoride and fluoridated tap water.

      A good or high calcium intake can help to reduce the dangers of fluoride and fluoridated tap water as calcium reacts to some extent with fluorine to form calcium fluoride CaF2 so anyone who is concerned about the dangers of fluoride and fluoridated water, as you are and myself and millions of other people, should ensure that they get plenty of calcium via their diet and if necessary from calcium supplements such as calcium carbonate, calcium gluconate, calcium ascorbate and others.

  23. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I found out a few months ago that i have Hashimoto’s disease(the graudal attacking of my thyroid by my body, causing it to slowly fail), which results in hypothyroidism. I’ve been put on levoxyl, but have gained a significant amount of weight in the past year and a half (about 65lbs). My family (parents mostly) are making me feel awful about this, though I’m not significantly obese (I was in the middle of my weight range when I started gaining) and it’s not interferring with my every day.

    Does anyone else have htis problem, or a similar one? How do you cope with these people, and your feeling self conscious? The weight will come off, I know that, but it will take time. I plan on starting to work out soon, but I work full time and go to school, and it’s very difficult. Can anyone give me some suggestions on what I can do? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have hashimoto’s disease, but i do have panhypopituarism, which also includes hypothyroidism and have had it since birth. I’ve never felt like I looked that overweight, but also never been skinny either. It is hard for me to lose weight also. I try to do weights,stretching, and run or walk daily. Often 3 miles a day and I eat pretty healthily. Sometimes its hard to keep up this exercise schedule and actually most people recommend not exercising every day of the week. I know what its like to try really hard to lose weight and not have much success.

      Sometimes it takes awhile. I used to try for a few weeks and then give up when I wasn’t seeing the results I wanted. Keep positive, pretend it doesn’t matter and keep exercising. Eventually you will get results.

      Its something you have to find a way to fit into your schedule if its something you want to do. I know its hard to find the time.

      It sounds like you pretty much know this stuff I just wanted to offer my support. I know you can do it. Don’t let other people bother you. There are an astronomical number of people that are overweight that do not have this problem.

  24. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease… Multinodular Goiter… Hypothyroidism?
    I am so confused. Depending on which doctor I talk to, I seem to get a different answer. If someone can correct all this for me I’d be so appreciative. I am ready to scream with all the back and forth… yes and no.. one doctor contradicting another… so here goes:

    About 9 years ago I started having menstrual cycle irregularities. I was all over the place, late, early.. very early (like a week after period ended it was back) and very late (like 7 weeks later and she still hasn’t come and not pregnant). After bloodwork and ultrasound my ob/gyn said the only thing she could think causing it was early perimenopause, I was only 30. So off I went waiting for full blown menopause to arrive. In the meantime other things began happening. I started losing hair.. even my eyebrows.. I was tired constantly. I was constipated or had diarrhea. My periods continued to be all over the place. I would feel sick all the time. To the point people (still to this day) think I was full of it. Then I got married. We decided to go for fertility treatments. My reproductive endo did a bunch of tests and found nothing. I was still fertile, but why I wasn’t ovulating she had no clue. My thyroid was fine she said – though she did not give me the lab number. I stopped seeing her after it was determined I would only get pregnant with IVF. If I wasn’t ovulating and the ovulation drugs weren’t making it happen, I felt this was a waste of time and money. I went for a physical with my primary doctor who found a suspicious lump on my neck. After asking me questions that seemed unrelated (i.e. periods, reflexes, hair, tired etc) she tested my thyroid and said I had a high tsh of 9.9 (not high though, right?) and prescribed synthroid and referred me to an endo. After several more tests of my thyroid it was determined I had a multinodular goiter and Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism. UGH.

    After being on meds for 3 months, my periods came back… my hair stopped falling out… and I got pregnant! But later miscarried due to high TSH. My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.

    WTH? Can someone enlighten me on this “disease” it seems I may or may not have? Who should I believe? I have read extensively and it seems I DO have characteristics… but why would a doctor tell me another doctor is wrong? I DO have a goiter – you can see/feel it. Even a radiologist called it a goiter when doing the test. HELP!! Why did I get pregnant if the only thing I changed was the meds? Can anyone help me understand?

    • ANSWER:
      “My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.” YOU NEED A NEW OB/GYN NOW!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  25. QUESTION:
    Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroidism)?
    I have hypothyroidism and I’ve recently been feeling worse than ever. I’m extremely fatigued and I have nausea accompanied by achy muscles (neck, shoulders, back, hips, and area in front of neck where thyroid is aches). It leaves me feeling physically worn down and I barely want to get out of bed. Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with hypothyroidism or has anyone with hypothyroidism experience the same thing? Thanks so much. (Also, I do not have a fever, virus, or any other illness that would be currently causing these symptoms)

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I want to know if anybody here was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and didnt use recreational drugs at parties but developed the disease naturally as I recently got some bad news….Basically I found out a friend who also went to parties has developed multiple sclerosis and I forgot I had hypothyroidism for a while but now I am feeling so bad……

    Pls could u give me some info….I dont do parties drugs now I really regret and am so afraid for my future as I already have hypothyroidism and I know that all drugs affect the nervous system which can cause disease…

    Urghhhh!!!! :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I have Hypothyroidism and it is no big deal. You take one little pill once a day and it makes you as normal as anybody else. The pills are cheap and there are no side effects because the pills contain a natural hormone. Hypothyroidism runs in families. My great Aunt is 98 and she has been taking the little pills for 40 years without obviously any ill effects.

  27. QUESTION:
    Can hypothyroidism cause excessive hunger or even just hunger pains but then you get full very quickly?
    in 2007 i got silent thyroiditis which is when you fluxuate between hyper and hypo over the couse of a couple months. you don’t actually have to treat the disease just treat the symptoms by taking a beta blocker until the thyroiditis goes away by itself.
    i have been perfectly fine since.
    last week i went for my yearly physical and routine blood work. my dr called me the next day saying my TSH was up (indicating hypothyroidism) so i had to go for more blood work (which i did on thursday) and a thryoid ultra sound (haven’t been able to make an appointment and i’m not sure if i’ll be able to make one until after this next week coming up due to transportation issues).

    at first i didn’t think i was even really having any of the symptoms of hypothyroidism cuz the symptoms i did have were just normal things i’ve dealt with my whole life like being tired and cold. everything else has been fine.
    but then i suddenly started feeling much more tired. (friday i watched my 17 month old niece all day and she took a nap from 10am-12pm and so did i. i then got lunch for both of us and after that she likes to watch yo gabba gabba and dances to the songs. i sat on the couch and she sat in the chair/stood up and danced. i actually fell asleep while she was watching it i was soooo tired still. that freaked me out cuz i realize she could have gotten into trouble and i was sleeping.

    FINALLY GETTING TO THE POINT:
    in the last couple days i’ve also noticed that i am very hungry. i’ll feel hungry for a few minutes and then all the sudden i’ll get really bad hunger pains like when you don’t eat for a really long time and you actually start feeling sick to your stomach like maybe you shouldn’t eat anything.
    then when i do eat i feel full really fast and can’t finish my food but then a little while later it starts all over again.
    i’ve been trying really hard not to eat more than usual through out the day and i just have something like a glass of apple cyder instead of something like chips or what not.
    so to the question. can hypothyroidism make you very hungry?
    thanks for your thoughts but i already know my thyroid is out of whack cuz the tests showed it. plus the fact that i’ve had thyroid problems in the past.
    and i haven’t always been super hungry its just been for a few days now which makes me think the hypothyroid thing is catching up to me. (if hunger is a symptom that is).
    i have tried the low carb thing before and my body can’t handle it. after a week of little to no carbs i got physically sick and exhausted. i started crying all the time and was very depressed. as soon as i started having a normal amount of carbs i felt fine again.

    • ANSWER:
      I had basically the same symptons and the doctors told me my thyroid was normal. I think it was a little high or low or whatever. I went on a low carb diet cut out all the yeast, flour, and sugar in my diet ate eggs, green veggies and meat or fish. I did that for about a month then I added yellow veggies after about a week I added melons, I slowly started added different foods into my diet that had more carbs but I still watch how much I eat especially bread. If I have bread I don’t eat potatoes. And I don’t eat high carbs every day once or twice a week like bread one day and potatoes a couple days later. And stay away from any kind of water that isn’t spring water. Chlorine will play havik on your thyroid and make you even worse. There is a disease that causes basically the same symptons I think it’s called Candidia you can look it up on the internet under Yeast Connection this will also help with Hypo thyroidism.

  28. QUESTION:
    Does hypothyroidism caused low blood pressure?
    My mom is now 61 years old. Her left half of thyroid was removed last 2000.

    Last 2010 she was diagnosed with goiter with the remaining right half. she was put on levothyroxine for 6 months. her goiter lump decrease in size.

    january 2011 she had fever, cough and pain in the neck. she took azyth antibiotic, arcoxia, ectrin and aerius. these are med prescribed by her cardio.

    she got well. the fever and cough was gone. but she felt pain in the neck plus her bp went up and we cannot do anything to bring it down. she took calcibloc and micardis 80 but it stayed high..160/100.

    we checked with her endo.
    ultrasound diagnosis was thyroid nodular disease “a large well circumscribed complex solid parenchymal nodule is located in the right thyroid lobe measuring 2.5 X 2.08 X 1.59 cms (l x w x thickness) the rest of the thyroid stroma is coarsened”
    but lab tests (tsh irma, ft4) show normal results.

    her doctor prescribed micardis and neobloc to lower down her bp and nothing for the thyroid. she said it is nothing but a goiter.

    Im suspecting hypothyroidism but her doctor told us otherwise and didnt prescribed any med for her. However her blood pressure is continuing to goes down to 90/60 and she almost fainted.
    we went back to her endo and she change her beta blocker Carvedilol. still no med for her thyroid. im confused. if it has nothing to with her thyroid disease then why is my mom’s blood pressure hard to control.coming from a high bp now getting really low.

    im reading on the net that sometimes even if lab tests show normal results there could still be a thyroid problem. In my mom case I think she really had hypo or hyper. how can I telll if her endo insists there’s nothing and need not any medication. what other tests can we do to make sure.

    we also checked with her opthalmologist to rule out glaucoma issue.

    I need a second opinion. Can anyone suggest me a great Endocrinology here in manila? or an appropriate doctor for this problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Tests to request on this link (a must is thyroid antibody tests) >>> http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      Yes it is possible to have normal thyroid results with hypothyroidism. A book that goes into a lot more detail is – Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal by Dr Kharrazian. >>>http://www.thyroidbook.com/

      “Low blood pressure is caused by a lowered force of blood being pushed through your arteries due to the lowered metabolism of thyroid disease. In this case, the upper number, called the systolic, is lower than it should be.

      And having adrenal insufficiency, which is common with hypothyroid, can also create a low circulating blood volume via the loss of salt.

      But in time, you will find yourself with high blood pressure.”

      Blood Pressure and Hypothyroidism can go hand-in-hand >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/blood-pressure/

      Not sure about doctors in Manilla. Many doctors and endocrinologists misdiagnose thyroid conditions with rigid reliance on the TSH test. Hopefully you find a doctor who can help your mother.

  29. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, mutually exclusive?
    I have symptoms of both, I go through phases where I match hypo, others when i match hyper. Is there a disease that causes the thyroid to both overproduce and underproduce hormones?

    My symptoms are:

    sudden unexplained weight loss
    heart beat changes (rapid, arrythmia, palpitations)
    fatigue
    sensitivity to cold
    sensitivity to heat
    changes in menstral patterns
    anxiety
    depression

    I am waiting blood test results, but until then i am wondering if its possible for the thyroid to both over produce and underproduce hormones (not at the same time obviously)?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, as the thyroid is dying, it sputters back to life and produces normal or even hyperthyroid symptoms. Eventually, it conks out.

      You should have full antibody profiles to detect the presence of both Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease.

      “Over many years, there can be periods where the thyroid sputters back to life, even causing temporary hyperthyroidism, then a return to hypothyroidism. ” (second link)

  30. QUESTION:
    anyone else have hypothyroidism(thyroid disease) and just suddenly stop taking their levoxyl/synthroid???
    ive only been out for a week or two now….. as far as I know its not deadly to be without the medicine…. and I want to see how I do without it……………instead I have been taking kelp..is this a bad decision? I have had a lot of dizziness and fatigue…. causing me to believe I have gallstones or something.

    • ANSWER:
      my wife was in the same situation. Its not deeadly to be without it, but its not healthy either I think. The kelp provides iodine which you also need. I read about this stuff awhile back and its sort of complicated involving T3 and T4 which interconvert, they regulate sex drive, body temp, mood, and other things.

  31. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and I have a few questions?
    Hey, I’m 17 and I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) just over four years ago.
    I have a few questions.

    What causes hypothyroidism?
    What effects does hypothyroidism have on people?
    What side effects does taking levothyroxine have on me?
    Is there any long-term I may develop from the disease or medication?

    My GP has always been rather vague and didn’t seem to know much. well informed websites if you know of any aswell. Thanks.
    Oops sorry jus asked my mum, it’s been caused by genetics, but yes i do suffer bowel problems and was REALLY bad before before I started on the meds.

    • ANSWER:
      They say hypothyroidism is caused by Hashimoto’s thyroidosis, but it can also be genetic. Hypo also can cause fatigue, weight gain, hair loss, problems sleeping, etc. I don’t know of any long-term side effects of taking the meds, because they are just a hormone that you need, nothing else. I also have never heard of having a disease because of the medication.

  32. QUESTION:
    Could i have an autoimmune disease?
    I was diagnosed as suffering from hypothyroidism (extremely underactive thyroid) in march and im still going through the process of getting my medication balance right, i believe its just about at the right level now but blood tests later this month will confirm hopefully. The docs think it was triggered as a result of my pregnancy (had my baby Nov 09) as the times tally up for symptoms etc. Lately though ive been catching many infections, especially in the last week ive had a urine infection, severe conjuctivitis and now i really think ive got a throat infection too, as well as a cold, my eyesight has deteriorated too which has led to me needing glasses as i have an astigmatism in one eye (which i know may not be connected) im just getting worried that there may be some underlying reason for all this, i know that an autoimmune disorder/disease can cause hypothyroidism, and the doctors told me my thyroid levels were at rock bottom, can anyone in medical career tell me if this could be the case please??

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroid patients show up with vitamin B12, iron and vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is essential as this steroid hormone activates the immune system. Child­birth can be a hor­mo­nal trig­ger for Hashimoto’s Disease and autoimmune pernicious anaemia is linked to this condition..unable to absorb vitamin B12 in the digestive tract. Vitamin B12 is essential to protect the myelin sheath (covering around the nerves) from damage. Blindness, double vision and blurred vision is a few of the many symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.

      I personally have autoimmune pernicious anaemia and i take under the tongue B12 spray daily. You haven’t mentioned any other symptoms so it may not be from this but it cannot hurt to check. Autoimmune pernicious anaemia is confirmed with a positive instrinsic factor and/or parietal cell antibody test. The first link is the recommended blood tests for anyone suffering hypothyroidism and what results to look for.

      Lab work:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      T4 meds don’t work:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/t4-only-meds-dont-work/

      Hasimoto’s disease:

      http://autoimmune.pathology.jhmi.edu/diseases.cfm?systemID=3&diseaseID=22

      Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms:

      http://b12d.net/book/export/html/29

  33. QUESTION:
    Why does God hate bald people?
    Isaiah 46:3b/4a claims God will take care of you until you are old and your hair is grey.

    What about bald people?Why won’t he take care of them?What about people with diseases that cause hair loss like Alopecia or Hypothyroidism?What about those who have chemotherapy,they cop a double whammy,first he gives them cancer then the treatment makes them bald so he won’t look after them again.What about people like redheads whose hair actually goes white instead of grey?What about people who dye their hair to prevent it being grey,is this a sin?

    • ANSWER:
      I think he hates the glare the skull gives off when he’s petting his unicorns up on the clouds.

  34. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a white doberman?
    Apparently they have a similar gene to the recessive gene that causes white tigers and it has no problems that usually go along with white abnormals (deafness and blindness). Its not albino just a white recessive coloring. Ijust wondered if anyone else had heard of this or seen it. I was reading some veterinary gene studies on breeds with known origins (the original crosses) and came across it. Interesting reading and very useful if you want to know why certain inheirent diseases are breed specific (eg hypothyroidism,epilepsy and other diseases affecting the brain function). You come across the weirdest things and i have never heard of a white doberman.
    Its not albino, just a white color, no pink or blue eyes and it can have the mask and markings in a pale tan, almost an apricot color. Just like the tigers arent true white or albino nor are the dobes.
    I cant find the paper i was reading, i am studying behaviour characteristics in domesticated animals at present and was just skimming it to see if it was relevant to my current thesis and it caught my eye cause i own 2 dobes.
    Actually i did just find some web sites devoted to white dobermans, but they are just white dobes bred from a single albino b*tch. I actually mean a color gene not a lack of color gene. Ones with normal brown eyes and some traces of marking and pigmented skin, dark nose and all that. The paper i was reading was pretty specific that it is not albinism.
    Apparently the white colored gene was inheirited when grey hound was added to the mix to create the modren doberman. But the arguments about which dogs are the originators give me a headache. The breed of the original 2 is unknown but people have said that great dane, rottweiler, beauceron, german pinscher, german pointer, greyhound and another smaller breed (terrier of some sort) with the black and tan markings are all what make up dobermans. There is a couple of them that have white colorings that isnt necessarily albino, not accepted coloring but it does happen. Plus it would explain the occasional pup born with some white but not all white. The white gene is in there its just a very recessive gene. I did find another paper which was on albinism in some dogs and apparently sometimes its not the mutated albino gene, just a recessive normal color gene.

    • ANSWER:
      It is in fact a mutation of the color allele that ends up creating the white dobermans. A breeder back in the 60s had a litter with a few white puppies. In order to establish the white she bred brother to sister and had a litter of puppies. These dogs are listed as being positive for the “Z Factor”. The AKC does not allow them to be shown. They often develop sight problems later in life in addition to having poor quality coats and often developing blisters when exposed to sunlight for too long. They are not healthy dogs and no one should ever intentionally breed for them. They technically are not albino, since it is in fact a mutation. However, many do have blue eyes, and while you can still see the markings as a cream color on some, on others you cannot see any markings. People breed them as a “rare” color, when in fact it is an unwanted color, and in turn charge more money for a lower quality dog.

      I know it isn’t a lack of a gene, it is a mutation of one of the color alleles. Normal dobes have 2 alleles for each color. So a black dobie is BBrR, BbRr, BBRR, you get the idea. The B is dominant for black. To get a red it is bbRR, or bbRr. For a blue it is bbRr, and to get a fawn it is bbrr. An albino has one of the Bs or Rs replaced with a different gene, giving it the so called “Z factor”. Proponents of white dobies say they aren’t albinos, which in fact it true, they are not true albinos since it isn’t lack of gene or a recessive. It is a mutation. The DPCA (Doberman Pinscher Club of America) actually calls them partial albinos. I state again that no one should ever breed an albino or breed a dog knowing it carries the Z factor.

      I won’t be commenting after this, but I don’t think you understand genetics. I am in research and have science degrees. Some dobies do have the occasional white marking on their chest, but the AKC limits the size, many breeds have this. There is no such thing as a “very recessive gene,” there is simply dominant and recessive. The C gene (which is what the gene for white is) is a mutation. If it wasn’t, white dobies would have been around much earlier than the late 60s when they happened, and it wouldn’t have all been traced back to 1 litter, other people would have experienced it. Some dogs do have white as a recessive color and it isn’t albino (like german shepards), but all the white dobies I have ever seen and all the pictures I can find on the internet, the dobies have pink noses and blue eyes. I have NEVER seen one with a normal colored nose and any shade of brown eyes. And it is true that albinos can have blue eyes. I suggest you do a little more research. This is a very heated issue for lovers of the Doberman breed. Here’s a really good website

      http://whitedobes.doberinfo.com/

  35. QUESTION:
    Is hyperthyroidism affects reproduction ?
    I just post another one regarding this; but I mistakenly put the disease as hyperthyroidism, sorry for that . the matter is

    One of my close relative whose marriage is already fixed is suffered from hypothyroidism. She worried about her disease.
    Is it cause reproduction/ reproductive system ?
    Is she fit for the marriage ?
    Is it cause any problem in their married life ?
    Is it cause any maternity problem ?

    • ANSWER:
      many HYPOTHYROIDS all over the world have been leading a NORAML LIFE!!
      if you stick to the medications as prescribed by the DOC i don’t see any difference !!

  36. QUESTION:
    How the Heck Do Kids Get Fat?
    I’m starting to see a lot more overweight kids nowadays, but aren’t kids supposed to have really really fast metabolisms? I am in my early twenties, and while I lose weight a lot easier than gain it, I keep hearing people say “oh, kids are lucky – they can eat whatever they want without getting fat”. So why so many fat kids? I know obesity can be caused by sedentary activity and a high calorie diet, but I during my entire childhood I was living off of Oreos, McDonalds, Taco Bell, KFC, mac & cheese, chips (and I ate CONSTANTLY). My parents never let me outside by myself till I was 13, so I spent my hours drawing, not running around. And I was never overweight. So, with a kid’s fast metabolism, how do these kids manage to become overweight? And don’t say it’s due to a disease or hypothyroidism, b/c I find it hard to believe that like, 15% of kids were born w/ diseases. Do you think it’s an additive food companies are now adding to products?
    I can understand how anyone in the puberty years or later become fat, b/c the metabolism slows. But fat 7-year-olds – I cannot understand..

    • ANSWER:
      They don’t go oustide anymore! When I was a kid, we were outside everyday, playing sports, running around, riding bikes, lots of things! Now, kids cant go outside because the parents fear that someone will snatch them. Times have changed, and also, kids these days have computers, video game systems, and television to keep them indoors. Plus, the food these days is really unhealthy, and some parents don’t care what their kids eat. It really sucks to be a kid these days!

  37. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  38. QUESTION:
    Do You Know How Your Thyroid Gland Affects Your Entire Body?
    Your Thyroid Gland affects your entire body. Thyroid disease can cause ‘Graves’ Disease, a goiter, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Thyroid Cancer and so much more. This is an Autoimmune Disorder. Visit www.isityourthyroid.webs.com

    • ANSWER:
      i have graves’/hashimoto’s. it’s debilitating, mentally and physically.

  39. QUESTION:
    So the benefits of fluoride are simply a statistical illusion?
    Trendley Dean, DDS, (“father of fluoridation”), the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his data purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    All Trendly Dean’s research showed was that fluoride delayed (or retarded), the eruption of individual teeth in children by six months to two years, therefore teeth are only delayed at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. To paraphrase Dean’s findings, “As children’s teeth disintegrate, they may have fewer cavities”. It’s good money for the dental industry. Fluoride is more toxic than lead yet they dump it in our tap water. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It increases a woman’s chances of having a Down’s Syndrome baby by 30%. It allows aluminum to cross the blood-brain barrier thus increasing one’s risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. It causes hypothyroidism. It kills the protective enzymes naturally in your mouth which fight cavities. You absorb fluoride through your skin while bathing and under your tongue when using a fluoridated toothpaste. The fluoride being put in tap water is an industrial waste by-product…mostly from the fertilizer industry. Much of it is imported from China. Worse yet, no one is monitoring our levels of fluoride… not the medical profession or the dentists. There are over 500 peer reviewed studies showing the adverse effects of fluoride but not one double blind study showing it’s benefits. Most of the countries that at one time fluoridated tap water have now discontinued the practice and there has been no increase in cavities.
    The use of fluoride in tap water hasn’t even been approved by the FDA!

    I don’t understand this…
    Thanks for the education. I feel much better emotionally now.
    Why don’t we take a look at what Ireland has to say about fluoridation…??

    http://www.thenhfireland.com/?p=454

    http://www.virginiahopkinstestkits.com/fluoridepolitics.html

    Interesting information Rusty:
    So a pea-sized amount of toothpaste = what a child would get in a glass of tap water? Doesn’t that mean a child swallowing a glass of water would be too toxic for them?
    So why aren’t we calling poison control when we give a child a glass of fluoridated tap water?
    Why are we allowing children to even drink fluoridated tap water?
    UPDATE: Further research has shown that the cause of the late eruption of the teeth in children who use fluoride is because the children have developed hypothyroidism. Strange. The medical profession doesn’t even screen these babies and children for this condition.

    http://www.wmaf.org.uk/index.php?content=home_page&parent=1&read=1

    “Fluoridation is the greatest case of scientific fraud of this century, if not all time.”
    – Robert Carton, Ph.D., Toxicologist

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    Is it expensive to get tested for heavy metals?
    I suspect that I have mercury toxicity. The reason for this is because I have 5 amalgam fillings and over the years they have been chipped little by little. I know a lot of you will tell me amalgam fillings are safe but I really do think there might be a chance of me being poisoned over the years. I’ve had my fillings in for approximately 9 years now and I was wondering is the cost expensive? I don’t have insurance but I really want to get tested so I can know for sure. I’ve read somewhere that mercury poisoning can cause hypothyroidism and other diseases. I’ve never smoked in my life but people think I look like one and I think that might have to do with heavy metal poisoning.

    Some of the following symptoms I experience:
    Insomnia
    Tingling sensation
    Fatigue
    Metallic Taste in Mouth
    Extremely cold hands and feet
    Muscle pain
    Extreme weakness
    Can’t concentrate very well
    Loss of hair
    Stomach pain
    Brittle nails
    Blue nails

    These symptoms get gradually worst. I’ve had a standard blood test that said everything was normal except my tsh level was said to be 7.7.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it is expensive but not as expensive as long term therapy for your hypochondria.

  41. QUESTION:
    What is I-131?(health)?
    I have a disease called “hypothyroidism”. it has tons of symptoms.

    I googled it and i got to a site where it said the causes of the disease.

    it said somthing about iodine and it said early exposure to I-131.

    what is this?

    Here is the site i found the causes on:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Causes

    also:that may say “L”-131

    they look alike.

    thanx

    • ANSWER:
      I-131 is Radioactive Iodine and it is used to burn off your thyroid. You have to be quarantined for a couple of days to my understanding because any contact with any people can expose them to your radiation. I-131 as far as i know though, is used for HYPERthryoid… (which is what i have) and is the other end of the spectrum that is a fast thyroid, or metabolism.

      From what i know people who suffer from hypothyroidism can be treated with medications like Synthroid (or Levothyroxine -generic name) and/ or surgery. You should really talk to your doctor and find – if you haven’t already found – an Endocrinologist and they should be able to help you further understand what you have, and what your options are for treatment… until then you should look up these website that may help you understand it a lot more :) good luck.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/hypothyroidism/article.htm

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/how_hypothyroidism_treated_000038_7.htm

      http://www.endocrineweb.com/hypo1.html

      http://women.webmd.com/guide/understanding-thyroid-problems-basics

      http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyroidism/alternativetreatments.aspx

      http://www.asktheinternettherapist.com/archive_hypothyroidism.asp

      http://www.drugdigest.org/DD/HC/Treatment/0,4047,910,00.html

  42. QUESTION:
    I know i have at least one autoimmume disorder, but do I have more?
    After having my son 12/2005, I developed at autoimmune disorder which cause me to have Hashimoto thyriod disease (hypothyroidism). I have also suffer from chronic hives since then. Is this a common thing with my condition or could this be another autoimmue disorder that my doctor has not found (who has left now, and my next appt. will be with someone new)? Should I see a hormone specialist? My hives get worst during my period, but in the past week they have spread all over my arms and legs. They normally stayed on my shine bone area and under control. I haven’t been myself since the birth of my child. Has anyone else have this condition after a birth and does it develop into anything worse?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had chronic hives since I was a little girl (I’m nearly 21- only 20 days left!). The hive “attacks” were worse when I first got them. They got milder over time- the hives were less extensive and lasted for a shorter time.

      Are you absolutely certain you’re not allergic to something?

      If you are, the location of hive breakouts and the severity can vary between attacks. I can get them on my arms, or my legs, or my back, or my stomach, or two or more of those areas during an attack. The severity of my attacks also varied- they could last for hours of days. Nowadays, I get them most commonly on my arms (though I still get them elsewhere occassionally) and they only last a few hours. And, I tend to breakout after I’ve washed vegetables. They used to last for days. Right now, I’m going through an unusually severe attack- I have them on my hands, arms and feet and a few scattered on my knee and they’ve been there for three days now.

      You should check in with your doctor to make sure you’re not allergic to anything, since if you are, are you are repeatedly or continuously exposed to the allergen, it could develop into something worse- possibly a more sever reaction. Chronic hives usually shouldn’t develop into something worse, but it’s still a good idea to check with your doctor.

      I’ve been unlucky enough to develop a bee allergy (on my third sting too) which results in head to toe hives. Compounded with my chronic hives, I am very familiar with hives, unfortunately. they itch like nothing else.

      If you need anymore advice regarding hives and treatment, feel free to ask.

  43. QUESTION:
    Is there something that could be causing me to not go into labor on my own?
    I am a 26 year old mother of 3 normal beautiful children. With all 3 of them, my body started early labor signs on it’s own, but never could kick into full blown labor on it’s own. I had to be induced with all 3. I have Crohn’s disease and I have hypothyroidism(brought on by pregnancy). I also am a small framed woman who tends to have larger babies(9 lbs). Could my health issues be causing me to not be able to go into labor on my own or is it something else? I am now pregnant with my 4th child, so I am curious to know if I may have to be induced again with this one.

    • ANSWER:
      If a person waited long enough labor would always start. . . there has never been a woman who has stayed pregnant forever. They end up inducing because they either don’t want you to go too far postdue, or the baby is suspected to be larger than average, or if there are signs of mild fetal distress / failure to thrive, or, just for maternal convenience.

      You don’t HAVE to be induced if you don’t want to. . . you always have the right to refuse. If you’ve successfully delivered larger babies in the past it wouldn’t really be much of a concern. But if the baby isn’t thriving, or if you go past due and keep having prodromal early labor that’s making you miserable and sleep deprived, etc., then induction might be a good option – talk to your doctor about your preferences and concerns.

  44. QUESTION:
    What could be causing fat storage in my midsection when I’m doing everything right?
    I’m 19years… I’ve been eating right, exercising and all but recently my tummy expanded (I can’t tell whether it’s fat storage or bloated) :S it is actually becoming bigger even though I’m at a calorie deficit and I exercise on daily basis usually, I can’t figure out what’s wrong and it’s bothering me because I can’t get rid of it. What could it possibly be? Could it be that I’m exercising too much? Would that cause more fat storage in my mid section? Or could it be because of a certain food I’m sensitive too but unaware that I’m consuming? Or could it be I got hypothyroidism and I’m just gaining weight? Or could it be any other disease/or sickness that causes fat storage in midsection – if so which ones cause that? Did anyone out there have a similar experience? If so please share how you’ve overcome this. I’ve been really under a lot of stress the past two weeks trying to figure what what’s wrong.

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    2ª) What is the treatment for this?
    The first question and some notes (question answered):

    1ª) What is the name of the disease that a person feels strong fumigations all over your body?
    Several doctors have looked all over my friend did not identify the disease yet.
    My friend drank radioactive iodine for his hyperthyroidism, causing hypothyroidism.
    He take a hormone (T3 and T4) every day for his own good.
    My friend feel very uncomfortable, and constant pain in the skin, a doctor has a remedy, which is amato, relieving a little the fumigations.
    Stress and heat (like the sun) intensifies the fumigations even with the amato in the blood.
    He also takes 2mg of rivotril (clonazepam) for day. (because of his heart that without it his heart acelerate.)
    My friend calls the fumigation of (perfuration of hot needles all over the skin).
    My friend lives with me at work and the disease is not contagious.
    There is no stain or redness on his skin. Noting that there is no muscle pain.
    Only pain in the skin.(only skin pain).
    I’ll appreciate and I will be grateful to the person who know the name of the disease.

    RESPOSTA;

    Soya, the tingling (fumigations) may be due to the hypothyroidism which the treatment has caused, something which physicians are aware of when they treat hyperthyroidism. Perhaps there are other symptoms of low thyroid function. Without enough thyroid hormone, the body becomes tired and run down. Every organ system slows—the brain slows down making it difficult to concentrate, the gut slows down causing constipation, and metabolism slows down causing weight gain. Aggressive treatment of hyperthyroidism may cause an underactive thyroid gland, the resulting effect on the body is the same.

    Many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism are very subtle. A lot of physicians overlook the symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and depression and attribute them to other causes. Physicians should check to see if thyroid disease is the cause of these everyday symptoms. Patients who are treated for hypothyroidism can regain full control of their lives and eliminate these symptoms entirely.
    Another common cause of hypothyroidism is the use of radioactive iodine. This destruction sometimes results in hypothyroidism. This type of hypothyroidism may be difficult to detect immediately, because there may be just a small amount of thyroid tissue that is not destroyed right away. This small piece of thyroid may produce enough thyroid hormone for the body for a little while. However, if this piece of thyroid burns out or gives up, hypothyroidism may result.

    Because this hypothyroidism can occur anywhere from months to years after treatment with radioactive iodine, you may not immediately recognize the subtle symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and difficulty concentrating. Your friend should visit the doctors regularly and have routine thyroid function blood tests. By checking these blood tests once a year, hypothyroidism may be discovered in its earliest stages before symptoms like fatigue and weight gain.
    Secondary Hypothyroidism
    The symptoms of hypothyroidism are mainly dependent on the amount of decrease in thyroid hormone and duration of time that the decrease has been present. For most patients, the symptoms are mild and can often be confused with other problems.
    Fonte(s):
    a medical professional

    2ª) The second question is: What is the treatment for this?
    My friend still suffering and taking drugs to not feel pain. I feel sad about him.
    This pain who he feels isn’t normal. The pain is strong, he said.
    He is taking a new drug: Floral ( from plants: it’s a detoxifier and a normalizing body )
    But I think isn’t a toxin, because it’s been months that he takes, and won’t get better.
    I think it’s a psychological illnesses.

    • ANSWER:
      The PURPOSE of the use of the radioactive iodine is to make one who is HypERthyroid (overactive/low TSH level), become HypO (underactive/hi TSH level) THEN one is commonly treated w/ Synthroid to bring the person up to the right level thus bringing the TSH level down hopefully to within the ‘normal’ range of .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best @ < 2). It may take several months to get the dose regulated ...even then, A LOT of people still DO NOT experience much relief...sorry.

      God bless

  46. QUESTION:
    A VERY important health question?
    Could someone have both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism? I have symptoms from both of these two. My hypothyroidism symptoms are:
    fatigue, slugishness, hoarseness of voice, muscle aches, dpression, delayed puberty. My hyperthyroidism symptoms are: nervousness and anxiety attacks, difficulty sleeping, increased appetite, irregular heartbeat, and change in menstrual patterns. Could I have both? Also, can either of these diseases cause nodules or lumps to grow on the side of the throat?

    • ANSWER:
      see your doctor for blood tests & a full exam. be sure to have your questions answered BEFORE you leave the office.

  47. QUESTION:
    What’s YOUR opinion of Synthroid, for Hypothyroidism?
    My doctor diagnosed me with Hypothyroidism and prescribed Synthroid but…I HATE DRUGS and their side effects!! Synthroid’s website says that you CANNOT ever get off of it or it can cause infertility, problems during pregnancy and heart disease…anyone know of anything NATURAL/HERBAL I can take instead??

    • ANSWER:
      I took it for 3 months and had a horrible reaction, went to the ER and it took months to recover from it. I stopped taking it. So now I made big changes in my diet, exercise and used all-natural progesterone. My symptoms totally reversed.
      I’m no doctor and I don’t know what your blood tests revealed, so I’m only telling you my own experience.
      Read “Alternative treatment for hypothyroidism”

      http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyroidism/alternativetreatments.asp

      and
      Specific methods of alternative medicine

      http://www.womentowomen.com/womenshealth/alternativemedicine.asp

  48. QUESTION:
    what is wrong with my metabolism? hypothyroidism/hypituitary/celiac?
    I’ve been listing out my symptoms and trying to decipher what is going on. Basically, I’m 15, I play tennis and exercise very often, I have an absolute health nut though I don’t usually have a problem with sweets, but I hardly eat them a lot. But it mainly happened over the tennis season in in just a few months, I went up from 135 to 153 lbs (I’m 5’9). Techniquely I’m still in healthy range, but really I don’t fit in anything right, I don’t feel good, and I’m certainly done puberty.

    These are all my symptoms:
    Change in stool softness (softer)
    Sudden and unexplained weight gain
    Joint Pain after exercising (which isn’t that unusual)
    Irregular, getting heavier and longer and then light and short periods
    Recurrent sinus infections, like this cough for 3 weeks
    I feel the need to yawn to get oxygen
    I feel cold sometimes at the wrong times
    I have shortness of breath sometimes
    I have unexplained nausea, especially in the mornings
    I get tired right around eight thirty every night, I wake up early but as soon as it gets late I’m beat. Maybe I’m a morning person…

    Also this would be important to note, my entire mother’s side of the family has celiac disease (an autoimmune disease where one cannot absorb gluten (wheat) and it causes a boatload of other autoimmune diseases). I was wondering the chances that I could have developed it. Nothing truamatizing has happened to me lately, besides a ton of stress from schoolwork.

    So I’m wondering if I could have developed celiac? I know that it has been attributed to weight loss, but if it affected my thyroid it would have the opposite affect. My mother is getting me tested for hypothyroidism, but what about hypopituitary stuff? That would be a little more serious.

    I’m healthy in a day, hardly passing 1200 calories but I’m not not eating, I just eat very healthy. I have oatmeal for breakfast, fruit for lunch, a snack probably fruit or a granola bar, and chicken breat usually for dinner. So I eat enough. But as soon as I eat too much my weight gain is incredible. 3000 calories=1 pound? I eat 2000 and I’ll gain 3.

    Thank you so much for your help (: I would just like some real feedback before I’m questioned by my doctor this week.

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    Borderline Personality Disorder and Hypothyroidism?
    I’m 18 and was just diagnosed with hypothyroidism about a month and a half ago. Before and after I was given medication, I was noticing all of my psychological issues I’ve been having for several years–and just so happen to have gotten worse when I was experiencing the symptoms of the thyroid disease. After being on the medication, some of my symptoms have gotten better, but I’m still having these fears of abandonment, have mood changes from crying to being perfectly fine during the day, have impulses for drugs and alcohol, have impulses to self-injure myself, and overall have a had time managing any type of relationship.

    Is it possible that I have it? I was thinking about seeing my doctor when I go home from college in the summer to see, because I don’t feel normal half the time. Is it caused by my hypothyroidism? Or is it just symptoms of my hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      WEll, you are doing well thinking all this through, and I think you are on the right track. Hypothyroidism can cause all kinds of problems in how one feels and thinks, as well. On top of that you have hormones and growth issues. That is why I would ,and any good therapist or doctor would not just jump to label you something as serious as ‘borderline’.
      You need to ask them to evaluate you well, and see how it comes out. If it were me, since i am really skeptical of any doctors and therapist that label people ‘borderline’, then I would ask them before you agree to be evaluated and spill your guts, exactly if they use that category in their practice, and if and how they would treat it, or if they think it is treatable, and ask them all kinds of questions on their views of feeling self injury, impulse control issues and the like.
      I think that this sounds like all things that could be thyoid, hromone related, for the most part.
      The frontal lobes that contrl impulses, does not fully develope until one is at least 25, so that is a factor here also, and another reason to hold off on such a heavey diagnosis.
      So, what i am saying it is all important for you to research each therapist /doctor you are interested in seeing, find out what their perspective and treatment modality is, and keep looking until you find one you think is right one and can help you. Otherswise it is a waste of time and money, and you could be put on meds that don’t rreally help you.
      I think you should call a compoupnding pharmacy and ask them waht doctors in your area will test, and know how to treat hormones, that is a big issue with hypothyroid, since most doctos have a ‘protocol’ on how to deal with it, and will tell the patient that the rest is ‘mental’ , which sounds like what happened to you already, adn that is just WRONG and inaccurate. There are many thyroid people who go through these issues.
      Here , thyroid.about.com that is about the best site for thyroid there is. Also, stopthethyroidmadness.com (org?) and elainemoore.com
      So , get more info and find the right people to help you.
      feelingfff.com thecanaryclub.org and thehallcenter.com could help you also.

  50. QUESTION:
    Is this how fluoride in tap water can causes heart disease?
    Also note that where fluoride was initially tested in Newburg, New York heart disease actually increased.

    High cholesterol is a symptom of hypothyroidism.
    Fluoride in tap water causes hypothyroidism.
    Doctors never check people’s level of fluoride in the body.

    So, why don’t they bother checking it?

    http://campaignfortruth.com/fluoridation.htm

    http://www.rense.com/general93/fluo.htm

    Jim,
    Fluoride does NOT improve your teeth and is not meant to be ingested.

    Trendley Dean, DDS, the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his data purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    Do your homework. The fluoride added to our water is an industrial waste by-product. Most of it currently comes from China. It is more toxic than lead. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It is also carcinogenic.
    All Trendly Deans research showed was that fluoride slows the eruption of individual teeth by 6 months to two years, therefore teeth are slower at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. It’s good money for the dental industry.

    • ANSWER:


Hypothyroidism Disease Causes

Our thyroid gland situated in front part of neck, just below thyroid cartilage is shaped like a butterfly and wraps the wind pipe or trachea. The gland produces hormones T3 or triiodothyronine and T4 or thyroxines that affect cellular metabolism, growth and brain development. The hypothalamus of brain releases TRH or thyrotropin releasing hormone which urges the pituitary glands to release TSH or thyroid stimulating hormones which in turn stimulate or activate thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4.

Abnormally low production of thyroid hormones can lead to a condition called hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can have widespread consequences for the body. The common causes of hypothyroidism are as follows: hashimoto’s thyroiditis, lymphocytic thyroiditis, thyroid destruction due to surgery or radioactivity, disease of pituitary glands, certain medications, severe thyroid deficiency etc. The symptoms of hypothyroidism include fatigue, weight gain, cold intolerance, excessive sleepiness, dry and rough hair, dry skin, constipation, depression, muscle cramps, rising levels of cholesterol, poor concentration, aches and pains and leg swelling.

Hypothyroidism symptoms can be managed through sensible fat free and fiber rich diet, increased water intake, exercises and intake of dietary iodine. But this switching over to healthy life-style is not enough; it has to be backed by medications. Synthetic, chemical drugs are not free from unwanted side-effects. So it is better to opt for products composed of natural ingredients, for they would take care of hypothyroidism in a safe and secure way. Thyromine is one such incredible product composed of potent herbs that supply the body with necessary nutrients, thereby enhancing the performance of thyroid gland.

Thyromine treats an under-active thyroid gland effectively and increases thyroid hormone production to match the body’s requirement. Thyromine promotes overall health of body, by improving thyroid gland malfunctioning and health deterioration due to it. By speeding up thyroid gland and correcting metabolism process, the supplement works amazing in helping to lose the weight you had put on. It helps you to look slim, smart and taut once more, giving you a good feeling altogether. One month’s supply of Thyromine comes in a bottle of 30 capsules. The supplement, being natural, is quite safe to use.

The ingredients of Thyromine include Nori, Bovine, ginger, Guglipid, Piper longum, L-Tyrosine. These ingredients supply the necessary vitamins and minerals, stimulating thyroid gland to produce more hormones. Thus Thyromine, helps to lose weight with hypothyroidism and solves hypothyroidism the natural way! Try this natural supplement and lose weight with hypothyroidism.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism causes hair loss, medication for the disease causes hair loss, what do I do to stop going bald?
    Thyroxine, the medication, is a case of the cure being worse than the disease. It makes me feel horrible, and the doctor just tells me ‘to continue taking the medication’.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s another alternative….Armour thyroid. I switched to it 4 years ago when Levoxyl wasn’t doing anything for my symptoms. Armour helps with hairloss, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and muscle and joint aches. I will provide links below that should help you come to a decision. There’s no need to be suffering with symptoms. If your current med isn’t working, it may be time for a different one.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s disease, which causes my hypothyroidism, or does it ever go into remission?
    3 years ago, at the age of 36, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. It totally came out of nowhere. I had also gained about 30 pounds and I’m wondering if there’s a connection. Plus, I’m a male, and Hashimoto’s is most common in women. I’m trying to get off of all prescription drugs, but my Endocrinologist has told me that I will need to be on my Synthroid medication for the rest of my life. I haven’t lost the weight either.

