Healthy Diet For Hypothyroidism

Healthy snacks, that taste good too, can help us meet our daily nutritional needs. Children in particular need healthy snacks that provide the essential nutrients and satisfy their growing bodies. Healthy snacks add extra calories and nutrients to an athlete’s diet without taking too much time to prepare or eat. Healthy snacks can give kids a boost, especially after school or going to and from activities.

Exercise is a part of a well-rounded lifestyle. No matter what type of activity you participate in, it is important to nourish your body with the right foods before and after you exercise. If you participate in sports, eating the right snacks after the big game can make all the difference to your body.

During any sporting event, whether intramural, or in your backyard, the muscles take a good beating. You feel good afterwards but that doesn’t mean that your body isn’t in need of some serious refueling. The body burns a lot of calories with each minute of play.

Perspiration is sticky and stinky at times but it is the body’s way of cooling off. You lose vitamins and electrolytes through your sweat. These nutrients need to be put back so that the body can recover sufficiently. Recovery involves building stronger muscle fibers and restoring the chemical balance inside your body.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Diet?
    I really need some help with knowing what foods are good for my thyroid and which are harmful. There’s just so much information out there. Is there anyone out there who has hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) who has found a healthy diet that helps them boost thyroid function and lose weight? I need some success stories from hypothyroid people or doctors. I’m ready to try anything. Please no spam please. I don’t want info on fad diets. I want to be balanced and healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      Many years ago, Lou Costello said that a diet was “When you could have all you wanted of everything you don’t like.” With that in mind, no one actually wants a diet, but they want to find things that they can enjoy that fit their needs.

      Your Doctor will probably be able to refer you to a nutritionist. That would be the best place to start.

  2. QUESTION:
    Looking for good diet for people with hypothyroidism….?
    I was diagnosed with Hypothroidism about 6 years ago. I gained almost 100 pounds! Even though I take my meds I have not lost any weight, my doctor says the meds really don’t help you lose weight. Has anyone found a good, healthy diet that works for people with Hypothroidism? I know I’ll never lose all of it, but I’d like to give a good try. I would prefer only serious answers please.

    • ANSWER:
      The imbalance in your thyroid can lead to imbalances in other glands, pituitary, ovaries and pancreas. You can have adrenal problems as well that increase weight gain. So you can have 4-5 factors working against you, not just one. The doctors don’t really tell you this. You have to read up on things yourself.

      I suffer from this condition after being treated with radioactive iodine. The result has been a nightmare. I used to be stick thin and could eat anything. Now I have to be careful and fight constantly. For the most part I have been successful, but if I stop at all, my weight goes up relentlessly. Remember that you will become increasingly hypothyridic for the rest of your life, so be aware that your thyroid meds will slowly have to be increased over time. You have to be vigilant. Most endochrinologists also are not huge amounts of help, I find. An interesting fact, btw — if you do manage to lose the weight and get pregnant, your chances of having identical twins increases by something like 30 per cent (read that somewhere).

      You have to exercise – a lot; you must raise your overall metabolic level over time, which means exercise every day. It is better to do two small sessions in the morning and evening (like two walks, or go to the gym and a short walk in the evening) than one big session. The idea is to keep everything at a constant and consistently raised metabolic level, which other lucky people have naturally. So you must work more activity into your whole life across the board (take the stairs, walk to work, lift small weights at your desk if you work behind one, etc.). You need to do yoga or other stretches like pilates and take vitamin and mineral supplements to reduce stress (chromium, hoodia, essential fatty acids, B vitamins, etc.). Try to get a good and sympathetic personal trainer, who understands people with medical problems like this and diabetes.

      Be aware that you are at a higher risk for diabetes, and you should basically switch to a diabetic diet, in order to avoid actually getting the disease. No white bread/noodles/rice. Cut out sugar. Eat celery and cucumber, whole grains, chicken and fish. Oatmeal is very good, as it burns slowly and you will find that you will feel better if you eat it without sugar, just cook it with fruit (blueberries, apples) and coconut, cinnamon or vanilla. Also, for some reason, pumpkin seeds are good for this disease (read it somewhere).

      Another thing I have found that works is small light meals and timing — eat each meal at the same time through the day every day, to the minute, if you can. You have to reconceptualise food and treat it like medicine. Try to get up early. This illness creates wakefulness in the late evening (you will get hormone rushes at the wrong times), prompting snacking late at night and staying up late (naturally thin people have appetite surges at different times of day and tend not to eat at night). Also, my doctor says that staying up late causes obesity. They have done research on shift workers and found that people whose internal clocks are not in rhythm with the sun gain a lot of weight. So go to bed at 11 (as you can see I am wide awake and it is 3:13 a.m. here so so much for good advice).

      This will help your body learn to regulate itself metabolically again, as the thyroid condition seems to involve an auto-immune disorder, in which the body becomes allergic to itself and unable to manage itself properly. It is like a ship swinging from side to side; the more it tries to fix things the more it pushes the swinging further. You have to create gentle, slow and small but beneficial changes in all aspects of life, step by step, over time. So aim first to lose five pounds only. Then another five, then another.

      It is NO FUN, horrible, I know, but you have to do it if you want to salvage your health.

      Mary Shomon is a patient’s advocate who writes extensively on this disease and also suffers from it. Check her website, sign up for her newsletter, and read her books; somewhere on her site is a list of doctors all over the UK and North America who are recommended by patients. She has spent years researching this illness and you will find out a lot that will help you to get your weight down to its ideal level and you will feel a lot better. Do NOT let anyone tell you that you cannot get your weight back down to its ideal level ever again, because I have done it, but have had doctors tell me that it is not possible. I think Shomon also has organised online groups where people can commiserate about having this illness, which helps, since most people with this ailment have to deal with a distinct lack of sympathy and understanding from the rest of the world.

  3. QUESTION:
    I’m extremely active, have an exceptionally healthy diet, and yet still have some stubborn belly fat?
    So, the basics – I weigh about 165 lbs, am 5’8″, jog/walk at least 2 miles *every single day*, and have a caloric intake of just under 2,000 calories (at most 20 grams of fat, usually less).

    I’ve had this stubborn little chub of belly fat ever since hypothyroidism hit in my teenage years. It’s completely under control now, labs are perfect, I take my meds on a completely empty stomach and that’s all completely fine. If you looked at any other part of my body, I’m all sorts of lean. But I have about 10-15 lbs of fat that’s clinging on for dear life right around my belly and just won’t go away.

    I won’t lie and make this out to be some epic amount of weight, it’s a purely aesthetic issue for me. I look fine now, but SHOULD look *great* given how much exercise I do and how healthy I eat. I want my due!

    Any ideas on getting rid of it?!

    P.S. I already do interval training when jogging, varying the speed/going for fast bursts to make it harder. I also do some casual weight lifting

    • ANSWER:
      hmm well if you can tolerate it, go to 1850 calories per day and see what that does. Also do some upper and lower ab workouts: something like crunches and suspended leg lifts. If your diet is really that good, i actually (i know this is hard to believe) recommend eating more fat- up it to 25 g/day (this should be in the form of flax and fish oil, olive oil, peanut butter) and try to cut out all the