    My little sister had thyroid cancer and had her thyroid removed, and a female cousin and an Aunt of mine also have Hashimoto’s so it runs in my family. But the WOMEN in my family. So why me?

    I just don’t want to have to wake up and take a pill for the rest of my life.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, where your own immune system attacks your thyroid for an unknown reason. Since you have had damage to your thyroid, there is no cure. There is no other treatment other than to take the synthroid. I know it is inconvenient, but it is the same hormone that your thyroid is supposed to make. As to why you, that’s impossible to answer. I’m sorry I can’t give you a better answer. Good luck.

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism caused by Autoimmune disease?
    My question is weird. I was brought up by a mother who’s over obsessive with health issues so now I have no real idea of what is serious and what’s not.

    I have previous history of hypothyroidism as caused by autoimmune disease. I am a single mother, full time student and a part-time worker. I barely have time to sleep let alone go to the doctor for a checkup. I need to know how serious this things is and if my symptoms are part of the disease or I’m most likely very stressed :)

    my symptoms:
    1. the thyroid is so big you can see it when I’m standing straight (it kind hangs out a bit)
    2. I’m constantly tired
    3. period is very irregular
    4. Gain weight EXTREMELY easily (my metabolism is extremely slow)
    5. nervous system goes haywire all the time
    6. lack of sleep
    7. constipation sometimes
    8. Slow thought process – I’m studying International Business and it’s a very competitive program and I know I’m not dumb but I do notice that to calculate something it takes me much longer than it used to. not because I can’t think of an answer, but because i just can’t think. I don’t know how to explain this. sorry

    I know that you wont’ have a medical advice but if someone ha previous experience with a similar disease and can guide me in the right direction that would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      You have Hasimoto’s Thyroiditis. You should get on Levothyroxine which could be prescribed by your internal med. doctor, or an endocrinologist. Once your levels are stable, all your symptoms should get better.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is anyone using PTU for Graves disease? What are the side affects? Does it cause hypothyroidism?
    I have Graves disease, my doctor is really rude and won’t answer questions for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Some possible side effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) include:
      skin rash,itching,abnormal hair loss,upset stomach,vomiting,loss of taste, abnormal sensations such as tingling, prickling, burning, tightness, or pulling,swelling,joint and muscle pain,drowsiness,or dizzyness.
      Rarely, propylthiouracil can affect the blood and cause decreased levels of red and white blood cells and platelets, which may cause an increased risk of infection, serious bleeding, anemia, or other problems. There have also been rare cases in which PTU has caused serious liver problems.
      These side effects are rare, but if you experience them you should consult a doctor immediately: sore throat,fever,headache,chills
      unusual bleeding or bruising,right-sided abdominal pain with decreased appetite,yellowing of the skin or eyes, or skin eruptions

      To answer your second question: no, PTU should not cause hypothyroidism.

      If your doctor won’t even answer some basic questions about a medication he/she is giving you, I would suggst finding another doctor. Any doctor that won’t even answer questions about the side effects of a medication doesn’t deserve your time.

  5. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a condition/disease that can cause hypothyroidism, gullstones …..?
    I have been doing alot of research lately on a few conditions i have developed. When i was about 17 i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. The Dr. that diagnosed me said at the time i was so underactive my thyroid was about to shut down. I have bee on synthroid to manage this disease. Early this year i was diagnosed with a gullstone. I had been having attacks for years before this unknown to the cause. Frequency of attacks lead to the diagnosis. Recently while talking with my mother she informed me that around the age of 10 i had blood drawn and “spun”. The Dr. at the time told her that the fat content in my blood was far to high. I do not have High cholesterol or high blood pressure.

    My worry is that i developed all of these symptoms at an early age. I am only 23. Does anyone know of a possible disease or condition that could tie all of these other symptoms together?

    Im going crazy trying to figure it out! Does anyone know where else i could look?

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Is this how fluoride in tap water can causes heart disease?
    Also note that where fluoride was initially tested in Newburg, New York heart disease actually increased.

    High cholesterol is a symptom of hypothyroidism.
    Fluoride in tap water causes hypothyroidism.
    Doctors never check people’s level of fluoride in the body.

    So, why don’t they bother checking it?

    http://campaignfortruth.com/fluoridation.htm

    http://www.rense.com/general93/fluo.htm

    Jim,
    Fluoride does NOT improve your teeth and is not meant to be ingested.

    Trendley Dean, DDS, the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his data purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    Do your homework. The fluoride added to our water is an industrial waste by-product. Most of it currently comes from China. It is more toxic than lead. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It is also carcinogenic.
    All Trendly Deans research showed was that fluoride slows the eruption of individual teeth by 6 months to two years, therefore teeth are slower at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. It’s good money for the dental industry.

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Why is hypothyroidism more common in women than men?
    I know what hypothyroidism is, but what causes more women to have hypothyroidism than men? If a male has hypothyroidism what would be some causes to that? In general, what are some underlying causes of hypothyroidism? My dad told me he went to the doctors and has hypothyroidism and has to go back to find out the causes. I don’t know if their is a family history of hypothyroidism or other auto-immune diseases.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid activity fluctuates within the day in response to diet, stress, temperature, etc. In light of this knowledge, one can speculate or identify genetic, hormonal, lifestyle, & dietary factors as contributors to hypothyroidism.

      Since hypothyroidism often besets someone gradually, it is one of the degenerative diseases that gets noticed as lifespans increase.As you mentioned, autoimmune diseases can target the thyroid & cause dysfunction, either by elevating thyroid activity or decreasing it (sometimes it increases it first & then decreases it later). It’s hard to isolate this as genetic or hormonal, since women do tend to have more autoimmune disorders. Perhaps it’s both. Estradiol (an estrogen) can have an antagonistic effect on thyroid function by competing for binding sites. If estradiol binds first, then thyroxine/tetraiodothyronine (T4) & triidothyronine (T3) cannot exert their effects. Estradiol also limits other thermogenic (calorie burning) & potentially thyroid stimulating effects due to its functions in limiting muscular development & encouraging fat storage. Furthermore, estradiol does not limit the activity of the adrenal glands the way that testosterone does. The “fatigue” of the adrenal glands (not as pronounced or fatal as Addison’s Disease) due to insufficient curbing of their activity can decrease thyroid function. Lifestyle factors such as lack of stress reduction accelerate this process. Finally, women tend to consume less calories than men; more specifically, they eat less fat & protein. Whereas adequate fat consumption is essential for the production of certain hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, etc.), adequate protein consumption is essential for peptide hormones like thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones consist of the amino acid tyrosine combined with 1, 2, 3, or 4 atoms of iodine (hence, they have names such as tri – iodo – thyronine). In the hope of losing weight or keeping weight down, many women deprive themselves of the building blocks for healthy amounts of hormones. Some foods & supplements are goitrogenic (goiter inducing/reduce thyroid activity), such as soy. Sometimes, the cause is idiopathic (of unknown origin).

      Men with hypothyroidism may have similar causes, such as an insufficient diet, excessive stress, etc. Low testosterone may correlate with low thyroid hormones, but it’s hard to say which causes which, as there are thyroid receptors in the testes, yet testosterone may increase or decrease thyroid hormone production (without necessarily causing hypothyroid symptoms). Likewise, men may have idiopathic hypothyroidism.

      Most of the factors listed above still fall within two basic categories: primary (the organ itself) hypothyroidism or secondary (the organ[s] that instruct it to act) hypothyroidism. Both men & women may have hypothyroidism as a result of inadequate TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary gland or failure of the thyroid to respond properly to TSH.

      Sorry to make your eyes bleed from this lengthy response. As a final consideration, make sure your dad’s doctor tests for thyroid function thoroughly via blood tests. TSH standards for hypothyroidism have been drastically revised (from 5.0 or greater to 3.0 or greater), & TSH itself is insufficient to identify true hypothyroidism without accounting for symptoms. The pituitary often mismeasures need for thyroid stimulating hormone. T4, T3, free T4, free T3, & reverse T3 are vital for determining true thyroid function. The source listed below contains information from patients contending with hypothyroidism who seek the best, most up-to-date medical advice concerning their disease. I wish you & your father well, as this can be very difficult to treat without a good doctor *who listens*.

  8. QUESTION:
    Could i have an autoimmune disease?
    I was diagnosed as suffering from hypothyroidism (extremely underactive thyroid) in march and im still going through the process of getting my medication balance right, i believe its just about at the right level now but blood tests later this month will confirm hopefully. The docs think it was triggered as a result of my pregnancy (had my baby Nov 09) as the times tally up for symptoms etc. Lately though ive been catching many infections, especially in the last week ive had a urine infection, severe conjuctivitis and now i really think ive got a throat infection too, as well as a cold, my eyesight has deteriorated too which has led to me needing glasses as i have an astigmatism in one eye (which i know may not be connected) im just getting worried that there may be some underlying reason for all this, i know that an autoimmune disorder/disease can cause hypothyroidism, and the doctors told me my thyroid levels were at rock bottom, can anyone in medical career tell me if this could be the case please??

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroid patients show up with vitamin B12, iron and vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is essential as this steroid hormone activates the immune system. Child­birth can be a hor­mo­nal trig­ger for Hashimoto’s Disease and autoimmune pernicious anaemia is linked to this condition..unable to absorb vitamin B12 in the digestive tract. Vitamin B12 is essential to protect the myelin sheath (covering around the nerves) from damage. Blindness, double vision and blurred vision is a few of the many symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.

      I personally have autoimmune pernicious anaemia and i take under the tongue B12 spray daily. You haven’t mentioned any other symptoms so it may not be from this but it cannot hurt to check. Autoimmune pernicious anaemia is confirmed with a positive instrinsic factor and/or parietal cell antibody test. The first link is the recommended blood tests for anyone suffering hypothyroidism and what results to look for.

      Lab work:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      T4 meds don’t work:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/t4-only-meds-dont-work/

      Hasimoto’s disease:

      http://autoimmune.pathology.jhmi.edu/diseases.cfm?systemID=3&diseaseID=22

      Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms:

      http://b12d.net/book/export/html/29

  9. QUESTION:
    What happens if you have two illnesses that cause opposite symptoms…?
    I mean like if you had hypothyroidism which causes weight gain but at the same time you had celiac disease which causes weight loss then would your weight stay the same since it would balance out? Or would one kind of override the other one and cause a change in weight? If it balances out then would this also happen with two diseases where one causes diarrhea and the other causes constipation so that you had normal bowel movements?

    It’s kind of a weird question i know but i’ve always wondered haha. Thanks!

    =)

    • ANSWER:
      My guess in the example you gave is the celiac disease woulde prevail because it is a disease of absorbtion. You would never be able to absorb the food so you would lose weight. In the second example, I can only point out it is possible to have constipation intermitted with diarhhea.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  11. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I found out a few months ago that i have Hashimoto’s disease(the graudal attacking of my thyroid by my body, causing it to slowly fail), which results in hypothyroidism. I’ve been put on levoxyl, but have gained a significant amount of weight in the past year and a half (about 65lbs). My family (parents mostly) are making me feel awful about this, though I’m not significantly obese (I was in the middle of my weight range when I started gaining) and it’s not interferring with my every day.

    Does anyone else have htis problem, or a similar one? How do you cope with these people, and your feeling self conscious? The weight will come off, I know that, but it will take time. I plan on starting to work out soon, but I work full time and go to school, and it’s very difficult. Can anyone give me some suggestions on what I can do? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have hashimoto’s disease, but i do have panhypopituarism, which also includes hypothyroidism and have had it since birth. I’ve never felt like I looked that overweight, but also never been skinny either. It is hard for me to lose weight also. I try to do weights,stretching, and run or walk daily. Often 3 miles a day and I eat pretty healthily. Sometimes its hard to keep up this exercise schedule and actually most people recommend not exercising every day of the week. I know what its like to try really hard to lose weight and not have much success.

      Sometimes it takes awhile. I used to try for a few weeks and then give up when I wasn’t seeing the results I wanted. Keep positive, pretend it doesn’t matter and keep exercising. Eventually you will get results.

      Its something you have to find a way to fit into your schedule if its something you want to do. I know its hard to find the time.

      It sounds like you pretty much know this stuff I just wanted to offer my support. I know you can do it. Don’t let other people bother you. There are an astronomical number of people that are overweight that do not have this problem.

  12. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease… Multinodular Goiter… Hypothyroidism?
    I am so confused. Depending on which doctor I talk to, I seem to get a different answer. If someone can correct all this for me I’d be so appreciative. I am ready to scream with all the back and forth… yes and no.. one doctor contradicting another… so here goes:

    About 9 years ago I started having menstrual cycle irregularities. I was all over the place, late, early.. very early (like a week after period ended it was back) and very late (like 7 weeks later and she still hasn’t come and not pregnant). After bloodwork and ultrasound my ob/gyn said the only thing she could think causing it was early perimenopause, I was only 30. So off I went waiting for full blown menopause to arrive. In the meantime other things began happening. I started losing hair.. even my eyebrows.. I was tired constantly. I was constipated or had diarrhea. My periods continued to be all over the place. I would feel sick all the time. To the point people (still to this day) think I was full of it. Then I got married. We decided to go for fertility treatments. My reproductive endo did a bunch of tests and found nothing. I was still fertile, but why I wasn’t ovulating she had no clue. My thyroid was fine she said – though she did not give me the lab number. I stopped seeing her after it was determined I would only get pregnant with IVF. If I wasn’t ovulating and the ovulation drugs weren’t making it happen, I felt this was a waste of time and money. I went for a physical with my primary doctor who found a suspicious lump on my neck. After asking me questions that seemed unrelated (i.e. periods, reflexes, hair, tired etc) she tested my thyroid and said I had a high tsh of 9.9 (not high though, right?) and prescribed synthroid and referred me to an endo. After several more tests of my thyroid it was determined I had a multinodular goiter and Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism. UGH.

    After being on meds for 3 months, my periods came back… my hair stopped falling out… and I got pregnant! But later miscarried due to high TSH. My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.

    WTH? Can someone enlighten me on this “disease” it seems I may or may not have? Who should I believe? I have read extensively and it seems I DO have characteristics… but why would a doctor tell me another doctor is wrong? I DO have a goiter – you can see/feel it. Even a radiologist called it a goiter when doing the test. HELP!! Why did I get pregnant if the only thing I changed was the meds? Can anyone help me understand?

    • ANSWER:
      “My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.” YOU NEED A NEW OB/GYN NOW!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  13. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism a cause of autoimmune diseases….?
    or the opposite, a symptom of an uatoimmune disease?

    • ANSWER:
      You got it right with the second guess. Hypothyroidism can be a symptom of an autoimmune disease, but it’s not a cause.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroidism)?
    I have hypothyroidism and I’ve recently been feeling worse than ever. I’m extremely fatigued and I have nausea accompanied by achy muscles (neck, shoulders, back, hips, and area in front of neck where thyroid is aches). It leaves me feeling physically worn down and I barely want to get out of bed. Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with hypothyroidism or has anyone with hypothyroidism experience the same thing? Thanks so much. (Also, I do not have a fever, virus, or any other illness that would be currently causing these symptoms)

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    Help, have hypothyroidism and need some answers?
    I have had hypothyroidism for yrs and been on synthroid 1mcg , my current TSH level is 2.91 (.34-4.82) is normal, anyway, I feel far from “normal” my hair is falling out, I’m cold mostly in the evenings, I have elevated lipids, hypertension,anemia, elevated homocysteine level, insomnia, muscle aches that’s partly why I can’t sleep is the pain, I’m still 40 lbs over wt. I will go back to my GP in about a week anybody else have these problems ? I went to about.com and it’s all there about my symptoms my Dr. wants to treat me with Antihypertensives, Vit., Iron, Lipid lowering agents, I think since the thyroid disease causes these symptoms that’s what he should treat. There isn’t a thyroid Dr. within hundreds of miles where I live. Please comment

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, those are all hypo symptoms. Your TSH of 2.91 is too high. Most feel best with the morning TSH around 1.0. TSH needs to always be done first thing in the morning or you may not get the correct dosage.

      With your symptoms, there’s a chance that you are converting enough T4 into T3 and may be helped by adding T3. This can be done by adding a small about of Cytomel or switching to Armour or Thyrolar.

      I started out on Levoxyl. It did nothing for my symptoms. Eventually I added 5 mcg’s of Cytomel and it helped about 75% of my symptoms. I am now on Armour and it has helped about 95% of my symptoms. I only have ridged fingernails and cold feet at night.

      Below are links that may help. Getting your levels right should help with the symptoms. Being just in range is not enough.

      You don’t need a thyroid doctor. A good family doctor who s willing to work with yo should be enough. Thyroid doctors aren’t always the best. I had one who added the Cytomel, but refused to use ARmour. If I had of stayed with him, I’d still be having some symptoms because Armour was the best medicaton for me.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why does hypothyroidism cause…?
    why does hypothyroidism produce the following symptoms:
    -coarse hair
    -sensitivity to cold
    -thick skin
    -husky voice

    i need the homeostatic malfunctions that could have caused these. I figured out why it causes weight gain and fatigue…but yea. I think the cold has to do with the autoimmune disorder hashimoto’s disease…but what about the husky voice? and the thick hair and skin?

    thanks!

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article from the University of Maryland is what you’re looking for:

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_causes_hypothyroidism_000038_2.htm

  17. QUESTION:
    anyone else have hypothyroidism(thyroid disease) and just suddenly stop taking their levoxyl/synthroid???
    ive only been out for a week or two now….. as far as I know its not deadly to be without the medicine…. and I want to see how I do without it……………instead I have been taking kelp..is this a bad decision? I have had a lot of dizziness and fatigue…. causing me to believe I have gallstones or something.

    • ANSWER:
      my wife was in the same situation. Its not deeadly to be without it, but its not healthy either I think. The kelp provides iodine which you also need. I read about this stuff awhile back and its sort of complicated involving T3 and T4 which interconvert, they regulate sex drive, body temp, mood, and other things.

  18. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?

    And especially when caused by Hashimoto’s disease? I’ve heard is an autoimmune disease, which I imagine would affect one’s immune system.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it’s related to a poor immune system. I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism myself, and all my bloodwork was normal except for having a TSH level of 132. Other than my thyroid issue, I’m healthy as can be. I just hope the synthroid pills kick in soon :)

  19. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  20. QUESTION:
    Controlling BP & Raynaud’s Disease with hypothyroidism?
    I had very high BP 120/180 then it eventually came to 110/160 after some CCB medicine. I did some research and found out a slightly elevated TSH can cause abnormal lipid profile and high BP. mine TSH was around 1.8-2.0 range, now i trying to keep it around 1.0 and my BP goes down to 90/155. but still high. recently my doctor give me this medicine (Amlodipine besylate 5mg /Valsorton 80). I am having Raynaud’s Disease (less sever) I heard that CCB and Alpha-blocker can help as combination therapy. i can replace Alpha-blocker with Valsorton ?
    Doc said they cannot give me beta-blocker as i am hypo. so can alpha-blocker be given? instead of Valsorton ? please help me with BP and Raynaud ?
    My reference here for Raynaud here http://www.nativeremedies.com/ailment/symptoms-of-raynauds-disease.html

    • ANSWER:
      Sheri,

      First of all, understand that in the presence of hypothyroidism these other problems are going to be consistent features of your medical make-up. It will take time for your TSH to stabilize and then for your physician to have a clearer picture of what it will take to manage your hypertension in the long term.
      You should be seeing an endocrinologist or an internist for diagnoses of this level of complexity.
      The drugs you are receiving are appropriate choices for your diagnoses. Please realize that Raynaud’s phenomenon can be managed by not cured.
      In addition, a beta blocker (Inderal) is entirely appropriate in those who are hypothyroid, but your physician has chosen not to use it because it is CONTRAINDICATED AND DANGEROUS in those with Raynaud’s phenomenon.
      Select a good internist/endocrinologist and allow them the time to gradually support each issue and organ system. It’s excellent that you see that these are issues that need to be corrected, but it is unsafe to hit them with a proverbial hammer, when gradual adjustments are safer strategies.
      Best wishes.

      Please see this reference:

      arthritis.webmd.com/tc/raynauds-phenomenon-treatment-

  21. QUESTION:
    I’m on 200 mg Levothyroxine for hypothyroidism and still feeling sluggish and having severe headaches.?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s Disease about 3 years ago. I am STILL trying to get my thyroid level back on track. My dr has continued to increase my dosage of Levothyroxine to no avail. I was on 175 mg of Levothyroxine up until 2 months ago and my bloodwork showed a TSH level of 20. So he upped my dosage to 200 mg saying that this is near the highest level normally prescribed. I have been taking it for 2 months and felt good for about 3 days and now am back to feeling very sluggish, having severe headaches, brain fog, weight gain (lots), mood swings, etc.
    It feels like I’m not taking anything…no effects whatsoever. (I’m taking it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with water. I don’t eat or drink for at least 1 hour afterwards…just like my dr instructed.)
    Has anyone experienced this difficulty of getting results from thyroid meds? What will the dr end up doing if this high dose doesn’t work? I just want my old life back…so does my husband…tired of the mood swings, I’m sure but he’s been really supportive!

    Thanks for any info or experiences you can share!

    • ANSWER:
      maybe you need to try b12 vitamins.. b12 is for your energy and such ppl use them to help lose weight as well and you medication might not be making you gain weight it could b from your hypothyrodism cuz it can cause weight gain

      ask your doctor if you can mix b12 vitamins (if you choose to try to) with your medication just incase it could do something to you

  22. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism, and my blood work had odd results…?
    I’ve visited a specialist (an endocrynologist) and understand completly what he told me. He said I had an autoimmune disease and I wasn’t sure if hypothyroidism is an autoimmune disease in itself or not. He also said hashimoto (sp?) may have been the cause for my hypothyroidism.
    He called me with the results of the blood work they did on me and said the couldn’t find hashimoto, but found something odd. He said there are two types of antibodies in my blood and I was missing one of them completely. I didn’t really understand the scientific talk, but I think one of the types of antibodies started with a “p” and that was the one I’m missing. What does that mean?! I’m not sure if I have an autoimmune disease or what caused it.

    I’m just confused in general. If you could shed ANY light on this matter, it’d be greatly appreciated! I want to know more about the limited info he told me so that the next time I visit I know the questions to ask! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with asking your doctor. I think this is an example of too much information, too little explanation (note to self: stop doing that!)

      Hypothyroidism is classified as an autoimmune disease if it is caused by the body’s attacking the thyroid gland with its own antibodies. From what you have said, it sounds as if your doctor thinks you don’t have the autoimmune type, or else that your tests for it have conflicting results.

      It sounds as if he didn’t get test the results he expected; maybe he jumped the gun a little in telling you that you had Hashimoto’s (can easily happen if you have classic symptoms). Don’t know what the “p” antibody might have been. Could it have been TSH (a hormone)? That would be unusual, but it’s not an antibody. Possibly anti-TPO? Most people with Hashimoto’s will have anti-TPO antibodies, so if these were negative, it might be surprising to him.

      The endocrine system is very tricky. One must be highly trained to interpret thyroid test results, and like any test, they results are not perfect. The point is, hypothyroidism is very common and easily treated, but difficult even for people in medicine to understand. :)

      Personally, I felt like H@LL when my thyroid was low, and it took MONTHS of waiting for test results and a referral before I could finally get that little pill that keeps me from feeling tired, depressed, even suicidal! (I am convinced the hypothyroidism happened because I was taking soy supplements, which have been linked with thyroid problems.)

  23. QUESTION:
    How can the following drugs and diseases cause depression?
    How can the following diseases cause depression:
    1. pernicious anemia
    2. hyperthyroidism
    3. hypothyroidism

    How can the following drugs cause depression:
    1. propanolol
    2. corticosteroids
    3. oral contraceptives
    4. alcohol
    5. isotretinoin

    • ANSWER:
      Any sort of anemia, pernicious or otherwise, can manifest as depression. You don’t have enough blood cells in your body, so you end up feeling tired all the time.

      Hypothyroidism also results in a significant lack of energy, so can have similar results. I honestly don’t know why hyperthyroidism can also result in depressive symptoms. It might be that patients have trouble sleeping or have problems with concentration and excessive psychomotor agitation.

      Propanolol slows your heart rate and decreases cardiac output. You basically get the same effect as with anemia–you just don’t have the energy that you would otherwise.

      Corticosteroids can cause a number of psychiatric changes that are often lumped together under the umbrella of “steroid psychosis”. This can include depression, mania, or overt psychosis. I don’t think it is understood why this happens.

      Oral contraceptives are hormones. If someone can explain to me why hormones cause mood swings in women, I would be indebted to him.

      Alcohol is well-known to be a downer, but I don’t think it is known how exactly it works. Some people argue that alcohol addiction is a *result* of depression, but I think the more common opinion is that it can be both a cause and effect.

      The evidence on isotretinoin is equivocal. The fact is that the group of patients who are most likely to be prescribed isotretinoin *already* have a higher risk of suicidality before they ever get the drug (the incidence of suicide is the same between kids who get isotretinoin for their acne and kids who get antibiotics for their acne). The reason isotretinoin is so tightly regulated now is because a Congressman’s son committed suicide and the Congressman blamed the drug–but there really is no reliable evidence behind it.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there another cause of Hypothyroidism?
    I’m a young person and have been diagnosed with subclincial hypothyroidism. I have every symptom of hypo except for weight gain which they have told me will eventually come in my lifetime. I will become one of those fat middle aged women no one loves are cares about. They said I will get full blown hypo in 5,10,15,20 years. They can’t tell me exactly when, just ‘It will shut down eventually’

    And then there all the information abouot how treatment doesn’t work and they just stay fat for the rest of their lives even after treatment.

    The depression is very bad and I’m suicidal and have been under observation 2 times, and this diagnoses is the cause of it, the inevitable life long misery of weight gain and fatigue and depression.

    I may have cealics disease and someone said this can cause hypothyroidism, so if i am diagnosed and gluten free will my symptoms go? This is my last hope for a normal life.

    • ANSWER:
      When your thyroid doesn’t produce enough hormones, the balance of chemical reactions in your body can be upset. There can be a number of causes, including autoimmune disease, treatment for hyperthyroidism, radiation therapy, thyroid surgery and certain medications.
      Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the front of your neck, just below your Adam’s apple. Hormones produced by the thyroid gland have an enormous impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism.
      Two main hormones
      Your thyroid gland produces two main hormones, thyroxine (T-4) and triiodothyronine (T-3). They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate, and help regulate the production of protein. Your thyroid gland also produces calcitonin, a hormone that regulates the amount of calcium in your blood.
      The rate at which T-4 and T-3 are released is controlled by your pituitary gland and your hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a thermostat for your whole system. The hypothalamus signals your pituitary gland to make a hormone called thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Your pituitary gland then releases TSH – the amount depends on how much T-4 and T-3 are in your blood. Finally, your thyroid gland regulates its production of hormones based on the amount of TSH it receives.
      Although this process usually works well, the thyroid sometimes fails to produce enough hormones. Hypothyroidism may be due to a number of different factors, including:
      Autoimmune disease. People who develop a particular inflammatory disorder known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis suffer from the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Autoimmune disorders occur when your immune system produces antibodies that attack your own tissues. Sometimes this process involves your thyroid gland. Scientists aren’t sure why the body produces antibodies against itself. Some think a virus or bacterium might trigger the response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved. Most likely, autoimmune diseases result from more than one factor. But however it happens, these antibodies affect the thyroid’s ability to produce hormones.
      Treatment for hyperthyroidism. People who produce too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) are often treated with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications to reduce and normalize their thyroid function. However, in some cases, treatment of hyperthyroidism can result in permanent hypothyroidism.
      Radiation therapy. Radiation used to treat cancers of the head and neck can affect your thyroid gland and may lead to hypothyroidism.
      Thyroid surgery. Removing all or a large portion of your thyroid gland can diminish or halt hormone production. In that case, you’ll need to take thyroid hormone for life.
      Medications. A number of medications can contribute to hypothyroidism. One such medication is lithium, which is used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. If you’re taking medication, ask your doctor about its effect on your thyroid gland.
      Less often, hypothyroidism may result from one of the following:
      Congenital disease. Approximately 1 in 3,000 babies in the United States is born with a defective thyroid gland or no thyroid gland at all. In most cases, the thyroid gland didn’t develop normally for unknown reasons, but some children have an inherited form of the disorder. Often, infants with congenital hypothyroidism appear normal at birth. That’s one reason why most states now require newborn thyroid screening.
      Pituitary disorder. A relatively rare cause of hypothyroidism is the failure of the pituitary gland to produce enough TSH — usually because of a benign tumor of the pituitary gland.
      Pregnancy. Some women develop hypothyroidism during or after pregnancy (postpartum hypothyroidism), often because they produce antibodies to their own thyroid gland. Left untreated, hypothyroidism increases the risk of miscarriage, premature delivery and preeclampsia — a condition that causes a significant rise in a woman’s blood pressure during the last three months of pregnancy. It can also seriously affect the developing fetus.
      Iodine deficiency. The trace mineral iodine — found primarily in seafood, seaweed, plants grown in iodine-rich soil and iodized salt — is essential for the production of thyroid hormones. In some parts of the world, iodine deficiency is common, but the addition of iodine to table salt has virtually eliminated this problem in the United States.

  25. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, mutually exclusive?
    I have symptoms of both, I go through phases where I match hypo, others when i match hyper. Is there a disease that causes the thyroid to both overproduce and underproduce hormones?

    My symptoms are:

    sudden unexplained weight loss
    heart beat changes (rapid, arrythmia, palpitations)
    fatigue
    sensitivity to cold
    sensitivity to heat
    changes in menstral patterns
    anxiety
    depression

    I am waiting blood test results, but until then i am wondering if its possible for the thyroid to both over produce and underproduce hormones (not at the same time obviously)?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, as the thyroid is dying, it sputters back to life and produces normal or even hyperthyroid symptoms. Eventually, it conks out.

      You should have full antibody profiles to detect the presence of both Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease.

      “Over many years, there can be periods where the thyroid sputters back to life, even causing temporary hyperthyroidism, then a return to hypothyroidism. ” (second link)

  26. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism-bleeding gums?
    Can hypothyroidism cause bleeding gums? please note that i do not have gum disease as i have been to two dentists who have both said my brushing is great.

    • ANSWER:
      The answer is, it depends. If it is just hypothyroidism and you are being treated, it shouldn’t be related.

      However, if you have hypothyroidism due to an autoimmune disorder (ie: lupus, rhumatoid arthritis, MS, etc.), it could be the autoimmune disorder that is causing your gums to bleed.

      You may want to see about going to your regular doctor or an immunologist or rheumatologist to find out if you have an underlying autoimmune disorder.

      Also, even if you don’t have gum disease, if you don’t floss regularly when you do floss, it may cause your gums to bleed. Or if you brush too hard.

  27. QUESTION:
    Chest pain associated with hypothyroidism?
    I have been on levothyroxine 100mcg for a few years now. Recently, I started getting bad anxiety attacks and my doctor cut back my dosage to 88mcg. I get on-and-off chest pains that sometimes happen throughout the day and other times they don’t happen at all. It seems to happen when I take dosages simultaneous (one day after another), so I started taking a dose each day for five days, then cutting one day out, and starting the cycle again. The pains aren’t as bad. Can hypothyroidism cause chest pain? Is this normal with this disease? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  28. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and I have a few questions?
    Hey, I’m 17 and I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) just over four years ago.
    I have a few questions.

    What causes hypothyroidism?
    What effects does hypothyroidism have on people?
    What side effects does taking levothyroxine have on me?
    Is there any long-term I may develop from the disease or medication?

    My GP has always been rather vague and didn’t seem to know much. well informed websites if you know of any aswell. Thanks.
    Oops sorry jus asked my mum, it’s been caused by genetics, but yes i do suffer bowel problems and was REALLY bad before before I started on the meds.

    • ANSWER:
      They say hypothyroidism is caused by Hashimoto’s thyroidosis, but it can also be genetic. Hypo also can cause fatigue, weight gain, hair loss, problems sleeping, etc. I don’t know of any long-term side effects of taking the meds, because they are just a hormone that you need, nothing else. I also have never heard of having a disease because of the medication.

  29. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism????
    im 14 and i have hypothyroidism. i know what it is and everything but i just wanted to know is it really thyroid disease cause on the bottle for cold pills and tylanol it says ask a doctor if u have thyroid disease. so is it okay to take it?? and also i have a groiter in my neck….will it go away?? i’ve been on medication for more that 2 years now and it hasnt gone down. any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about four or five years ago. I’ve never had a problem with taking Tylenol, Claritin, Amoxcillin, ZPac. My doctors have always said that it was ok. You may want to check with your doctor just in case. I’ve never had a goiter, so I can’t answer your question about that. Just be sure to take your thyroid medicine everyday.

  30. QUESTION:
    Are American doctors & dentists even aware of the fraudulent science behind fluoride & fluoridated tap water?
    It’s based on a statistical illusion. It’s fraudulent science and it causes many health problems in both children and adults. Trendley Dean, DDS, (the “father of fluoridation”), the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his evidence purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    All Trendly Dean’s research showed was that fluoride delayed (or retarded), the eruption of individual teeth in children by six months to two years, therefore teeth are only delayed at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. To paraphrase Dean’s findings, “As children’s teeth disintegrate, they may have fewer cavities”. It’s good money for the dental industry. Fluoride is more toxic than lead yet they dump it in our tap water. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It increases a woman’s chances of having a Down’s Syndrome baby by 30%. It allows aluminum to cross the blood-brain barrier thus increasing one’s risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. It causes hypothyroidism. (once used to treat hyperthyroidism) It causes arthritis and bone fractures. It kills the protective enzymes naturally in your mouth which fight cavities. You absorb fluoride through your skin while bathing and under your tongue when using a fluoridated toothpaste. The fluoride being put in tap water is an industrial waste by-product…mostly from the fertilizer industry. Much of it is imported from China. Worse yet, no one is monitoring our levels of fluoride… not the medical profession or the dentists. There are over 500 peer reviewed studies showing the adverse effects of fluoride but not one double blind study showing it’s benefits. Most of the countries that at one time fluoridated tap water have now discontinued the practice and there has been no increase in cavities. The use of fluoride in tap water hasn’t even been approved by the FDA!

    Considering how over-fluoridated Americans are, do doctors ever use Ion Chromatograpy to diagnose a patient;s symptoms or diseases? Especially in the over weight population? Do doctors even know that bathing in fluoridated tap water causes hypothyroidism in adults and children? That’s why children’s teeth erupt later than normal… by up to two years later.

    Take a look at what the country of Ireland says about fluoride…

    http://www.thenhfireland.com/?p=454

    http://qualityassurance.synthasite.com/fluoride-and-the-atomic-bomb.php

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oX8ppB-wKEQ&feature=related

    • ANSWER:
      The popular and common belief is that fluoride levels of the order of 1ppm are beneficial for kids for their teeth even though there are no benefits for adults. At such low levels as 1ppm it is supposed to be harmless for adults.

      You have clearly demonstrated that fluoridated water is a dangerous health risk for kids as well as adults even at very low levels but it is unlikely that American doctors and dentists are aware of the fraudulent science behind fluoride and fluoridated tap water.

      A good or high calcium intake can help to reduce the dangers of fluoride and fluoridated tap water as calcium reacts to some extent with fluorine to form calcium fluoride CaF2 so anyone who is concerned about the dangers of fluoride and fluoridated water, as you are and myself and millions of other people, should ensure that they get plenty of calcium via their diet and if necessary from calcium supplements such as calcium carbonate, calcium gluconate, calcium ascorbate and others.

  31. QUESTION:
    So the benefits of fluoride are simply a statistical illusion?
    Trendley Dean, DDS, (“father of fluoridation”), the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 50 years ago under oath, that his data purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis were not valid. (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)… also… (See 4-1: “Fluoridation Benefits — Statistical Illusion.” Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

    All Trendly Dean’s research showed was that fluoride delayed (or retarded), the eruption of individual teeth in children by six months to two years, therefore teeth are only delayed at getting cavities. If teeth haven’t come through the gums yet, teeth will naturally not be capable of forming cavities. After the teenage years, there are actually more cavities in those who use fluoridation. Fluoride is toxic and makes both teeth and bones brittle. To paraphrase Dean’s findings, “As children’s teeth disintegrate, they may have fewer cavities”. It’s good money for the dental industry. Fluoride is more toxic than lead yet they dump it in our tap water. It lowers the IQ’s of children. It increases a woman’s chances of having a Down’s Syndrome baby by 30%. It allows aluminum to cross the blood-brain barrier thus increasing one’s risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. It causes hypothyroidism. It kills the protective enzymes naturally in your mouth which fight cavities. You absorb fluoride through your skin while bathing and under your tongue when using a fluoridated toothpaste. The fluoride being put in tap water is an industrial waste by-product…mostly from the fertilizer industry. Much of it is imported from China. Worse yet, no one is monitoring our levels of fluoride… not the medical profession or the dentists. There are over 500 peer reviewed studies showing the adverse effects of fluoride but not one double blind study showing it’s benefits. Most of the countries that at one time fluoridated tap water have now discontinued the practice and there has been no increase in cavities.
    The use of fluoride in tap water hasn’t even been approved by the FDA!

    I don’t understand this…
    Thanks for the education. I feel much better emotionally now.
    Why don’t we take a look at what Ireland has to say about fluoridation…??

    http://www.thenhfireland.com/?p=454

    http://www.virginiahopkinstestkits.com/fluoridepolitics.html

    Interesting information Rusty:
    So a pea-sized amount of toothpaste = what a child would get in a glass of tap water? Doesn’t that mean a child swallowing a glass of water would be too toxic for them?
    So why aren’t we calling poison control when we give a child a glass of fluoridated tap water?
    Why are we allowing children to even drink fluoridated tap water?
    UPDATE: Further research has shown that the cause of the late eruption of the teeth in children who use fluoride is because the children have developed hypothyroidism. Strange. The medical profession doesn’t even screen these babies and children for this condition.

    http://www.wmaf.org.uk/index.php?content=home_page&parent=1&read=1

    “Fluoridation is the greatest case of scientific fraud of this century, if not all time.”
    – Robert Carton, Ph.D., Toxicologist

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    What is I-131?(health)?
    I have a disease called “hypothyroidism”. it has tons of symptoms.

    I googled it and i got to a site where it said the causes of the disease.

    it said somthing about iodine and it said early exposure to I-131.

    what is this?

    Here is the site i found the causes on:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Causes

    also:that may say “L”-131

    they look alike.

    thanx

    • ANSWER:
      I-131 is Radioactive Iodine and it is used to burn off your thyroid. You have to be quarantined for a couple of days to my understanding because any contact with any people can expose them to your radiation. I-131 as far as i know though, is used for HYPERthryoid… (which is what i have) and is the other end of the spectrum that is a fast thyroid, or metabolism.

      From what i know people who suffer from hypothyroidism can be treated with medications like Synthroid (or Levothyroxine -generic name) and/ or surgery. You should really talk to your doctor and find – if you haven’t already found – an Endocrinologist and they should be able to help you further understand what you have, and what your options are for treatment… until then you should look up these website that may help you understand it a lot more :) good luck.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/hypothyroidism/article.htm

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/how_hypothyroidism_treated_000038_7.htm

      http://www.endocrineweb.com/hypo1.html

      http://women.webmd.com/guide/understanding-thyroid-problems-basics

      http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyroidism/alternativetreatments.aspx

      http://www.asktheinternettherapist.com/archive_hypothyroidism.asp

      http://www.drugdigest.org/DD/HC/Treatment/0,4047,910,00.html

  33. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I want to know if anybody here was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and didnt use recreational drugs at parties but developed the disease naturally as I recently got some bad news….Basically I found out a friend who also went to parties has developed multiple sclerosis and I forgot I had hypothyroidism for a while but now I am feeling so bad……

    Pls could u give me some info….I dont do parties drugs now I really regret and am so afraid for my future as I already have hypothyroidism and I know that all drugs affect the nervous system which can cause disease…

    Urghhhh!!!! :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I have Hypothyroidism and it is no big deal. You take one little pill once a day and it makes you as normal as anybody else. The pills are cheap and there are no side effects because the pills contain a natural hormone. Hypothyroidism runs in families. My great Aunt is 98 and she has been taking the little pills for 40 years without obviously any ill effects.

  34. QUESTION:
    Can hypothyroidism cause excessive hunger or even just hunger pains but then you get full very quickly?
    in 2007 i got silent thyroiditis which is when you fluxuate between hyper and hypo over the couse of a couple months. you don’t actually have to treat the disease just treat the symptoms by taking a beta blocker until the thyroiditis goes away by itself.
    i have been perfectly fine since.
    last week i went for my yearly physical and routine blood work. my dr called me the next day saying my TSH was up (indicating hypothyroidism) so i had to go for more blood work (which i did on thursday) and a thryoid ultra sound (haven’t been able to make an appointment and i’m not sure if i’ll be able to make one until after this next week coming up due to transportation issues).

    at first i didn’t think i was even really having any of the symptoms of hypothyroidism cuz the symptoms i did have were just normal things i’ve dealt with my whole life like being tired and cold. everything else has been fine.
    but then i suddenly started feeling much more tired. (friday i watched my 17 month old niece all day and she took a nap from 10am-12pm and so did i. i then got lunch for both of us and after that she likes to watch yo gabba gabba and dances to the songs. i sat on the couch and she sat in the chair/stood up and danced. i actually fell asleep while she was watching it i was soooo tired still. that freaked me out cuz i realize she could have gotten into trouble and i was sleeping.

    FINALLY GETTING TO THE POINT:
    in the last couple days i’ve also noticed that i am very hungry. i’ll feel hungry for a few minutes and then all the sudden i’ll get really bad hunger pains like when you don’t eat for a really long time and you actually start feeling sick to your stomach like maybe you shouldn’t eat anything.
    then when i do eat i feel full really fast and can’t finish my food but then a little while later it starts all over again.
    i’ve been trying really hard not to eat more than usual through out the day and i just have something like a glass of apple cyder instead of something like chips or what not.
    so to the question. can hypothyroidism make you very hungry?
    thanks for your thoughts but i already know my thyroid is out of whack cuz the tests showed it. plus the fact that i’ve had thyroid problems in the past.
    and i haven’t always been super hungry its just been for a few days now which makes me think the hypothyroid thing is catching up to me. (if hunger is a symptom that is).
    i have tried the low carb thing before and my body can’t handle it. after a week of little to no carbs i got physically sick and exhausted. i started crying all the time and was very depressed. as soon as i started having a normal amount of carbs i felt fine again.

    • ANSWER:
      I had basically the same symptons and the doctors told me my thyroid was normal. I think it was a little high or low or whatever. I went on a low carb diet cut out all the yeast, flour, and sugar in my diet ate eggs, green veggies and meat or fish. I did that for about a month then I added yellow veggies after about a week I added melons, I slowly started added different foods into my diet that had more carbs but I still watch how much I eat especially bread. If I have bread I don’t eat potatoes. And I don’t eat high carbs every day once or twice a week like bread one day and potatoes a couple days later. And stay away from any kind of water that isn’t spring water. Chlorine will play havik on your thyroid and make you even worse. There is a disease that causes basically the same symptons I think it’s called Candidia you can look it up on the internet under Yeast Connection this will also help with Hypo thyroidism.

  35. QUESTION:
    Does hypothyroidism caused low blood pressure?
    My mom is now 61 years old. Her left half of thyroid was removed last 2000.

    Last 2010 she was diagnosed with goiter with the remaining right half. she was put on levothyroxine for 6 months. her goiter lump decrease in size.

    january 2011 she had fever, cough and pain in the neck. she took azyth antibiotic, arcoxia, ectrin and aerius. these are med prescribed by her cardio.

    she got well. the fever and cough was gone. but she felt pain in the neck plus her bp went up and we cannot do anything to bring it down. she took calcibloc and micardis 80 but it stayed high..160/100.

    we checked with her endo.
    ultrasound diagnosis was thyroid nodular disease “a large well circumscribed complex solid parenchymal nodule is located in the right thyroid lobe measuring 2.5 X 2.08 X 1.59 cms (l x w x thickness) the rest of the thyroid stroma is coarsened”
    but lab tests (tsh irma, ft4) show normal results.

    her doctor prescribed micardis and neobloc to lower down her bp and nothing for the thyroid. she said it is nothing but a goiter.

    Im suspecting hypothyroidism but her doctor told us otherwise and didnt prescribed any med for her. However her blood pressure is continuing to goes down to 90/60 and she almost fainted.
    we went back to her endo and she change her beta blocker Carvedilol. still no med for her thyroid. im confused. if it has nothing to with her thyroid disease then why is my mom’s blood pressure hard to control.coming from a high bp now getting really low.

    im reading on the net that sometimes even if lab tests show normal results there could still be a thyroid problem. In my mom case I think she really had hypo or hyper. how can I telll if her endo insists there’s nothing and need not any medication. what other tests can we do to make sure.

    we also checked with her opthalmologist to rule out glaucoma issue.

    I need a second opinion. Can anyone suggest me a great Endocrinology here in manila? or an appropriate doctor for this problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Tests to request on this link (a must is thyroid antibody tests) >>> http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      Yes it is possible to have normal thyroid results with hypothyroidism. A book that goes into a lot more detail is – Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal by Dr Kharrazian. >>>http://www.thyroidbook.com/

      “Low blood pressure is caused by a lowered force of blood being pushed through your arteries due to the lowered metabolism of thyroid disease. In this case, the upper number, called the systolic, is lower than it should be.

      And having adrenal insufficiency, which is common with hypothyroid, can also create a low circulating blood volume via the loss of salt.

      But in time, you will find yourself with high blood pressure.”

      Blood Pressure and Hypothyroidism can go hand-in-hand >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/blood-pressure/

      Not sure about doctors in Manilla. Many doctors and endocrinologists misdiagnose thyroid conditions with rigid reliance on the TSH test. Hopefully you find a doctor who can help your mother.

  36. QUESTION:
    What is the name of the disease that a person feels strong fumigations all over your body?
    Several doctors have looked all over my friend did not identify the disease yet.
    My friend drank radioactive iodine for his hyperthyroidism, causing hypothyroidism.
    He take a hormone (T3 and T4) every day for his own good.
    My friend feel very uncomfortable, and constant pain in the skin, a doctor has a remedy, which is amato, relieving a little the fumigations.
    Stress and heat (like the sun) intensifies the fumigations even with the amato in the blood.
    He also takes 2mg of rivotril (clonazepam) for day. (because of his heart that without it his heart acelerate.)
    My friend calls the fumigation of (perfuration of hot needles all over the skin).
    My friend lives with me at work and the disease is not contagious.
    There is no stain or redness on his skin. Noting that there is no muscle pain.
    Only pain in the skin.(only skin pain).
    I’ll appreciate and I will be grateful to the person who know the name of the disease.
    For those who have seen this question, I’m from Brazil and I apologize for any error. The word fumigation was put in this text, and I mean tingling. Sorry again. Replace the word fumigation for tingling, and will be correct.

    • ANSWER:
      Soya, the tingling (fumigations) may be due to the hypothyroidism which the treatment has caused, something which physicians are aware of when they treat hyperthyroidism. Perhaps there are other symptoms of low thyroid function. Without enough thyroid hormone, the body becomes tired and run down. Every organ system slows—the brain slows down making it difficult to concentrate, the gut slows down causing constipation, and metabolism slows down causing weight gain. Aggressive treatment of hyperthyroidism may cause an underactive thyroid gland, the resulting effect on the body is the same.

      Many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism are very subtle. A lot of physicians overlook the symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and depression and attribute them to other causes. Physicians should check to see if thyroid disease is the cause of these everyday symptoms. Patients who are treated for hypothyroidism can regain full control of their lives and eliminate these symptoms entirely.
      Another common cause of hypothyroidism is the use of radioactive iodine. This destruction sometimes results in hypothyroidism. This type of hypothyroidism may be difficult to detect immediately, because there may be just a small amount of thyroid tissue that is not destroyed right away. This small piece of thyroid may produce enough thyroid hormone for the body for a little while. However, if this piece of thyroid burns out or gives up, hypothyroidism may result.

      Because this hypothyroidism can occur anywhere from months to years after treatment with radioactive iodine, you may not immediately recognize the subtle symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and difficulty concentrating. Your friend should visit the doctors regularly and have routine thyroid function blood tests. By checking these blood tests once a year, hypothyroidism may be discovered in its earliest stages before symptoms like fatigue and weight gain.
      Secondary Hypothyroidism
      The symptoms of hypothyroidism are mainly dependent on the amount of decrease in thyroid hormone and duration of time that the decrease has been present. For most patients, the symptoms are mild and can often be confused with other problems.

  37. QUESTION:
    Is hyperthyroidism affects reproduction ?
    I just post another one regarding this; but I mistakenly put the disease as hyperthyroidism, sorry for that . the matter is

    One of my close relative whose marriage is already fixed is suffered from hypothyroidism. She worried about her disease.
    Is it cause reproduction/ reproductive system ?
    Is she fit for the marriage ?
    Is it cause any problem in their married life ?
    Is it cause any maternity problem ?

    • ANSWER:
      many HYPOTHYROIDS all over the world have been leading a NORAML LIFE!!
      if you stick to the medications as prescribed by the DOC i don’t see any difference !!

  38. QUESTION:
    Do You Know How Your Thyroid Gland Affects Your Entire Body?
    Your Thyroid Gland affects your entire body. Thyroid disease can cause ‘Graves’ Disease, a goiter, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Thyroid Cancer and so much more. This is an Autoimmune Disorder. Visit www.isityourthyroid.webs.com

    • ANSWER:
      i have graves’/hashimoto’s. it’s debilitating, mentally and physically.

  39. QUESTION:
    What are some of the causes for gastroparesis other than diabetes?
    Hi I’m 26 and today I was diagnosed with a stomach motility disorder called gastroparesis. I’m not exactly sure how severe it is telling from the gastric emptying test. It showed I had 24% of my food left over in my stomach during the scans over the course of 4 hours, whereas people with proper digestion would have had only 10% left. Now I’m wondering how my vagus nerve became damaged in the first place. I read that diabetes is the most common cause of the condition, but I’m wondering what other diseases I should have ruled out. I have also had biliary colic like pain in my rib and back and seemed as if I had something wrong with my gallbladder. I have one aunt with diabetes, and a family history of hypothyroidism and gallbladder disease.

    • ANSWER:
      Things like food poisoning can sometimes trigger gastroparesis, as can diseases of the autonomic nervous system. Sometimes a cause can never be found…’idiopathic gastroparesis’ as this is called is very common.

      I also have gastroparesis (as it happens, I’m also nearly 26)- mine is secondary to a disease called Complex Regional Pain syndrome, which affects most of my nervous system. Mine is very severe – from memory I still had 78% of the food material left in my stomach after my scans. My symptoms are very severe also – I can’t eat any ‘solid’ foods – I’m totally reliant on things like soups, porridge, soft stewed fruits and vegetables and so on. I’m doing a little bit better now than I was, but I almost died as a result of mine – I’m still struggling with my weight (I’m just under 5’4 and weigh about 40kg) but my bodyweight has fallen below 30kg in the past.

      Has your doctor mentioned any treatments? Mild GP can usually be managed with diet alone – small, frequent meals, soft food, etc., but there are several medications available if needed.

      I hope that helps – feel free to email if you want.

  40. QUESTION:
    What causes swollen hands?
    I have a thyroid problem and am taking replacement thyroid hormone. Doses are being adjusted right now from hypothyroid from radioactive iodine ablation for Graves disease almost 7 years ago.

    Could hyperthyroidism possibley cause this or is it more hypothyroidism? I am also taking vitamin c, vitamin mineral pill, and D3, B12.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroidism, any kind, doesn’t cause swollen hands. I have Hypo and I never had that problem. It may be something else, and you should go consult a doctor if it starts becoming a problem. It may be that you are dehydrated, I had that happen only once when I went out running during the summer for hours without water… (Stupid move, I know… -_-’) My hands puffed up and I was panicking thinking I was having an allergy attack (I never had one but one of my friends did and it was scary). But it went down when I relaxed, drank some water and took a nap. :3

  41. QUESTION:
    hashimoto’s disease help? severe pain?
    Hey everyone!
    I have something very strange happening to me. If I don’t sleep well enough my muscles will start hurting. The pain gradually grows, and usually starts at night, making falling asleep almost impossible. sometimes the pain is deeper, more in the bone. I have asked my mom if this is normal, but all she says is that i am just being whiny. I don’t remember when it started but i fell like it’s been a couple of years now. Also I have hypothyroidism, caused by Hashimoto’s, could this be related?
    Is this normal?
    thank you very much!! :)))

    • ANSWER:
      This can come from Hashi’s. I assume that you are on meds. Are you rechecked regularly, like at least every 6 mos?

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  42. QUESTION:
    I know i have at least one autoimmume disorder, but do I have more?
    After having my son 12/2005, I developed at autoimmune disorder which cause me to have Hashimoto thyriod disease (hypothyroidism). I have also suffer from chronic hives since then. Is this a common thing with my condition or could this be another autoimmue disorder that my doctor has not found (who has left now, and my next appt. will be with someone new)? Should I see a hormone specialist? My hives get worst during my period, but in the past week they have spread all over my arms and legs. They normally stayed on my shine bone area and under control. I haven’t been myself since the birth of my child. Has anyone else have this condition after a birth and does it develop into anything worse?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had chronic hives since I was a little girl (I’m nearly 21- only 20 days left!). The hive “attacks” were worse when I first got them. They got milder over time- the hives were less extensive and lasted for a shorter time.

      Are you absolutely certain you’re not allergic to something?

      If you are, the location of hive breakouts and the severity can vary between attacks. I can get them on my arms, or my legs, or my back, or my stomach, or two or more of those areas during an attack. The severity of my attacks also varied- they could last for hours of days. Nowadays, I get them most commonly on my arms (though I still get them elsewhere occassionally) and they only last a few hours. And, I tend to breakout after I’ve washed vegetables. They used to last for days. Right now, I’m going through an unusually severe attack- I have them on my hands, arms and feet and a few scattered on my knee and they’ve been there for three days now.

      You should check in with your doctor to make sure you’re not allergic to anything, since if you are, are you are repeatedly or continuously exposed to the allergen, it could develop into something worse- possibly a more sever reaction. Chronic hives usually shouldn’t develop into something worse, but it’s still a good idea to check with your doctor.

      I’ve been unlucky enough to develop a bee allergy (on my third sting too) which results in head to toe hives. Compounded with my chronic hives, I am very familiar with hives, unfortunately. they itch like nothing else.

      If you need anymore advice regarding hives and treatment, feel free to ask.

  43. QUESTION:
    Can Osteoporosis or Osteopenia cause a compression fracture in the spinal vertebrae?
    Does anyone know the most common causes of compression fractures of the cervical vertebrae? My mother was recently diagnosed with a compression fracture in her spinal cord at C7 (neck area).

    She was Dx w/osteopenia 4 years ago, but hasn’t taken any steps to prevent further progression other than calcium supplements (and not routinely). She has a history of bone fractures, as she fractured her wrist about 2 years ago in a minor fall.

    She has yearly mammograms and had lung X-rays taken last year as part of her annual physical. Everything was fine: no traces of cancer in either place. She is 64 y/o, caucasian, non-smoker, healthy and active, and other than having hypothyroidism, she has no other history of disease.

    Her recent MRI did not reveal any type of tumor at the sight, however, they want to do further testing to make sure she doesn’t have a malignancy anywhere else in her body. Apparently many cancers can matastasize in the spine.

    What are the chances this compression fracture is due to a lack of bone density and NOT to an unidentified malignancy elsewhere in the body?

    Please sight any references, if possible.

    Thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Your description matches perfectly for someone who will be prone to having a compression fracture. The broken wrist and osteopenia along with being a post menopausal woman who is not actively protecting herself against further bone loss. Compression fracture almost certainly.

      My MIL also would not take calcium and did not eat a balanced diet. One day she called unable to get out of bed due to extreme pain. 7 compression fractures. Her spine looked like swiss cheese only with tiny holes. The Dr took one look at the x-rays and said no wonder she is in so much pain. Over a period of time the stress fractures slowly healed although she now has a low level of chronic back pain.

      For the past ten years she has been on 2 tablespoons daily of liquid calcium, magnesium and Vitamin D mixture since she can not swallow big calcium pills.

      http://www.puritan.com/pages/file.asp?PID=5459&CID=1&CPID=8249&rlid=&xs=EBD07B3FD2F044D4BDCBD276D8724FB0&searchterm=liquid%20calcium

      She also takes an extra 400IU Vitamin D because vitamin D is needed for the calcium to be absorbed. New research indicates that someone like your mom needs about 1000 IU daily. My MIL also takes the RX spray Miacalcin which slows the turnover of bone osteoclasts which strengthens bone when the drug is taken over time. This spray is only one nasal squirt daily and much easier than Fosamax for an elderly lady to use. http://www.miacalcin.com/index.jsp

      While it certainly will not hurt your mother to have a non invasive workup to make sure there is not some type of malignancy, if I was betting money, my money would be on compression fracture caused by osteoporosis. Healing is a process so expect this to take a while. If she does not start taking better care of herself it is highly likely that she will have new fractures in the future. good luck

  44. QUESTION:
    2ª) What is the treatment for this?
    The first question and some notes (question answered):

    1ª) What is the name of the disease that a person feels strong fumigations all over your body?
    Several doctors have looked all over my friend did not identify the disease yet.
    My friend drank radioactive iodine for his hyperthyroidism, causing hypothyroidism.
    He take a hormone (T3 and T4) every day for his own good.
    My friend feel very uncomfortable, and constant pain in the skin, a doctor has a remedy, which is amato, relieving a little the fumigations.
    Stress and heat (like the sun) intensifies the fumigations even with the amato in the blood.
    He also takes 2mg of rivotril (clonazepam) for day. (because of his heart that without it his heart acelerate.)
    My friend calls the fumigation of (perfuration of hot needles all over the skin).
    My friend lives with me at work and the disease is not contagious.
    There is no stain or redness on his skin. Noting that there is no muscle pain.
    Only pain in the skin.(only skin pain).
    I’ll appreciate and I will be grateful to the person who know the name of the disease.

    RESPOSTA;

    Soya, the tingling (fumigations) may be due to the hypothyroidism which the treatment has caused, something which physicians are aware of when they treat hyperthyroidism. Perhaps there are other symptoms of low thyroid function. Without enough thyroid hormone, the body becomes tired and run down. Every organ system slows—the brain slows down making it difficult to concentrate, the gut slows down causing constipation, and metabolism slows down causing weight gain. Aggressive treatment of hyperthyroidism may cause an underactive thyroid gland, the resulting effect on the body is the same.

    Many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism are very subtle. A lot of physicians overlook the symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and depression and attribute them to other causes. Physicians should check to see if thyroid disease is the cause of these everyday symptoms. Patients who are treated for hypothyroidism can regain full control of their lives and eliminate these symptoms entirely.
    Another common cause of hypothyroidism is the use of radioactive iodine. This destruction sometimes results in hypothyroidism. This type of hypothyroidism may be difficult to detect immediately, because there may be just a small amount of thyroid tissue that is not destroyed right away. This small piece of thyroid may produce enough thyroid hormone for the body for a little while. However, if this piece of thyroid burns out or gives up, hypothyroidism may result.

    Because this hypothyroidism can occur anywhere from months to years after treatment with radioactive iodine, you may not immediately recognize the subtle symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and difficulty concentrating. Your friend should visit the doctors regularly and have routine thyroid function blood tests. By checking these blood tests once a year, hypothyroidism may be discovered in its earliest stages before symptoms like fatigue and weight gain.
    Secondary Hypothyroidism
    The symptoms of hypothyroidism are mainly dependent on the amount of decrease in thyroid hormone and duration of time that the decrease has been present. For most patients, the symptoms are mild and can often be confused with other problems.
    Fonte(s):
    a medical professional

    2ª) The second question is: What is the treatment for this?
    My friend still suffering and taking drugs to not feel pain. I feel sad about him.
    This pain who he feels isn’t normal. The pain is strong, he said.
    He is taking a new drug: Floral ( from plants: it’s a detoxifier and a normalizing body )
    But I think isn’t a toxin, because it’s been months that he takes, and won’t get better.
    I think it’s a psychological illnesses.

    • ANSWER:
      The PURPOSE of the use of the radioactive iodine is to make one who is HypERthyroid (overactive/low TSH level), become HypO (underactive/hi TSH level) THEN one is commonly treated w/ Synthroid to bring the person up to the right level thus bringing the TSH level down hopefully to within the ‘normal’ range of .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best @ < 2). It may take several months to get the dose regulated ...even then, A LOT of people still DO NOT experience much relief...sorry.

      God bless

  45. QUESTION:
    What’s YOUR opinion of Synthroid, for Hypothyroidism?
    My doctor diagnosed me with Hypothyroidism and prescribed Synthroid but…I HATE DRUGS and their side effects!! Synthroid’s website says that you CANNOT ever get off of it or it can cause infertility, problems during pregnancy and heart disease…anyone know of anything NATURAL/HERBAL I can take instead??

    • ANSWER:
      I took it for 3 months and had a horrible reaction, went to the ER and it took months to recover from it. I stopped taking it. So now I made big changes in my diet, exercise and used all-natural progesterone. My symptoms totally reversed.
      I’m no doctor and I don’t know what your blood tests revealed, so I’m only telling you my own experience.
      Read “Alternative treatment for hypothyroidism”

      http://www.womentowomen.com/hypothyroidism/alternativetreatments.asp

      and
      Specific methods of alternative medicine

      http://www.womentowomen.com/womenshealth/alternativemedicine.asp

  46. QUESTION:
    Hashimotos Disease?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. I think the underlying cause might be Hashimoto’s Disease. But my ANA levels were normal. So, is it possible to have Hashimotos and have a normal ANA test?

    P.S. I don’t normally use Y!A for medical advice, but my Doctor’s nurse is an idiot and can’t correctly ask my questions to the Dr.

    • ANSWER:
      its autoimmune thyroiditis ,the ana isnt relevant,more auto thyroid antiboides are more important ,and yes its normal

  47. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a white doberman?
    Apparently they have a similar gene to the recessive gene that causes white tigers and it has no problems that usually go along with white abnormals (deafness and blindness). Its not albino just a white recessive coloring. Ijust wondered if anyone else had heard of this or seen it. I was reading some veterinary gene studies on breeds with known origins (the original crosses) and came across it. Interesting reading and very useful if you want to know why certain inheirent diseases are breed specific (eg hypothyroidism,epilepsy and other diseases affecting the brain function). You come across the weirdest things and i have never heard of a white doberman.
    Its not albino, just a white color, no pink or blue eyes and it can have the mask and markings in a pale tan, almost an apricot color. Just like the tigers arent true white or albino nor are the dobes.
    I cant find the paper i was reading, i am studying behaviour characteristics in domesticated animals at present and was just skimming it to see if it was relevant to my current thesis and it caught my eye cause i own 2 dobes.
    Actually i did just find some web sites devoted to white dobermans, but they are just white dobes bred from a single albino b*tch. I actually mean a color gene not a lack of color gene. Ones with normal brown eyes and some traces of marking and pigmented skin, dark nose and all that. The paper i was reading was pretty specific that it is not albinism.
    Apparently the white colored gene was inheirited when grey hound was added to the mix to create the modren doberman. But the arguments about which dogs are the originators give me a headache. The breed of the original 2 is unknown but people have said that great dane, rottweiler, beauceron, german pinscher, german pointer, greyhound and another smaller breed (terrier of some sort) with the black and tan markings are all what make up dobermans. There is a couple of them that have white colorings that isnt necessarily albino, not accepted coloring but it does happen. Plus it would explain the occasional pup born with some white but not all white. The white gene is in there its just a very recessive gene. I did find another paper which was on albinism in some dogs and apparently sometimes its not the mutated albino gene, just a recessive normal color gene.

    • ANSWER:
      It is in fact a mutation of the color allele that ends up creating the white dobermans. A breeder back in the 60s had a litter with a few white puppies. In order to establish the white she bred brother to sister and had a litter of puppies. These dogs are listed as being positive for the “Z Factor”. The AKC does not allow them to be shown. They often develop sight problems later in life in addition to having poor quality coats and often developing blisters when exposed to sunlight for too long. They are not healthy dogs and no one should ever intentionally breed for them. They technically are not albino, since it is in fact a mutation. However, many do have blue eyes, and while you can still see the markings as a cream color on some, on others you cannot see any markings. People breed them as a “rare” color, when in fact it is an unwanted color, and in turn charge more money for a lower quality dog.

      I know it isn’t a lack of a gene, it is a mutation of one of the color alleles. Normal dobes have 2 alleles for each color. So a black dobie is BBrR, BbRr, BBRR, you get the idea. The B is dominant for black. To get a red it is bbRR, or bbRr. For a blue it is bbRr, and to get a fawn it is bbrr. An albino has one of the Bs or Rs replaced with a different gene, giving it the so called “Z factor”. Proponents of white dobies say they aren’t albinos, which in fact it true, they are not true albinos since it isn’t lack of gene or a recessive. It is a mutation. The DPCA (Doberman Pinscher Club of America) actually calls them partial albinos. I state again that no one should ever breed an albino or breed a dog knowing it carries the Z factor.

      I won’t be commenting after this, but I don’t think you understand genetics. I am in research and have science degrees. Some dobies do have the occasional white marking on their chest, but the AKC limits the size, many breeds have this. There is no such thing as a “very recessive gene,” there is simply dominant and recessive. The C gene (which is what the gene for white is) is a mutation. If it wasn’t, white dobies would have been around much earlier than the late 60s when they happened, and it wouldn’t have all been traced back to 1 litter, other people would have experienced it. Some dogs do have white as a recessive color and it isn’t albino (like german shepards), but all the white dobies I have ever seen and all the pictures I can find on the internet, the dobies have pink noses and blue eyes. I have NEVER seen one with a normal colored nose and any shade of brown eyes. And it is true that albinos can have blue eyes. I suggest you do a little more research. This is a very heated issue for lovers of the Doberman breed. Here’s a really good website

      http://whitedobes.doberinfo.com/

  48. QUESTION:
    what is wrong with my metabolism? hypothyroidism/hypituitary/celiac?
    I’ve been listing out my symptoms and trying to decipher what is going on. Basically, I’m 15, I play tennis and exercise very often, I have an absolute health nut though I don’t usually have a problem with sweets, but I hardly eat them a lot. But it mainly happened over the tennis season in in just a few months, I went up from 135 to 153 lbs (I’m 5’9). Techniquely I’m still in healthy range, but really I don’t fit in anything right, I don’t feel good, and I’m certainly done puberty.

    These are all my symptoms:
    Change in stool softness (softer)
    Sudden and unexplained weight gain
    Joint Pain after exercising (which isn’t that unusual)
    Irregular, getting heavier and longer and then light and short periods
    Recurrent sinus infections, like this cough for 3 weeks
    I feel the need to yawn to get oxygen
    I feel cold sometimes at the wrong times
    I have shortness of breath sometimes
    I have unexplained nausea, especially in the mornings
    I get tired right around eight thirty every night, I wake up early but as soon as it gets late I’m beat. Maybe I’m a morning person…

    Also this would be important to note, my entire mother’s side of the family has celiac disease (an autoimmune disease where one cannot absorb gluten (wheat) and it causes a boatload of other autoimmune diseases). I was wondering the chances that I could have developed it. Nothing truamatizing has happened to me lately, besides a ton of stress from schoolwork.

    So I’m wondering if I could have developed celiac? I know that it has been attributed to weight loss, but if it affected my thyroid it would have the opposite affect. My mother is getting me tested for hypothyroidism, but what about hypopituitary stuff? That would be a little more serious.

    I’m healthy in a day, hardly passing 1200 calories but I’m not not eating, I just eat very healthy. I have oatmeal for breakfast, fruit for lunch, a snack probably fruit or a granola bar, and chicken breat usually for dinner. So I eat enough. But as soon as I eat too much my weight gain is incredible. 3000 calories=1 pound? I eat 2000 and I’ll gain 3.

    Thank you so much for your help (: I would just like some real feedback before I’m questioned by my doctor this week.

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    How the Heck Do Kids Get Fat?
    I’m starting to see a lot more overweight kids nowadays, but aren’t kids supposed to have really really fast metabolisms? I am in my early twenties, and while I lose weight a lot easier than gain it, I keep hearing people say “oh, kids are lucky – they can eat whatever they want without getting fat”. So why so many fat kids? I know obesity can be caused by sedentary activity and a high calorie diet, but I during my entire childhood I was living off of Oreos, McDonalds, Taco Bell, KFC, mac & cheese, chips (and I ate CONSTANTLY). My parents never let me outside by myself till I was 13, so I spent my hours drawing, not running around. And I was never overweight. So, with a kid’s fast metabolism, how do these kids manage to become overweight? And don’t say it’s due to a disease or hypothyroidism, b/c I find it hard to believe that like, 15% of kids were born w/ diseases. Do you think it’s an additive food companies are now adding to products?
    I can understand how anyone in the puberty years or later become fat, b/c the metabolism slows. But fat 7-year-olds – I cannot understand..

    • ANSWER:
      They don’t go oustide anymore! When I was a kid, we were outside everyday, playing sports, running around, riding bikes, lots of things! Now, kids cant go outside because the parents fear that someone will snatch them. Times have changed, and also, kids these days have computers, video game systems, and television to keep them indoors. Plus, the food these days is really unhealthy, and some parents don’t care what their kids eat. It really sucks to be a kid these days!

  50. QUESTION:
    remedies for immediate constipation relief?
    My daughter is 8 and gets severely constipated. She has hypothyroidism(which can cause constipation) and celiacs disease(which causes digestive problems as well). I try to give her daily prune juice as none of the fiber supplements seem to have worked, but what i really need is advice on what i can do when she is already on the pot, literally! She sometimes sits there for 2 hours, just crying and trying to go. We’ve tried enemas, but she can’t seem to hold it in long enough for them to work. Are there any kind of exercises or something she can drink to make her go IMMEDIATELY?

    • ANSWER:
      heating pads hugged against stomach with a stuffie.


Hypothyroidism Disease

Many of you may be wondering what hypothyroidism is and how it can affect you in your life. Hypothyroidism is caused by an underproduction of thyroid hormone. The thyroid gland is the body’s internal thermostat, regulating the temperature by secreting tow hormones that control how quickly the body burns calories and uses energy. If the thyroid secretes too much hormone, hyperthyroidism results; too little hormone results in hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism affects an estimated 5 percent, or about 13 million people, in the United States, about 90 percent of whom are women. Women between the ages of thirty and fifty see to be the most prone to this condition. Thyroid problems can cause many recurring illnesses and fatigue. The thyroid can be affected by poor diet, fluoride in the water, excessive consumption of unsaturated fats, endurance exercise, pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables, radiation from x-rays, alcohol, and drugs. Less than 25 percent of people with an interactive thyroid have been properly diagnosed and properly treated.

Here are the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism. Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, inability to tolerate cold, low body temperature, a slow heart rate, easy weight gain, elevated cholesterol, painful premenstrual periods, heavy periods, a milky discharge from the breasts, fertility problems, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, dry and scaly skin, a yellow orange coloration in the skin (particularly on the palms of the hands), yellow bumps on the eyelids, hair loss (including the eyebrows), recurrent infections, migraines, hoarseness, respiratory infections, constipation, depression, difficulty concentrating, slow speech, goiter, and drooping, swollen eyes. The most common symptoms are fatigue and intolerance to cold. If you consistently feel cold while others around you are hot, you may be suffering from reduced thyroid function.

Measuring levels of different hormones in the blood can determine if the thyroid gland is working properly. A physician may order a blood test to measure levels of thyroid hormone or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This hormone is secreted by the pituitary gland and in turn helps regulate thyroid hormone production. Even a minuscule drop in thyroid function registers as a distinctly elevated TSH level. Most endocrinologists believe that TSH levels rise when a person is in the earliest stages of thyroid failure.
A physician may perform a iodine absorption test for you. This test involves ingesting a small amount of radioactive iodine. An x-ray then shows how much of the iodine was absorbed by the thyroid. A low uptake of the iodine may indicate hypothyroidism.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What meds are safe to take with Hypothyroidism disease?
    I am 18 and just got diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. I know it’s not a HUGE deal, but I am on Synthroid for it and on 40 mg of Adderall for ADD… but my adderall doesn’t work anymore since I’ve had hypothyroidism! I used to just take 20mg and I would work like crazy and I couldn’t go to sleep for days on it, but I tried taking 60mg and I was still tired, sluggish, and unfocused! Does anyone know why? Or if it is safe to even mix these drugs?! I am also on Zoloft for anxiety. Please help!
    My doctor KNOWS all the meds I am on. Im not retarded. Im just asking if anyone else has had this happen with Adderall.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of possibilities of what may be happening based on my experiences:

      1) if you were just diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, it may not be regulated yet and it’s the Hypothyroidism that is making you tired, sluggish, and unfocused; afterall these are major symptoms of the disease.

      2) Your drugs may be interacting with each other. I’m only guessing, but perhaps the Adderall is preventing the Synthroid from working.

      There are quite a few drugs that interact with Synthroid and keep it from working (and doctors and pharmacists don’t always know about them). There is quite a list of drugs on my Pharmacy info sheet that say they may interact with Synthroid. I’ve taken Synthroid for a few years now and have discovered that there are even more medications than what’s listed on my info sheet that prevent the Synthroid from working.

      I don’t know if you take all your medicines at one time, or not, but if you do…stop! Take the Synthroid by itself, and take your other medications about 2 hours later. Sometimes you may have to wait longer, but 2 hours is what works with my meds. Don’t ever take Calcium or magnesium within 4 hours of taking the Synthroid. So if you take a multi-vitamin or take calcium and magnesium alone, don’t do it within 4 hours of the Synthroid.

      And remember Synthroid needs to be taken on an empty stomach and at least 1/2 to 1 hour before eating.

      From now on, keep in mind that just about every pill/medication and supplement you can swallow may interact with the Synthroid when taken at the same time and you need a 2-4 hour time space between them. I learned the hard way a couple times and made myself quite ill. When the Synthroid isn’t working, it makes you feel so ill and run-down, and you just can’t figure out what’s wrong.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the difference in hypothyroidism and thyroid disease?
    I have hypothyroidism and want to take some sinus medication. It says don’t take if you have thyroid disease.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like hypothyroidism is classified as thyroid disease. I wouldn’t take that medicine!

  3. QUESTION:
    Can a more serious disease by mistaken for hypothyroidism?
    I was just wondering if anybody knows if there is something worse that could be mistaken for hypothyroidism. I am a 24-year-old male and I know quite a few people who have been diagnosed with it, but they are all older women. Is it odd that I have been diagnosed with it? Could it be mistaken for another, more serious, disease. Any feedback would help. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Guys get it too haha, my dad has it

      its not a gender disease, it can hit anyone
      its not even a big deal

      best thing you can do is get it treated early so it doesnt affect your growth bro

      relax a little :D

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism or graves disease?
    I would like to hear from people who have some personal experience with this because i think i may be in the early stages of graves disease. my doctor wants me to have blood tests and an ultrasound of my thyroid, but i cannot do it right now because i don’t have any health insurance. I have to wait until i have some way to pay for these tests and anything else if i do have the disease. my thyroid is definitely enlarged, and i have lost a lot of weight unintentionally.

    • ANSWER:
      I had Graves Disease (it’s in remission right now), so maybe I can help you with this one. It’s definitely something that you should get taken care of though, so maybe there’s a way you can get yourself to a free clinic or something to get a simple blood test. Pretty much what brought me to the doctor initially was that I lost weight without really trying to. I also had a voracious appetite. Other symptoms that I only noticed later were dry skin, a dull headache above my eyes (I thought it was a sinus infection until I realized that it went away once my graves was under control), irritable mood swings (this is one of the main reasons you should get it taken care of asap- graves can affect your personality… it can trigger anxiety, irritability, inattention, etc.). Good luck and feel better! Luckily, graves is very treatable but unexplained weight loss can be symptomatic of other more serious illnesses, so you definitely need to get this taken care of.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do I deal with a disease called Hypothyroidism during pregnancy?
    I am currently 7 weeks pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to an endocrinologist and your OB. They would be the best ones to advise you. If you are taking thyroid medicine, I would continue to do so unless advised to stop. Thyroid is something your body needs to function properly and should not be dangerous for your unborn baby.

  6. QUESTION:
    I have mitral valve prolapse, hypothyroidism, and maybe early Chron’s disease. How risky would pregnancy be?
    I had an uncomplicated pregnancy with my son, who is now almost four. However, my hypothyroidism did not start until after he was born. I have had both an upper and lower GI scope and blood tests that indicate possible Chron’s disease. However, my results were very low positive and my symptoms are relatively mild, so I am not being treated at the moment. I would like another child, but want to know the risks and benefits of pregnancy with multiple autoimmune disorders.

    • ANSWER:
      This is a good questoin for your doctor.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism related to Cushings Disease in dogs?
    My dog was diagnosed with low thyroid. Then we discovered that he has Cushings disease from the steroids used to treat his allergies. He has been off steroids for over 2 months now and is doing very well. Should I have his thyroid rechecked (0 test) or are these things unrelated?

    • ANSWER:
      You definitely ought to have his thyroid function reassessed- if he is truly hypothyroid, he will need to be given synthetic thyroxine (thyroid hormone) for life.

      It is a possibility, as Vet Tech said, that the low thyroid function was due to his Cushings- almost any illness can create a condition called Sick Euthyroid Syndrome, which basically means that although the thyroid gland is prefectly normal, less thyroid hormone is being produced as a direct effect of the illness.

      As his Cushings was caused by the steroids, rather than by his body producing too much cortisol, the Cushings should resolve over time. You’ve said that he’s doing very well, which I’m taking to mean that the Cushings signs are resolving as expected.

      The important thing when you do have him re-tested is to make sure that it is done as a FREE T4 (FT4) test. This is really the only practical and accurate test to diagnose hypothyroidism.

      A Total T4 (TT4) test will detect low thyroid hormone, but cannot differentiate between sick euthyroid and true hypothyroidism.

      A TSH test is not overly useful either, and I wouldn’t waste your money on it- while it should be higher than normal, up to 40% of hypoT dogs have normal levels, and up to 20% of normal dogs have elevated levels.

      I hope that makes sense. Please feel free to email me if anything I’ve said is unclear.

  8. QUESTION:
    I want to start taking “Alli” but can’t if I have Thyroid disease. Is Hypothyroidism a Thyroid Disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is a condition resulting from a thyroid disorder.. there are several that can cause you to be hypothyroid – when your thyroid gland is unable to produce sufficient hormone for your body to be able to function in a healthy manner.

      It would be FAR better for you to get the hypo condtion PROPERLY treated so that your body is able to function well and be able to get back to a healthy weight.

      The first step would be to have proper labs run. By proper I mean to have the thyroid hormone levels checked, not just the TSH (which is a pituitary hormone). Once you have those labs you’ll need to have them checked by someone that understands how to read them. Your doc may not be that person, I’ve run across far too many instances where even IF the doc runs the correct tests, they have no clue as to how to interpret the results.

      In a nut shell, to have labs ‘in normal range’ is NOT good enough.. it’s akin to driving around on a low tire and saying that as long as it’s not actually flat that it’s ‘good enough’. You’ll just shell out the money to pay for the extra gas and repairs to the car that result from driving around on that low tire.

      For us.. it’s dealing with the symptoms and, for too many, taking masking drugs to mask the symptoms that they are dealing with cuz their body does not have enough thyroid hormone to be able to LIVE…

  9. QUESTION:
    Is graves disease and hypothyroidism the same?
    i think it could be the same from the information i found but is it the same as hyperthyroid or hypothyroid? or is it totally different? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Definition
      Graves’ disease is the most common form of hyperthyroidism. It occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks your thyroid gland and causes it to overproduce the hormone thyroxine.

      The abnormal immune response can affect the tissue behind your eyes as well as parts of your skin. The higher thyroxine level in Graves’ disease can greatly increase your body’s metabolic rate, leading to host of health problems.

      Graves’ disease is rarely life-threatening. Although it may develop at any age and in either men or women, Graves’ disease is more common in women and usually begins after age 20.

      There’s no way to stop your immune system from attacking your thyroid gland, but treatments for Graves’ disease can ease symptoms and decrease the production of thyroxine.

      Hypothyroidism is underactive thyroid.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism a serious disease or not?
    My older sister was diagnosed. Before diagnosed she would be lazy and lay around all day doing nothing. Is it serious?

    • ANSWER:
      YES, VERY! MANY symptoms & meds do not always work.

      She needs testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypO & is worse. WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease particularly Hashi’s. Also, she may have to go to more than one before she gets the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon…

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  11. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism causes hair loss, medication for the disease causes hair loss, what do I do to stop going bald?
    Thyroxine, the medication, is a case of the cure being worse than the disease. It makes me feel horrible, and the doctor just tells me ‘to continue taking the medication’.

    • ANSWER:
      There’s another alternative….Armour thyroid. I switched to it 4 years ago when Levoxyl wasn’t doing anything for my symptoms. Armour helps with hairloss, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and muscle and joint aches. I will provide links below that should help you come to a decision. There’s no need to be suffering with symptoms. If your current med isn’t working, it may be time for a different one.

  12. QUESTION:
    Recently diagnosed with Hypothyroidism disease– should I be tested for Hashimoto’s disease?
    Before being diagnosed, I would always tell my mother of various symptoms I was having. From extreme fatigue, to lethargy and brain fog…to achiness all over to weight gain.. I would tell her these different symptoms and because it wasn’t just /one/ symptom and instead, many, she started calling me a hypochondriac and treated me in a manner that suggested she believed I was making it up and was “just being lazy”.

    Well, I went to the doctor and was notified that I had Hypothyroidism and was recently put on the drug, Levothyroxine. I didn’t know much about the disease, so I went searching online (to legitimate health websites, nothing taboo with a bunch of woohoo) and discovered that it was common for young people with Hypothyroidism to actually have Hashimoto’s disease. (I’m 20)

    I told my mom because I wasn’t tested for Hashimoto’s and now she thinks I’m being a hypochondriac. Should I get tested and is my concern reasonable?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, absolutely! You are not a hypochondriac…you are being proactive about your health. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is the leading cause of hypothyroidism. As hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, lowering thyroid antibodies is a must to prevent more damage to the thyroid gland not to mention reduce hypothyroidism symptoms.

      “In the new study, researchers noted the symptom levels of more than 400 women with thyroid conditions, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. They theorized that higher levels of antithyroperoxidase antibody – an immune cell associated with Hashimoto’s – would correspond with more severe symptoms.

      While this was found to be the case, the team made an unexpected secondary discovery. Women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis often experienced its symptoms even when their levels of thyroid hormone were within a healthy range.” >>>

      Autoimmune thyroid disease may cause symptoms even when hormone levels are normal >>>

      http://www.endocrineweb.com/news/hypothyroidism/4599-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-may-cause-symptoms-even-when-hormone-levels-are-

      Studies show 200mcg of selenium (a few brazil nuts) daily lowers TPO antibody levels up to 40% in 3 months and “…researchers found that…organ-specific autoantibodies (i.e., thyroid antibodies) — will disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet.” Natural desiccated thyroid hormone can lower thyroid antibodies if the dosage is high enough.

      There is a genetic defect in the ability to process vitamin D with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which means higher supplemention of vitamin D is needed. It is recommended to take 5000IU – 20 000IU daily. Other deficiencies or low levels commonly seen with hypothyroidism include iron, vitamin B12, folate, magnesium, potassium.

      Recommended labwork >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Selenium for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis >>>

      http://jeffreydach.com/2009/11/07/selenium-for-hashimotos-thyroiditis-by-jeffrey-dach-md.aspx

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection >>>

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      Revolutionary way to treat Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism >>>

      http://thyroidbook.com/

      Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Vitamin D deficiency >>>

      http://www.yourthyroidsolutions.com/hashimotos-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-vitamin-deficiency

  13. QUESTION:
    I have Hoshimoto’s hypothyroidism. Should I be worried about celiac disease?
    I have been going untreated for my thryroid disease for months now due to a lack of health coverage. Recently, I have been experiencing a loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea (no vomiting), and diarrhea. I have heard that there may be a link between celiac and hypothyroidism and am now concerned that I should be screened for celiac. Should I be worried or do I just have some kind of stomach bug?

    • ANSWER:
      A stomach bug doesn’t last that long so if your symptoms continue then it is likely to be from another condition. These symptoms could be from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis itself, low vitamin B12 or magnesium levels which are commonly associated with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, or celiac’s disease.

      “Relative risks of almost all other autoimmune diseases in Graves’ disease or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis were significantly increased (>10 for pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison’s disease, celiac disease, and vitiligo).”

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20103030

      90% with hashimoto’s has genetic defects with vitamin D absorption so the odds you have vitamin D deficiency is extremely high. Without vitamin D you cannot absorb calcium or magnesium effectively. Blood tests are recommended but of course if you cannot afford it, then my suggestions are: supplementing with vitamin B12 (sublingual – under the tongue), magnesium, calcium and vitamin D and go on a gluten free diet. A gluten free diet is shown to lower thyroid antibodies. Also, a must is selenium (about 4 brazil nuts a day). Selenium is shown in clinical trials to lower TPO thyroid antibodies.

      If you cannot afford supplementing, then increase your diet with magnesium, calcium and vitamin B12 rich foods and go out into the sun daily between 10 – 2 for about 20 minutes – no sunscreen which blocks UVB rays that create vitamin D. This said, if you have a deficiency this may not be enough. If you have autoimmune pernicious anaemia, then it is essential to take sublingual vitamin B12 to bypass the digestive tract.

      Hypothyroidism symptoms >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

      The book: Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal goes into treating Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis without drugs. >>>

      http://thyroidbook.com/

      Recommended lab work >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Optimal Lab Values–how to interpret your results >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      Selenium for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis >>>

      http://www.drdach.com/Selenium_Hashimotos.html

      Vitamin D >>>

      http://vitamindcouncil.org/

      Magnesium >>>

      http://www.fgb.com.au/natural-uses/magnesium-deficiency

      Vitamin B12 >>>

      http://vitamins.lovetoknow.com/Signs_of_Vitamin_B12_Deficiency

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection >>>

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

  14. QUESTION:
    What is the differience between Hypothyroidism and Hoshimoto’s disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s leads to hypothyroidism but hypothyroidism does not cause Hashimoto’s disease. there are other conditions that can give rise to hypothyroidusm too.

      Hashimoto’s disease is part of the spectrum of autoimmune disease. It is the commonest cause of goitrous hypothyroidism in non-iodine deficient areas.
      Pathogenesis

      In this condition typically there is aggressive destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes (in contrast to the stimulatory effect seen in Graves’ disease). It is not yet understood why this occurs.

      * Antibodies binding to and blocking the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor have been described and may contribute to further impairment in thyroid function.1
      * The result is inadequate thyroid hormone production and secretion, although, initially both preformed thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) may “leak” into the circulation from damaged cells.
      * The goitrous form (rather than atrophic) is associated with HLA-DR5.

      What causes hypothyroidism?

      The main causes of hypothyroidism are:

      * chronic autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid gland, also known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. In autoimmune conditions the body’s immune system seems to turn against some of its own tissues.

      * complications arising from previous surgery to the thyroid gland or from radioactive iodine treatment, both of which are used to treat overactivity of the thyroid gland.

      # an inherited incomplete development of the thyroid gland.

      # as a consequence of treatment with certain medicines such as propylthiouracil, carbimazole (Neo-mercazole), amiodarone (eg Cordarone X tablets) and lithium.

      # taking large amounts of iodine for example in some cough syrups or excessive amounts of dietary supplements made from or containing kelp.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is anyone using PTU for Graves disease? What are the side affects? Does it cause hypothyroidism?
    I have Graves disease, my doctor is really rude and won’t answer questions for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Some possible side effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) include:
      skin rash,itching,abnormal hair loss,upset stomach,vomiting,loss of taste, abnormal sensations such as tingling, prickling, burning, tightness, or pulling,swelling,joint and muscle pain,drowsiness,or dizzyness.
      Rarely, propylthiouracil can affect the blood and cause decreased levels of red and white blood cells and platelets, which may cause an increased risk of infection, serious bleeding, anemia, or other problems. There have also been rare cases in which PTU has caused serious liver problems.
      These side effects are rare, but if you experience them you should consult a doctor immediately: sore throat,fever,headache,chills
      unusual bleeding or bruising,right-sided abdominal pain with decreased appetite,yellowing of the skin or eyes, or skin eruptions

      To answer your second question: no, PTU should not cause hypothyroidism.

      If your doctor won’t even answer some basic questions about a medication he/she is giving you, I would suggst finding another doctor. Any doctor that won’t even answer questions about the side effects of a medication doesn’t deserve your time.

  16. QUESTION:
    Can Hypothyroidism and Auto-immune disease lead to..?
    Can Hypothyroidism, Hashimotos Auto-Immune disease, Gynecomastia lead to stunted growth in the “private” area of a boy? Will it grow more once the hormones from puberty have calmed down, and my estrogen levels go down?
    I’m 15 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest you make an appointment to see your family doctor.

  17. QUESTION:
    help me with this disease: Hypothyroidism?
    ok, so ive had this disease since i was born. so, Ive had to take a pill (synthroid) every day, forever. but since I ran out, and my parents cant get it at the moment, what happens if I don’t take a pill for 4 days?

    • ANSWER:
      I’d assume not much. It would take several weeks for your thyroid levels to get completely out of whack. The reason I say this is because when they adjust my medication for my thyroid, they do it in 3 month increments. I’d think you’d be fine for a couple of days, but you may find yourself moody, anxious, or really tired. Left unattended your thyroid can wreck havoc on your body, so it is best to keep your medication at a constant level in your body. Get some as soon as you can.

  18. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease… Multinodular Goiter… Hypothyroidism?
    I am so confused. Depending on which doctor I talk to, I seem to get a different answer. If someone can correct all this for me I’d be so appreciative. I am ready to scream with all the back and forth… yes and no.. one doctor contradicting another… so here goes:

    About 9 years ago I started having menstrual cycle irregularities. I was all over the place, late, early.. very early (like a week after period ended it was back) and very late (like 7 weeks later and she still hasn’t come and not pregnant). After bloodwork and ultrasound my ob/gyn said the only thing she could think causing it was early perimenopause, I was only 30. So off I went waiting for full blown menopause to arrive. In the meantime other things began happening. I started losing hair.. even my eyebrows.. I was tired constantly. I was constipated or had diarrhea. My periods continued to be all over the place. I would feel sick all the time. To the point people (still to this day) think I was full of it. Then I got married. We decided to go for fertility treatments. My reproductive endo did a bunch of tests and found nothing. I was still fertile, but why I wasn’t ovulating she had no clue. My thyroid was fine she said – though she did not give me the lab number. I stopped seeing her after it was determined I would only get pregnant with IVF. If I wasn’t ovulating and the ovulation drugs weren’t making it happen, I felt this was a waste of time and money. I went for a physical with my primary doctor who found a suspicious lump on my neck. After asking me questions that seemed unrelated (i.e. periods, reflexes, hair, tired etc) she tested my thyroid and said I had a high tsh of 9.9 (not high though, right?) and prescribed synthroid and referred me to an endo. After several more tests of my thyroid it was determined I had a multinodular goiter and Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism. UGH.

    After being on meds for 3 months, my periods came back… my hair stopped falling out… and I got pregnant! But later miscarried due to high TSH. My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.

    WTH? Can someone enlighten me on this “disease” it seems I may or may not have? Who should I believe? I have read extensively and it seems I DO have characteristics… but why would a doctor tell me another doctor is wrong? I DO have a goiter – you can see/feel it. Even a radiologist called it a goiter when doing the test. HELP!! Why did I get pregnant if the only thing I changed was the meds? Can anyone help me understand?

    • ANSWER:
      “My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.” YOU NEED A NEW OB/GYN NOW!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  19. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  20. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been pregnant with crohn’s disease and hypothyroidism?
    I am having a rough pregnancy. This is #4 and I am feeling really sick and uncomfortable. I was diagnosed with crohn’s disease 3 years ago and was told that I had hypothyroidism with my second pregnancy. throughout that pregnancy, my thryoid issue got better and for a while after that my thryoid was fine. Soon after I had my second child, I found out that I have crohn’s disease. In 2007, I had my 3rd child and had no issue with my thryoid. I am now 8 weeks pregnant with my 4th and was told that I have hypothyroidism. I had been experiencing symptoms of hypothyroidism a few months before I got pregnant again. I have been dealing with spastic colon, diarrhea, nausea, extreme fatigue, lightheadedness, and feeling extremely cold almost all the time. I am currently on levothyroxine for the hypothyroidism and am taking a prenatal vitamin. I am just looking for some advice or information on my situation or someone else who has dealt with this. I don’t have time to be going to the dr everyday. Has anyone been in this situation or are you dealing with it now?
    I only want answers from people who actually want to help me. I don’t want just for someone to tell me that they have never been there or don’t know what I’m talking about. That is a little rude.

    • ANSWER:
      hi iam, I am a female crohn’s pt. for over 20 yrs.

      Check out the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s site. They have topics on diet, women’s issues, a live chat & hotline run by healthcare experts as well as an open forum where you can post questions to other women who are in the same situation as yourself.

      Check into it as you will get more honest answers you are looking for and actually get to speak with women who are pregnant and have CD.

      best of luck to you.

  21. QUESTION:
    Does anyone suffer from drug-induced hypothyroidism ? Or has anyone tried a natural remedy for their disease ?
    I was wondering if anyone has found any success with natural cures for their hypothyroidism ? i.e. herbal remedys like thyax or the kind advertised on the web. I think i got drug-induced hypothyroidism from Quetiapine or Paroxetine or both. The docters never told me but i just happened to get it while taking these drugs together. Has anyone else experienced similar misfortune ? I don`t fancy taking levothyroxine for ever so was excited by the idea that this disease can be cured by herbal remedies. After my experience with so called experts in medicine i never want to take another synthetic or especially psychtropic drug again. They do more harm than good definately. I was in perfect physical health before i took any antidepressant or antipsychotic medication. Now i have a disease called hypothyroidism for the rest of my life. Rather than cure my problem the N.H.S. has given me one. My advise to anyone thinking about taking an antidepressant – don`t they`ll make you worse.

    • ANSWER:
      There are thyroid medications that are natural. I’ve been on Armour now for 4 years with great results. When I was on the synthetic med, I had no improvement of my symptoms. Armour thyroid is the oldest thyroid medication. It’s not used as much as Synthroid and the other T4 meds, but things are slowly changing as more and more people are finding out there’s a natural med that most feel better on. Links below.

  22. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism a disease?
    I’m just wondering. And is it serious?
    Please answer becuase I really want to know. I will give an easy 10 points if u can answer me!
    Well I already went to my doctors for a virus I had. It ended up that my thyroid was swollen and I had a virus.(2 different things) and I got a blood test and was confirmed to have it. I was just scared it was a disease.

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    Is Hypothyroidism a serious disease?
    My older sister was diagnosed and put on meds recently. She would lay around all day tired and achy and my mom would yell at her for being lazy. She still yells at her, but I don’t think my sis can help it.

    • ANSWER:
      It is not a serious disease if you get the medication that you need (or your sister needs in this case). Have her get the meds she needs.

  24. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I found out a few months ago that i have Hashimoto’s disease(the graudal attacking of my thyroid by my body, causing it to slowly fail), which results in hypothyroidism. I’ve been put on levoxyl, but have gained a significant amount of weight in the past year and a half (about 65lbs). My family (parents mostly) are making me feel awful about this, though I’m not significantly obese (I was in the middle of my weight range when I started gaining) and it’s not interferring with my every day.

    Does anyone else have htis problem, or a similar one? How do you cope with these people, and your feeling self conscious? The weight will come off, I know that, but it will take time. I plan on starting to work out soon, but I work full time and go to school, and it’s very difficult. Can anyone give me some suggestions on what I can do? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have hashimoto’s disease, but i do have panhypopituarism, which also includes hypothyroidism and have had it since birth. I’ve never felt like I looked that overweight, but also never been skinny either. It is hard for me to lose weight also. I try to do weights,stretching, and run or walk daily. Often 3 miles a day and I eat pretty healthily. Sometimes its hard to keep up this exercise schedule and actually most people recommend not exercising every day of the week. I know what its like to try really hard to lose weight and not have much success.

      Sometimes it takes awhile. I used to try for a few weeks and then give up when I wasn’t seeing the results I wanted. Keep positive, pretend it doesn’t matter and keep exercising. Eventually you will get results.

      Its something you have to find a way to fit into your schedule if its something you want to do. I know its hard to find the time.

      It sounds like you pretty much know this stuff I just wanted to offer my support. I know you can do it. Don’t let other people bother you. There are an astronomical number of people that are overweight that do not have this problem.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroidism)?
    I have hypothyroidism and I’ve recently been feeling worse than ever. I’m extremely fatigued and I have nausea accompanied by achy muscles (neck, shoulders, back, hips, and area in front of neck where thyroid is aches). It leaves me feeling physically worn down and I barely want to get out of bed. Is nausea and achy muscles common in those with hypothyroidism or has anyone with hypothyroidism experience the same thing? Thanks so much. (Also, I do not have a fever, virus, or any other illness that would be currently causing these symptoms)

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    Do Hypothyroidism treatments/medications speed up metabolism for those suffering from the disease?

    • ANSWER:
      It should get the metabolism back to normal by getting the amount of thyroid hormone in your body back to normal.

  27. QUESTION:
    62y/o female with 16% kidney function, diabetes, HTN, Hypothyroidism, heart disease, and Chrones disease…?
    What is my mother’s prognosis with dialysis?

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like my father.

      First and foremost, you should talk to a doctor.

      However, once the Kidney function is gone it takes about 2 weeks for a person to die from the build up of toxins in the blood. They will start to fill sicker and more lethargic, and eventually they will fall asleep and die. At the end, I am told that it is relatively peaceful, but they will be unconscious when they die.

      Once a patient goes on dialysis the risk of heart attack or stroke increases tremendously. The risk of heart attack or stroke while having dialysis or shortly afterwards skyrockets. I believe once someone goes on dialysis their previously life expenctancy is cut in half. I think it’s worth it though, she’ll feel better than she has in a long time after dialysis treatments.

      Also the diet for a kidney/diabetes patient is only possible with strict portion control.

      And just a heads up. With heart disease with next major organ to fail are the kidneys. Dialysis is the only option. The organ that fails after that, are the large intestines. For this there is no cure.

  28. QUESTION:
    Any hypothyroidism (thyroid disease) sufferers have the same problems…?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a year ago now (I am 23 now) and was wondering when the symptoms actaully stop once you are put on the tablets!! I have been taking only 50micrograms of levothyroxine since diagnosis and I still feel the same as I do when I was diagnosed and the symptoms are still going on. I am still experiencing weight gain (and if no weight gain then a difficulty in losing ANY weight no matter what I do), hair loss, bad circulation and freezing cold hands and feet, tiredness all the time and low metabolism. Surely the tablets are supposed to help and get rid of the symptoms? I have had about 3 tests recently and they have all come back as normal meaning I am on the correct dosage but I still do not feel myself at all. Is this normal? Does anyone have any other experiences of hypothyroidism? Please help. Thanks x

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism caused by Autoimmune disease?
    My question is weird. I was brought up by a mother who’s over obsessive with health issues so now I have no real idea of what is serious and what’s not.

    I have previous history of hypothyroidism as caused by autoimmune disease. I am a single mother, full time student and a part-time worker. I barely have time to sleep let alone go to the doctor for a checkup. I need to know how serious this things is and if my symptoms are part of the disease or I’m most likely very stressed :)

    my symptoms:
    1. the thyroid is so big you can see it when I’m standing straight (it kind hangs out a bit)
    2. I’m constantly tired
    3. period is very irregular
    4. Gain weight EXTREMELY easily (my metabolism is extremely slow)
    5. nervous system goes haywire all the time
    6. lack of sleep
    7. constipation sometimes
    8. Slow thought process – I’m studying International Business and it’s a very competitive program and I know I’m not dumb but I do notice that to calculate something it takes me much longer than it used to. not because I can’t think of an answer, but because i just can’t think. I don’t know how to explain this. sorry

    I know that you wont’ have a medical advice but if someone ha previous experience with a similar disease and can guide me in the right direction that would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      You have Hasimoto’s Thyroiditis. You should get on Levothyroxine which could be prescribed by your internal med. doctor, or an endocrinologist. Once your levels are stable, all your symptoms should get better.

  30. QUESTION:
    Anyone have experience with horses with hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease, or insulin resistance?
    Sorry in advance that this is so long! I started to suspect my 7 y/o paint mare was showing signs of what I thought would be hypothyroidism. I called out my vet, he has to see her for her allergies anyway and I ordered some blood work that he suggested. His initial impression was that she was hypothyroid or insulin resistant, but he made it seem like it was more of a thyroid problem than anything and didn’t even suggest that I get her tested for insulin resistance. I’m still waiting on the results of the blood work, it has been about a week and a half. I have another veterinary clinic that I trust to get a second opinion if I need to but this vet that I currently use is extremely well respected and knowledgeable so I will see what he suggests first.

    When I did a little research on the subject, I found a couple of medical studies and articles that said that the normal blood panel for thyroid problem testing for T3 and T4 levels is not accurate enough to fully diagnose a horse as hypothyroid. They also go on to state that most horses that have been diagnosed as having thyroid problems are actually insulin resistant or are in early stages of Cushing’s disease and that confirmed cases of thyroid problems are extremely rare.

    So…I’m not quite sure what to think now. She does show a few of the signs of Cushing’s: cresty neck, easy keeper (even though I manage her weight she does sometimes get fat deposits but they are not in strange areas on her body), sometimes lethargic (this may be related to the heat here), and has a slightly decreased immune system. I was told that vertical ridges in her hooves, weak hooves, and her mane and tail rubbing are also signs of these diseases by a friend of the family. I don’t know if there is any truth to the hoof ridges but the mane and tail rubbing also can tie in to her skin allergies and fly/mosquito allergies. She’s on antihistamines for that. She however does not drink an excessive amount (I usually have to make sure she has extra salt to encourage her to drink), does not have a thick shaggy coat or slow shedding, or abnormal urination.

    Does anyone have a horse with any of these diseases who could give me any insight on if any of this sounds familiar to you and what treatments your horse is on and the cost that I would be looking at here? Any vets, vet techs, anyone with medical experience, etc that could offer some help would be greatly appreciated as well.

    *Selling her is not an option because I am very afraid she would end up in the kill pen if she is diagnosed with this disease combined with her other health problems. She is very well taken care of here.*
    Thank you all for your answers!

    She doesn’t have the coat of Cushing’s horses. Her coat is extremely short and thin, even in winter.

    I realize that the mane and tail rubbing is most likely from her allergies and fly and mosquito hypersensitivity, I had just heard that it was also related to these other diseases and was wondering if there was any truth to that. She is currently treated for the itching twice daily plus the antihistamines and for the mane and tail re-growth. The lethargy is unrelated to the antihistamines, she has always been kind of pokey (especially in summer) but she has a shiny coat and bright eyes. I wasn’t sure if this was related either.
    She has access to several salt/trace mineral blocks at all times and I see her frequently licking them several times a day.
    Thank you all so much for the info and links, so many great answers :) The fly and mosquito allergies are actually quite common where I live in southern Louisiana but she has other allergies as well. The climate here is horrible for animals and people with allergies, myself included. I’m miserable so I can only imagine how she feels. I’m still waiting to her from the vet on the rest of the results and from what it sounds, she doesn’t have hypothyroidism but that isn’t a surprise. I will have him come out and draw blood to do the test for the insulin resistance. He couldn’t do it from the blood he drew the other day because she hadn’t been fasting. Hopefully each problem will improve together, it seems when one disorder is off, it throws the whole body out of whack. I’m researching diet changes now to see what I can do to make small adjustments until I find out for sure if this is the problem. I don’t want to do anything major based on my hunch alone.
    I also forgot to mention that I would consider selling her to someone in the Midwest or Northwest (she originally came from Iowa) where there are not so many nasty bugs, allergens, heat, and humidity as there are here. I don’t want her to suffer so it would be unreasonable for anyone to tell me that I am selfish for keeping her here because of her allergies. However, with her other health issues and that she is still relatively green broke and needs an advanced intermediate and up rider…I have valid reason to be concerned that she’d be sent to the kill pen because healthy horses are these days. Selling is not an option unless I can no longer manage her care and until I get the health concerns straightened out to where I can at least educate potential new owners on how to manage them. And to avoid that, I would rather relocate from Louisiana because I’m sick constantly and I really can’t stand the weather here either!

    • ANSWER:
      I have a gelding with Cushing’s and a mare with insulin resistance. The gelding was diagnosed after the vet noticed a slight crest forming on his neck. He never exhibited any shedding problems or other of the typical signs. But when he was tested, his hormone levels were all over the place. He has done so well in the years that followed, that we have retested several times, still showing the same hormonal abnormalities. My point is, a horse doesn’t necessarily exhibit all of the signs, but may still have the disease. My gelding has had the disease for several years now, and still has no coat or shedding abnormalities. He is managed with diet and Evitex (chasteberry extract). He has not needed Perolide to maintain him in good condition. Pergolide can’t be used if the horse also exhibits insulin resistance, though.
      I have read the same research on diagnosing hypothyroid or hyperthyroid conditions in horses. My gelding’s thyroid levels are always off, but his diagnosis is Cushing’s. Early on he was tried on Thyrol, but it was later determined to be unnecessary. These days, I don’t think it is used very often.
      You probably need further testing to come up with a diagnosis. Be aware that in the fall there is more risk of false positives since the hormone levels are altered normally during the transition to shorter periods of daylight.
      In the meantime, it doesn’t hurt to restrict soluble starches in her diet, which is indicated in either condition.

      One more thought on thyroid insufficiency…..I did have a hypothyroid horse decades ago, that was treated successfully by adding iodized salt to her diet. Iodine is needed to make thyroid hormones. Iodine deficiency in today’s feeds are probably rare, but could occur if the feed is grown in areas where iodine is deficient, and the feed is not fortified. If a horse was fed only hay and pasture, and both were deficient, it might be the problem. I doubt that it is the case in your situation, but is something else to consider.

      My insulin resistant mare is a whole other story, and I am posting an excellent article on it that you should read before you proceed. It will give you a very good overall knowledge base for decisions on what comes next. I hope it helps.

      http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12588

  31. QUESTION:
    anyone else have hypothyroidism(thyroid disease) and just suddenly stop taking their levoxyl/synthroid???
    ive only been out for a week or two now….. as far as I know its not deadly to be without the medicine…. and I want to see how I do without it……………instead I have been taking kelp..is this a bad decision? I have had a lot of dizziness and fatigue…. causing me to believe I have gallstones or something.

    • ANSWER:
      my wife was in the same situation. Its not deeadly to be without it, but its not healthy either I think. The kelp provides iodine which you also need. I read about this stuff awhile back and its sort of complicated involving T3 and T4 which interconvert, they regulate sex drive, body temp, mood, and other things.

  32. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a condition/disease that can cause hypothyroidism, gullstones …..?
    I have been doing alot of research lately on a few conditions i have developed. When i was about 17 i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. The Dr. that diagnosed me said at the time i was so underactive my thyroid was about to shut down. I have bee on synthroid to manage this disease. Early this year i was diagnosed with a gullstone. I had been having attacks for years before this unknown to the cause. Frequency of attacks lead to the diagnosis. Recently while talking with my mother she informed me that around the age of 10 i had blood drawn and “spun”. The Dr. at the time told her that the fat content in my blood was far to high. I do not have High cholesterol or high blood pressure.

    My worry is that i developed all of these symptoms at an early age. I am only 23. Does anyone know of a possible disease or condition that could tie all of these other symptoms together?

    Im going crazy trying to figure it out! Does anyone know where else i could look?

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    Controlling BP & Raynaud’s Disease with hypothyroidism?
    I had very high BP 120/180 then it eventually came to 110/160 after some CCB medicine. I did some research and found out a slightly elevated TSH can cause abnormal lipid profile and high BP. mine TSH was around 1.8-2.0 range, now i trying to keep it around 1.0 and my BP goes down to 90/155. but still high. recently my doctor give me this medicine (Amlodipine besylate 5mg /Valsorton 80). I am having Raynaud’s Disease (less sever) I heard that CCB and Alpha-blocker can help as combination therapy. i can replace Alpha-blocker with Valsorton ?
    Doc said they cannot give me beta-blocker as i am hypo. so can alpha-blocker be given? instead of Valsorton ? please help me with BP and Raynaud ?
    My reference here for Raynaud here http://www.nativeremedies.com/ailment/symptoms-of-raynauds-disease.html

    • ANSWER:
      Sheri,

      First of all, understand that in the presence of hypothyroidism these other problems are going to be consistent features of your medical make-up. It will take time for your TSH to stabilize and then for your physician to have a clearer picture of what it will take to manage your hypertension in the long term.
      You should be seeing an endocrinologist or an internist for diagnoses of this level of complexity.
      The drugs you are receiving are appropriate choices for your diagnoses. Please realize that Raynaud’s phenomenon can be managed by not cured.
      In addition, a beta blocker (Inderal) is entirely appropriate in those who are hypothyroid, but your physician has chosen not to use it because it is CONTRAINDICATED AND DANGEROUS in those with Raynaud’s phenomenon.
      Select a good internist/endocrinologist and allow them the time to gradually support each issue and organ system. It’s excellent that you see that these are issues that need to be corrected, but it is unsafe to hit them with a proverbial hammer, when gradual adjustments are safer strategies.
      Best wishes.

      Please see this reference:

      arthritis.webmd.com/tc/raynauds-phenomenon-treatment-

  34. QUESTION:
    I have Addison’s Disease and Hypothyroidism. I injured my back and was given generic vicodin.?
    On the warning labels for the vicodin it says not to take if you have Addison’s or hypothyroidism. I need to know why? Should I not take the vicodin? Should I get a different prescription? I just need to know how the vicodin will affect both of the conditions I have before I take them. I’m actually surprised the doctor prescribed them to me with my health problems. I have researched for hours online and have not found out why I shouldn’t take them. I’m in such pain but am terrified of the side effects. Thanks for whatever help you can offer.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is a disease that slows things down in the body. People with hypothyroidism may experience tiredness, sensitivity to cold, the gastrointestinal system slows down which means constipation occurs more often which means your metabolism slows down and you can gain weight. On the other hand HYPERthyroidism its opposite people may experience anorexia which means they dont feel like eating, they are hyper and irritable and cant sleep at night etc… Vicodin is a drug that slows things down in your body it is a pain killer and when you take it you feel tired and want to sleep. The problem with Vicodin and your disorder is that Vicodin and all other pain killers (like Norco, Percocet, Dilaudid etc…) cause constipation. Since hypothyroidism slows down peristalsis (the movement of food in ur GI tract) the Vicodin slows it down even more so u can make the constipation even worse. I am pretty sure that this is the main problem interfering w/ur disease otherwise your doc would never prescribe it. If you are not experiencing any constipation or little then thats why he prescribed it get it? So if u decide to take the Vicodin make sure you drink alot of fluids and dont drive while taking it. Hope this helps!!! AND BY THE WAY the girl that said that Vicodin is an NSAID is wrong. VICODIN IS NOT AN NSAID it is not a steriod it is an opioid antagonist which means it blocks pain receptors!!

  35. QUESTION:
    Losing weight with hypothyroidism, I have been trying to lose weight with this disease, what else can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      If your hypothyroidism is under control. You should be able to go on a regular diet like anyone else. When it’s under control its as thought your body does not have the disease so you have to make sure it controlled. Other that that I would suggest an ADA diet.

  36. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism…..People who know about the disease please..?
    I haven’t had blood work or medication in over 2 years anyone know whats the longest you can go without treatment for this, and the hair falling out, muscle aches, and sleepless nights does this disease contribute to depression and all the other symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism refers to any state in which thyroid hormone production is below normal. Because thyroid hormone affects growth, development, and many cellular processes, inadequate thyroid hormone has widespread consequences for the body.
      Thyroid hormones are produced by the thyroid gland. This gland is located in the lower part of the neck, below the Adam’s apple. The gland wraps around the windpipe (trachea) and has a shape that is similar to a butterfly – formed by two wings (lobes) and attached by a middle part (isthmus).

      The thyroid gland uses iodine (mostly available from the diet in foods such as seafood, bread, and salt) to produce thyroid hormones. The two most important thyroid hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which account for 99.9% and 0.1% of thyroid hormones present in the blood respectively. However, the hormone with the most biological activity is T3. Once released from the thyroid gland into the blood, a large amount of T4 is converted into T3 – the active hormone that affects the metabolism of cells.
      source: http://www.medicinenet.com/

      The early clinical signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism are:
      - intolerance to cold
      - receding hair line
      - facial and eyelid edema
      - dull-blank expression
      - extreme fatigue
      - hair loss
      - lethargy
      - dry skin
      - muscle aches and weakness
      - brittle hair and nails
      - constipation
      - menstrual disturbances

      And the late clinical signs and symptoms are:
      - below normal temperature
      - decrease pulse rate (normal pulse ranges: 60-100/ minute)
      - thickened skin
      - weight gain
      - cardiac complications (fatal)

      Treatment:
      For hypothyroidism to be reversed permanently,the client must usually take thyroid hormone(TH) for life. Levothyroxine sodium is the principal form of replacement therapy, it is converted in the body to both T4 and T3. The dosages vary with client’s age, the severity of hypothyroidism, the general medical condition and the client’s response to medical treatment at the initiation of therapy. That is why it is best to consult your doctor for your concerns or questions you have about the options available. Hypothyroidism is a very common disease, it is easily addressed and treated.

  37. QUESTION:
    My nails are separating from the nail bed. I do not have fungal nail disease my nails have been tested?
    for that.
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism some months ago but since taking levothyroxine most of my problems have cleared up, but my nails are getting worse.
    Could I have another disease as well as hypothyroidism?
    There’s nothing there underneath the nail.

    • ANSWER:
      You should ask your doctor who prescribed you the levothyroxine. It could be that it will take a few months for your nails to “catch” up. When you say that the nails are separating from the nail bed, do you see a new nail growing underneath or is there nothing there?

      Perhaps there is a new healthy and firmer nail growing underneath and is simply pushing the old brittle nail out. But I would ask you doctor to be sure.

  38. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of having low T4 levels specifically (and NOT just hypothyroidism in general)?
    I know what the symptoms are for hypothyroidism but I want to know if there are specific symptoms for having low T4 levels, regardless of T3 levels or other aspects of hypothyroidism. I have Hashimoto’s disease and have HIGH T3 levels but LOW T4 levels. Since I have other health issues, I want to know what symptoms I should be expecting from the low T4. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroxine is the body’s main metabolic hormone, regulating the rate of oxygen use by cells, and the generation of body heat. In the liver, T4 promotes glucose metabolism to pyruvate, gluconeogenesis from fats, and increases release of cholesterol. In the digestive system, T4 increases secretion of digestive juices, and promotes smooth muscle contractions for motility. In skeletal and in cardiac muscles, T4 promotes normal development, tone and function. In bones, T4 promotes growth and coordinates maturation with age. In the nervous system, T4 promotes normal development of the system during youth, and maintains it’s functions during adulthood. In the reproductive system, T4 promotes the ability for conception, and secretion of milk by the breasts. In the skin, T4 promotes hydration, secretions of exocrine glands, and the growth of hair. With low serum levels, you might experience the opposite of the normal effects.

  39. QUESTION:
    i have hypothyroidism, and addisons disease, is vertigilo a symptom of any of these??

    • ANSWER:
      You might have one of the Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndromes. Vitiligo which is a skin depigmentation disorder can coexist with any of these syndromes. The reason — Vitiligo is also an autoimmune disorder . The antibodies in your body are going nuts and are destroying your endocrine glands and skin pigment . Other autoimmune disorders that you can experience are Alopecia , Pernicious Anemia , Diabetes and Premature ovarian failure.

      In conclusion this is not a symptom rather co-existance of another disorder.

      Hope that helps.

  40. QUESTION:
    If I already have hypothyroidism, Addison’s disease, Raynaud’s disease and vitiligo will I get diabetes also?

    • ANSWER:
      You are certainly more at risk of getting diabetes. Hypothyroidism is a glandular thing, as is Addisons and diabetes is too. If you get one of them you are more at risk of developing others.

      Apparently if you have vitiligo you are also more at risk of getting diabetes, hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism but I don’t know what the link is from what I have quickly just read. See the web link below for details on vitiligio.

      I think Raynauds is not linked.

      I have diabetes and hypothyroidism by the way – but you can keep anything else to yourself, I don’t want them.

  41. QUESTION:
    Why is thyroid disease called the butterfly effect?
    I have hypothyroidism, and i was wondering why thyroid disease is called the butterfly effect?

    • ANSWER:
      It actually has a double meaning. The thyroid gland is shaped like a “butterfly”, but also regulates so many other parts of the body that it can cause a “ripple” effect if not functioning properly.

      The “butterfly effect”, or “chaos theory” states that, essentially, a butterfly flapping its wings on the other side of the world can cause a breeze that eventually will result in a tornado over here.

      Basically something seemingly insignificant can have major consequences to something else that appears unrelated. So a diseased thyroid can result in hair loss, for instance, although hair seems unrleated to the thyroid.

  42. QUESTION:
    I have under active thyroid. Hypothyroidism ( Hashimoto`s disease ) I take 150 mcg of levothyroxine,?
    Even though I take med I still do not feel good. Especially in cold weather and hot weather. 20 to 24 deg not so bad. Medication does not make me feel like normal. Metabolic system is very low, just cannot get going. Which is not normal for me. I have always been energetic but now with this it makes life hard. Maybe some one has some information, with some helpful hints to improve. I live in New Zealand and can only get this med for this thyroid problem, but have heard that other types of thyroid meds can make some difference. Maybe some one has had some experiance with other meds, Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      I love RedAngel to bits, but I do not wholly agree with her views on alternative medicine. Too set in my conventional ways, perhaps : ) Still, I cannot forbear to say that 5000 units per day, is one hell of a lot of Vitamin D.

      I think you need your thyroid function tests, (including your TSH level), measuring again. If your problems are still down to your thyroid hormones, the tests should be abnormal, and should point the way to the answer.

      I suppose you are getting your levothyroxine from a reliable source? The tablets aren’t likely to be time-expired (out of date), or from a dodgy supplier?

      You are not on any other medication which “goes against” levothyroxine?

      You are remembering to take the 150 micrograms of levothyroxine every single day, and not just when you are feeling badly?

      Lastly, (a real rarity), – you don’t have some doting relative or girlfriend who wants to inherit your fortune, early, and is switching your tablets for blanks? : )

      I hope this is of some help.

      Best wishes,

      Belliger
      retired uk gp

  43. QUESTION:
    ADVICE WITH MY MUM WHO HAS HYPOTHYROIDISM AND GRAVES DISEASE?
    MY MUM HAS RADIOACTIVE TREATMENT WHICH WIPED OUR HER THYROID ABOUT
    5 YEARS AGO AND SHE TAKES THYROXINE NOW LIKE THE OTHER 10 IN 1000 PEOPLE IN THE COUNTRY. BUT SHE CONSTANTLY IS ILL SAYING ITS HER “THYROID” BUT SHOULD IT STILL BE GIVING HER TROUBLE IF SHE IS OIN THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF THYROXINE ITS REALLY WIERED AND I THINK SHE JUST FAKES IT TO GET ATTENTION

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, what makes you think that she is on the right dose of thyroxine? Most people can not get their doctors to prescribe enough. Plus the doctor treats the TSH level, which will be suppressed for years in people with Grave’s disease.

      Second, you do understand that she still has Grave’s disease, right? She can still have every symptom of Grave’s disease except hyperthyroidism. She can have skin problems, eye problems, and a bunch of other autoimmune things.

  44. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i’m frustrated, please help if you had this disease or know of it!!!?
    So i have hypothyroidism, which makes sense since it is impossible to lose weight but so easy to gain it. Everything that i read on the computer said that after the doctor said that they would lose the weight with the medicine, they gained like 50 pounds. I am so scared. I’ve had eating disorders and issues and I find it incredibly crazy that its so hard to lose weight. Did you lose weight after the medicine or does it actually make you gain weight? please help thank you

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    I was tested for hypothyroidism when I was 16 and the test came back negative. Can I develop it later in life?
    My father has hypothyroidism which he takes medication for, and it is an inheritable disease. I’m just wondering if this is the answer to some of my problems the last few years. Maybe the test was a false negative? I’m in my mid twenty’s now.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, hypothyroidism can develop later in life.

      I am also going to include the link to a site that may help you find even more information. The link is at: http://thyroid.about.com

  46. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with Hypothyroidism and confused about the disease?
    I was diagnosed with an underactive thryoid recently (I’m 20, by the way) and I really don’t know much about it at all. Basically, my doctor’s nurse briefly informed me over the phone and put me straight on Levothyroxine. I’m extremely confused and no one has given me in depth info :(

    I know that Hypothyroidism means that my thyroid is not making enough hormones for my body…but now that I’m reading through different support forums, I realize there’s a lot more to it all (they’re talking about B12 vitamins, gluten free diets, painting iodine on their feet, iron levels etc.) and I don’t know where to begin. Any help is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not surprised at your confusion. There is a LOT of information (and misinformation) out there!

      Please, be very careful when researching any disease or condition on the Internet. There is a lot of bad and misleading information out there! It can be difficult to acertain what is reliable information and what is not.

      As a nurse (who also has been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, by the way), I can tell you that while eating a generally healthy diet is important, you do NOT need to go to extremes. Gluten free diets, painting iodine on your feet, blah blah blah . . . . this is a bunch of woo that you need to remember has NOT been backed up by any actual scientific information.

      Hypothyroidism is simply a state where your body is not making enough thyroid hormone. It’s quite common, especially among young women. It can cause fatigue, weight gain, hair loss, cold intolerance, and heavy menstrual cycles. It’s easily treatable with thyroid supplementation. It’s safe and effective – no need to paint your feet with iodine!

      Be aware that it does take a while for you to feel the full effects of medication. I had to take my levothyroxine for about 6 weeks before I noticed a difference, but what a difference it made! I lost weight, slept better, had more energy, and my only regret is that I didn’t see my doctor sooner about my horrible fatigue! I suffered a long time – needlessly.

      You wanna try a gluten free diet – fine. You want to take a B vitamin supplement – fine. Just know that these interventions are NO substitute for real treatment – medication. I hope you will take the medication your doctor has ordered for you and judge for yourself. Meanwhile, remember that there is lots of information out there – be careful whom you trust. Check out reputatable websites (Web MD, Mayo Clinic, etc) rather than visit forums where misinformation and conspiracy theory abound.

      Hope this helps and that you feel better soon!

  47. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s disease, which causes my hypothyroidism, or does it ever go into remission?
    3 years ago, at the age of 36, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. It totally came out of nowhere. I had also gained about 30 pounds and I’m wondering if there’s a connection. Plus, I’m a male, and Hashimoto’s is most common in women. I’m trying to get off of all prescription drugs, but my Endocrinologist has told me that I will need to be on my Synthroid medication for the rest of my life. I haven’t lost the weight either.

    My little sister had thyroid cancer and had her thyroid removed, and a female cousin and an Aunt of mine also have Hashimoto’s so it runs in my family. But the WOMEN in my family. So why me?

    I just don’t want to have to wake up and take a pill for the rest of my life.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, where your own immune system attacks your thyroid for an unknown reason. Since you have had damage to your thyroid, there is no cure. There is no other treatment other than to take the synthroid. I know it is inconvenient, but it is the same hormone that your thyroid is supposed to make. As to why you, that’s impossible to answer. I’m sorry I can’t give you a better answer. Good luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  49. QUESTION:
    Is there any long-term effects to early treated Congenital Hypothyroidism?
    I have had Congenital Hypothyroidism all of my life, i was diagnosed at 2 days old. I have been taking Levothyroxine since i was 2 days old also. I am now 16, but I am curious if there are any long term effects of living with it. For some reason I have never really looked into my disease that much.

    • ANSWER:
      Possible long term problems appear to be in the areas of memory, attention and visual spacial problems but as yours has been treated since day 2, you may not experience any of these.

  50. QUESTION:
    Why is hypothyroidism more common in women than men?
    I know what hypothyroidism is, but what causes more women to have hypothyroidism than men? If a male has hypothyroidism what would be some causes to that? In general, what are some underlying causes of hypothyroidism? My dad told me he went to the doctors and has hypothyroidism and has to go back to find out the causes. I don’t know if their is a family history of hypothyroidism or other auto-immune diseases.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid activity fluctuates within the day in response to diet, stress, temperature, etc. In light of this knowledge, one can speculate or identify genetic, hormonal, lifestyle, & dietary factors as contributors to hypothyroidism.

      Since hypothyroidism often besets someone gradually, it is one of the degenerative diseases that gets noticed as lifespans increase.As you mentioned, autoimmune diseases can target the thyroid & cause dysfunction, either by elevating thyroid activity or decreasing it (sometimes it increases it first & then decreases it later). It’s hard to isolate this as genetic or hormonal, since women do tend to have more autoimmune disorders. Perhaps it’s both. Estradiol (an estrogen) can have an antagonistic effect on thyroid function by competing for binding sites. If estradiol binds first, then thyroxine/tetraiodothyronine (T4) & triidothyronine (T3) cannot exert their effects. Estradiol also limits other thermogenic (calorie burning) & potentially thyroid stimulating effects due to its functions in limiting muscular development & encouraging fat storage. Furthermore, estradiol does not limit the activity of the adrenal glands the way that testosterone does. The “fatigue” of the adrenal glands (not as pronounced or fatal as Addison’s Disease) due to insufficient curbing of their activity can decrease thyroid function. Lifestyle factors such as lack of stress reduction accelerate this process. Finally, women tend to consume less calories than men; more specifically, they eat less fat & protein. Whereas adequate fat consumption is essential for the production of certain hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, etc.), adequate protein consumption is essential for peptide hormones like thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones consist of the amino acid tyrosine combined with 1, 2, 3, or 4 atoms of iodine (hence, they have names such as tri – iodo – thyronine). In the hope of losing weight or keeping weight down, many women deprive themselves of the building blocks for healthy amounts of hormones. Some foods & supplements are goitrogenic (goiter inducing/reduce thyroid activity), such as soy. Sometimes, the cause is idiopathic (of unknown origin).

      Men with hypothyroidism may have similar causes, such as an insufficient diet, excessive stress, etc. Low testosterone may correlate with low thyroid hormones, but it’s hard to say which causes which, as there are thyroid receptors in the testes, yet testosterone may increase or decrease thyroid hormone production (without necessarily causing hypothyroid symptoms). Likewise, men may have idiopathic hypothyroidism.

      Most of the factors listed above still fall within two basic categories: primary (the organ itself) hypothyroidism or secondary (the organ[s] that instruct it to act) hypothyroidism. Both men & women may have hypothyroidism as a result of inadequate TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary gland or failure of the thyroid to respond properly to TSH.

      Sorry to make your eyes bleed from this lengthy response. As a final consideration, make sure your dad’s doctor tests for thyroid function thoroughly via blood tests. TSH standards for hypothyroidism have been drastically revised (from 5.0 or greater to 3.0 or greater), & TSH itself is insufficient to identify true hypothyroidism without accounting for symptoms. The pituitary often mismeasures need for thyroid stimulating hormone. T4, T3, free T4, free T3, & reverse T3 are vital for determining true thyroid function. The source listed below contains information from patients contending with hypothyroidism who seek the best, most up-to-date medical advice concerning their disease. I wish you & your father well, as this can be very difficult to treat without a good doctor *who listens*.


Hypothyroidism Dieting

An overactive or underactive thyroid gland can result in a number of troublesome symptoms that require medical attention. Fortunately, while you find out what is the most appropriate treatment for you, you may start including foods that help the thyroid gland; they support thyroid function mostly by providing a source of the mineral iodine, which is crucial to a healthy thyroid.

The thyroid gland, which is located in the neck, produces hormones that affect a variety of metabolic processes in the body. If the body does not produce sufficient amounts of the thyroid hormone T4, symptoms of underactive thyroid result. Among these symptoms are fatigue, depression, weight gain, hair loss, feeling cold often, constipation, brittle or splitting nails, memory problems, and dry skin. Since iodine is required to produce thyroid hormones, certain foods that are rich in this important mineral may play a key role.

Iodine-rich Foods that That Help The Thyroid Gland

Thyroid activity involves several hormones, most notably T4, T3, and TSH. When levels of T4 are low, symptoms of an underactive thyroid gland will become apparent unless hormone levels are regulated. Under normal circumstances, this regulation takes place when the pituitary gland produces TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to extract more iodine from the blood. The iodine is used to produce enough T4 to restore adequate hormone levels in the blood.

There is usually 20 to 30 mg of iodine stored in the body, mostly in the thyroid gland, though some iodine is also stored in the lining of the stomach, salivary glands and in the blood. If iodine stores become depleted, the body will not be able to make enough thyroid hormone. In such cases, foods that have shown to help the thyroid gland to produce T4 are important to help the body make adequate amounts of thyroid hormones.

Some of these foods include:
seaweeds like lato, kelp, nori, gamet and balbalulang
yogurt
cow’s milk
seafood
foods grown in iodine rich soil

Foods You Should Avoid

It is also important to note that in addition to foods that help the thyroid gland naturally, there are also foods that inhibit the production of thyroid hormones. These foods, known as goitrogens, contain compounds that interfere with iodine absorption. Goitrogen-containing foods include cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.

To learn about other 5 foods that can interfere with the thyroid function – and for a full and easy-to-follow diet and weight loss plan for hypothyroidism, visit: hypothyroidism, food and diet.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can prolonged crash dieting cause hypothyroidism?
    I am only 15 years old.Last year,I tried to lose weight by eating only very little calories and skipping meals.Months ago,my blood test result showed that I have hypothyroidism with borderline normal T4 and very low T3 level.I feel so regretful for screwing up my own body.Can I reverse the effects?please help me.thx

    • ANSWER:
      Low T3 is not necessarily a sign of hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests can be abnormal in people who have other illnesses, or who have something else major going on with their body, such as a lot of weight loss. This doesn’t mean there is actually something wrong with the thyroid – it’s just something you see when someone is ill. A big percentage of people in hospital, for example, would have abnormal thyroid tests if you tested them all. Once you get better and get back to a normal, healthy weight and lifestyle, the results will probably get back to normal. (hypothyroidism is almost always diagnosed using a TSH test – not T4 or T3)

  2. QUESTION:
    Dieting with hypothyroidism…please help! 10 points!! =)?
    I have hypothyroidism and really need to drop 20 lbs. ( pounds) really fast. I have been on a diet for a week now.. I have cut out all junk and regular soda.. and have been eating better and smaller portions, but when you have hypothyroidism, its harder to lose weight, so what I am asking, .. do any of you guys know how and what I can do to drop the weight faster?? I walk everyday for a mile or more, and eat extremely better. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    I am on Synthroid.

    • ANSWER:
      try the link below. You must be seeing a doctor, I think you know. Are you on meds? I hope so. Or a special diet. Happy dieting.

  3. QUESTION:
    where can i find a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    i would like any help i can get without having to take diet pills.. i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4 years ago. since then i have put on almost 40lbs. i would like some input on what foods to eat that would help speed up my metabolism. also a good workout regimen would help too. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      According to Dr. Todd Nippoldt of the Mayo Clinic, “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.”

      Question asked of Dr. Nippoldt: “Can iodine supplements help regulate thyroid function in a person with hypothyroidism?”

      Dr. Nippoldt: “No. Some alternative medicine practitioners recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements — which are high in iodine — for people with hypothyroidism. It is true that severe iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism. But iodine deficiency is extremely rare in the United States and other developed countries since the addition of iodine to salt (iodized salt) and other foods. If iodine deficiency is not the cause of hypothyroidism, then iodine supplements provide no benefit.

      “Hypothyroidism is safely and effectively treated with the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine.”

      Walking a couple of miles twice a day would help keep your metabolism revved up naturally. If your health is good enough, try it. My prayers are with you. The main thing is not to forget to take the synthetic thyroid hormone your doctor prescribes for you.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have a very bad hormonal and thyroid issues so I need to get this under control immediately so I appreciate anyone w/ HYPOthyroidism to give me any advice or foods that help

    Thank you so MUCH!!!

    • ANSWER:
      If you indeed do have a thyroid problem you need to see your doctor for synthetic thyroid replacement. First, your doctor will do a simple blood test to find out how low your thyroid actually is. There is no diet which will fully get your thyroid back to normal. Many women take synthetic thyroid. I have for 8 years.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for someone with hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and trying to lose weight any suggestions for a diet for people with hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Losing weight with hypothyroidism is difficult but can be done. You must do 60-90 minutes of cardio daily.

      You must eat three regular meals and 2 healthy snacks. Reduce the refined carbs in your diet, like pototos, white bread, rice and replace them with lots of colourful veggies, eat lots of chicken and fish, and make sure you eat some protein with all of your meals and snacks.

      I assume you are on medication, and once the medication starts doing its job it will be easier for you to lose weight.

      Good luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for people with hypothyroidism?
    I just got diagnosed with hypothyroidism, and I am looking for a good diet for the thyroid. So if anyone could give me any suggestions I would appreciate it.

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      WAIT,BIANCA???? OMG i am SO confused ok fruits,vegetables,and lots of water are all good and stay away from lots of salt and soy products because they mess up your levothyroxine,(your medicine) and they also make you tired so yeah as long as you stay away from those products and eat vegetables and fruit AND take your medicine everyday then you are good.

  7. QUESTION:
    are there any special diets or anything for hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and I cannot lose weight and I know thats normal but I’m on a very strict diet and exercise regime and it still will not work. I am also tired of being infertile and I hate that my hair is so frekin thin. is there any special home remedies or diets I can try for this? I do not have helathcare coverage so the medication is honestly out of reach at the moment.

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    My TSH levels are elevated but not to the point of needing medication in my Endocrinologist opinion. I am rapidly gaining weight without changing my eating habits. I was wondering if anyone knew of a diet that would help loose weight while you are caught in that ‘grey’ area.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.

      if you have hypothyroidism, take thyroid hormone replacement as directed by your doctor — generally on an empty stomach. It’s also important to note that too much dietary fiber can impair the absorption of synthetic thyroid hormone. Certain foods, supplements and medications can have the same effect, including:

      Walnuts
      Soybean flour
      Cottonseed meal
      Iron supplements or multivitamins containing iron
      Calcium supplements
      Antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium
      Some ulcer medications, such as sucralfate
      Some cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as cholestyramine and colestipol
      To avoid potential interactions, avoid these products or use them several hours before or after you take your thyroid medication.

  9. QUESTION:
    Please help….i am 16 could i have hypothyroidism or is my slow metabolism due to dieting.?
    Last year i went on a diet and lost about 2 and a half stone then suddenly i couldn’t lose anymore weight and thought it was a plateau. Then i randomly gained a stone by eating 1300 calories….i tried weightwatchers and i gained weight despite eating lower than they recommended. Now i gain weight if i eat over 1300 calories and i need to eat about 800 to maintain my weight. At the moment i exercise for about 1 hour four times a week…on days i exercise i eat 600 or 700 calories. and days i dont exercise i eat about 500, and with this i can only lose a pound a week. I have some symptoms of hypothyroidism like joint pain, muscle weakness, tiredness, severe depression. I also have a slow heart rate.

    Is it possible that i have hypothyroidism or is my slow metabolism due to dieting last year???

    In addition, if i eat 400 calories i dont even lose weight.
    In addition, i haven’t grown in heaight since i was 11

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. Have you been to the doctor to get tested for Hypothyroidism ???? It’s a simple blood test, and you definitely have some of the symptoms of someone with a thyroid problem. I was diagnosed with it about a year ago, and it’s something that will get worse if you let it go untreated. Just go get the blood test ( it’s called a TSH test ), so you can know for sure if that’s the problem. Good Luck :-)

  10. QUESTION:
    what would be a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have no thyroid an am on meds,but weight is not cooperating. I stay within the same 2-4 lbs and cant seem to get down to my old weight

    • ANSWER:
      Avoid processed and refined foods, and foods with white flour and sugar. Avoid tap water — Chlorine and Fluoride block iodine receptors in the thyroid gland. Include the following items in your diet: apricots, dates, egg yolk, molasses, parsley, potatoes, prunes, raw seeds and whole grains. Eat fish or chicken.

      Be careful with brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, kale, peach, pear, spinach and turnips. They have the potential of further suppressing thyroid function.

      If you want to try some supplements, use Kelp (contains Iodine, the basic substance of thyroid hormone) and L-Tyrosine. And, take your vitamin B complex supplements.

      If you are on any other meds, take them several hours apart. Thyroid medications can interact with other ones. In terms of exercise, I assume you are doing some aerobic exercise so that you can burn fat. I have noticed that if I try to lose weight only with a diet, it rarely works. But if I incorporate some light fat burning exercise like walking or biking with the pulse being around 110-125, i.e. not that high, but high enough to burn fat, my weight just comes off like crazy.

  11. QUESTION:
    Does medication for hypothyroidism make you gain weight or will it help you lose weight?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism today. I have been dieting and have lost 10.5lbs in the last 5 weeks… will the medication that I am put on help with the diet or will I gain that all back? I’ve seen many different things on the internet saying that I will put it back on!!

    • ANSWER:
      hypothyroidism makes it difficult to loose wieght. The medication should raise your thyroid levels, thus making it easier to lose weight. But it takes quite a while for the medication to have an effect. My boyfriend has been taking his thyroid meds for about 2 weeks and he isn’t really feeling better yet.

      If your thyroid levels were dropping before the meds,they will likely continue to drop for a while before the meds kick in. So it might get harder to lose weight before it starts to get easier.

  12. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    This thyroid is the one were you gain weight.

    • ANSWER:
      everyone would say…yeah go see a doctor..and the end result is medication or directs you to a specialist, that’s how it goes.

      usually 95% of the time, doctors help relieve the symptoms and most of the time doctors don’t try to fix the root of the problem. (don’t attempt to cure the problem)

      hey if they did cure the problems, what would happen to the big pharm industry? no denying that businessmen cant make money off of healthy people.

      visit the link below (google.book) the book describes what hypothyroidism is and treatments available.

      if you want to go see a doctor, you will be mostly likely be using synthetic thyroid hormone treatment and worst part you probably have to use it for the rest of your lifetime.

      don’t eat goitrogenic foods such as rapeseed, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, maize, lima beans, soya and pearl millet.

      you need food high iodide such as fish.

      eat a well rounded meals with mixed fruits and veggies.

      if you are looking for in-depth details i suggest looking at the sources down below

  13. QUESTION:
    is it OK to have iodine in your diet when you have hypothyroidism?
    My wife has hypothyroidism, and shes been drinking a lot of slim fast to loose weight. slim fast has a significant amount of iodine in it.

    • ANSWER:
      David,

      I guess the first question would be what is the “Cause” of your wife’s hypothyroidism? Since one of the leading causes of hypothyroidism is iodine deficiency then an iodine deficient person would definitely need more iodine.

      With that being said… Iodine deficiency is usually only a problem (and cause of hypothyroidism) in third world or developing countries. So I’m doubting this is the case if your wife has access to Slim-Fast ;-).

      In all seriousness though… It’s important that you know what caused your wife’s hypothyroidism because then you can educate yourselves on how to treat it.

      As far as your initial question about iodine I think your wife will be fine by taking in the iodine from Slim-Fast.

      As far as learning more about weight loss with hypothyroidism I’m going to point you to two resources.

      #1 – http://www.HypothyroidismExposed.com

      This is a great website to get more information about hypothyroidism, including what the causes are, what supplements are available as well as tips to lose weight when dealing with this condition.

      #2 – http://www.JesseHedeen.com

      This is a good friend of mine and genius when it comes to getting fit and losing weight. He provides a ton of free content for people looking to get in shape and live a healthier life.

      I hope this information helps you and I wish you and your wife the best of luck.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is there a Hypothyroidism Diet?
    I have been doing some research and there are lots of suggestions out there for diets to help battle hypothyroidism. I was hoping someone could give me a little insight to what the best way to lose weight is when I have hypothyroidism and PCOS.

    • ANSWER:
      The following foods are recommended on the Hypothyroidism diet:

      * Fish;
      * Nuts;
      * Kelp;
      * Rice;
      * Fruit;
      * Some vegetables – such as carrots;
      * Flaxseed and linseed oil.

      The follow should be avoided:

      * Caffeine drinks – such as coffee and cola;
      * Refined salt;
      * Monosodium Glutamate (MSG);
      * Aspartame;
      * Saturated fats – such as animal fat, fried foods;
      * Refined sugars – such as sweets – and natural sugars – such as honey;
      * Alcohol.

      The intake of the following should be reduced, as they may suppress iodine levels:

      * Brussel sprouts;
      * Broccoli;
      * Cauliflower;
      * Soya beans;
      * Cabbage.

  15. QUESTION:
    What would happen if I took medicine for hypothyroidism and didnt really have it?
    I have tried everything to lose weight excersize and dieting dont help,last year a friend of mine was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism he lost alot of weight if I take hypothyroidism medicine will I get hyperthyroidism what are the possible side effects?

    • ANSWER:
      If you try this method of losing weight you run a very strong risk of causing permanent damage to your heart.
      Severe damage to the thyroid gland itself.

      It’s a very dangerous way to try and lose weight

  16. QUESTION:
    I need to know how hypothyroidism relates to the Southbeach Diet and how the two interract with each other?
    I am familiar with both of them, but would like to hear personal experiences or any knowledge of the two together. Does anyone believe that the Southbeach diet could be easier/harder than other diets with the hypothyroid factor included? Serious answers only please. I’m also posting this in the diseases and conditions section. Thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few factors to consider. To start, are your T4 and TSH levels within the “normal range” and do you feel like you’re taking a proper dosage of thyroid hormone? If not, it will be difficult to set realistic weight loss goals, but you can still start by changing your eating habits and staying active. You should make an appointment with your doctor to test your levels and get the proper dosage.

      Also, have you gained weight as a result of the hyporthyroidism? If you have and feel like you eat relitively well, talk to your doctor about what you can do to boost your metabolism. You may be on the wrong dosage.

      If you are on the right dosage, I think the diet has to be something that is realistic as a life choice. Do you enjoy cooking? Are you good a planning meals? Do you eat out a lot? I know for me, dieting is difficult because I have somewhat of a low motivation for planning meals, and I don’t follow strict recipes when cooking. I bought the South Beach diet book, read it, tried it for a couple months and lost weight, but I didn’t like it. I felt like I was on a diet and wanted a “diet” that I could enjoy and do for te rest of my life. I’ve been successful with cutting back on refined sugars and carbohydrates and having small meals throughout the day with weight watchers online. There is a cool online journal I use.

      The most imprtant thing is to know your body. I know if I eat a large meal or certain foods, I will feel lethargic. There are certain foods I just don’t eat because my metabolism is a little slower – like fried and high fat foods.

      So to answer your question, I don’t think the SB diet is easier or harder that other diets…it really depends on your motivation and what type of foods you enjoy. I would say to try it for a month and see what happens! Good luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for someone who has hypothyroidism and high cholesterol/triglycerides?
    I just got diagnosed with all three of these and need to change my diet. I already am on an exercise regime, but I need some guidelines for my diet. I’d appreciate any help I can get. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Did you know that high cholesterol is associated with having hypothyroidism? Talk with your doc about prioritizing the treatment of your thyroid problem over the other two. Once your thyroid level is brought back into line, ask about having the cholesterol checked. You may find that it is then at a level that makes the doc happy.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism & am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help me lose weight. Any suggestions?
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have lost more than 100 pounds and I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am also finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      A good hoodia product will definitely help your weight loss program, but I’d get a supplement that has a metabolism booster as well.

      I take a supplement called Herbalean, and it contains hoodia and the recently un-banned ephedra Ma Huang. It’s made by the people that originally made MetaboLife 356, and their new fomula works very well for me. I have a lot of energy, and have completely stopped snacking between meals.

  19. QUESTION:
    Effective way for people with Hypothyroidism to lose weight?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about four years ago, and once i started taking synthroid, i started gradually losing weight. For the past year, I’ve not been taking my medicine like I should have and have gained quite a bit of weight back. I’ve been regularly taking my medicine again for about six months, but so far I’m still carrying around these extra pounds. I’m dieting, exercising some and taking my meds. Is there any thing else I could do to lose this weight?

    • ANSWER:
      Increase the dosage under medical supervision and you will lose the weight.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there a special diet for someone with hypothyroidism?
    I’ve been told that I shouldn’t eat anything with soy or aspertame. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      I havn’t read that there is a special diet for someone with hypothyroidism, but by providing the body with replacement thyroid hormones, almost all of the complications are completely avoidable.

      Well, I havn’t read that soy or aspertame makes hyperthyroidism complicate, but I think, it is not true.

  21. QUESTION:
    What kind of diet pill can I take with hypothyroidism?
    I was just wondering if anyone know’s what kind of diet pill I could take? I am on levethyroid, but I still have trouble losing weight. Does some one know what I could take that would be safe to take with my Thyroid Meds?

    • ANSWER:
      Stay away from diet pills. If you want to take supplements try fiber, zinc, ltryosine, selenium, digestive enzymes, and raw apple cider vinegar before dinner. Really though you should get your thyroid set first, as this is the main cause for difficulty losing weight. Doctors either have us undermedicated or on the wrong medication.

      Always test thyroid in the morning. You are on T4, so you would want your morning TSH to be around 1.0 for relief of symptoms and optimal for weight loss. You do need to exercise and watch food intake. I exercise at least an average of 1 hour a day, usually with walking.

      If you stil have symptoms of low thyroid after getting the TSH to a 1.0, then its time to look into a T4/T3 medication like Armour. That’s what I’m on. It is adjusted by the free t4 and free t3, not by TSH. Basically you want a above midrange FT4 and a high in range FT3.

      Thyroid links below

  22. QUESTION:
    Can a person on thyroid drugs for hypothyroidism do the Atkins diet safely?
    Extra weight is causing me to be depressed.
    Not feel good about myself
    I just hate it!!!
    please help…

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve got hypo myself, and I don’t see why not. Atkins just deals with low carbs or no carbs right? I think that diet also works with the glycemic index as well. I know some of the products include nutrients that most overweight people are lacking like selenium. In fact, my doctor told me that it’s a good idea to take selemium daily to assist with my hypo. Here’s a website I found – check out #11 for info on your thyroid: http://www.low-carb.com/at-art5.html.

      Hope that helps!

  23. QUESTION:
    How can I lose weight when I have hypothyroidism?
    I am a youngish person, and I am tired of weighing 200 pounds. I just reached that weight yesterday, and it is depressing. I wanted to know what kinds of exercise should I do that would be most effective, and what kind of diet plan would be best. None of the pills for hypothyroidism will work fo rme, so please do not suggest those. Thanks, and any help is greatly appriciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I know exactly how you feel! I also am youngish and suffer from hypothyroidism. I gained weight like crazy and could not get rid of it no matter what I did. Plus, the side effects are you’re tired all the time and it leads to depression.

      I’ve been losing weight recently (20 lbs over the past year) through a combination of ways to break the metabolism curse that is hypothyroidism. Firstly, you need to see an endocrinologist to see what replacement thyroid drug you need, they come out with new ones every so often. I’m on Synthroid and it works, but it takes at least two weeks to kick in. You take those every morning before you eat! This is important because anything you eat/take will interfere with thyroid pills!

      Also, you may be deficient in vitamins, most of us are. I take a multivitamin and vitamin D, and trust me IT HELPS. Just take them 2-4 hours after your pills because they will block absorption.

      I suggest seeing a nutritionist as well, a lot of endo offices have one or two that work with the patients. Once you get the vitamins and the thyroid pills right, it should be easier to lose weight. Unfortunately, losing weight for us is not just a numbers game (calories in vs calories out), it’s a chemical equation.

      As for exercise, try earlier in the morning right after you take your pill. Aim for 30-60 minutes of moderate-to-high intensity cardio four times a week. Normal people can get away with less, but for us it takes more effort. I would suggest going most days and alternating days of weight training. The weight training is just as important as the cardio because muscles will burn 20X more calories than fat tissue does, thus revving the saggy metabolism.

      As for type of cardio, just make sure you crosstrain to avoid muscle memory. Try jogging one day, the bike the next. It’s important to keep your body guessing because if you can’t adjust, you’ll burn more calories with effort.

      And finally, water. Drink lots of water to keep your body flushing out the toxins.

  24. QUESTION:
    What are the syntoms of hypothyroidism ?
    My mom is getting over weight. She had two liposuction and she tried every diet she have heard. We know she has an hormone disorder, but she went to the doctor and didn’t help, she heard that probably is hypothyroidism. Her legs and arms are huge and she feels discomfort , burning, tingling, tired, and not even before to go to bed. Also she is retaining water.

    • ANSWER:
      early symptoms of hypothyroidism include:
      energy loss, sensitivity to cold, unexplained weight gain, fatigue, constipation, forgetfulness..

      as the disease progresses, the patient may have:
      loss of appetite, numbness, prickling or tingling, joint stiffness, muscle cramping

  25. QUESTION:
    Can I take a diet pill with Subclinical Hypothyroidism?
    I am not taking any treatments for it. I am gaining weight like crazy. I am starting a new diet. I just found out I have this so I dont know alot about it. Like what can I take and what can I do. Now I am taking some meds for my migranes at the moment and I do want to wait till I am done with at least a couple. Does anyone know if I can take a diet pill or a metabolism booster. Thanks/.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello

      first, check with your doctor, you might need medication to balance those hormones. And then you are right about dieting, but it is possible, if you are hypothyroid, that your body won’t react to calories like for other “normal” people.

      It is possible also that you start a diet and keep gaining weight when you are hypothyroid. You need to educate yourself and see an endocrinologist. A normal doctor doesn’t specialize in hormones.

      And about a diet pill for hypothyroidism : yes, you can take one that boost the metabolism, but it is possible that you would be sensitive to it, like make you ‘shaky” or something.

      But the real question is : you want to stay on a pill to keep you thin ?

  26. QUESTION:
    What are risks for pregnant women with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering if someone could give me sights to explain what hypothyroidism is.? The doctor said I was perfectly healthy other than that. I know weight loss is an issue, but can it cause infertility or the inability to concieve right away? I really love my doctor but he did not explain what it was. I am 10 weeks and 4 days pregnant and wanted to know if it could cause any complications in pregnancy. I know this is alot to ask but I wanted to know whether other than tyroid medication whether there was anything in my diet I needed to change. Any help would be appreciated. I only would like advice. I know that you are not doctors but any helpful sites or input would be useful.

    Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Just do everything that they tell you too and keep taking your medicine. My cousin has that and she has had 2 perfectly healthy baby girls, but did have a very hard pregnancy. Here is a link about pregnancy and thyroidism.

  27. QUESTION:
    How to lose weight with type ONE diabetes and hypothyroidism?
    Ive been trying extremely hard to lose weight but the scale reads the same number. I have type ONE( not adult on set diabetes you get from poor lifestyle) and hypothyroidism which I think is the problem. I’m so tired of bring in twice the effort as a normal person and not seeing ANYTHING change(not a decimal number, nothing) so does anyone out there know of a diet and exercise plan or trick to help a person with my glitches lose weight? Thanks for the answers!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey there! I am in the same boat as you. I also have hypothyroidism and type ONE. While weight loss has been excruciatingly hard, I can offer some tips that I have been doing that have helped me slowly but surely get on the fast track to losing some weight.

      1. Take a multivitamin: Our bodies are always fighting off so much. If you take a vitamin, you will ensure that your body will be getting the vitamins and minerals it needs to fight off infection and allow your body MORE energy to do other things, such as losing weight. Look for multivitamins that promote a health heart and strong bones, as well as a good immune system.

      2. Count your calories: This is hard, but when there is a will, there is a way. Ever look on the nutrition facts of food and note the servings? Follow that! Record your total calories, fat, sodium, etc. Keep a journal and do this. I started out by just recording what I ate in a normal day, evaluating it (weaknesses: eat too big portions, not enough meat, too much bread/sugar, etc) and then seeing what I can do to improve it. Try to keep your calories to about 2,300 per day, and then whittle it down. I’m currently at 2,245 at the most per day, and I’m noting a change in my energy.

      3. EXERCISE: Speaking of energy, hypothyroidism simply kills your metabolism with an AK-47. :( RIght here, you just need a little more willpower. Think of living longer. At least that’s what I do. Don’t use elevators: instead, use the stairs. Walk a little more than you need to. Have Nintendo Wii? Do WiiFit. It works out muscles you never thought you could work out! Walk around your neighborhood every day. Go to a track at a school and walk the curves and jog the straights for thirty minutes to an hour. I totally understand taht your energy will deter you from doing this, but even a little effort should help.

      4. Stay happy! SOmething you love to do that doesn’t compromise your health or well being? Indulge in it! I like to draw and sew among other things. If you keep your feelings and personality up, then you can do all i have listed above and more.

      5. Go to sleep on time. Yes this is very important. Your sleep helps regulate SO much.

      While ALL are important, the integral plan is to choose a method and STICK WITH IT! Watch your portions, and work out every day for at least thirty minutes. Take that vitamin, get some sleep, and remember to do something you enjoy.

      From one hypobetes dealer to another, I HAVE FAITH IN YOU!

      And a last note: I’ve been doing this very method for the past week and a half, and I lost four pounds. Just keep going, and with a little patience you’ll get there!

  28. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i want to know if there are any diet pills that I can take with synthroid?
    I want to know if there are any diet pills I can safely take with my synthroid medicine to help me to lose weight. Thanks!

    NO RUDE ANSWERS OR YOU WILL BE REPORTED!

    • ANSWER:
      i take the same medicine and was told by my doctor not to even think about iti cant have any of them please call your doctor the one who prescribed them to you and ask them.

      they all say on the bottle if you have a thyroid condition do not take

  29. QUESTION:
    Is it true people loose weight with hypothyroidism medication? If so how does it work?
    I am a 22 year old female with hypothyroidism and am being referred to an endocrinologist. I am not sure what to expect. For a little over a year now I have not changed my diet or exercise and I slowly gained weight. With hypothyroid hormone treatment will it help or make it easier to loose weight? How does that work?

    • ANSWER:
      The answer to your question is yes. Hypothyroidism is caused by the thyroid’s inability to produced a hormone. By replacing the hormone with a synthetic one it will speed up the body’s metabolism and thus burn off more calories. This will result in weight loss, although not quickly.
      Hope this helps.

  30. QUESTION:
    Is there a meal plan that’s benefical to hypothyroidism that can improve weight loss?
    I have hypothyroidism, and as a result have trouble upon trouble losing weight. I’m beginning to think it’s a no win situation and it’s very frustrating. Is there a meal plan that can help?

    I said MEAL PLAN not pill, fake diet fad, or advertisement, thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Most people have hard time losing weight on synthetic hormones, but do much better on natural hormones (Armour brand)

      I advocate a low carb way of eating for optimal health. One thyroid specialist, Dr. Broda Barnes who did the metabolic studies on carbs/calories ratios, found that treated hypothyroid patients (not untreated) tended to lower their conversion of T4 to T3 when under 30grams of carbs per day or under 1500 calories. So would suggest keeping carbs over 30 grams per day (less than 9 grams per hour though) and calories greater than 1500 (low carb way of eating requires calories to be MUCH higher than 1500 for most people)

      You can lose more body fat eating protein & fat (don’t eat protein alone) than not eating AT ALL. To lose weight fast, eat all you want, but nothing but meat, eggs, healthy oils, mayo, butter & half an avocado a day (for added potassium). Keep the calories high & the fat percentage high, at least 65% of calories. Green vegetables & some cheese will continue weight loss but at a slower pace.

      The first 2 weeks eat several cups a day of (mostly) lettuce & celery, cucumbers, radishes, mushrooms, peppers & more variety of vegetables thereafter – add 5 grams per day additional every week (30 grams day first 2 weeks, 35grams 3rd week, 40grams 4th week etc) til you gain weight, then subtract 10grams. That will be your personal carb level (everyone is different & depends on how active you are.)

      Start with meat, fats & salads for 2 weeks and then slowly add in more green veg, wk4 fresh cheeses, wk5 nuts & seeds, wk6 berries, wk7 legumes, wk8 other fruits, wk9 starchy veg, wk10 whole grains. You will learn how your body reacts to different foods.

      The first week is just water weight but fat is lost thereafter if you keep your calories high enough. Otherwise the body will strip it’s own lean tissue for nutrition. Although that may look great on a scale it will make it MUCH easier to accumulate fat in the future (since all that pesky lean tissue burning up calories will be gone). The body won’t release fat stores if you lower calories below what it needs. It will slow metabolism to compensate & store every spare ounce as fat. If you continue lowering calories, it will continue lowering the set point, til it can survive off nothing & store fat on anything. The body will only release it’s fat stores if it knows there is plenty of nutritious food.

      Eating carbs while trying to lose body fat is terribly inefficient. When in glycolysis (burning glucose as fuel) you have to lower your calories (which slows your metabolism) & exercise heavily to deplete your glycogen stores before burning body fat.

      The core of Atkins program is converting the body from glycolysis (burning glucose as fuel) to ketosis (burning fat as fuel). Dietary fat levels need to be at >65% of total calories, if not, the body will still remain in glycolysis by converting 58% of excess protein into glucose (via gluconeogenesis).

      It takes minimum of 3 days to convert a body to ketosis, (but only one bite to convert back to glycolysis). People feel sluggish the first week but most feel better than ever thereafter.

      Simple carbohydrates (sugar, flour, bread, cereal, pasta, potatoes, rice) trigger insulin which can store the calories eaten into fat. The more protein the more the fat burning hormone glucagon is released. The more carbohydrate the more the fat storage hormone insulin is released.

      Simple carbs are addictive & can be disastrous to health. The best way to break the addiction is NO carbs for 3 days. Make a huge batch of deviled eggs, eat one every time you want “something” – have huge omelets with bacon, sausage, peppers, mushrooms & cheese. Pork chops smothered with peppers, mushrooms & cheese – pork rinds & dip or tuna/chicken/turkey/egg salad – steaks – a huge sugar free cheese cake. Eat so much you won’t feel deprived of anything. By the 4th day, the addiction will be gone & you can start making healthy choices.

      High insulin levels promote inflammation, weight gain, hunger & unbalance other hormones. Controlling insulin levels will balance out other hormones & allow human growth hormone (HGH) to be produced naturally so lean muscle will be gained even without exercise. Any exercise will greatly increase muscle mass with high HGH levels.

      Ground flax seed (2 Tbsp) 1/4 cup water, artificial sweetener, mix in a raw egg – let sit 10 min. to absorb liquid, put some cream cheese in the middle & nuke 2 minutes. Suggested for daily fiber needs.

      As long as you have <9grams carbs per hour, you will maintain insulin control & shouldn't gain weight, no matter the calories. Many people gain weight on high carb, do low carb to lose weight & then are shocked when they return to high carb & gain weight. Many people can return to moderate carb levels but very few can really eat all they want of sugar & maintain weight or health.

  31. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism diet ?
    I have hypothyroidism, I am 21 and was diagnosed when I was 19. I am currently taking .5mg of thyroxin each morning to help stabilize my metabolism however I am still gaining weight. I weighed 70kg when I was first diagnosed, however, now I weigh 93. I find it hard to exercise regularly however I try walking and I do yoga at home. I am a Vegan and I eat plenty of fresh fruit, veg and legumes and drink upwards of 3 liters of water per day. I do eat the occasional packet of chips or have a vegan chocolate bar but otherwise my diet is fairly healthy. Why am I still gaining weight?
    I do not for one second believe you are a doctor, no doctor would prescribe weight loss medication to a patient with a bad thyroid gland.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when I was 20. I am 29 now and I currently take 100mg of thyroxine. My advice to you would be to go back to your doctors so that they can see if your dosage needs to be increased. Try swimming or gentle walks for exercise. You will get through this. xxx

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have hypothyroidism but not be overweight?
    I have all of the symptoms of hypothyroidism..I am just not overweight. I was chubby up until the time I was 17 when I started a strict workout and diet schedule. I still gain weight relatively easily but I am much better at managing it now. Is it possible that I do have a thyroid problem and it just isn’t extreme? All advice is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      the only way to know is to see your dr and to have labs done. but yes, it can be possible especially given your history of weight gain and loss and high active lifestyle.

  33. QUESTION:
    questions for those who had or currently have hypothyroidism
    1.) How many pounds did you gain from having hypothyroidism?
    2.) Was it only a matter of months since you gained those pounds or did it take years?
    3.) Were you able to lose some of the weight you’ve gained through dieting and exercise?
    4.) When you gained the weight, was it like 10 pounds in a month? or something that fast?
    that’s all, just curious :3
    i forgot to add, 5.) What exercises were you doing? did it work or not?

    • ANSWER:
      I have hypothyroidism and was diagnosed with 5 years ago when I was 18. I will try to answer your questions from my personal experience the best I can.

      1. Right before I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism I gained about 30 pounds.

      2. I gained the 30 lbs pretty quickly, probably within 4 or 5 months.

      3. Even with taking Synthroid for my hypothyroidism, I still was not able to lose any of the weight I gained before being diagnosed.

      4. As I said before, I gained the weight pretty quickly, or at least in my opinion. By the time my weight leveled off, it had probably been about 5 months since I had started gaining.

      I hope this helps!!

  34. QUESTION:
    Has anyone been able to successfully lose lots of weight with hypothyroidism?
    If so, how did you do it and how long has it taken? I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism today and the starting synthroid tomorrow. I have a very active lifestyle with a healthy diet but I am so scared to be stuck with those extra pounds forever.

    • ANSWER:
      Once your medication is stabilised and you are euthyroid, your metabolism is returned to normality. Weight loss them becomes just as easy/difficult as it is for the rest of us and requires the usual combination of diet and exercise.

  35. QUESTION:
    What will happen if I take diet pills while on Synthroid (for Hypothyroidism)?
    I’m considering taking Hydroxycut (I have before, but this was before I was taking Synthroid), but some say one shouldn’t take diet pills while taking medication for hypothyroidism. What would/could happen if I do so?

    • ANSWER:
      Your heart will race and you will feel like crap.Ive tried diet pills and synthroid too and for me they dont mix.

  36. QUESTION:
    Has anyone out there suffering from hypothyroidism been able to become seriously fit and slim? Can it happen?
    This is really a question for those who have hypothyroidism, because you’ve experienced it, and you know what I mean. Have you been able to be successful in an exercise and diet plan- and have you had amazing results? Is it possible?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      My sis in law is hypothyroid, and she is size 0 petite. My elderly mom is hypothyroid, and size 8. So, of course, once the thyroid problem is fixed, it NO LONGER is a factor in the weight issue.
      Other factors may include, too much stress, which overloads the adrenals, not enough sleep, which causes too much cortisol, nearing closer to menopause, which decreases metabolic rate, or simply going through the same struggle that everyone goes through.
      So, don’t focus on the thyroid, it doesn’t help matters.
      Build muscle, it burns 300% more calories per pound than fat tissue.
      Avoid simple starch and sugar like THE PLAGUE
      Drink green tea, and go for a daily walk.
      good luck

  37. QUESTION:
    what is the best way, in additon to syntroid, to control your weight hen dealing with hypothyroidism?
    i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer in march of ’06. my syntroid(replacement thyroid hormone) has been upped numerous times but i am still plagued by the excess weight my condition causes despite controlling my diet and exercise. is there something else i can be soing specific to my condition that can help boost my metabolism?

    • ANSWER:
      Is the doctor keeping the TSH suppressed because of your recent thyroid cancer. This is very important, so that none of the cancer cells come back. Plus, having a lower TSH should help in weight loss. If it doesn’t, then maybe you need both T4 and T3 in the form of Armour. Synthoid is only T4.

      Thyroid links below.

  38. QUESTION:
    Has anyone used the green tea diet for decreasing the size of your thyroid for Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      I have written an article on green tea and hypothyroidism, and paste it below for your benefit:

      We have not come across any study that looks at green tea and hypothyroidism. Neither are we aware of any case reports that link green tea and hypothyroidism.

      Nevertheless, a 2005 study conducted by Dr Michael Whyte from the Washington University in St Louis raised some concerns.

      Dr Whyte tested for the fluoride content of instant tea available on the supermarket shelves. He found that certain instant tea such as Lipton’s contains as much as 6.5 part per million fluoride, which is well above the maximum level of 4 part per million.

      Too much fluoride may cause hypothyroidism.

      Why does green tea, or any other tea beverages, contain fluoride?

      The tea plant accumulates fluoride from soil and water. The older the leaves, the more fluoride it contains. According to some sources, the mature, old leaves can contain 10 to 20 times more fluoride than the young leaves of the same tea plant.

      Your safest bet is to drink green tea made from young tender tea shoots or fluoride free extract The second article explains why.

  39. QUESTION:
    with hypothyroidism I cant take diet pills because of my medications so now what?
    My doctor said I cant take diet pills because of my medication other than exercising what else can I do for I dont always have the time to excercise

    • ANSWER:
      find 30 minutes to work out about five days a week. That should not be too hard to do. and your medication should help increase your metabolism so you shouldn’t need diet pills

  40. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Diet?
    I really need some help with knowing what foods are good for my thyroid and which are harmful. There’s just so much information out there. Is there anyone out there who has hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) who has found a healthy diet that helps them boost thyroid function and lose weight? I need some success stories from hypothyroid people or doctors. I’m ready to try anything. Please no spam please. I don’t want info on fad diets. I want to be balanced and healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      Many years ago, Lou Costello said that a diet was “When you could have all you wanted of everything you don’t like.” With that in mind, no one actually wants a diet, but they want to find things that they can enjoy that fit their needs.

      Your Doctor will probably be able to refer you to a nutritionist. That would be the best place to start.

  41. QUESTION:
    What’s the best diet for a person who has hypothyroidism? (slow metabolism)?
    I have been taking thyroid medication for 15 years now & would really like to lose 30 pounds.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello. I have hypothyroidism too. I take my thyrax every day and find that eating a higher protien, low carb diet with lots of water really is the best choice. Never neglect to exercise. It will blow the cobbwebs away too. :-)
      I hope this helps.

  42. QUESTION:
    Diet & hypothyroidism?
    What is the best diet plan for someone with hypothyroidism? I heard low carb, no soy products.Plus I’m allergic to all sugar substitutes so anything that contains splenda,equal,sweet & low etc. is out of the question.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Valerie,

      First and foremost you need to get your thyroid levels regulated if you haven’t done so already. Without this you will find it difficult to lose any weight, if that is your goal.

      As far as a general diet is concerned you will want to eat foods that contain iodine. Seafood, kelp and certain vegetables contain iodine. You can get iodine supplements at your local health food store or pharmacy if you don’t like seafood.

      There are, however, other foods that you should stay away from. They are called Goitrogens and they interfere with the absorption of iodine into your system. Soy is one of them. That is why you’ve heard to stay away from soy. Others would be broccoli, peanuts and Brussels sprouts, just to name a few.

      As far as low carb and such, you main concern should be to not go over your daily caloric needs and get moving. Start exercising and get that metabolism up. Also, eat more frequently but eat less at each meal. This has the effect of keeping your metabolism peaked out throughout the day.

      If you don’t go overboard on the use of sugar it shouldn’t interfere too much with your diet provided you’re burning it off and not letting it accumulate. ;-)

      Good luck!

  43. QUESTION:
    What is the diet to be followed for Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    Low Carb Diet and Hypothyroidism?
    Is a low carb diet best for me since I have hypothyroidism? How do I know how many carbs to eat. Don’t know much about a low carb diet so any help would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      I Swear! y!A is going to think I’m a paid promoter for this low carb forum i am a member of! I’ve posted it so much on here. There are all kinds of low carb diets, atkins and southbeach just being the most recognized. It could very well help your medical problems.
      here you go, and good luck.

      http://forum.lowcarber.org/forumdisplay.php?f=25

  45. QUESTION:
    i have hypothyroidism and take the generic for synthroid. is taking the diet pill hydroxycut ok?
    if so, when should i take it?

    • ANSWER:
      You should not take diet pills with thyroid medications. It usually states this with the info that gets printed with your prescription. If you are having difficulty losing weight with diet and exercise, chances are your thyroid levels are off. Either your morning TSH is to high. It should be around 1.0 or you are not convertingenough of the T4 (Synthroid) to T3.

  46. QUESTION:
    what can i do to loose weight with hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism taking synthroid.. I have had 3 c-sections .. I am trying to loose 30 pounds the weight seams to be in the belly now where else…
    nothing seams to be working I use the elliptical machine 5 days a weak for 30 min i have changed my diet to salads and fruits .. what can i do to loose this weight.. there has to be something besides a tummy tuck to get rid of this weight

    • ANSWER:
      I have hypothyroid too, but luckily I was young and very active when diagnosed so I never experienced any weight gain. yes hypothyroidism can cause weight gain, but since you are being treated with synthroid your metabolism should be normal as long as you are one the right dose. you should be able to lose weight like everybody else. eat right and exercise.

  47. QUESTION:
    Can I take diet pills while on Synthroid for my hypothyroidism?

    I see a nutritionist and excercise for hours every week and I am still not losing inches. I need a metabolism boost.
    My thyroid levels were at 115 …that is the lowest my doctor had ever seen. She was surprised I was still alive and able to walk. Now I take synthroid and go to a nutritionist. I also exercise hard for hours in the week and I just cannot lose any more than twenty pounds. I need to lose body fat. I need a metabolism boost. Is it okay to take some sort of pill to help me with this with my medicine?
    I eat what I should and exercise…lots and lots

    • ANSWER:
      NO!!!!!

      It’s extremely dangerous. Synthroid should never be taken with diet pills. Talk to your doctor about how to lose weight safely while taking it.

  48. QUESTION:
    How can get rid of the excess fat over my abdomen and ribs when I have severe hypothyroidism?
    I am about 20 pounds overweight and can’t seem to lose any of it with eating a super high fiber diet and low fat – no meat vegetarian diet. I exercise about 4 days a week with 3 mile runs and weight lifting. I take a thyroid replacement hormone Levothyroxine but I am still tired all the time and can’t lose any pounds.

    • ANSWER:
      Get into treatment for your hypothyroidism and get euthyroid. You won’t be able to lose any weight until then. Once you are euthyroid, you are caught up to where everyone else gets to start. Then simply eat less, and exercise more.

  49. QUESTION:
    How quickly does iodine deficiency lead to hypothyroidism?
    If one was having very little iodine in their diet, how quickly could they get an underactive thyroid as a result?

    • ANSWER:
      Iodine deficiency is virtually non existent in the UK now, since small iodine supplements are added to all salt and this ends up in every-body’s diet.

  50. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight if you have hypothyroidism?
    I am hypothyroid and also bipolar for which I take lithium. Is there anything to help in this situation? No regular diet plans have helped.

    • ANSWER:
      hi :) am not sure whats available in the markets…but, this is what i did to lose weight… PLEASE DONT TAKE PILLS… pills are nothing but anorectic agents… they make you feel less hungry… there is no way to loose weight fast… though , sauna , steam and massages help slightly… it has to be combined with diet and excercise… pills are very bad in the long run… can lead to impotency and infertility…

      Also… short term diets are no good because , they terribly pull down your body metabolism rate since you dont eat much during that period … Because of this , once you break your diet , you’ll start putting on more weight, the reduced body metabolism will take longer and slower to burn the food you take in…

      They also dont work because once you break your diet and start eating normally, you will get back to your normal weight as you might not be cautious as to how many cals you take in per day…

      i lost 10 kgs in about 5 months time… i am getting married in august and i desperately needed to loose weight… i was 65 kilos when i started… according to my BMI , i was 10kgs + overweight… i stand 5’2.odd and 65 kilos is grossly overweight…

      just dieting wont help like i found out in my case… diet + exercise will do the trick…

      i’ll tell you what i did… it worked for me… hope it works for you too :)

      the trick is not to starve but to eat smart :) and stay healthy :)

      what you should cut down :
      oil , butter , cheese , margarine , mayonisse , sauces (depends , will get back to that a bit later), chips , crisps, nuts , chocolates , sugar , cola, fizz , areated drinks ,ice creams , chocolate , alcohol , cakes and everything else thats hi – cal… you’ll need to avoid everything thats sweet , oily and sticky… if you are not sure about what foods to avoid… check the net…loads of info available…

      vegetables / meat to avoid :
      potatoes – very very important , beetroot (its a root and has concenterated sugar in it) , all kinds of roots basically except carrot… avoid lamb, mutton , pork , beef, and prawns… all these put on weight… eat only lean meats… thats fish and chicken.. avoid eating egg yolk… eat just the egg white…

      fruits to avoid :
      mangoes , bananas , jackfruit

      now that we had a look at what foodstuff is to be avoided…you might be wondering if there is anythig at all that you can eat… thats how i felt… there is loads of stuff you can eat actually :)

      here they come :)

      fast foods are a big no no… you can order salads and special lo cal foods that are avaailable in most outlets…

      its best to eat at home for the period you are dieting and trying to lose weight…after those few months… once you’ve shed your load…you can get back to your usual lifestyle… of course with some caution…

      my diet…
      breakfast:

      skimmed milk (use skimmmed milk , is low in fat , other typer of milk are higher in fat content) , fruit… i am from India… am not sure where you are from and hence you might not understand certain food types we consume here… but let me tell you something… Indian food is very very oily and very difficult to diet…

      and try cereal in the mornings… oats, weetabix… etc… have a good breakfast…alwaays use brown bread… whole wheat brown bread is very good for weight reduction…

      for lunch , we are staple rice eaters… rice is bad for fat reduction… but i still took rice because its a habit tht cant be changed… everyone takes rice here… so… rice – one cup – 100gms and lots of veggies cooked in less oil.. and absolutely no coconut and curry with less oil… all in all keep your oil intake to 2 tea spoons everyday… that would be just for seasoning… also using olive oil helps a lot…

      then for dinner… compulsarily have wheat… pasta is a good option…but make sure you buy wheat pasta… check before buying… and of course in pasta absolutely no sauces… some varities of sauces are acceptable… as far as they dont have cheese , butter , oil ,mayonisse and fattening substances in general… you can use tomato spicy sauces etc… make sure your sugar intake doesnt cross 2 – 3 spoons per day… (not tablespoons) and no butter and ghee of course… eat a lot of fruits and vegetables… and all kinds of cereal… if you are hungry… eat a fruit… or you can eat stuff like puffed wheat and puffed rice… but no puffed corn… corn products again put on weight…

      eat sandwiches as much as possible… i dont know which part of the world you are from and hence cant suggest much for you in terms of recepies…

      and combined with dieting… you need to excercise for atleast an hour everyday… you’ll see the difference…defenitely… if you think gym is boring… take up dance classes… or run along the beach… if you have one… or skate… or just about any physical activity… brisk walking will also help…
      the key is to stay healthy while you diet and lose weight…

      drink loads of water…atleast 6 glasses per day… and do a lot of physical activity…. take the stairwy instead of the lift…. and small things like that…
      if you have any more queries…mail me… cheers :) and good luck :) its not difficult…you’ll get used to it in a few days… and of course the results are fab:) who doesnt want a great looking body…

      you can get back to your normal lifestyle once you slim down… after that… its just eating what you like and burning it out the next day with just a little bit of excercise :) also check your weight everyday… its a great way to motivate and monitor your progres :)

      Source(s):

      personal exp :)


Hypothyroidism Diet Treatment

By hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is producing too less hormones to stimulate the metabolism or the body is not able to utilize the hormones. The lack of thyroid hormones slows down the metabolism and thus all the activities in the body, giving a combination of many symptoms related to slowness of bodily processes.

Hypothyroidism is common, but the frequency of the condition is not well determined. Some authorities estimate that 0.5% of the total American population have the disease to some degree. The frequency is much greater among people over 50 years of age than among young people.

THE SYMPTOMS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

The most common early symptoms are: Mental and physical fatigue, weakness, weight gain or over-weight, and depression.

One or more of these symptoms also use to appear early: Constipation, sensitivity to coldness, cold hands and feet, thick tongue, decreased sweating, dry hair, thin brittle hair, thin brittle nails, muscle and joint pain, pale or yellowish skin.

One or more of these symptoms usually appear later: Poor memory, slow thought process, drowsiness, slow speech, thinning of eyebrows, hoarseness, poor circulation, dry and flaky skin, decreased taste and smell, menstrual irregularities, skin thickening, puffy face, puffy hands and feet, swelling of extremities, overall swelling, muscle spasms, muscle atrophy, joint stiffness.

In children or young persons hypothyroidism may give developmental problems, like disturbed tooth development and short stature.

Hypothyroidism increases the risk of elevated cholesterol levels, heart disease and diabetes (diabetes mellitus). This occurs even by moderately decreased thyroid production.

THE THYROID GLAND AND ITS HORMONES

To understand the hypothyroidism, some knowledge about the thyroid gland and its hormones is essential.

The thyroid gland produces hormones that accelerate and in other wise regulate metabolism. A part of metabolism is the process of breaking down energy containing nutrients, and using the energy to produce molecules that all the processes and activities in the body use as fuel. Another part is the production of molecules that the body use as building materials.

The thyroid makes four hormones: Thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), diiodothyronine (T2) and monoiodothyronine (T1). The hormones contain iodine, and the figures tell about the number of iodine atoms in each hormone molecule. T3 is not made directly, but is produced from T4. T3 is a more efficient hormone than T4. Therefore this conversion is important.

The pituitary, a gland under the brain, produces a hormone called thyrotropin or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) that enhances the activity of the thyroid gland. If the body has too less thyroid hormone in the blood, the pituitary produces more thyrotropin. This makes the thyroid gland speed up its own production. By a too heavy thyroid hormone concentration, less thyrotropin is produced by the pituitary, and the thyroid gland slows down. This feed-back mechanism regulates the metabolism of the whole body.

THE MECHANISMS AND CAUSES OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

By hypothyroidism the body does not get enough thyroid hormone, or the hormones do not work effectively in the body. This causes the metabolism to slow down. When the metabolism decreases, the processes in the body do not get enough fuel and building materials, and all the body activities will therefore slow down. Energy containing nutrient will also be stored as fat, since they are not broken down.

Serious variants of hypothyroidism are called myxedema. This is a rare condition. However, less serious, but painful variants are common. There are several reasons for hypothyroidism, each giving a variant of the disease:

* An autoimmune reaction against the thyroid tissue can destroy the capability of the thyroid gland to produce hormones (for example Hashimoto’s disease).

* Sometimes the production of T3 by conversion from T4 is impaired. The total amount of hormones may be normal in these cases, but the body is still lacking T3, and gets the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

* Iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, since the thyroid hormones contain iodine. In Europe and America the food is seldom short in iodine, but bad nutrition may result in iodine deficiency.

* Surgery or radiation at the thyroid area can destroy enough tissue to cause hypothyroidism.

* Injury or disease in the pituitary or of the part of the brain controlling the pituitary may cause a decrease in secreted thyrotropin, and then the thyroid will respond by producing less of its own hormones with hypothyroidism as a result.

* Some people have symptoms of hypothyroidism even though the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood is normal. One of the symptoms is raised levels of thyrotropin, indicating that the body signals need for more thyroid hormones. This variant may be caused by conditions elsewhere in the body that make it difficult for the hormone to reach their destination in the cells. In many of these cases the immune system produces anti-bodies against the thyroid hormones. This variant is called sub-clinical hypothyroidism, and responds to the same treatment as ordinary hypothyroidism.

* Some types of food can contribute to a depressed thyroid function or aggravate hypothyroidism when eaten raw in great amounts: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy and turnips. By cooking these vegetables, the depressing effect is decreased.

* Factors suspected for causing hypothyroidism are: The artificial sweetener aspartame, mercury pollution, dental fillings containing mercury, fluoride and heavy metal pollution.

HOW CAN HYPOTHYROIDISM BE TREATED

For serious hypothyroidism caused by tissue destruction, external supplement of thyroid hormones is necessary.

When the condition is caused by lack of iodine in the diet, dietary changes and iodine supplements will be a part of the treatment.

Less serious, but painful hypothyroidism is sometimes also treated with hormone supplements. In these cases it is difficult to find the right dose, and treatment may result in hormone poisoning.

You can sometimes alleviate hypothyroidism by reducing the amount of food suspected for depressing the thyroid function: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy, soy products and turnips. However, these food types are valuable in many ways, so it is probably not wise to cut them out totally. Also try to avoid artificial ingredients like the sweetener aspartame, conserving additives and fluoride.

Changing out mercury dental fillings and avoiding mercury or heavy metal exposure may help to ameliorate the condition.

You may also alleviate the condition by eating food that stimulates the thyroid function according to practical experience: Chia seed, dulse, fish from the ocean, flax seed, pumpkin seed, seaweed, coconut and brewer yeast.

You can find nutritional supplements to help for hypothyroidism. The compositions of these products vary:

* They may contain building materials that the thyroid uses to make its hormones, for example: iodine, acetyl-L-tyrosine or L-phenylalanine.

* They may also contain vitamins and minerals that stimulate the mechanism of hormone production by being a part of necessary enzymes, or by helping the absorption of the ingredients that hormones are made from, like: Magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper and vitamin E.

* They may furthermore contain constituents that stimulate tissue regeneration by being part of tissue building enzymes, and thus helping to restore a degraded thyroid, for example: Folic acid or folate, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cyanocobalamin) and molybdenum.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism treatment and weight loss?
    Right now I have subclinical hypothyroidism. I’m about to have my T3, T4, T3 Free, T4 Free, and TSH tested again, so it may be clinical now. I have most of the symptoms, even some of the uncommon ones such as inability to concentrate, memory problems (such as walking up the stairs and forgetting why), etc. I didn’t realize how many of the symptoms I had until a few weeks ago. I know that I have this and I do need treatment. Most days I can barely concentrate, absolutely cannot study, and I feel like the human sloth. I have absolutely no energy most of the time. Most days, I wish I didn’t exist because I cannot function as I should be able to. I lack the concentration to read casual books now (most of the time).

    Quick note. Two months ago my TSH was at 4.06 and is expected to be higher now. For those who don’t know, anything below a 5.5 is subclinical. Anything above is clinical. 1 is normal.

    I live very healthily. I take a lot of vitamins as suggested by my doctors. I also exercise everyday and I have a very good diet. I’m very knowledgable when it comes to diet and exercise. I don’t overwork myself, I utilize muscle confusion, and I allow my body to rest. I never work the same muscle group two days in a row. Lots of stretching and yoga. As far as my diet goes, it’s tailored to help me with my acute onset inflammatory arthritis which I am in the process of conquering. Making progress everyday.

    However, and this is extremely frustrating, I have the hardest time losing weight. I had A LOT of medical issues this past year and I learned a lot about my body. Deficiencies, conditions, etc. I also learned a lot about hypothyroidism and I know that weight gain, or the inability to lose weight is a symptom. I also know that weight loss is common when treating hypothyroidism.

    What should I expect after starting treatment? I know that it takes about 4-8 weeks to have results, but how soon can I expect to lose weight. Also, how soon could I expect to feel normal again (normal concentration, energy, no depression, no insomnia, etc)?

    I know that it varies from person to person, but a rough estimate would be nice. I’m a 22 yr old male, 5’10 at 160 lbs.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:

  2. QUESTION:
    Can I take a diet pill with Subclinical Hypothyroidism?
    I am not taking any treatments for it. I am gaining weight like crazy. I am starting a new diet. I just found out I have this so I dont know alot about it. Like what can I take and what can I do. Now I am taking some meds for my migranes at the moment and I do want to wait till I am done with at least a couple. Does anyone know if I can take a diet pill or a metabolism booster. Thanks/.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello

      first, check with your doctor, you might need medication to balance those hormones. And then you are right about dieting, but it is possible, if you are hypothyroid, that your body won’t react to calories like for other “normal” people.

      It is possible also that you start a diet and keep gaining weight when you are hypothyroid. You need to educate yourself and see an endocrinologist. A normal doctor doesn’t specialize in hormones.

      And about a diet pill for hypothyroidism : yes, you can take one that boost the metabolism, but it is possible that you would be sensitive to it, like make you ‘shaky” or something.

      But the real question is : you want to stay on a pill to keep you thin ?

  3. QUESTION:
    Alternative treatment for hypothyroidism?
    A few years ago I was diagnosed with mild hypothyroidism and given the choice of taking medicine or not. I decided not to because I didn’t want to start taking something that would hook me for life, but my sypmtoms seem to be getting worse. I have a low body temperature and am constantly tired. Cutting sugar out of my diet has helped a lot but I’m wondering if there are some herbs or vitamins that I should take. Eventually I’ll go to the endocronologist, but until then, what causes thyroid problems and what can I do to treat them myself in the meantime?

    • ANSWER:
      NO! You can’t treat it yourself, You need to get to the doctor right away, so they can test your blood and see how many micrograms is best for you!

      Mam, your thyroid is going to be non-functional very soon, please don’t wait!

      I have to take synthroid everyday, I almost died! I’ll have to take it the rest of my life, because my thyroid gland is dead and will never work again, what it does you see, is it stimulates the pituitary gland which controls all your organs, and it’s very important, TSH is thyroid stimulating hormone, it comes from the pituitary gland and goes to the thyroid gland, and when it get’s up in the hundreds it’s getting bad, TH – is Thyroid hormone, and it sends the message back to the pituitary gland.

      What happens, is your body functions will totally shut down, and that’s dangerous!

      Go to the doctor NOW! and have a blood test, and get on the sythroid, and you’ll start feeling better in about ten days, and in about eight weeks you will be un-stoppable, and you will feel much, much better!

      Please! GO NOW!

  4. QUESTION:
    do you think i should push for treatment based on my symptoms, hypothyroidism, details inside?
    ok so ive been feeling down recently, not emotionally, im a rock upstairs, but physically run down

    in the last year ive put on a huge amount of weight, and i know i dont exercise enough and i eat a little too much (or used to) but the last time i lost weight i was eating maybe 500 calories a day and my job involved 6 hours a night of essentially cardio workouts and even then i didnt lose much.

    i decided to go to the doctor because i had tried dieting and exercise again to no avail so i went to see what help i could get. she took a history to which i provided to following symptoms (some answers were prompted by her, they are all true, but some i dont notice without thinking on it)

    sensetivity to cold (im used to working in a kitchen, followed by long stints in the walk in freezer) now i get shivery if the wind blows

    weight gain as discussed above

    low energy

    lack of desire to eat, infact if i dont eat breakfast, i can go about 2 days without any food before feeling hungry (my blood sugar is normal, as is my cholesterol)

    low sex drive (my testosterone came out as low, havent had it rechecked yet, but ive gone from having or desiring sex at least once a day to not really wanting sex at all… im 22 and ive gone off sex!!!) its not a performance issue btw it still works fine, i just have no desire for it.

    inability to sleep, and then when i do sleep, i find it incredibly difficult to wake up again.

    muscle weakness, now i know im overweight and out of shape, but i get cramp going up stairs, my hands cramp opening a tin of beans, ive lost no muscle mass but i cant lift or carry the same amounts anymore and i tire very easily.

    now my TSH level was 4.6 which if you dont know is .4 below the “treatment” stage (tsh is the indicator to how much of a kicking your thyroid needs to start working, the higher the number, the more effort it takes to get it to turn on)

    my t4 level was “normal” so she said, but she would have to watch my tsh to see if anything develops

    now considering that since the last blood test on record had a normalish tsh and the huge weight gain (im talking 100lbs in 12 months with no considerable change in diet/lifestyle) that to me shouts “hypothyroidism” but she suggested that the low testosterone may be to blame.

    now im no doctor, but my testosterone was 9 point something, and 10 is normal whereas my tsh is 4.6 gone up alot in the last year, blood relatives with thyroid conditions, and all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, surely that seems a more likely diagnosis? anyway if ive gained weight of course my testosterone will be low, thats why fat people have low fertility… i weight 24 stones at 6 foot tall! i actually make scales say error or the dial do a complete circle (dont laugh lol, ok ill let you laugh) of course there will be other problems, but surely treating for the symptoms is a good idea i mean, its either gonna work, or its not, right? i mean thats diagnostics at its simplest, surely starting at a low 50mg of thyroxine wouldnt cause any harmful side effects? if the symptoms show signs of improvement then increase the dose as necessary, if no improvement in symptoms or the TSH then sure, keep looking…

    am i right in demanding treatment based on the symptoms and the evidence provided above? i cant survive like this much longer im too damn fat, too damn tired, and if i dont get my sex drive back, my relationship with my fiancee is going to take a hit… shes hornier than a dog in heat!

    i await your responses,
    a valid point about the “fat” dieting

    i got a little fat, so i exercised, my job took up my whole life so i didnt get time to eat (never been one to remember to eat… go figure! a fat guy who doesnt get hungry!)

    i have tried eating balanced meals at regular intervals to no avail.

    and fyi, i dont like processed foods, i really love vegetables and as a chef i regularly cook proper food, and when im too busy my fiancee or parents make sure i eat right (cause they know what im like)

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly no one can, or indeed should, demand any treatment that their physician does not feel appropriate. To make a confirmed diagnosis of hypothyroidism requires 3 criteria in most cases, a raised TSH, a low T4 and a positive thyroid antibody. Though of course it does occur in men, it is also much more common in women. It is also the case that in most patients these days who do get a hypothyroid diagnosis, even when levothyroxine is given it makes no difference to the patients weight, as this is usually unrelated to the thyroid disease.

  5. QUESTION:
    Would taking diet pills cause serious complications if taken with Synthroid?
    I have Graves Disease. I originally had severe Hyperthyroidism that nearly caused heart failure. I had to have radioactive iodine treatment. After the treatment I am left with Hypothyroidism that must be treated with Synthroid for the rest of my life. My prescription is 150 MCG of Synthroid daily. Am I able to take diet pills?

    • ANSWER:
      I would not recommend doing that. There are too many unknowns with supplements.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is it true people loose weight with hypothyroidism medication? If so how does it work?
    I am a 22 year old female with hypothyroidism and am being referred to an endocrinologist. I am not sure what to expect. For a little over a year now I have not changed my diet or exercise and I slowly gained weight. With hypothyroid hormone treatment will it help or make it easier to loose weight? How does that work?

    • ANSWER:
      The answer to your question is yes. Hypothyroidism is caused by the thyroid’s inability to produced a hormone. By replacing the hormone with a synthetic one it will speed up the body’s metabolism and thus burn off more calories. This will result in weight loss, although not quickly.
      Hope this helps.

  7. QUESTION:
    im 19 yrs old..i have HYPOTHYROIDISM and PCOS pls help me…?
    im 19 yrs old..suffering from hair fall so met a dermatologist n she asked me to take blood test n ultrasound of pelvis…then she found that i have hypothyrodisim n pcos..since my mom had thyroid problem i know about thyroid but im unaware about pcos…then after searching about pcos in the internet im totally upset… is it real that hypothyroidism n pcos is not curable n pcos causes infertility…im so disturbed..i cant control my tears.. pls somebody suggest me to control my hair fall..because my scalp is seen out n my friends all started making fun of me..i really feel ashamed to go out..please help me to know the diet, exercise and proper treatment for hypothyroidism as well as pcos…my TSH is 8.28 mIU/ml….pls help me..

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    best diet for hypothyroid??
    ive been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, along with very high antibodies… after 9 long months before being diagnosed, i put on almost 60lbs…… now my endocrinologist has started me on 50 mgs of levo thyroxine, im really pleased about finally getting the right treatment, but would really like to shift this weight, is there a good way for people with hypothyroidism to diet? 3 large meals of 5 small meals? im also a vegetarian…
    thanks for any advice

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest the 5 small meals. It will keep you full throughout the day so you don’t have the urge to snack. Trust me though, the mere fact that you have started treatment will make a huge difference in your weight loss. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about 3 years ago after a struggle to lose weight for several years (I was only 13 at the time, but I was 5’1″ and weighed around 150 pounds). Several weeks after I started taking the medication, I noticed a difference. Now I am 5’6″ and 115 pounds, and I’m actually trying to gain a couple of pounds :P

      Best of luck!

  9. QUESTION:
    Does treatment for HYPERthyroidism turn it into HYPOthroidism?
    Last week I was diagnosed with Hyperthyroisim. I’m on meds to lower my hormone levels and relieve the symptoms (tremors, heat flashes… etc). In a few months the doctor wants to treat me with the radioactive pill. I’ve read/heard that this pill removes the thyroid and that most cases (of people who get this treatment) goes into hypothyroidism. I know people with hypothyroidism and they are overweight and with diet/exercise its still impossible for them to lose. I’ve been slim my whole life, (I’m 23 tall and slim). I’m worried that after treatment I’ll develop hypothyrodism and become overweight and not be able to lose it. Does anyone know if this will happen? Anyone have experience or know of someone with this? I dont mind working out at all, but those I know with it can’t lose weight no matter what they do. (They’ve had hypo almost their entire life though)

    Thanks
    10 pts BEST ANSWER! :)
    No lynn, hypo slows down your metabolism and hyper (by definition) speeds it up. I’ve been slim all my life but I can’t gain weight, with this hyperthyroism, and I’ve even lost some time. I know someone who had hypo and gained 60 lbs in less than two months.

    thanks for the answers everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      With hypo they should be losing weight I think you have it the other way around.

  10. QUESTION:
    Any new treatments for hypothyroidism?
    I am making a plea to all endocrinologists or other physicans that have knowledge about hypothryroidism. I have had this condition my whole life and i have a serious weight problem i have tried dieting then excercise and combined as well as being on prednisone and synthroid for many years ( i am 27 ) i need to have some type of repreve from my weight i cannot seem to lose any at all now i am not speaking of a drastic change but i need to lose around 80 pounds i had a total hip surgery 4 yrs ago and lost weight but in the process have gained some back i need to know is there a needle or special drug i can take to lose weight or program or anything i spoke about this to my family dr months ago and he never got back to me so i need to take matters into my own hands and i am willing to try anything at this point.

    • ANSWER:
      i think the only standard treatment is what’s available currently – levothyroxine (synthroid). if you have your thyroid levels under control, you shouldn’t be experiencing weight gain.

  11. QUESTION:
    question on hypothyroidism?
    hey guys! I was recently diagnosed with slight hypothyroidism and I was able to gather quite some info on line but I was wondering about people’s personal experience. did you find a diet that works for you? if so, what kind? I was eating macrobiotic for a long time but now I need to find something new since soy is a no-no food. did you see the changes in your energy levels before and after treatment? how much do you exercise? and what kind of exercises do you do? how much are you suppose to eat? 1200kcal? or is it ok to go lower than that? and did anyone experience significant weight loss after starting hormone replacement treatment? for me it didn’t change so much. I just find it easier to get out of bed in the morning :)

    any information is extremely helpful

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid labs are usually out of date. TSH should be 0.3 – 2.5mU/L. New research shows above 2mU/L is in the early stages of hypothyroidism. Do you have antibodies attacking your thyroid? I am currently reading a great book by naturopath Dr Sandra Cabot. Her diet program brought one patients antibody levels from 1600 to 400 in 4 months.

      100mcg selenium daily (2 brazil nuts) – studies show antibodies lowered just with selenium alone. Selenium is necessary for T4 (storage hormone) to T3 (active thyroid hormone) conversion
      10mg of zinc daily
      150mcg of iodine daily
      gluten and dairy free diet…(gluten free diet halts antibodies)
      oily fish, beans, nuts, seeds, tahini paste
      A bowel and liver detox
      Raw juices daily – carrot, beetroot, oranges, lemons, limes, cucumber and capsicum

      Most symptoms were gone but the patient wanted to try natural desiccated thyroid hormone as well and antibodies went from 400 to 150 in 6 months which resolved all symptoms.

      I would recommend the book Your Thyroid Problems Solved by Dr Sandra Cabot. Another great website and book is called Stop The Thyroid Madness by Janie A Bowthorpe.

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://books.google.com.au/books?id=XrtoPgAACAAJ&dq=your+thyroid+problems+solved&hl=en&ei=uLI5TKPEGovfca2v7foO&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDUQ6AEwAA

  12. QUESTION:
    Husband hiding medical condition and refuses to follow Dr’s treatment advice. What should I do?
    I just accidentally found out that my husband has a thyroid condition. He doesn’t know I know. I found out that his Dr. prescribed a drug for hypothyroidism and he never filled it. I don’t know how to handle this news since he clearly doesn’t want me to know. He recently had a Dr appt and afterwards he said, “I need to change my diet and that’s all your getting” and something about his “organs shutting down.” He made it clear that he had an illness but he wasn’t going to tell me what it was. He is VERY weird about prescription drugs and I’m guessing he just doesn’t want me to pressure him to take them. However, he & I both have family history of hypothyroidism and I know that untreated, you can eventually die from it. I don’t understand why he’s being so weird about this. He has actually made me think he has something much worse than a thyroid problem and I think that was on purpose….for sympathy maybe? I want him to take his medicine so he will get better. Any advice?
    Also, we have two toddlers and he’s been saying things like “after I’m dead make sure the kids know how much I loved them” etc. I’m sure this is just depression related to the thyroid problem (that’s a symptom) but he’s too stubborn to see this. I don’t think he’s suicidal, but it seems like he thinks this thyroid problem could kill him and there’s nothing he can do about it. It all just seems crazy to me. Also, his Dr won’t talk to me….patient privacy, etc.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, he shouldn’t be keeping secrets from you.
      Second, fill the perscription for him and hand it to him and tell him you need for him to start taking his medication. For you and for the kids. Has he even thought about what your life and your kids’ lives would be like without him? Maybe you should paint him a picture of how you’d all do financially and emotionally without him and see if that has any affect. If he tries to get angry about you finding out about his personal business you tell him that in a marriage your business IS my business especially when it has to do with your health so you have no right to be angry with me, in fact I have every right to be angry with you for not telling me. I’m supposed to be your partner not your roommate. You owe me the truth.

  13. QUESTION:
    I need some advice on how to help treat hypothyroidism?
    When I first met my fiancee, he was 21, quite a thin guy, healthy though, except for the smoking part. After he quit smoking, he suddenly gained a lot of weight (I mean, like… 30 pounds in a few months). At first I thought it was because he wasn’t smoking anymore, but a year goes by and more symptoms appear… after a visit to a doctor, looks like he has an under-active thyroid.

    I’m in a holistic health program right now, and I’m just learning, so I don’t know much about how to treat this. I have an idea of a homeopathic treatment, I have the idea that a weak liver could cause hypothyroidism… so I’m just wondering, is there any natural ways that I can help him? I don’t want to put him on drugs, or have him popping a pill for the rest of his life. Is there something we could do to, maybe, help his thyroid for good? Any diets or anything?

    Thanks for any insight!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article might be of some help:
      “…One of the key amino acids involved in the manufacture of the thyroid hormones is tyrosine. This nutrient, by the way, has been used to help cocaine addicts kick the habit by helping them avoid the worst of the withdrawal symptoms, including tiredness, depression, and irritability. It is also one of the active agents in a new formulation called Thyro Boost, which will help too. It includes kelp, which provides iodine (the other nutrient needed to make thyroid hormones) in the form of iodide and energy-boosting Co-Enzyme Q10. Thyro Boost is available by mail order from the Nutri Centre (0800 –587 2290)….”

  14. QUESTION:
    PCOS SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT?
    Ok so I went to the doctor becasue i am getting a lot of wacked out symptoms ..I have hypothyroidism and am on levothyroxine ..For a while i was losing weight with diet and exercise i was down to 220 and i am now up to 257 the heaviest i have ever been ..I have been having bad constant cramps when I eat anything at all i get real losoe stools and i have no periods i have been on bc pills to regulate them and still nothing my thyroid labs came back all normal ..I am tired and grouchy and weak all the time no matter what ..My hair is dry adn brittle and i have dandruff real bad to the point my head bleeds and i have a lot more acne then i ever did b4 and periods where my skin goes from dry to super oily my arm pits are really dark in sporadic patches same with my inner thighs and labia I have hair on my toes and cheeks ( not super noticeable ) and i get really painful blister/burn like things on the inside of my thighs ( always thought they were from my legs rubbing0
    I also just started getting really painful bumps on the inside of my thighs that leave a purple scar after they pop…Does this sound like pcos or can it be caused by my thyroid..i wont know the results of my lab until wednesday :)

    • ANSWER:
      please see my response to your other question too.

      you need to understand that PCOS is not a single disease but a syndrome, which means a pattern of symptoms. There are numerous sub-types (different patterns) under the general PCOS category. So then, here is a full list of symptoms, but note that each type only has some of these:

      - irregular or no periods
      - weight gain
      - oily skin, acne
      - male pattern hairiness
      - male pattern head baldness/head hair loss
      - skin tags
      - under-developed breasts (esp if PCOS emerges at an early age, ie before/during breast development)
      - skin darkening
      - persistent dandruff

      But note that hormone disturbances and skin discolouration (due to moisture and fungal irritation in skin folds) can also occur as a result of obesity. The blisters are not typical of PCOS, I think it may be due to your legs rubbing, perhaps plus infection due to the area remaining moist.

      But overall, it does sound probable that you have PCOS but you have to wait for the test results. I hope you got your insulin resistance checked as I mentioned before, not jsut your hormone levels. also please note that fasting insulin and fasting glucose levels can be misleading when looking for insulin resistance. Even a glucose tolerance test (GTT rather than IGTT) can give misleading results. So make sure its an IGTT, its the gold standard.

  15. QUESTION:
    “Normal TSH” Low T4…treatment thoughts?
    My TSH is 2.5 (reference range .450 to 4.500) and my T4 is .77 (reference range .82-1.77). My T3 is normal at 2.5 (reference range 2.0-4.4). A lot of patients say that a TSH under 1.5 is when they feel their best, but besides that, my T4 IS actually abnormal. My internist wants to put me on Armour Thyroid to for optimum thyroid health, or at least Synthroid to build up the T4. My endocrinologist is having a fit saying that because my TSH is normal, it means there is absolutely nothing wrong with my thyroid.

    I have diagnosed pituitary disease (ACTH deficiency and on steroids to treat it), and I am in my early 30s, overweight and still gaining despite a very restricted diet, autonomic nervous system dysfunction causing heart problems, I have cuts & bruises that never heal and I’m constantly cold with my hair falling out. My grandmother had severe hypothyroidism in her 20s and had a thyroidectomy in her early 40s.

    Given my symptoms, my family history, and my host of health problems, doesn’t thyroid disease seem likely? I can’t figure out why my endocrinologist is being this way. She said I should not take any thyroid medication at all, yet can’t explain herself.

    Any advice? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      You could be in normal range .3 – 3 per TSH, but that is not the whole story……you need test for antibodies…Endo will know. If he/she refuses, get another Endo.

      Blessings

  16. QUESTION:
    My Mother is competing with me at weightloss.?
    About 6 months ago I started a weightloss program with my Mother. She lost weight very quickly and although I was eating the same as her and exercising more began to put weight on. After a few fruitless months I when to the Doctors and was eventually diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. Since then I am recieveing treatment and with diet and exercise the weight is starting to come off. What is upsetting me though is my mother attitude to my losing weight. She has lost 60 lbs and is already slimmer that me but now that I am beginning to lose wieght I notice that she is becoming competitive e.g. she has dished up dessert for the family including herself if I refuse she then says she doesn’t want any either. She always seems to be looking at my figure and comparing my body with hers. Before I was diagnosed and struggling to lose wieght she was supportive but now she buys in all my favorite treats as though to tempt me to eat and says I don’t have her will power.
    How can I tell her to stop?
    I am very proud of her efforts and have been supportive of her but she now constantly says things like I’m not eating enough and tells me I’m exercising too much. She gets a real kick out of her new figure and thats great but I feel also that she felt previously like she had beaten me. I never felt it was a competion and that we were supposed to be supporting each other. I just find her behavior so hurtful at times.

    • ANSWER:
      I would talk to her and tell her that the way she is acting is not helping you. Don’t blow up at her, but try to talk to her in a calm manner. Maybe she doesn’t realize how what she is doing is affecting you.

  17. QUESTION:
    question for people who have thyroid problems?
    I have been diagnosed as having a thyroid nodule on the right side of my neck. it is moderate in size and so it has been suggested by the doctor ( my gyno found it during a routine exam, sent me for an ultrasound and sure enough there it is) that I see a regular MD and have it further evaluated.. I must admit that after reading about nodules that I have a lot of the symptoms that could be assosciated with hypothyroidism, specifically the constipation, depression,fatigue, heavy mentral cycles,musle aches and pains,very pale dry skin,thin brittle hair and nails, weekness and also unintentional weight gain. or rather i should say that since giving birth to my baby boy about 11 months ago even being on a good healthy diet i am still holding on to the weight gain.. I am trying to find a MD to go and have the nodule looked at, but what I want to know, and am curious about is if it comes back benign and that i do in fact have hypothyroidism what is the treatment, medications ect.? and also, any of you who have been diagnosed with this in the past, how successful was the treatment been for you, meaning have your symptoms eased up or gone away entirely? have you been able to control or lose the weight gain successfully with the meds and or treatments added to a healthy diet? what about the other symptoms like the fatigue and the problems with skin, nail and hair? are those better now? I guess i want to know what I can expect to get better for me once I am diagnosed. I can’t say 100% but I have a feeling that is exactly what is wrong with me and what is causing all of my issues.. I appreciate any and all info that anyone can give me on your personal experiences.. Thank you!! =)

    • ANSWER:
      First, don’t put off having the nodule taken care of! It can be very dangerous if it’s cancer! In any case, it probably needs to come out.

      I have recurrent painless thyroiditis that ends up killing a part of my thyroid with every bout. There is no way to make your thyroid consistently put out more thyroxin once it’s damaged (it can grow back sometimes on its own, however). There is no treatment–there is only replacement. To replace the needed thyroxin, I take Armour Thyroid (if it’s available) or synthroid (if it’s not). By monitoring your blood levels every few months, your doctor can adjust the amount of replacement you need. Symptoms caused by low thyroxin should go away COMPLETELY if your levels are adjusted correctly.

  18. QUESTION:
    How can I get out of the rut in my relationship? Plus more issues!?
    My boyfriend and I have been in a serious relationship for almost three years. Lately things have been relatively “blah” as we call it. We’re not BORED; we’re happy with each other. We do love one another and we make each other laugh; so there is nothing bad in that department. He is my best friend — my rock.

    However, roughly six months ago, I asked him to be honest about the one thing that makes any man cringe: Have I been gaining weight, and do you think I am sexy? He didn’t want to answer, but I made him anyway, even though I knew what the answer was in my head. His answer was that, yes, I have gained weight, and unfortunately it has been a factor is us not having sex as much as we used to. I didn’t think it was going to, but oh man, did that kill my confidence. He tells me I am still beautiful, but it’s just not the same. I don’t feel happy with my body, and now I know he isn’t happy with it either. In turn, this makes me not want to initiate anything, knowing that he doesn’t love my body that much. I have gained about 30 pounds in two years, and I am only 22 years old. I am being treated for hypothyroidism but my treatment isn’t showing any serious changes.

    I know what to do: Work out and diet. Easier said than done. I am a full time student going into PR at Wayne State University, and I work five – six days a week. I also still live at home, and my mother buys my food. Granted, she is a diabetic, so it is not like we have junk food in the house. I mostly slip up when I am at school or going out to the bar or a restaurant with my boyfriend or friends.

    My diet and exercise issues are not the whole point of this, however it IS a factor. I think that if I felt good about my body, it would be easier to get out of the rut in our relationship. I need to get tips about what I can do otherwise, while I am trying to get into shape. Granted, if you have any tips for my situation in regards to my weight loss, feel free to comment! I DO need to know some tricks of the trade to get our relationship fun again. He is working on his master’s degree, and also works full-time in construction. He also lives with his mother – so it’s really difficult to spice things up with parents around. I would like to do something that might bring back more of the emotions rather than the physical excitement. Do they go hand-in-hand? PLEASE help!

    Oh – and one more thing. He has recently gained friendship with an old friend he used to have feelings for in high school. He is completely open with me about their friendship, and I know for a fact he would not cheat on me, but I don’t trust her. I’ve hung out with her, and she loves me and my boyfriend as a couple, but I can’t help but one day be worried that she is going to steal my boyfriend’s heart. She is REALLY cool, and totally his type. I tell my boyfriend my concerns, and he tells me I have nothing to worry about. He tells me that he loves me, and his feelings for her are strictly platonic, but I still feel really insecure when they hang out together when I am not there. He also is not hiding anything from me about her, even if he knows it makes me sad if they hang out. He says he just wants me to know so I can get used to it, and by telling me everything, he is not hiding anything. If I were to ask him not to hang out with her when I am not there, he would be annoyed, because I would be denying him hanging out with a friend. He would resent me more than be understanding, only because he says he has zero feelings for her in that way. Also, I enjoy hanging out with her too…she really is a very cool, nice girl. This makes things even more confusing for my boyfriend…I like her, he likes her (as a friend) but yet I don’t like her hanging out with him…does that make any sense at all? How do I handle this? What can I tell myself to calm down about them hanging out?

    I KNOW this is long, but please, PLEASE help!

    • ANSWER:
      Okay here’s the thing. You need to stop forcing him into telling you things he knows will hurt you, which will then hurt him.

      Also, maybe the two of you should start going out and doing different things together, here and there, to break up the monotony.

      Have you two considered a new hobby, a new passion of some kind? Maybe work out together, and make your body a project for both of you.

      Change the kinds of sex you have and the times when you have it, so its more spontaneous and fun. Sex is supposed to be playing together, not just some rigid, mechanistic thing you do.

      And you have to learn how to handle the ennui. That is break up the boredom.

      Boredom comes around when you do the same, repetitive things, and develop the same annoying habits over time. So start breaking up the monotony and colorizing your world together instead of fading to black and white.

  19. QUESTION:
    How do I get a normal metabolism?
    I grew up on dieting. My father starting counting my calories when I was six, and I was doing it on my own by age nine. By the time I was 13 I maintained my weight on 1500 calories. I was 5′ 5”, weighing in at 130. I decided to lose some weight. I ate 1,000 calories per day, and lost one pound per week for ten weeks. I was 120, and I was happy.

    Then, I slipped up. I started eating 1500 calories per day, because I was on maintenance. The weight came back FAST. Suddenly, in order to maintain my weight of 130, I was no longer eating 1500, but 1,000 calories. 1,000 calories, just to maintain a normal weight.

    Two years passed by, and I hadn’t gotten my period.I went to my doctor, who told me I was eating too little to get a period. I increased to 1500, and BALLOONED. Ten pounds in two weeks! The worst part was, it was impossible to lose!

    At 140 I felt horrible. Yes, I knew it was a healthy weight, but it just didn’t feel fair. I was only 10 pounds away from being overweight and I was eating 1,000 calories per day! The worst part was, I KEPT GAINING!

    I decided to go with a new way of dieting. I would eat ONLY when I was hungry. The problem was, I didn’t know what hunger felt like. I never learned. So, I rarely ate. I estimate I took in 200-500 calories per day for nearly a month. I lost ten pounds, and I was ECSTATIC. Quick, easy weight loss. I could eat WHATEVER I WANTED, so long as the portions where small (to match my appetite).

    The people at UCSF didn’t think this was such a great thing. They diagnosed me with an eating disorder, and I flew up to 145 pounds. I eat 1200 calories, and continue to gain. I know, “You’re in starvation mode”. Well, it’s been 4 months, and I still can’t get out. Is there any way? Am I just stuck? Will I have to get fat first? I was diagnosed as having mild Hypothyroidism. Because treatment involves weight loss, will anyone give me medicine if they know I have an eating disorder history?

    I’m just on the verge. I’ve been dieting and exercising like crazy, and I’m just about ready to give up and return to my…”eating disorder”.

    • ANSWER:
      You are in a rough situation. You already know that you’ve been in starvation mode, so your body has adjusted. It may not be the amount of calories that you’re taking in so much as when you’re taking in the calories. Try eating more frequent small meals. Let your body know that the food comes in a near constant stream. Snack all the time on healthy food. 6 times a day is not too often. Try almonds (3 or 4 at a time throughout the day) and even some dark chocolate (just a bite at a time). Also, stop drinking artificially sweetened drinks. Your body reacts to the artificial sweeteners by ignoring them, treating more and more that you need as “empty” calories, knowing that and slowing your metabolism. Once you retrain your body you will find that it will reach a stable weight.

      It will take time to retrain your body.

  20. QUESTION:
    My red blood cell count has been dropping slowly but steadily over the last year …?
    and I would appreciate some suggestions as to possible causes, and treatments. I’m a 57 yr old male diabetic, with a healthy diet, taking diaformin & diamicron, and thyroxine for hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      Anaemia – a decrease in the number of red blood cells which lead to low red blood count. I had anaemia from iron deficiency. Taking iron supplements will increase levels..but check the vitamin test first! many supplements do not absorb which i why i take under the tongue spray and liquid vitamins.

      Pancytopenia – a lowering of all three types of blood cells; red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, which may lead to low red blood cell count, low blood platelet count, and/or low white blood cell count. I personally had pancytopenia from vitamin B12 deficiency.

      Thrombocytopenia – a decrease in the number of platelets which may lead to low blood platlet count. There are many reasons as listed on the website below. Tranfusions may be needed.

      Anyone with hypothyroidism is at risk vitamin B12 deficiency, iron deficiency and vitamin D. This article lists the 10 things to improve your hypothyroid symptoms.

      10 reasons you may still feel bad:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/2009/01/15/ten-reasons-you-may-still-feel-bad/

      Thrombocytopenia:

      http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec14/ch173/ch173d.html

      Vitamin Test:

  21. QUESTION:
    my dogs kidney number are elevated?
    My dog went to the vet to recieve 3 days of constant iv fluids for really high kidney numbers. After the treatment his kidney numbers returned to normal. The doctor told us to bring him back after a month to check his number again. after that test his numbers were just mildly elevated. I was wondering if there is hope for my dog to live a long life. He is only 4 years old. he also has hypothyroidism. I have him on a renal diet as of now so what other options is there?

    • ANSWER:

  22. QUESTION:
    Why prescribe synthroid without symptoms?
    My 21 year old son visited a doctor close to home to request doctor’s note for leave of absence. He was suffering with cold and severe headache (similar to sinus) for three days and his company asked him to get a note from the doctor. This doctor immediately ordered blood test for cholesterol and thyroid. Dr. wanted him to come for a follow up and when my son went the dr. prescribed synthroid and other stuff for cholesterol as well as asprin.
    Now he tells that he has some nodes and tells him to take those prescribed medication.
    My son’s cold is long gone. He is otherwise healthy, energetic and does not have any symptoms that are connected with hypothyroidism.
    I am concerned and want to get treatment if my son really has this problem. How do I find out if the doctor is telling the truth?
    BTW, when I went with my son to the dr’s, he asked me “so when is Mommy coming to see me?” I asked why? I am fine.
    He says I may have some healthy issues or cholesterol!!!! I am 120lbs and my diet does not consist of any fatty stuff at all.
    On his second visit my 23 year old daughter went with him and the doctor wanted her to come in to do a blood test for thyroid problem. We are not overweight family so how can the doctor say this just by glancing at us? Are the doctors able to tell a person’s health condition just by looking at them without even asking ANY questions or checking blood pressure or any tests?

    • ANSWER:
      Not all people with thyroid problems have weight issues. What were your kids TSH results? Normal range is 0.4 – 4. I would go get a second opinion if the results are in a normal range.

  23. QUESTION:
    A doctor told me Fibromyaligia is not a true diagnosis, another doc says it is.. I’m confused?
    Okay I was really hurting + addiitonal uncomfortable symptoms, and had a billion test, including MRI’s, and in the end it was decided I have hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia, and now I am being treated. Medication, stretching, diet… so on.. I do feel better, but my doctor was out and had to see his partner, he explained my diagnosis was nonsense, but still continue to treat. Anyone else run into this? What did you do? I am following up with my doctor to discuss this next week, and I am still got the same treatment. I just am confused with why he would say that, do you think its real or fake?

    • ANSWER:
      If this doctor doesn’t “believe in fibromyalgia” then he needs to go back to medical school, because he is evidentally calling the Mayo Clinic, The American Journal of Medicine, the New england journal of medicine, and a couple hundred million VERY well respected doctors liars.

      The reason so many doctors believe its a nonsense diagnosis is because there are MANY idiot doctors that get tired of trying to find out whats wrong, and just slap a label of Fibromyalgia on it.
      That results in widespread misdiagnosis, and that with the fact that you can’t take an x-ray and see it, or take blood and see it, means, to some stupid doctors, that FMS isn’t real.

      I know it’s real. I’ve lived with the juvenile form since I was 16 years old, probably longer.

      Please, get in touch with me, and I’ll get you as much information as I can on what’s going on.

      Remember this one fact:
      THAT DOCTOR WORKS FOR YOU!
      If he’s not doing what you are hireing him to do, FIRE HIS @$$!

  24. QUESTION:
    Have I possibly been misdiagnosed?
    So, My doctor and endocrinologist tell me I have Graves Disease and HYPERthyroidism. But what I don’t understand is all my symptoms point towards HYPOthyroidism. The fatigue, the brain fog, the weight gain…no matter how much I diet and exercise, the confusion and so on and so on. My endocrinologist is being very insistent in giving me radioactive iodine to destroy my thyroid. But if I do that, I will become hypothyroid anyways. I just don’t understand and I am getting very upset…mostly over the inevitable weight gain. I mean…I am already fat, I don’t need to gain more weight. I’ve been trying to call her, but she always seems to be out of the office. I’ve tried all sorts of medications to control the T3 and T4 hormones that are supposedly “out of control” and nothing is working. That’s why my doctors want to give me the RAI treatment. I also find it very suspicious that before I went on this medication (methimazole 60mg, recently bumped down to 50mg) I was losing weight left, right, and center…now, no matter how hard I try, I can’t lose even an ounce. And every time I go get blood work done to see how the medication is doing me, I am told my thyroid hormones are still “out of control”. I am just at the end of my rope here. I just don’t understand! Somebody please help me before I make a huge mistake I have to live with for the rest of my life!

    • ANSWER:
      Uh-oh. I think this article will help: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc/

      It’s important that you get hard copies of all your lab tests and results.
      TSH – should be less than “1″, or almost zero. Some doctors think a low TSH means “hyperthyroidism”, when in fact it does not. It could mean a number of things from being normal to have pituitary damage. http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/tsh-why-its-useless/
      FREE T3 and FREE T4 – the 2 thyroid hormones that should normally be tested. They should be high in range with the FREE T3 being higher than the FREE T4. It’s ok if they are slightly over range.

      There can also be other reasons for your issues like adrenal problems, low ferritin, electrolyte imbalance, etc.

      Your body temperature should be 98.2 degrees F (36.777 C) or a bit higher, NOT lower.
      If it’s lower, this points to a metabolic (low thyroid) issue. Symptoms would be: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

      If it is higher than 99 F (37.222 C), and diarrhea, shaking, sweating, racing and rapid heart rate, excessive and rapid weight loss, hair loss, exhaustion, excessively high Ft3/Ft4, etc this points to possible hypErthyroidism. Treating hypErthyroidism with RAI (radio active iodine) is wrong and dangerous (just say NO to RAI). Giving someone an antithyroid drug will lower the production of thyroid hormones by lowering body iodine. However, most times hypErthyroidism is caused by iodine deficiency….sigh…

      What I suggest is to read the first article I posted, find a better doctor, do a little investigating of your lab results, join one of the Yahoo thyroid groups (thyroidless is a great one as is Naturalthyroidhormones), read the files and database sections, and ask ask ask those that have been thru the same. Ok? That is how I learned to save my own life.
      Here are the addresses for the 2 groups I mentioned: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless/ http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones

      Don’t do anything permanent!

  25. QUESTION:
    Chain rejection on Kidney Stones?
    I’m a kidney stone producing machine and just found out what triggers the deficiency on citric acids and overproduction of calcium in my body.
    Urologist prescribed a high blood pressure drug called Hydrochlorothiazide (I have low blood pressure) to reduce the production of calcium and a citric acid supplement I’m really not sure as if I should take this. I have to inject myself with B12 on a monthly basis which I need because I can’t produce it anymore myself and found out that this reduces the citric level. Then I came across Hypothyroidism and wonder if that is the reason for the high calcium production? Does anyone have suggestions on how I should approach the treatment or know about natural ways to get this in control? I do a low oxalate diet and avoid foods triggering my symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      Hydrochlorothiazide is a diuretic and is often the first step in lowering blood pressure in someone who is newly diagnosed with high blood pressure. I would follow your physician’s suggestions on care rather than trying to treat it yourself. You can also try holistic methods but in conjunction with your physician’s recommendations. Also, let your doctor know what herbs/supplements that you plan on taking so that he can verify whether there might be a problem with interactions between the substances. Sometimes, a low oxalate diet does not stop the kidney stones and medications may be needed. And, dehydration is a common cause of kidney stones so make sure your daily water intake is high.

  26. QUESTION:
    Thinning hair and severe fatigue help!?
    I have always had thick hair that grew
    quickly and lots of energy, but ever since the summer things have been bad I’ve been experiencing abnormal fatigue and no matter what I take or do, it never goes away. My hair has thinned substantially, and my hair falls out frequently just when I touch it. I’m irratable to cold and my memory and concentration have gotten bad, I’ve been taking GNC hair skin and nails treatment And using less heat on my hair, but nothing. I’ve been to the doctor five times and she diagnonsis it as “commen stress” and diet and exercise will make it better. well I’ve been doing trust for a bit And nothin rlle has changed. I think I might have hypothyroidism, although my blood levels were normal, is it still possible? I really hope it’s just stress because I’m going into the military and they might not take me if I have a chronic problem. Please someone help me possibly diagnose what I have. Ten points!

    • ANSWER:
      you seem to have all the symptoms of hypothyroidism. many of my tests were normal for quite a while before i was actually diagnosed. you could have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. my TSH was normal, as was the T3, but my T4 was too low. once i started taking medicine for it, the tests were all abnormal.

      you should have repeat tests to check again. also, stop taking the GNC stuff. supplements are not regulated by the FDA, so there is really no way to know what exactly is in them, or the amounts. if you are not eating a healthy, balanced diet, start to. not getting proper nutrition can also cause severe fatigue and hair loss.

      your symptoms are classic for hypothyroidism though.

  27. QUESTION:
    Please help! So many symptoms but I don’t know what’s wrong.?
    If anyone could help me with these symptoms, to either help reduce the symptoms or give me any idea what they could mean that would be great!

    I have had chronic vaginal yeast infections for two years now, tested and confirmed that it is thrush. Treatment works but it comes straight back. I’ve been taking Inner Health Plus but I don’t think it’s helped (it helped lessen symptoms while I’ve been on antibiotics though).

    I have been getting bloating in my tummy for about a year now, found out I’m allergic to wheat (and have IgE level of 1300 last test) but I don’t think wheat is causing the bloating as I’ve tried a wheat-free diet and it hasn’t helped. I had an ultrasound of my ovaries etc… To look for ovarian cancer last month and it was fine.

    I have had diarrhea for the past six months, not bad but still annoying.

    For the past 4 months I’ve experienced excessive sweating, fast heart beat, heart palpitations, absolute heat intolerance to the point where I can’t even drink hot drinks or eat hot food. Doctor did thyroid functions tests and found TSH levels normal and low levels of antibodies (can’t remember exact antibodies or results). I am due to do another blood test this week to see how it’s going.

    These symptoms are only getting worse and I feel like my doctors (yes, I’ve tried multiple, they all give up…) are only half testing for things and then giving up. Does anyone have any ideas what this could be or any tests or conditions I could bring up with my doctor?

    My eyesight is declining very quickly, my optometrist is concerned but can’t find anything wrong with my eyes. My blood glucose levels have been up and down and they can’t figure out why.

    I’m 19, my grandma has hypothyroidism (not sure if it’s autoimmune or not), my grandpa has type II diabetes and so does my dad, I have asthma and am allergic to pretty much everything under the sun! Not seriously allergic though.

    • ANSWER:
      You see to have many symptoms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome… This could have something to do with a gene for hypothyrodism, which your grandma had. Here is some info:

      ***Chronic Fatigue Syndrome***

      Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized by multiple causative factors. Decreased adrenal function and a weak immune system that allows chronic yeast (candida albicans) or viral infections to fester are among commonly accused culprits. Symptoms of CFS in addition to “unexplained” persistent fatigue may include decreased concentration and short-term memory, headaches, muscle and joint pain without swelling and redness, tender lymph nodes, sore throat, unrefreshing sleep, post-exertional malaise lasting 24 hours or more, along with a host of others.

      Eighty percent of the CFS persons suffer recurrent ear, nose, and throat infections as children, acne as adolescents, recurrent hives, anxiety attacks, headaches, and bowel problems later, as well as being unable to tolerate alcohol. Ninety percent of these people’s cholesterol levels are above 225. These symptoms closely match those of hypothyroidism.

      Treating children’s hypothyroidism substantially reduces the use of antibiotics by bolstering their immune system. Many people with multiple chemical sensitivities meet the CDC guidelines for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Chemically sensitive persons’ weak immune systems are often overwhelmed by numerous airborne and food allergies in addition to environmental toxins. These people usually have personal and family histories consistent with hypothyroidism.

      People who suffer from CFS all require thyroid hormone replacement and iodine/iodide. Chronic yeast infections, allergies, mercury and other heavy metal toxins, magnesium and nutritional deficiencies, and dental problems are also common and must be addressed.

      Has anyone mentioned this to you? Has it been ruled out at all? Bring this info to a doctor if it hasn’t. Or has anyone ever talked to you about Graves disease?

      ***Graves Disease Symptoms***

      •Anxiety
      •Breast enlargement in men (possible)
      •Difficulty concentrating
      •Double vision
      •Eyeballs that stick out (exophthalmos)
      •Eye irritation and tearing
      •Fatigue
      •Frequent bowel movements
      •Goiter (possible)
      •Heat intolerance
      •Increased appetite
      •Increased sweating
      •Insomnia
      •Menstrual irregularities in women
      •Muscle weakness
      •Nervousness
      •Rapid or irregular heartbeat (palpitations or arrhythmia)
      •Restlessness and difficulty sleeping
      •Shortness of breath with exertion
      •Tremor
      •Weight loss (rarely, weight gain)

  28. QUESTION:
    Low progesterone/high estrogen symptoms. Going for tests today. What will the doctor suggest and will it help?
    I am TTC (trying to conceive) and discovered that my luteal phase is only five days or less and I may be having trouble ovulating. My doctor suggested I come in for hormone tests today. After talking with friends and tracking my cycles, I am almost positive I have high estrogen/low progesterone levels. If so, what will the doctor suggest as treatment? I’m mostly wondering because I have terrible symptoms that are linked to high estrogen. I have had these problems since I was 10. If I am successful in conceiving is there a chance my doctor will keep giving me some sort of progesterone after pregnancy so that my symptoms don’t come back? If it helps, these are the symptoms I have that may be because of low progesterone.

    *Started periods at age 10
    *Large breasts, small frame, hourglass figure with a 20 pound weight gain mostly in my stomach/breasts in my early 20′s though my diet did not change
    *Excruciatingly painful period cramps–stay home from work because of them
    *Stomach problems-diagnosed with IBS
    *Diagnosed with endometriosis
    *Luteal phase of 5 days or less
    *ALWAYS tired, but with a random (significant) boost of energy about three days before my period???
    *Cold hands/feet
    *Possible hypothyroidism
    *Elevated resting heart rate (around 90-100 bpm)
    *Low sex drive
    *Very emotional, sometimes depressed for no reason

    Sorry if this is TMI…I thought it might be important, though. As you can see, most of these symptoms are very difficult to live with. I feel like progesterone cream or something would help when I’m TTC. I’m basically just wondering what the doctor will do for me when I’m NOT TTC. Thanks for reading my long post!

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    Anyone with thyroid disorder have luck with gluten-free?
    I found out a few months ago that I have Hypothyroidism and so I have been trying out some different natural forms of treatments, such as acupressure, adding coconut oil to my diet, and cutting out certain foods from my diet. I’ve been reading that gluten intolerance/Celiac disease has been “linked” to Thyroid disorders. It’s hard to know what to believe these days as far as what is good for you and what is the best treatments for this and that,etc. But I’ve tried various things and have noticed that cutting the gluten out of my diet seems to help with my thyroid symptoms the most.

    Just curious if anyone else out there with thyroid trouble has tried a gluten free diet and what kind of effects did you get?

    • ANSWER:
      That is good to know that you are seeing results from it. Thanks for sharing. That could help others out, because this disease can be hard as heck to deal with. I have been considering buying this book on this website I buy my supplements from, because it has a hypothyroidism cookbook that comes with it. I haven’t tried it yet but I think I am going to have to give it a go. I’m not sure if it is gluten free of not, but it would be nice to have recipes to follow.

  30. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when someone’s red blood cells are ‘shaped funny’?
    I am 21 years old, and have had an autoimmune disease for over ten years which caused anemia (specifically low iron) and hypothyroidism (which is actually how we should out about the disease in the first place). With the anemia, I’ve tried everything to treat it that doctors have recommended over the years and nothing helps. Several different brands of supplements, diet change and iron infusion. I had sort of resigned myself to just having it and coping with no treatments.

    Recently, my latest blood work showed that my iron levels are higher but now the red blood cells are ‘shaped funny’ or so says the nurse who wouldn’t explain herself further. She seemed more insistent on trying more treatments for me, but would explain what exactly it means since this is a recent development. Could my autoimmune disease have caused this? Would low iron in the long term cause this?

    • ANSWER:

  31. QUESTION:
    Hair loss help? (stress/hypothyroid)?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, I am now on a pill and trying to find the right dose and pill that is right for me. I have been having hair loss for 2years, I am 23 and it is now to the point that I cannot wear my hair down anymore at all, I have to keep it up to hide it but I have lost so much even that has become a CHORE to hide it. :( I need help!
    I’m working on a better diet, I am drinking more water, I am starting on Fish Oil, Multi Vitamin and/or hair, nail, skin vitamin.
    I have used Olive oil, raw egg, Aloe and Apple Cider Vinegar in my hair/on my scalp and they seem to help some but never used enough or continuous enough to see if it actually helped promote hair growth. Now I am reading more about Evening Primrose Oil and taking the pills along with it to help promote hair growth and I just need HELP!! I’ve also read about Hot oil treatments, that open up the shaft and pore and help to clear out any debris and then you seal the pore/hair shaft. But I have read so much my head is spinning…
    Anyone out there going through or have went through this and have found things that has worked for them?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    How can I get out of the rut in my relationship? Plus more issues!?
    My boyfriend and I have been in a serious relationship for almost three years. Lately things have been relatively “blah” as we call it. We’re not BORED; we’re happy with each other. We do love one another and we make each other laugh; so there is nothing bad in that department. He is my best friend — my rock.

    However, roughly six months ago, I asked him to be honest about the one thing that makes any man cringe: Have I been gaining weight, and do you think I am sexy? He didn’t want to answer, but I made him anyway, even though I knew what the answer was in my head. His answer was that, yes, I have gained weight, and unfortunately it has been a factor is us not having sex as much as we used to. I didn’t think it was going to, but oh man, did that kill my confidence. He tells me I am still beautiful, but it’s just not the same. I don’t feel happy with my body, and now I know he isn’t happy with it either. In turn, this makes me not want to initiate anything, knowing that he doesn’t love my body that much. I have gained about 30 pounds in two years, and I am only 22 years old. I am being treated for hypothyroidism but my treatment isn’t showing any serious changes.

    I know what to do: Work out and diet. Easier said than done. I am a full time student going into PR at Wayne State University, and I work five – six days a week. I also still live at home, and my mother buys my food. Granted, she is a diabetic, so it is not like we have junk food in the house. I mostly slip up when I am at school or going out to the bar or a restaurant with my boyfriend or friends.

    My diet and exercise issues are not the whole point of this, however it IS a factor. I think that if I felt good about my body, it would be easier to get out of the rut in our relationship. I need to get tips about what I can do otherwise, while I am trying to get into shape. Granted, if you have any tips for my situation in regards to my weight loss, feel free to comment! I DO need to know some tricks of the trade to get our relationship fun again. He is working on his master’s degree, and also works full-time in construction. He also lives with his mother – so it’s really difficult to spice things up with parents around. I would like to do something that might bring back more of the emotions rather than the physical excitement. Do they go hand-in-hand? PLEASE help!

    Oh – and one more thing. He has recently gained friendship with an old friend he used to have feelings for in high school. He is completely open with me about their friendship, and I know for a fact he would not cheat on me, but I don’t trust her. I’ve hung out with her, and she loves me and my boyfriend as a couple, but I can’t help but one day be worried that she is going to steal my boyfriend’s heart. She is REALLY cool, and totally his type. I tell my boyfriend my concerns, and he tells me I have nothing to worry about. He tells me that he loves me, and his feelings for her are strictly platonic, but I still feel really insecure when they hang out together when I am not there. He also is not hiding anything from me about her, even if he knows it makes me sad if they hang out. He says he just wants me to know so I can get used to it, and by telling me everything, he is not hiding anything. If I were to ask him not to hang out with her when I am not there, he would be annoyed, because I would be denying him hanging out with a friend. He would resent me more than be understanding, only because he says he has zero feelings for her in that way. Also, I enjoy hanging out with her too…she really is a very cool, nice girl. This makes things even more confusing for my boyfriend…I like her, he likes her (as a friend) but yet I don’t like her hanging out with him…does that make any sense at all? How do I handle this? What can I tell myself to calm down about them hanging out?

    I KNOW this is long, but please, PLEASE help!

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    My red blood cell count has been dropping slowly but steadily over the last year …?
    and I would appreciate some suggestions as to possible causes, and treatments. I’m a 57 yr old male diabetic, with a healthy diet, taking diaformin & diamicron, and thyroxine for hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      This is not the best forum for issuing a diagnosis. The facts you gave are just the intro to the type of information that would go into determining a diagnosis. Work with your primary care physician for definitive answers.

      Best wishes


Hypothyroidism Diet Foods

Diet For Hypothyroidism: Here are my top 4 steps:

Are you one of the 30 million people currently suffering with hypothyroidism? I’m sure you know that a diet for hpothyroidism will help you but what foods specifically do you need to eat?

In this article I will reveal 4 steps to a top hypothyroidism diet. Imagine for a moment how good you will feel once you’ve implemented these changes in diet. Your hair will no longer be brittle, the weight will drop off and your mood will lift.

So let’s get going and put together your diet for hypothyroidism:

Diet for Hypothyroidism Step 1:

Some foods contain compounds that hinder the functioning of the thyroid gland. These are called goitrogens. I’ve listed below some of the foods I know contain these and it will help if you either cut them out or at least cut them down:

1)Cabbage
2) Broccoli
3) Turnips
4) Rutabaga
5) Kale
6) Spinach
7) Brussels sprouts
8) peaches
9) Pears
10) Strawberries
11) Radishes
12) Cauliflower
13) Millet
14) Peanuts

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    where can i find a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    i would like any help i can get without having to take diet pills.. i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4 years ago. since then i have put on almost 40lbs. i would like some input on what foods to eat that would help speed up my metabolism. also a good workout regimen would help too. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      According to Dr. Todd Nippoldt of the Mayo Clinic, “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.”

      Question asked of Dr. Nippoldt: “Can iodine supplements help regulate thyroid function in a person with hypothyroidism?”

      Dr. Nippoldt: “No. Some alternative medicine practitioners recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements — which are high in iodine — for people with hypothyroidism. It is true that severe iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism. But iodine deficiency is extremely rare in the United States and other developed countries since the addition of iodine to salt (iodized salt) and other foods. If iodine deficiency is not the cause of hypothyroidism, then iodine supplements provide no benefit.

      “Hypothyroidism is safely and effectively treated with the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine.”

      Walking a couple of miles twice a day would help keep your metabolism revved up naturally. If your health is good enough, try it. My prayers are with you. The main thing is not to forget to take the synthetic thyroid hormone your doctor prescribes for you.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have a very bad hormonal and thyroid issues so I need to get this under control immediately so I appreciate anyone w/ HYPOthyroidism to give me any advice or foods that help

    Thank you so MUCH!!!

    • ANSWER:
      If you indeed do have a thyroid problem you need to see your doctor for synthetic thyroid replacement. First, your doctor will do a simple blood test to find out how low your thyroid actually is. There is no diet which will fully get your thyroid back to normal. Many women take synthetic thyroid. I have for 8 years.

  3. QUESTION:
    What foods should I eat/avoid with Hypothyroidism, Hypercortisolism, Pernicious Anemia, Vitamin D2 deficiency?
    I am being treated for them all, but I’m wondering if with the right diet I can get better faster.

    Currently taking Synthroid 75 mcg, vitamin B12 injections weekly, vitamin D2 vitamins weekly, and getting help for high cortisol (possible Cushing’s– undergoing more testing)

    • ANSWER:
      Of course a good diet will help you recover, but there aren’t any magic foods. Your body is doing its best with the slightly odd chemical system it inherited.

      Your doctor will be thrilled if you maintain your weight at a healthy level and eat a balanced diet. Lots of fresh veggies, some fruit, whole grains, and your choice of proteins (but not too much meat).

  4. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Diet?
    I really need some help with knowing what foods are good for my thyroid and which are harmful. There’s just so much information out there. Is there anyone out there who has hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) who has found a healthy diet that helps them boost thyroid function and lose weight? I need some success stories from hypothyroid people or doctors. I’m ready to try anything. Please no spam please. I don’t want info on fad diets. I want to be balanced and healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      Many years ago, Lou Costello said that a diet was “When you could have all you wanted of everything you don’t like.” With that in mind, no one actually wants a diet, but they want to find things that they can enjoy that fit their needs.

      Your Doctor will probably be able to refer you to a nutritionist. That would be the best place to start.

  5. QUESTION:
    Diet for Pre-Diabetes and Hypothyroidism?
    I have recently been seeing a reproductive endocrinologist for fertility issues. Through testing he has found that I have PCOS (which I have known for years), I am pre-diabetic, AND I have hypothyroidism. I am going on Metformin, which I have been on before, and Synthroid. I am going to be meeting with a nutritionist in a few weeks to arrange a proper diet that meets the restrictions of my pre-diabetes as well as my hypothyroidism.
    I’m just wondering if anyone else with both conditions has met with a nutritionist. If so, what was the diet like? What types of foods (besides the obvious white breads, potatoes, starches) were you told to avoid? What types of foods did you learn were beneficial for both conditions? I would like to know so I can start getting myself healthy now rather than waiting two more weeks and eating potentially dangerous foods.
    I definitely don’t think that I’m going to really harm myself in a few weeks, but I would like to stay away from the foods that have put me in this position and I would like to start ASAP. I have even heard that for hyothyroidism that foods like broccoli and spinache can be no-no’s. Who knows if that’s true, but I already about sugars, starches, and white processed breads and pastas. I’m looking for those foods that one might not expect, but cause harm to people with hypo and pre-diabetes.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m on the same medications. I never saw a nutritionist, but here’s what I eat. I cut out grains, rice, corn, potatoes and most sources of starch. I severely limit fruit, and only eat a handful of berries (most raspberries and blueberries) a few times a week at most because they’re relatively low in sugar. I’ve read that soy can really throw off the thyroid, so I don’t eat much soy. Maybe some soy sauce once or twice a month. I eat a lot of spinach and broccoli because my vegetables all come from non-starchy sources and those are two of my favorites, and my thyroid hasn’t been affected. Thyroid levels seem to fluctuate all the time and a dosage that works for you one year might not the next. I recently had my thyroid medication adjusted because my thyroid came back slightly elevated at my last checkup, but I’d been on the medication for over a year without a problem. Nothing in my diet had changed.

      Because you’re pre-diabetic, exercise will probably have a profound effect on your blood sugar. The nutritionist will likely follow the ADA diet recommendations of 30-40 grams of carbohydrates per meal, 15 grams per snack, with lots of whole wheat grains and fruit. As a pre-diabetic, you might be able to get away with that, but many diabetics cannot, and I am generally distrustful of this low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet since carbohydrates are really the driving engine of high blood sugar in diabetics. The ADA is just very concerned about heart disease and they believe restricting your fats and upping your fruits and grains is good for your heart, but when I saw the benefits of a high-fat and moderate-protein diet on my meter, and in my blood work later (my cholesterol and trigs plummeted), I stopped listening to my doctor’s pleas that I incorporate brown rice and brown bread into my daily diet.

      So, my main recommendations are that you buy a meter, test yourself regularly and experiment with food to see what spikes you, what doesn’t, and what your portions should be. Also, consider limiting all your grains, even whole grains, as well as starchy foods and even fruit. You might be able to delay the progress of diabetes by losing weight if you need to and sticking to a low-carbohydrate and low-glycemic diet, but be warned: the low-glycemic diet is based on how non-diabetics react to foods. As a diabetic, what the low glycemic index tells you may not work for your body.

  6. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism medication and Diet and Weight Loss?
    I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism. A friend told me that there are certain foods I should not eating with Levothyroxine. I typed it into the COMPUTER and found that I should stay away from high fiber foods. I had started making with real fruit smoothies, the list included: raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, orange juice, banana, acai berry juice, nonfat yogurt, noni juice. Now I’m afraid that I can’t eat things like this anymore. Or do I need to just limit it to so many hours after taking my medication? I’m so confused now. If anybody can help I’d really appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      I would probably cut down on high fiber foods. The recommended daily value for fiber is 25-30g a day. Maybe cutting down to 20 wouldn’t be a bad idea. Eating too much fiber will decrease the absorption of Levothyroxine and won’t be as therapeutic. The medication is not a long term one so I would cut back on your fiber intake minimally and let the drug do it’s job.

  7. QUESTION:
    Hello I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, is there any food and drink I should avoid?
    Could I have some advice please as I would like to know about the different kinds of food and drink I must avoid example can I drink coffee or tea? is there any certain foods to take out of my diet like fish, certain meat, vegetables, any soya products etc etc, can I eat chocolate and snacks.
    some sound advice please thanks.

    should I change my diet or continue as usual

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I have the opposite of your condition – I am overactive. My GP and endocrinologist have both stated that there is no need to follow any special diet.

      As others have said before me, eat a normal healthy diet and take your doctor’s advice.

      Good luck, it gets a bit hard at times, but your levels will stabilise with your medication and you will feel better.

  8. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism, Pre-diabetic diet and work outs?
    I’ve had hypothyroidism for almost 2 years along with being pre-diabetic. I’m taking medicines for both, plus i’m on a food supplament pill that my doctor prescribed after 6 MONTHS of me excersising and only losing 5 pounds you could say i was pretty deppressed after that. I’ve got 3 months till i’m 16, that’s a young age to have all these things wrong with me! I can’t lose weight easily, but I can gain it like it’s nothing! i watch what i eat, and i’ve continued to excersise… so far i’ve lost 16 pounds in almost 8 months..it makes me so depressed and upset because i dont know what to do! so i guess my question is, What is a good work out and diet plan to stick to in order for me to lose weight more easily without the risk of hurting myself physicaly,mentaly, and internaly?
    I know it’s a lot to ask for, but I reaallly need this. i don’t want to be this size (20 in pants) for the rest of my life…. my goal is to be down to a 12 in pant size BEFORE i’m a senior.
    Thank you all so much!

    • ANSWER:
      sorry it might not be that much help but i googled it and Pre Diabetes Diet (the second site google came up with) seemed to have a whole bunch of answers. i hope this helps and helps u feel less depressed (i think personally from all the weight u said u lost that it probably shows the mirror might make us feel bigger than we r. (though i should also take my own advise i keep obsessing over weight 2. crunches seem to work well though))

  9. QUESTION:
    Diet for someone with no thyroid?
    Help! I’m 17 4’11 and at least 30lbs overweight. My thyroid became enlarged so it was removed last year. I’ve decided to get really serious about losing weight so I started looking for diets for people with hypothyroidism (no thyroid is still considered hypothyroidism), but most of the diet suggest food that will increase thyroid activity. Obviously those are of no help to me, but I can’t find a diet anywhere to help people without thyroids and I am completely lost on what to do now.

    • ANSWER:
      well you should be taking thyroxine, which your dr would have mentioned or prescribed to you. I have hypothyroidism and i eat a lot of low GI foods, like whole meal pastas, bread, fills me up therefore i tend to eat less. lots of fruits and veg as well as drinking lots of water. this will be healthy diet for you

  10. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism food help…?
    I was just recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism, and was put on the medication. But I’d like to go on somewhat of a diet to help me feel more energized and just plain better. Does anybody know where I can find a no- nonsense, straightforward chart of foods that I could incorporate into my diet?

    • ANSWER:
      Just eat fresh, wholesome foods. It’s best to avoid soy while on you thyroid medication, it’s been known to decrease the efficacy.

  11. QUESTION:
    blood test for hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism?
    Hi,

    I would appreciate some information on thyroid disease.

    * Is blood test (TSH) used to diagnose both hypo and hyper-thyroidism or just for hypothyroidism ? If not, what type of blood is used for each?

    * Is there any diet food/vitamine that help in reducing symptoms ?

    Thanks
    I also heard of T3, T4, are they part of TSH test or separate tests?

    When I ask my doctor for throid blood test, should I ask for TSH, T3 and T4 test or it is kind of by default ?

    Thanks again

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors try to use TSH to diagnose both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. But TSH is an INDIRECT measurement of thyroid hormone levels, so it is not good enough. If you have symptoms, insist on Free T3 and Free T4 as well as TSH. T3 and T4 are the actual thyroid hormones. Making a diagnosis based on them is far more accurate than diagnosing based on TSH.

  12. QUESTION:
    my freind having Hypothyroidism,cholesterol,high carbohydrate, which diet is the best?
    which food should avoid?

    • ANSWER:
      How do you know hes hypo thyroid? Just because someone is overweight, it doesnt mean they are. You need a blood test from the doctor to find out. So if he hasnt done that, he should. And if he has, he should be on some thyroid medication. Also if he has high cholesterol, depending on how high it is, he might need some medicine for that.

      He needs to diet and exercise. Its very easy, he should just stick mostly to salads and lean protein such as turkey and tuna. He should keep calories low and lift weights and do cardio. Those are the only things that are going to help him.

  13. QUESTION:
    Do Holistic Nutrition practitioners always put everyone on an individual diet based on your OWN needs?
    Or do they exercise the same type of diet to everyone – all unrefined, unprocessed, whole food sources of food like meat, chicken, oranges, carrots, squash, peanuts, etc…

    I have hypothyroidism, will they put me on a specific diet for that?

    • ANSWER:
      You should have a look this method that I tried. It works fast for me and I lost 13 pounds in 4 weeks. You can find more info at link below.

  14. QUESTION:
    Do Holistic Nutrition practitioners always put you on an individual diet based on your OWN needs?
    Or do they exercise the same type of diet to everyone – all unrefined, unprocessed, whole food sources of food like meat, chicken, oranges, carrots, squash, peanuts, etc…

    I have hypothyroidism, will they put me on a specific diet for that?

    • ANSWER:
      If you know right diet information you can lose weight. I did the program at this site and I lost 9 pounds in 4 weeks. It is very easy to lose weight. You can get my diet program that lost me 19 pounds in 5 weeks at link below.

  15. QUESTION:
    What kind of foods should you eat to improve your metabolism?
    I have low metabolism and hypothyroidism and can’t use diet aids so I want to know how to improve my metabolism naturally.

    • ANSWER:
      No food, drink or herb will boost your metabolism.
      If there was one, it would be worth a million bucks!

      Exercise, as little as 30 minutes a day, will boost your metabolism.

      The good news is that exercise helps metabolism even hours after you stop.

      Try walking briskly for 30 min to start (where you can barely carry on a conversation) and work up to an hour a day. You should do this 5-6 days a week.

      Good luck!

  16. QUESTION:
    Im constantly very tired and sleepy due to my hypothyroidism, can I take something to improve this?
    Im on 100 mg of levotiroxin, and my hormone levels seem t be normal. But Im so tired specially in the mornig, its so hard to get out of bed, I cant really control it. Im wodering if a food suplement, special diet or medication can help me have more energy and need less sleep. Anyone knows??

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem and then I changed my diet completely and it helped. Try eating fruits and vegetables more often things that will boost your energy like nuts, and don’t eat too much carbs or eat too much of anything at once it will drain your energy and make you sleepy and at times lethargic.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is there any kind of diet I should follow while I battle hypothyroidism?
    I’ve been dealing with hypothyroidism for almost 4 years. Since I was diagnosed I’ve gained about 50 pounds. I am an active person & walk 5 days a week about 4 miles. But I still can not get the weight off. I am on Synthroid 50 mg & have been for a long time. Is there any diet I can follow to help me lose weight? I heard if you cut meat out it will help. I am a huge fruit & vegetable girl. And I don’t eat a lot of junk food or sweets. I literally feel like a size 8 woman (my original size) stuck in a size 17 body. Please someone recommend me something, I’m so tired of struggling & being depressed. Thanks for anyones advice!

    • ANSWER:
      Find out how many total calories you eat each day. Use an online calculator to determine your daily energy requirements. Adjust your portion sizes accordingly. Cutting out meat for the sole reason of losing weight is dangerous because it means you won’t be looking into healthy alternatives for protein, iron, and vitamin B12. It’s also altogether too easy to just eat more cheese and bread, causing you to gain even more weight. If all else fails, recheck your thyroid hormone levels. If your level of thyroid supplementation is appropriate, there should be no physical barrier to weight loss.

  18. QUESTION:
    what is some really good diet food?
    i have a sensitivity to alcohol so nothing cooked in wine or anything, because it hurts my stomach really bad, but i have severe hypothyroidism and im trying to lose about 50 lbs is there some good recipes that’s healthy and helps me lose weight? tank you in advance

    • ANSWER:

  19. QUESTION:
    What is a low sodium healthy diet to have during pregnancy?? So you dont gain unhealthy weight??
    OK what are some good foods to have around to have a healthy pregnany?? Like apples veggies?? Things that are not to high in sodium (on blood pressure med)… Also was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism… Is it better to eat like salads and cut out some of the meat ?? I am currently 7wks pregnant and just dont want to gain weight that i dont need to gain! Thanks to all

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of fruits and veggies…Remember you’re only 7 wks, right now the most important thing is to consume food that’s high in folic acid to avoid birth defeat. As food with low sodium…never ever eat can veggies, high in sodium and preservatives, not good for anyone. Use Mrs. Dash, seasoning it’s no salt. Eat baked meat, don’t fry and stay away from fast foods.

  20. QUESTION:
    Diet plan for a 13 year old female?
    Hi. I am overweight and I’m very upset about how I look and I want to go on a diet without a program. I have hypothyroidism by the way but that shouldn;t give me too much of an excuse for my weight. I am 5’5 and 153 pounds. I don’t know what foods to include and exclude in my diet. Can you please help? No rude answers about my weight please.

    • ANSWER:
      5″5″ and 153 lbs? You aren’t overweight. If you have body-image problems though, here’s a few suggestions:
      Don’t Eat:
      -Potato chips
      -Soda
      -Anything deep-fried
      Replace:
      -White bread with whole grain wheat bread
      -Whole/ 2% milk with 1% or skim
      - ice cream/ cake/ etc. with fruit
      -Fruit drinks with fruit juice ( no sugar added)
      - High fat foods with naturally low fat foods
      - Candy with nuts
      -Sugary/kid cereals with wholesome options (Frosted mini-wheats, Great Grains, Honey Bunches of Oats, Raisin Bran, etc)
      Remember:
      - Low-fat and low-sugar foods almost always have the same or more calories than the regular versions (milk being excluded)
      - Some foods, especially potatoes, make your blood sugar spike, which causes a spike in insulin, which then causes hunger, so you eat more.
      - Don’t skip breakfast!!!
      - your more likely to overeat at night, so stop eating around 7:30 ish
      - And most importantly EXERCISE!!! The more muscle mass you have, the more calories your body burns even when you’re not exercising. And remember you have to exercise at moderately hard intensity at least 30 min to see real improvements. I highly suggest running/ walking.
      - Also, the “sugar-free” stuff has a really bad tendency to teach your body that even though it detects sweetness, its getting no calories, so it makes you much more likely to eat a ton more sugar than usual to make up for it.

  21. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism – Can you have it even if it doesn’t show up in the initial blood test?
    Know someone who has many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism, ie: dry, brittle cuticles/nails, joint pain, fatigue, sketchy memory here and there, trouble maintaining weight (though exercizes daily and has fairly healthy diet). Also has had onset of many food/and a few antibiotic allergies in the past couple of years, and sudden predisposition to either psoriosis or eczema in the winter (dry/CA) months. All seems to lead to a compromised immune system, but preliminary blood works does not indicate hypothyroid issues……Quite perplexed.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you can be hypothyroid and not have the blood test show it. Unfortunately, a blood test is the only form of diagnosis for hypothyroidism and it is not reliable. Sometimes it will take up to 10 years, after showing symptoms, before the blood work will show it and, for some, the blood work will never show it. I also have all the symptoms and it runs in my family…my doctor admits I have them…but without the blood test to back them up, he will not treat it. I told him I know the blood test may never show it and he admitted I was correct…but without documentation, does not feel right treating me for it.

      I’d like to suggest one other thing. Find out if your friend’s doctor ordered a cortisol level (another blood test). The symptoms of hypothyroidism and an elevated cortisol level can be quite similar in the beginning. When the symptoms are present, and the thyroid tests are normal, it is often worthwhile to check the cortisol level.

  22. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism & weight issues?
    had a baby in november my weight went from 155-198. After I had the baby I weighed 188. I tried to lose weight by watching what I ate but nothing happend I was stuck there. So in January I started taking a diet pill called oxyelite pro, did cardio 5days a wk, & watched what I ate. I was down to 167. Last week I went to the dr for a check up and they called me back saying my TSH was 29, and I have hypothyroidism. They put me on synthroid 100mg so I stopped the diet pill and continued the cardio and food diet. In a week I have gained 3lbs! I was losing until I stopped the diet pill and started the synthroid, My question is why did the weight gain happen and will it continue???? thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    Crohns, Celiac, Lupus, Hypothyroidism????? Help!?
    I started to have mental fogginess issued back in 2004, and remember having a general feeling of not feeling well. I can’t really remember exactly what it was like back then though. By the time 2006 came along, my issues had progressed pretty rapidly. I…

    - Had mental clarity issues.
    - I would get up to go to the grocery store and get in the car and realized I had forgotten where I was going.
    - I would bruise easily. I had diarrhea.
    My stomach was extremely bloated.
    I could barely carry on a conversation.

    After a few failed attempts at the doctors, I DIAGNOSED MYSELF with Celiac’s disease. Immediately, I went on a gluten free diet. After 6 months of being gluten free, I did notice improvement in some areas. But I never got to feeling 100%. Not even 60%.

    So I continued my research…

    About a year ago, I truly thought I was dying. I had…

    It feels as if all my stomach organs are swollen along with my head
    I feel like I have a fever, and my skin is hot to the touch (but no actual fever)
    Severe mental fogginess
    Underarm sweating
    Diarrhea
    Severe grogginess when waking
    Severe bloating
    Bruisings
    Pressure headaches (get migraines on occasions with blurred vision, I think unrelated)
    Swollen and puffy eyes
    Got sick easily
    Cold hands and feet
    Shiver in cold weather
    Fatigue
    Major skin issues. Pustuals on the hands and feet, rashes, etc. However I was able to get that at bay with very very mild soap.

    I knew at this point, I had to make a change. I cut everything out of my diet and slowly reintroduced things. At the end of this test, the only thing I could eat (at not perfect at that) was fruits, veggies, millet bread, sunflower butter (peanut butter substitute). I stuck to that diet for about 6 months and really better but dropped to 140 pounds. I went from a 1 out of 10 to a 6. But then started noticing that I was lacking nutrients and was getting other symptoms for not being balanced nutritionally. I have added a few things back in with a major herbal supplement system that I have created to help assist.

    Right now my diet is this…

    Food:
    Fruits
    Veggies
    Millet bread
    Sunflower butter

    Supplements:
    Garden of Life meal shake with probiotics and enzymes
    Activated Charcoal (Draw out poisons)
    Aloe Juice (Digestion)
    Basil (Digestion)
    Cayenne (Immune Booster)
    Cilantro (Detox)
    Cinnamon (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Coconut (Anti-Viral, Anti-Bacterial)
    Flax Oil (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Garlic (Anti-Viral, Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal)
    Ginger (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Ginko (Blood Flow)
    Ginsing (Digestion)
    Lime (Anti-Biotic)
    Mushroom (Cancer inhibitor)
    Peppermint (Digestion)
    Rosemary (Blood Flow)
    Tumeric (Anti-Inflammatory, Cancer Fighter)
    Lemon Water

    I have seen certain improvements with my herbal remedy, but nothing too major.
    I thought way back that it was celiac’s. Deleting gluten from my diet helped, but did not fix the problem. My current research makes me feel like it is either Crohn’s or something similar, or Hepatitis C. I have read that the two can be confused. I have recently been tested through a private company for Hep C and it came back Negative. What confuses me is that I do not have stomach pain like most Crohn’s patients do. However, I am pretty sure I have an ulcer. I do have a sharp pain in my stomach that comes and goes at times. And the biggest issue for me is mental clarity and this swelling fever I deal with. I can deal with irregular bowel movements, but the way I feel is unacceptable. I have a copy of blood work I had done a year ago when I was feeling my worst, and I noticed that they didn’t test for Hypothyroidism? Do these symptoms sound like this could possibly be a culprit? Lupus?

    I am probably the healthiest person you know. I don’t drink, I don’t smoke, all of my diet is natural organic from the earth foods, herbs and minerals. I should not fee the way that I do.

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t see any protein or saturated fat in your diet which are essential to good health. I would highly suggest eating eggs if you can. Can you eat oysters? I started eating 1 oz. canned oysters every morning for the naturally occurring zinc (170% DV) & found it also had 90% DV of B12 as well as getting an extra 3g a week in EPA/DHA.

      Optimize your vit.D levels most people are deficient & especially ill people. Vit.D is not really a vitamin but a hormone that regulates your immune system. I would highly suggest researching. I personally did 35,000iu a day for 3 months to refill my depleted stores & now do 10,000-20,000iu per day. The constant fibromyalgia pain I had for 10 years went away doing this. I did 35,000iu for 2 months, then knocked it down to 2000iu day & the pain was back after a week, so I did another month of higher levels.

      I highly suggest filtering water to remove fluoride & other things. I’m using a zero water filter but wish I had invested in a Berkey water filter system because the filters are cleanable & don’t need to be replaced. What I’ve spent on filters, I could have bought a berkey system.

      I highly recommend a green drink with 2 tablespoons each of chlorella, spirulina, kelp, turmeric (pinch of pepper & half teaspoon of cinnamon) mixed in 28oz of water with a splash of raw apple cider vinegar & raw honey. I add half a cup of chia seeds to another 28oz blenderball bottle of water & serve these half & half over ice. The chia seed makes the green drink much more enjoyable. I buy chia seeds in bulk from getchia.com & algae from nutsonline.com

      I would suggest testing your thyroid at home with the Barnes Basal Temperature test (instructions online) – consistent low basal temperature is indicative of thyroid dysfunction & is more accurate than blood test (but harder to document) Low thyroid can cause a lot of health issues including brain fog.

      Are you using unrefined salt – preferably mined celtic or himalayan – Unrefined salt contains over 80 minerals. Salt and water work together to do important work in your body, including stimulating your metabolism, helping you detoxify, support your adrenals and making sure your nerves, hormones and immune system function properly.

      The body needs saturated fats to make vitamins & minerals & even omega 3 oils bioavailable so they can be incorporated into the body structure. I do not recommend flax seed oil – ground flax seed is fine (chia seed is better, because it doesn’t need to be ground) Unsaturated oils are fragile & oxidize (go rancid) when exposed to air & create free radical damage in the body – oils in whole foods are fine though.

  24. QUESTION:
    i have hypothyroidism and need some tips on how to loose weight?
    i wanna loose about 25 lbs. i take my meds like i should. but i still gain weight! im 5 foot 5 and weigh about 165lbs. yea i know its huge! i dont want to be in a size 5 or 6.. just a 10. what are some foods i could eat to loose weight. im not talking about 1/2 cut grapes 1 cup or this a cup of that. i want normal diet friendly foods that i could cook. i dont like tomatoes and i hate steamed veggies. also some things i could take to speed up my metabolism. thanks so much. ive gained a few lbs since august when i found out my mom died. so now i wanna be back on track. thank you
    also i hardly ever drink soft drinks. if i do they are diet. i drink tons of water every day and now ive been trying some ruby red grapefruit juice cause i heard it speeds up your metabolism.

    • ANSWER:
      Did you not lose weight after starting your thyroid medicine? It should have made you more active. I’m a comfort eater, so I can understand gaining in grief. You may want to see a psychiatrist or psychologist about that.

      The general agenda is still the same. ALWAYS eat something for breakfast. CUT (not eliminate) the amount of empty calories in your diet (junk food & soda). RAMP UP the amount of exercise you do. Doesn’t have to be big, just park further away from the store. Just walk up and down ALL the aisles of the grocery.

      If you’re not losing, talk to your doctor. They do have several weight loss medicines they can give you.

      Believe it or not, I was 5’7″ and weighed 165 lbs. on my wedding day 24 yrs ago. I’d give almost anything to get where you are, sweetheart!

      TX Mom

  25. QUESTION:
    What’s the best way to lose weight when you have Hypothyroidism (preferably without medications)?
    Ok. I’m a 20 year old girl with Hypothyroidism. I’ve been over weight for years because of this, and I can’t afford the medications. I really want/need to lose weight and get into shape. I exercise a lot and eat as healthy as a college student with no money can. So my question is this: What would be the best way for me to lose the weight?
    Are there any specific foods that I should eat or vitamins I should take?
    What are some exercises that I should do? (the weight’s pretty evenly distributed, so anything helps).
    Is there a special diet for people with Hypothyroidism?
    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Everyone is different but here’s what I am taking after reading up on it

      L-Tyrosine
      Iodoral (which is Lugol’s solution in pill form)
      There are doctor’s who believe that Iodine Deficiency is why the thyroid malfunctions.
      I feel better with the Iodoral. Here’s a link to read up and good luck. I hope you feel better soon. I hated being UNDER medicated and having those awful symptoms.
      Also AVOID soy like the plague since you are hypo.

      http://www.soyonlineservice.co.nz/

      http://www.qfac.com/articles/august/iodine.html

      http://www.qfac.com/articles/august/iodine.html

      http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/122714-overview

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

  26. QUESTION:
    Questions about Hypothyroidism?
    Much to my relief I have recently diagnosed myself with Hypothyroidism. The symptoms fit like a glove (5-10 extra pounds I can’t shed regardless of diet and exercise, cold ALL THE TIME, fatigue, fogginess…), plus I have quite the family history of people with thyroid issues. I have always know there was something hormone-related wrong with me but have pretty much been nursing or pregnant for the past 5 years so it was really hard to judge the problem. I can’t tell you how sure I am this is it. My questions:

    I got my thyroid tested and the results came back normal. I have heard this happens a lot because they only test for a certain type of thyroid hormone, T4′s I think. If your body can’t convert them to T3′s, the T4′s are useless? Supposedly this is pretty cutting edge. Who can I go to to ensure I get the right kind of tests, and what exactly do I ask them?

    How can I naturally improve my thyroid health? I already exercise faithfully every day and eat a clean diet, no sugar or processed foods. I have also heard no broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower. Digging a little deeper I read no dairy, limited meat, and much to my chagrin, no peanuts or peanut butter. Is this correct? Oh, also that I should eat a lot of essential fatty acids. Anything else?

    Do symptoms get worse in the winter? I always have to work really hard to keep my weight down, but since November I have gained 6lbs inexplicably, and no matter what I do I can’t lose it… I am mortified about this. If winter is worse, what can I do to ease the symptoms?

    Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps a kelp tablet (rich in iodine) every day might help.

  27. QUESTION:
    how can I maintain this vegetarian diet without soy?
    Alright, I’m having a very hard time here. I’ll try to simplify this as much as possible. I’m 19 years old and decided to try vegetarianism starting the new year, Jan 1 2009. After adapting to the different types of foods and living the life style of a vegetarian, I felt excellent mentally, but not the best physically.

    Since soy is the most common replacement for meat in a vegetarian’s diet, I was eating a lot of it per day. After a month of this I was experiencing severe eye pressure, coldness, and others problems caused by malfunction of the thyroid gland. After doing a little online research I learned that soy really has some serious debilitating effects on the thyroid gland. Just one quick google of “hypothyroidism” and “soy” and you will come up with hundreds of results discreditting soy. After realizing that the soy in my diet wasn’t allowing my thyroid gland to function properly and was affecting my vision I had to drop it from my diet completely.

    Now, here is my main problem. I completely agree with the countless number of reasons to become a vegetarian, from the health benefits, to the anti-animal abuse, and the positive environmental effects. However, I am starting to rethink this whole vegetarian diet, which saddens me.

    It looks as if I’m going to have to drop the lifestyle I’ve been so dedicated to for the past 40 days or so and go back to the immoral meat-eating. If I did go back I’d definately be eating organic meats from the grocery store and not EVER McDonalds, but I would still feel terrible doing it. Does anyone have any advice for me? It just seems without soy in my diet, the amount of vegetarian foods available to me would be cut dramatically and it would be extremely hard to maintain vegetarianism without soy.

    Thanks.
    i was eating oatmeal (breakfast), boca burgers w/ cheese (lunch), bean burritos (dinner), raisins, pasta and I was drinking water, protein shakes, and orange juice.

    • ANSWER:
      People were vegetarian and healthy for years without soya products.

      When I first became vegetarian in 1969 there were not really any ‘fake meats’, just TVP chunks that tasted like cardboard, so I was a vegetarian for years before I had any soya products. Cooking real food from scratch rather than relying on processed food is the key.

      Now I eat some soya products. I’m vegan, but as you’re vegetarian rather than vegan and you find it easier to rely on convenience foods sometimes then there are plenty of non-soya alternatives. There are burgers etc made without soya, and Quorn makes varios forms and flavours of meat substitutes and ready meals http://www.quorn.co.uk/CMSPage.aspx

      I’m sceptical of the anti-soya claims. I believe that soya is only contraindicated for a certain existing thyroid condition or conditions, rather than causing them – you really need to do some more research on that if it concerns you.

      Your choice of course, but there really isn’t any need for vegetarians or vegans to eat soya if they don’t want to.

  28. QUESTION:
    how to lose weight with hypothyroidism?
    i am on synthroid .75 and i am 25 lbs overweight.
    i want to know what i can do to lose this weight?
    i use treadmill 3 times a week 30 min
    eat alot less food
    is there any diet pills i can use?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are taking a thyroid supplement already, you are doing everything right with diet and exercise. Diet pills never work anyway!
      I’m not sure what you are doing on the treadmill (running, walking, etc), but try to get at least 30 minutes of good cardio 3-5 times per week. If you are only walking, try to alternate a couple minutes of running with a minute or two of walking – anything to get your heart pumping.
      You can also do some muscle building exercises – muscle burns a lot more calories than fat, so the more muscle, the better (just keep this in mind when you weigh yourself if you are building muscle – it also weighs a bit more than fat). I don’t know if you are going to the gym, but some good exercises at home could be push ups, crunches, lunges, squats, etc. (look up more online)
      It would be helpful to keep track of what you are eating, so you could start a food diary. If you are dieting, you don’t want to be eating too LITTLE, or else your body will just store all the fat you’re getting. Around 1200-1500 calories is usually good for a diet (for women – a bit more for men I believe). You can use this website to look up your daily calorie burn (“just for being alive”), and also to look up food nutrition facts http://caloriecount.about.com/cc/calories-burned.php
      And you can look up how many calories you are burning from exercise on this website http://www.healthstatus.com/calculate/cbc
      Good luck! Keep up the good work-
      PS It might take a little while for you and your doctor to figure out the appropriate dosage of thyroid – so if you are still having difficulty getting tha weight off, talk with him.

  29. QUESTION:
    Just took my first CELLUCOR D4 thermal shock diet pill and i had weird results please reply if you have tried!?
    I’m 5’3 and im weighing in a lil more than i should. I’m not fat yet but i don’t want to get there either. I went to a diet supplement store and the guy strongly suggested the D4 thermal shock from CELLUCOR. I took one pill today ( even though it suggest to take 4) and I had a crazy intense burst of energy! I felt amazing all day and was so motivated to just keep moving, and be active. Im changing my diet to really healthy hearty foods and once it got to night i felt a strange come down i felt i was getting a little hotter and was a LIL dizzy. I drank plenty of water today but still unsure if this pill is right for me. I also have MILD hypothyroidism but havent got my medicine for this yet because i really really wanted to loose some pounds before sticking to a medicine i’m gonna be forced to take for a LONG while and i cant take both at the same time. Any tips or expereices with this product??

    please real answers, no rude comments/spam or I will report. THANKS!

    • ANSWER:
      Stay away from any type of diet pills, they really mess your system up. What you need to do is just eat healthier foods without them.

  30. QUESTION:
    Do I have hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism earlier in the year, and they scheduled an MRI scan for me, but I was too afraid to attend due to my agoraphobia. I had a second blood test a few weeks ago, and my TSH blood results for hypothyroidism returned as normal, but they were also the same results as I received earlier in the year. A friend of mine said that different doctors think of different TSH levels as normal; for instance, a 3.5 may be excessive to 1 practice but average for another. Is that slight difference possibly the reason to my excessive weight gain, or it too slight to matter? I went on a 1300 cal diet with healthy food and regular exercise for a month, and lost 7 kilograms. I continued it for a second month and lost 0 kilograms.
    I’ve used 3 scales, all of which give me the same results; I fluctuate from gaining 0 to 5 kilograms every day. For example, yesterday I could weight 70 kilograms but today I could weigh 75. If it isn’t hypothyroidism, could this abnormal body activity be something else? I’m a 17 year old female if it helps. I’m so sorry for asking so many questions! I’m just so worried.

    • ANSWER:
      No

      TSH : Normal ————-> no hypothyroidism

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for this condition?
    I have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. I have been slowly gaining weight for about 4 or 5 years, and am about 40 pounds from my goal weight (I am over 6 feet tall so it really isn’t that much on my frame) and now I want to get it back down.

    I am hoping for advice on what the best diet would be for my condition. I exercise regularly and all of that, but I want to make sure my diet is focused on the right foods.

    As a side note I can’t eat really spicy foods (never did and it upsets my stomach now) and I had major mouth surgery on my jaw and i can’t eat very acidic foods like oranges or cola.

    • ANSWER:
      there is no such specific diet for hypothyroid people, eat normal & nutritious diet. you can keep an eye on the followings:
      1. eat foods that have iodine (sea fishes, crabs, iodised salt instead of normal salt). u see iodine is the most important component of thyroid hormone so a deficiency of iodine in body can lead to hypothyroid state.
      2. avoid vegetables of brassica family (e.g. cauliflower, cabbage, turnip etc) as they binds iodine present in food & decreases absorption of iodine.
      3. avoid high calorie foods (deep fried foods, cola etc.) as hypothyroid people tend to gain weight easily
      4.most importantly, consult a doctor as you may have to take thyroid hormone as a medication if your body thyroid hormones concentrations are too low.

  32. QUESTION:
    Going From Hyperthyroidism to Hypothyroidism?
    After doing some research, I think that I might have had hyperthyroidism that is now hypothyroidism.

    Originally, I could eat very unhealthy foods in massive quantities without gaining anything. Weightloss was very easy and effortless, it was like if I thought about it I could lose 5 lbs a week without even trying. I had sever panic attacks, I had excessive sweat, I was often nervous/restless, and I had the symptoms of ibs. This lasted from the from about the ages of 17-19.

    When I was about 20, I suddenly gained about 20 lbs in about 4 months. My eating habits hadn’t changed, and the amount I exercised had actually increased. I started eating much healthier, but still I kept gaining. I had extremely cold hands/feet, was very exhausted/lethargic, constipation, my face took on a puffy appearance, and generally moodiness. After I had gained about 30 lbs in 6 months, I got worried and started really watching my diet and did intensive workouts for about 10 hrs a week. I still kept gaining. A year later, I have gained a total of 50 lbs, even with diet and exercise.

    First, is it possible to have hyperthyroidism turn in to hypothyroidism? Or is all of this just a coincidence?

    • ANSWER:
      actually, you went from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism. its a common misprint in the magazine and online articles about these things.
      Hypothyroidism makes you lose weight like nothing. (i have it) and hyperthyroidism makes you gain weight and struggle to take it off and keep it that way. It is possible, in fact with your age group i think thats exactly what happened. when you left your teens you matured and your metabolism slowed and other body processes started to slow as well, except your thyroid it went into overdrive sending a lot of those little thyroid hormones everywhere, your metabolism shot-puts and weight flies on as if your bodies getting revenge for all the weight loss before.
      my grandma did the switch when she made it through menopause.
      my moms thyroid completly died on her.
      and im 15 with hypothyroidism. i was confused when they told me i had it five years ago cuz i couldnt keep the weight on and thats when they told me of the misprint in just about every type of article with these diseases.
      hope i helped though if your not on medication for this i strongly suggest seeing an endocrinologist to get the tests.
      take the test multiple times because my test came back with a false-negative for 8 years. :(
      good luck. :D

  33. QUESTION:
    What is the procedure of a someone who practices Holistic Health restoration?
    I know they give you medicine and pills.

    But do they put you on an individual diet?

    Do holistic nutrition practitioners always put everyone on an individual diet based on your OWN needs? Or do they exercise the same type of diet to everyone – all unrefined, unprocessed, whole food sources of food like meat, chicken, oranges, carrots, squash, peanuts, etc…

    I have hypothyroidism, will they put me on a specific diet for that?

    • ANSWER:
      They do a nice little song-and-dance routine, possibly involving magical crystals, then present a “highly-individualized therapeutic modality” which just happens to be identical to that of the last seventeen customers.

      In short, it’s a scam. Find a real physician and get some real medical treatment.

  34. QUESTION:
    A Little Diet Pill Help?
    Okay, I know that they’re not safe and they’re kinda cheating, but I’m tired of being fat. I had a baby 14 months ago, and beforehand I was always petite and now I just can’t stand to look at myself. I have a thyroid disorder, hypothyroidism, and I was ignorant to it until my pregnancy. In the months before my pregnancy I gained about 15 lbs, which was probably good for me, but it scared me, and in my pregnancy I gained about 50 lbs, which my doctor said was also good because I was so small. I didn’t mind until the weight I gained wouldn’t come off. I currently weigh 150 lbs and I’m trying to get thinner, but it’s just not working. I can’t diet, I love to eat, I enjoy food and I always have. I don’t want to get rid of the foods I love, I just want to lose the weight. I’ve researched online and now I’d just like to know your opinions on what the best diet pills are out there.
    I definitely WOULD prefer not to use diet pills, if anyone knows any workouts that are effective and not too hard on the hips, I’d love to hear about it.

    • ANSWER:
      i also have had weight issue, i have tried every work out video and diet. nothing helps. i have tried diet pills and i think that the worse you could do.
      i stopped them because i was happy to me at the weight i reach and when i did that i gained it back in a few weeks. and got heavier then i was before.
      im working out now. seem like you don’t have the time. but you have to make 30-40min for your self beside your work out you get a moment to relax to yourself. wk-ends when you have your spouse there try to work out.
      Running HELPS and you don’t have to be super fast.
      i understand you might feel unhappy about your weight and it is hard. but you can do it. u don’t have to give up food, its not the food it the quantity of the serving. good luck

  35. QUESTION:
    How do I go about ‘detoxing’ my body?
    I am a morbidly obese 31 y/o mother of 2 small children. I have hypothyroidism and am unable to be treated with the conventional hormone therapies. I want to try radically changing my diet and have recently gone nearly meatless as I still eat chicken and seafood. Besides letting go almost completely of caffeine, sugar, and salt, what else can I do to detox my system and really cleanse myself to sort of re-start my metabolism? Are there any really good foods to aid me? And what about antioxidants? What are they good for? As you can see, I am really uneducated in this area of holistic foods.

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest green tea, or slimming tea [i call them both green tea :P] you can get those at a local grocery store and they work wonders. It cleanses the system of toxins and it provides fast, temporary calorie burning. I have lost 2 pounds in one week just from having 2 cups of it but mostly I’ve noticed that i’m not as tired and my stomach, although not losing alot of weight, is still a flatter than what it was before. The longer you let the tea bag sit in the water, the more potent it is. It isn’t alot, but every little bit counts. Good luck

  36. QUESTION:
    New food ideas..burnout on diet.?
    I currently take medications for hypothyroidism & diabetes type II. I’ve lost weight by eating right & exercising. My problem is…. I have been eating the same types of foods for about two years & I’m so burnt out on everything; coffee is my only satisfaction I have left. I don’t want anymore salad, or any veggies for that matter, no more peanut butter, no more oatmeal, & no more yogurt…even water is starting to gag me. I don’t eat a lot of fruit because of the carbs & the fact that after I eat just one fruit I’m hungry about an hour later. Any ideas on new foods that are healthy for me? The only meat I will eat are eggs & turkey; I’m burnout on chicken…red meat is bad & I hate seafood!

    • ANSWER:
      here is the list of foods, separated into 3 categories:
      - good sources of protein
      - good sources of carbs
      - good sources of fat

      Good Sources Of Protein

      Chicken (without skin)
      Turkey (without skin)
      Lean cuts of beef
      Lean cuts of pork
      Lean cuts of lamb
      Lean cuts of veal
      Eggs
      Egg whites
      Tuna fish
      Salmon
      Shrimp
      Lobster
      Flounder
      Sardines
      Snapper
      Swordfish
      Trout
      Crab
      Clams
      Scallops
      Milk (2% or skim)
      Cottage cheese (low fat/non fat)
      Yogurt (low fat/non fat)
      Tofu
      Black beans
      Garbanzo beans (aka chick peas)
      Kidney beans
      Lentils
      Lima beans
      Navy beans
      Pinto beans
      Miso
      Soybeans
      Peanuts
      Almonds
      Cashews
      Hazelnuts
      Pecans
      Pistachio nuts
      Natural peanut butter
      Pumpkin seeds
      Sunflower seeds
      Protein powder, protein shakes and protein bars

      Good Sources Of Carbs
      Brown Rice
      100% whole wheat bread
      100% whole wheat bagels
      100% whole wheat pita bread
      Whole wheat/whole grain pasta
      Sweet potatoes
      Yams
      Oatmeal
      Buckwheat
      Bulgur
      Bran cereals
      Garbanzo beans (aka chick peas)
      Kidney beans
      Black beans
      Lentils
      Navy beans
      Pinto beans
      Lima Beans

      (Fruits And Vegetables)
      Apple
      Orange
      Plum
      Banana
      Grapes
      Strawberries
      Peaches
      Pears
      Cantaloupe
      Pineapple
      Broccoli
      Brussels sprouts
      Cabbage
      Asparagus
      Spinach
      Lettuce
      Romaine lettuce
      Avocado
      Cucumber
      Eggplant
      Tomato
      Cauliflower
      Celery
      Turnip
      Bok choy
      Mushrooms
      Peppers
      Green peas

      Good Sources Of Fat
      Salmon
      Mackerel
      Herring
      Anchovies
      Sardines
      Scallops
      Halibut
      Fish oil supplements (I use this brand)
      Peanuts
      Almonds
      Walnuts
      Cashews
      Natural peanut butter
      Olive oil (extra-virgin)
      Flax seeds
      Flax seed oil
      Pumpkin seeds
      Sunflower seeds

  37. QUESTION:
    What are the best vitamins to take when you have hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and I’m trying to stay away from foods that are goitrogenic foods. Some of these foods contain my favorite veggies. I can’t eat them raw, but I can eat as much as I want when they are cooked. Of course, everyone knows that when you cook veggies, they loose a lot of their nutritional value. What is the best vitamin I can take that contains a full days worth needed for my diet? If it helps, I’m a 22 year old female. I’m also overweight because I went a few years not knowing I had this syndrome and it caused me to gain a lot of weight (which is another reason why I’m asking this because I’m trying to loose the weight I’ve put on by switching to eating more fruits, veggies, and protein).

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend you cut out all grains from your diet. Grains contain Phytic acid and that is an inhibitor that binds healthy minerals from being absorbed into your system. Even if you do take vitamins, the grains might be keeping them away from being used by your body.

      I would concentrate on removing grains and sugars (especially ones that contain high fructose corn syrup) from your diet. No reason to start putting vitamins in your body until you know if you actually have a shortage, which you won’t with a proper diet.

      Try these foods instead:

      1) Fish (salmon), eggs or some grass-fed beef. Don’t be shy about eating meats. Just ensure that the beef is grass-fed (no antibiotics or hormones.) If they are grain fed, then you are not getting the same amount of valuable nutrients.

      2) Salads consisting of a mix of kale, chard, broccoli, cauliflower, radishes, olives, dried tomatoes, avocados, plus, kidney or pinto beans, walnuts, dried raspberries, and add in olive oil (lots) and lemon juice.

      3) Fruits: apples, blueberries, pears are all fruits that are not too high in sugar content. Have some hard cheese with is, preferably Swiss.

      Absolutely stay away from any grains (cereals, pastas, breads.) This is where the extra weight on Americans comes from (in addition to sugar snacks.) Try to stay away from the soft drinks and stick with water.

  38. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism; is it too risky or can i do this without a doctor for now.?
    i have had this problem for several years now.
    I keep a well balanced diet having fish several times a week.
    not to mention leafy greens meats fruits and grains the whole nine yards when it comes to foods that are good for the thyroid for more than a year now with little to no effect on it .

    currently i don’t have the time or means to consult a doctor for this problem.
    and so i am thinking of adding TYROSINE & IODINE “kelp” supplements to my daily diet in hopes of alleviating my symptoms.
    i was wondering sense they’re only supplements whether it’s okay to take them without getting my levels tested first, as i am a bit concerned because no two cases are exactly the same when it comes to hypothyroidism. and so you might end up making it worse as a result.

    another is what are the risks of taking T4 and what are the doses they come in.

    exercise doesn’t seem to have much effect on it either.

    i appreciate any help i can get for this problem as it’s gotten pretty annoying. my mind isn’t as sharp as it use to be and my fingers are always freezing among other things.>_<

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There used to be a weight loss med that had thyroid in it. Withdrawn because too many people died.

      Iif you have been hypothyroid for a while, the heart cannot take a full dose of thyroid. It must be slowly titrated up. I would strongly advise you do NOT try this on your own. There are free clinics in almost every city- why not go to one, and let someone with some experience manage your problem?

  39. QUESTION:
    Symptoms of Hypothyroidism?
    I was just wondering a few things regarding weight gain and other symptoms… I remember well… it was probably about a year and a half ago since I’ve last visited the doctor. I tend to avoid the doctor because I don’t like needles and because I am overweight…and the doctor said something about it and we told him that it was hard for me to lose weight regardless of what I do.(I go to the gym and work out whenever I have time and diet) and he suggested a blood test for my thyroid, which I threw a fit about since I HATE HATE HATE any type of needle.. or something thats going to puncture my skin.. and my weight didn’t used to be as bad until around 6 ish – 7th grade (I’m in 9th now) but I really tried to lose weight this summer and I ended up staying the same weight… almost. I gained a few pounds unfortunately.. BUT even when I do lose weight, it comes right back about 3 days later. Its like its really stingy and just wont go away. :<
    I don't eat a lot. I don't eat unhealthy foods often.. only on certain occassions and i still try to avoid them. I looked up symptoms for hypothyroidism and I don't know about all the ones... but a few did stick out such as fatigue/sleepiness, weight gain, cold intolerance ( I always have a cold :l), muscle cramps, dry skin, and decreased concentration ( maybe :l ... I have noticed something like this when I try to read)... I don't have like super excessive symptoms but as I was reading them out It was just like "Oh, thats happened to me..wow... maybe I should have gotten that test done..." Should I go back to the doctor to get a test done? I really really really don't want to be put on medication for the rest of my life... I want to be normal :[

    • ANSWER:
      cold intolerance means you can’t take the cold temperature. Get the test done sweetie. there is nothing so bad about taking Thyroid meds
      I do it. Watch also for less hair on your legs and underarms and a patch on either side of your hairline might be thinning actually all your hair could be much thinner than 6th grade. get the blood test,be brave. You can lose the weight get thick hair and get warm :) all for the price of a tiny pill…not a horse pill :)

  40. QUESTION:
    I have Hypothyroidism and on meds. I exercise and eat healthy, but I’m gaining weight?
    Hello, I have to ask others, aside from doctors (who seem to know NOTHING about this!) I have Hypothyroidism, I’m 22 yrs old and I’m 5’5-5’6 ft. I weigh at last count 158-160lbs. I have been to the doctors and am currently on medication for the problem (Levothyroxine). I diet and exercise, and I’ll explain what it is I do, I walk over 3 miles a day and hit the dumbbells, I eat healthy foods, and never exceed 1200 calories a day. I am very frustrated and just flat out sick of this!!! I do all that I do and somehow I KEEP GAINING.. well I do hit platos at times, as that can be frustrating as well!!! I have been on this medication for almost a year now, and have only seen a change in my hunger. Now don’t get me wrong I have made an appointment with the doctors, but I would still like some input, from maybe those with the same or similar problems. Now there has been some sudden changes not only with my weight gain, but my breasts are bigger and I AM NOT PMS’s when I PMS I cramp and there is no cramping?! I also cannot be pregnant for my bf has had a vasectomy along time ago. I figure it’s hormones for why the breasts are bigger (which sucks for I have small D’s :( and they are bigger now… have I mentioned this!) Anyways, I need some advice, what am I doing wrong? If I’m doing it all right then why am I gaining????!?!?!?!??!?!?! Please any advice is helpful, I’ll take all!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I am afraid that some 50% of the population of the UK is now overweight and getting heavier. Provided your dose of levothyroxine is correct, your failure to lose weight will be unrelated to your corrected thyroid status. Walking though better than nothing neither improves cardiovascular status, nor uses up all that many calories. Try increasing the amount of vigorous exercise that you take and you may move on from your plateau.

  41. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that I have hypothyroidism?
    I’m 18-years-old and over the past year I started experiencing a lot of changes with my body. I ignored most at first, but it seems lately that it’s getting worst.

    I started to gain weight last fall. It wasn’t a lot of weight (I went from 133lb to 147lb in only a couple of months). It was very frustrating because my diet and lifestyle was exactly the same, and yet I was gaining weight. I started watching what I eat and stopped drinking pop and eating fast food. Despite changing my diet, it was exceedingly hard for me to lose the weight. I’m still around 145, and I eat healthier than I’ve ever eaten.

    I started feeling very tired a lot too, regardless of how much sleep I got. I felt drained and depressed all the time, not wanting to do anything but lie in bed.

    Near the end of spring my hair started to change. It looked more and more damaged every day. Yes, I style it a lot, but I’ve done that for years and it’s never had the brittle texture that it has now. I was suddenly getting split ends like nobody’s business. I cut seven inches of it off a month and a half ago in hopes it would look healthier, but it already looks dry and fried.

    I moisturize every single day, but my skin gets extremely dry (to the point of peeling) anyway. My hands and feet always feel numb they’re so cold lately, even when I’m somewhere warm. I’ve always had a very regular menstrual cycle, but the last few months it’s been all over the place. I haven’t had my period since September 9th. I’ve also been extremely constipated and bloated on and off, and I’ve had very frequent urges to use the bathroom (going anywhere from four to eight times a day).

    Hypothyroidism is very common on my mom’s side of our family, and I fear that I may have it as well. Is anyone familiar with the signs of hypothyroidism? Could these be symptoms of something else?

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    Is it hypothyroidism or a food allergy?
    For the past year I’ve been struggling with digestive problems. Constipation, bloating, gas, etc. I’ve also recently been experiencing swelling in my ankles, feet and legs, especially after drinking alcohol. Often feeling cold when others are not. Feeling of fatigue, exhaustion and some unexplained weight gain. I work out 6 days a week with at least 40 minutes of cardio. I don’t eat red meat and maintain a very healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, only whole wheat, whole grains and very little to no dairy. I was given a medication by my gastronologist for chronic constipation but feel this is not the right diagnosis for me as this is not the major problem. He also mentioned there might be some underlying thyroid problems which I am thinking of getting checked but wondering if acupuncture or looking into food allergies might be the better cure. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:

  43. QUESTION:
    Why am i fat?this is my diet,exercise and health?
    Your Open QuestionShow me another »
    AM I FAT??????????????????????
    A typical day is..
    Morning-(a bowl of grapes) or (2 hard boiled egg w/o yellow part and 1/2 cup of cabbage or less) or (A serving size of Koshi heart healthy cereal w/ organic milk) or (a bowl of pasta) and sometimes I have a bowl of grapes with one of the breakfasts.
    Lunch-(a small cup of soup with a bagel and a tsp of creamecheese and a small amount of strawberries with added sugar)or a (bagel with a 1/4 cup serving of macaroni salad and sugar added strawberries 1/4 cup or peach pear stuff) what they serve at lunch at the healthiest.
    Liquids-(water all day usual tap[tap is good quality not fluoridated and comes from underground]) and some days (V8 witch is 50cal per serving and its pureed vegetables)
    Snacks-when I get home I usual have a (1-4 servings bowl of grapes with other fruit) and/or (1-3 servings…if no fruit in the house 2-6 Koshi cereal milk less)
    Dinner-(bowl of soup)or (pasta with sauce piled on the plate because my mom cooks too much damn pasta and I eat most of it) or (less pasta but still a lot with meatballs) or (steak with baked potato that’s actually baked not microwaved) or (organic canned rice and beans with peeper stuffed)
    -One fault is I eat snacks late-
    -I almost never touch touch junk food unless its cookies but i only eat home cooked cookies-
    -I eat a lot but the foods are usually the same-
    -this covers a weekday food schedule-

    Weekend Scedeual
    Breakfast-(none when I wake up late)or(same as weekdays)
    Lunch-(pasta w/tsp sauce and a pinch organic butter)or(a bowl of soup)/or(koshi cereal a bowl no milk) or(a bowl of grapes) or(a bowl of grapes with other fruits) or (3 or 4 glasses of V8)or (koshi cereal bowl with 3 or 4 glasses of V8) or (some cabbage)
    Dinner-(same as weekdays)
    snack-(same as weekdays but it varies more)

    okay that’s my diet.

    Now for exercise.

    I walk to all 9 high school classes.
    I go to track for 2 hours.(depending on the day I face extreme temps and run around the track 2 times and do drills and depending on the day I either do more running/drills or stand for an hour and throw+ heaving balls or disks while stretching and occasionally running/jogging a bit)
    at home i usually sit on the computer from 5:00-12:30 or watch a toddler for 20min-2hrs on some occasional days.

    As for medical stuff
    when i was 12, 5’3 I weighed 193
    I found out I had hypothyroidism which is an extremely slow metabolism
    and ever since taking the pills I lost weight.

    Miscellanies- I drink 2cups-8cups a day and im trying to drink more water,
    I’m trying to eat more veggies
    I poop 1nce a day, sometimes none, sometimes twice
    I sleep about 7hrs on schooldays and 10hrs+ on weekends
    I’m a health food fanatic and hope to be a dietitian(or nanny)
    i told u i dont drink soda and i listed what i drink, water and v8

    • ANSWER:
      unfortunate metabolism…and possibly too much pasta and eating snacks late…if you’re drinking soda that will hold you back. Drink green tea (no sugar – maybe some lemon) it’s high in antioxidants and speeds the metabolism…be careful w/ weight loss pills…i wouldn’t recommend them…you may find out a few years later they cause tumors or something…some ppl just weren’t mean to be thin and lean…maybe you should make your goals more realistic? I dunno how much you weigh or how tall you are now..only how tall and how much you weighed at 12

      —-additional info—-

      a thousand apologizes…i read water and v8 and mentioned soda incase i happened to miss it in the enormous amount of text you typed….you didn’t answer the question about how much you weigh now or how tall you are. bottom line some ppl are just meant to be kinda big, better start working on other areas of your being like personality…like how not to be rude and snippy to someone who’s trying to give you advice

  44. QUESTION:
    Why am I fat? This is my diet, exercise and health?
    Your Open QuestionShow me another »
    AM I FAT??????????????????????
    A typical day is..
    Morning-(a bowl of grapes) or (2 hard boiled egg w/o yellow part and 1/2 cup of cabbage or less) or (A serving size of Koshi heart healthy cereal w/ organic milk) or (a bowl of pasta) and sometimes I have a bowl of grapes with one of the breakfasts.
    Lunch-(a small cup of soup with a bagel and a tsp of creamecheese and a small amount of strawberries with added sugar)or a (bagel with a 1/4 cup serving of macaroni salad and sugar added strawberries 1/4 cup or peach pear stuff) what they serve at lunch at the healthiest.
    Liquids-(water all day usual tap[tap is good quality not fluoridated and comes from underground]) and some days (V8 witch is 50cal per serving and its pureed vegetables)
    Snacks-when I get home I usual have a (1-4 servings bowl of grapes with other fruit) and/or (1-3 servings…if no fruit in the house 2-6 Koshi cereal milk less)
    Dinner-(bowl of soup)or (pasta with sauce piled on the plate because my mom cooks too much damn pasta and I eat most of it) or (less pasta but still a lot with meatballs) or (steak with baked potato that’s actually baked not microwaved) or (organic canned rice and beans with peeper stuffed)
    -One fault is I eat snacks late-
    -I almost never touch touch junk food unless its cookies but i only eat home cooked cookies-
    -I eat a lot but the foods are usually the same-
    -this covers a weekday food schedule-

    Weekend Scedeual
    Breakfast-(none when I wake up late)or(same as weekdays)
    Lunch-(pasta w/tsp sauce and a pinch organic butter)or(a bowl of soup)/or(koshi cereal a bowl no milk) or(a bowl of grapes) or(a bowl of grapes with other fruits) or (3 or 4 glasses of V8)or (koshi cereal bowl with 3 or 4 glasses of V8) or (some cabbage)
    Dinner-(same as weekdays)
    snack-(same as weekdays but it varies more)

    okay that’s my diet.

    Now for exercise.

    I walk to all 9 high school classes.
    I go to track for 2 hours.(depending on the day I face extreme temps and run around the track 2 times and do drills and depending on the day I either do more running/drills or stand for an hour and throw+ heaving balls or disks while stretching and occasionally running/jogging a bit)
    at home i usually sit on the computer from 5:00-12:30 or watch a toddler for 20min-2hrs on some occasional days.

    As for medical stuff
    when i was 12, 5’3 I weighed 193
    I found out I had hypothyroidism which is an extremely slow metabolism
    and ever since taking the pills I lost weight.

    Miscellanies- I drink 2cups-8cups a day and im trying to drink more water,
    I’m trying to eat more veggies
    I poop 1nce a day, sometimes none, sometimes twice
    I sleep about 7hrs on schooldays and 10hrs+ on weekends
    I’m a health food fanatic and hope to be a dietitian(or nanny)
    my family is average.. usauly the older family members are my wieght and the kids of my family are healther wieght. im 14 btw

    • ANSWER:
      You are eating too much, especially white carbs. Cut out sweets, seconds, and junk including processed foods and things made from white flour. Use the whole grain version instead like whole wheat or multi-grain bread, whole wheat pasta (which I actually prefer), and brown rice. Bagels are actually one the most calorie dense breads around.

      Drink only water. Cut out sodas, energy drinks, juice, etc. They are loaded with calories and/or nasty chemicals.

      However, allow yourself one small cheat a week. This keeps you from feeling deprived and gives you something to look forward to the rest of the week.

      Snacks are fine if they are healthy. Do not snack on leftovers or carbs like cereal, bars, breads, etc. Have fresh fruit or cut veggies NO SUGAR. Try not to snack in the evening or in front of a screen (tv, computer, etc). This leads to overeating.

      Get away from the computer and use the time moving around.

  45. QUESTION:
    Why am i fat?this is my exercise and health and diet?
    Your Open QuestionShow me another »
    AM I FAT??????????????????????
    A typical day is..
    Morning-(a bowl of grapes) or (2 hard boiled egg w/o yellow part and 1/2 cup of cabbage or less) or (A serving size of Koshi heart healthy cereal w/ organic milk) or (a bowl of pasta) and sometimes I have a bowl of grapes with one of the breakfasts.
    Lunch-(a small cup of soup with a bagel and a tsp of creamecheese and a small amount of strawberries with added sugar)or a (bagel with a 1/4 cup serving of macaroni salad and sugar added strawberries 1/4 cup or peach pear stuff) what they serve at lunch at the healthiest.
    Liquids-(water all day usual tap[tap is good quality not fluoridated and comes from underground]) and some days (V8 witch is 50cal per serving and its pureed vegetables)
    Snacks-when I get home I usual have a (1-4 servings bowl of grapes with other fruit) and/or (1-3 servings…if no fruit in the house 2-6 Koshi cereal milk less)
    Dinner-(bowl of soup)or (pasta with sauce piled on the plate because my mom cooks too much damn pasta and I eat most of it) or (less pasta but still a lot with meatballs) or (steak with baked potato that’s actually baked not microwaved) or (organic canned rice and beans with peeper stuffed)
    -One fault is I eat snacks late-
    -I almost never touch touch junk food unless its cookies but i only eat home cooked cookies-
    -I eat a lot but the foods are usually the same-
    -this covers a weekday food schedule-

    Weekend Scedeual
    Breakfast-(none when I wake up late)or(same as weekdays)
    Lunch-(pasta w/tsp sauce and a pinch organic butter)or(a bowl of soup)/or(koshi cereal a bowl no milk) or(a bowl of grapes) or(a bowl of grapes with other fruits) or (3 or 4 glasses of V8)or (koshi cereal bowl with 3 or 4 glasses of V8) or (some cabbage)
    Dinner-(same as weekdays)
    snack-(same as weekdays but it varies more)

    okay that’s my diet.

    Now for exercise.

    I walk to all 9 high school classes.
    I go to track for 2 hours.(depending on the day I face extreme temps and run around the track 2 times and do drills and depending on the day I either do more running/drills or stand for an hour and throw+ heaving balls or disks while stretching and occasionally running/jogging a bit)
    at home i usually sit on the computer from 5:00-12:30 or watch a toddler for 20min-2hrs on some occasional days.

    As for medical stuff
    when i was 12, 5’3 I weighed 193
    I found out I had hypothyroidism which is an extremely slow metabolism
    and ever since taking the pills I lost weight.

    Miscellanies- I drink 2cups-8cups a day and im trying to drink more water,
    I’m trying to eat more veggies
    I poop 1nce a day, sometimes none, sometimes twice
    I sleep about 7hrs on schooldays and 10hrs+ on weekends
    I’m a health food fanatic and hope to be a dietitian(or nanny)

    • ANSWER:
      As for your exercise, you need to be more active. For instance, you need to do push ups, sit ups, and other activities to stay active. You’re also not running enough, You need to jog a longer distance with plenty of water

      Dear, grapes are good for you, but they swell up in your stomach; Try eating bananas. Bananas are great for potassium and they lessen the effects of sodium. So Try one or two bananas each day. And stay away from bagels. Bread fills you up. Also cream cheese is high in calories, fat, and sodium! Please no more of the bagels. Try eating mixed nuts, or cheerios (Great for lowering cholesterol.

      Everything else you’re doing is good, just stay away from cookies. You have to run for a mile just to make up for eating 2 cookies. It’s true. So no more cookies! too much sugar and sodium. Try eating a banana to fill you up. No one said losing weight was going to taste good! Sorry, And drink more water okay?

      If you follow these procedures for 3 weeks, you’ll lose a minimum of 10 pounds. I PROMISE!
      You also said you’re trying to eat more veggies? You can’t just try, you have to actually do it!. Green bean, asparagus, artichoke, etc. are good for you. Stay away from veggies like corn and potatoes because it’s high in starch

  46. QUESTION:
    Can you explain the psychology behind a parent who want you to be overweight?
    I had been obese growing up. In high school I would try to go on a diet but my mom would sabotage by keeping cookies or fried goodies laying around the kitchen in front view. I finally lost the weight in college. Since then, I stayed at my mother’s for 2 months. She refused to let me prepare my own food. If I begged her please no she would throw a fit. I realize now that she would secretly put sugar in my food. I would confront her about the extra sweetness and she said it was Splenda. Spenda in fruit? I just took her word for it, even though my gut said otherwise, but why would she? She would do such things like open up my yogurt and put a spoon in it and the yogurt would be mixed. Anyway, the skyrocketed weight gain despite my working out confirmed that she indeed was doing so. (I have hypothyroidism and PCOS, daily healthy diet & exercise regime is pertinent to keep my weight in a healthy range) Strangely, during this time, my mother had been starving herself and has become
    anorexic. It is not about body image though (or is it?) My whole life I would overhear her complaining to just about everyone that her life was soo tragic that she was treated like a servant at home (her weight loss was supposedly due to the intense stress not the fact that she would starve herself) and the kids were obese b/c of their laziness.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like one crazy lady to me. Apparently anoerexics love feeding their families and friends. She sounds like she needs therapy. And quickly.

  47. QUESTION:
    Has anyone has success with the Southbeach Diet.?
    I am not one for fad diets or diet pills but I had put on some weight and recently found out that I have hypothyroidism, so anyways now I am on Synthroid. I want to take off some weight and maintain a normal weight. I was wondering if anyone had a suggestions. I have heard that the Southbeach Diet is very sensible and doesn’t cut out one specific food group. I already exercise and walk a lot on at my job, I’m a nurse. I can run for 30-45 minutes on the treadmill and lift lite weights. I don’t really want to do anymore but I do need a book or something to give me diet suggestions, I know the basics, I need something that will give me a structured eating plan but at the same time, something I can do long term. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      my Dr. suggested that i try south beach to eat healthier, as I have a strong history of diabetes in my family. It was very easy to stick to.
      It has a two week induction where you cut out ALOT of carbs and sugar, but its vey important becuase you really do stop craving them so much, and things that are naturally sweet will begin to taste sweeter. I also lost about 8 lbs on it, and it hasn;’t come back. once you get past the induction, the diet is a bit more relaxed, however, its not a “6 month diet”. its a lifestyle change. you will learn to replace fatty and unhealthy foods that we are so used to eating, with whole grain goodness (which also tastes better than it used to once you get past the sugar cravings).

      The prepackaged meals taste good too, and they arn’t too expensive, but cooking good that fits the diet is super easy also.

      one other great thing is that this diet is constantly feeding you… im an eater, i LOVE to eat… and i actually got to the point where i was just so sick of eating all day long. lol.

      i think southbeach is great. its very healthy. and very easy. your whole bod will feel better.

      if you want more info on it, i spent a few weeks researching meal ideas, etc (like what to plan for work week and stuff) feel free to email me.

      The most difficult part of this diet was cooking for my bf. he is very thin and i always felt bad making him eat “diet” food. I usually gave him an extra helping of fruit or made some potatoes or something for him, and extra veggies for myself fo my plate wouldn’t look empty (where that delicious stuffing should be!!)

      go luck on getting healthier. =)

  48. QUESTION:
    What foods should I feed a 15 year old dog with liver problems?
    My 15 year old yorkie has been diagnosed with liver problems. The vet said her liver enzymes are too high and gave me some prescription dog food for her. She’s not too fond of it and in the past has preferred to lose weight than eat something she doesn’t like (she has food allergies so has always been on restricted diets).

    I don’t want her to start losing weight but how can I supplement her diet? The vet said she can have any vegetables or fruits. What about bread and cereals? Cheese? Eggs?

    Can I keep giving her rawhide and pigs ears to chew on? She apparently also has hypothyroidism and giving her pills is difficult when there’s nothing tasty to hide them in!

    Any help much appreciated!
    Thanks for responses. I guess I need to go consult another vet! Manny you need to relax! Many a15 year old dog has developed health problems without the owner being to blame!

    • ANSWER:
      my dog’s liver enzymes are too high and i was told by the vet to feed him 1 chicken wing with a spoon full of cottage cheese and kelp powder

      he loves it and has been living on it for over a year :D plus and occasional dried lamb treat

  49. QUESTION:
    I changed my diet, and started exercising 3-4 times a week, what can i do to speed up my weight loss?
    I’m a 20 yr old female, and I’m pretty heavy. It’s always been a problem for me but recently something snapped and made me really upset about it so I’m doing my best to keep motivated to look better… and maybe even more important feel better, I’m just done being overweight and unattractive.
    My diet before was full of fast food and junk, so changing that, although a little hard is definitely seeming worth it already. I mainly buy fruits and vegetables and more fresh stuff in general. No chips/candy/soda, but im not on any sort of diet plan or anything. I do have a thyroid problem– hypothyroidism, which I am on medication for, and recently I signed up for the gym and I’ve been doing an hour of cardio every other day for almost 2 weeks now.
    So far I’ve lost about 6 lbs. which is good. and i know if i keep going it’ll keep coming off, but i was hoping maybe there is something, like a specific diet plan, or maybe a natural sort of diet pill, maybe even a different way to exercise, that could help speed my weight loss along a bit?
    ANY suggestions would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Well you’ve done a swell job of cutting back on junk food. Most people can’t even take that step…so GOOD job!

      Definitely stay with the Natural stuff, even though it’s tempting to have a go at the sugary food.

      I would recommend that you use some herbs like Cinnamon (help with thyroidism), Green Tea, and black seeds.

      As for exercise, you don’t need to be hardcore…just start by walking 2-4 miles a day (or bicycle 3-5 miles)…keep a bottle of water with you to hydrate yourself.

      There’s so much more I can talk about. If you need to know more, just ask me..or go to this site

      http://TwitPWR.com/LgJ

  50. QUESTION:
    I quit meth. I quit smoking. in the last year i gained 70 pounds. Need to lose at least 50! am trying a diet..
    I was on meth 24/7 for a year.Have now been clean for 1 yr, and quit smoking cigarettes 4 months ago. Have gained so much weight…now excercising, eating dry toast for breakfast, 2 apples for a snack, leancuisine for lunch, an apple and a lowfat granola bar for snack, and another lean cuisine for dinner.I eat dinner around 5:00, jog half a mile, then have another apple.I also have an hypothyroidism which I am on medication for.Is this a healthy diet? Is it low enough in fat and calories that I should lose weight? My eating was out of control, since getting clean, food has taken on a whole new meaning and has never been so good! and of course, since quitting smoking, i ate instead of smoked. now the cravings are under control, but i am up to 200 pounds!hope someone can make some suggestions!

    • ANSWER:
      first off I will congratulate in making the right choice that you do want to lose some 200 pounds.

      if you do exactly what I tell you, I guarantee you that you will see results.

      you must do the following:

      1. food.
      (a) unhealthy foods – - -please say good bye to any form of unhealthy food including junk foods whatsoever.
      (b) healthy foods – - – - please consult with a doctor about nutrition and diets to see what forms of foods you are allowed to eat.
      2. liquids.
      (a) because you will go to the gym, every single day, you will be required to drink at least a gallons worth of liquids (excluding sodas of any sort and mineral water) such as water, milk, orange juices, etc., etc., etc.
      3. exercise
      (a) I suggest that you do at least between 2 or 3 miles in the treadmill in which it should be approximate about 40 to 60 minutes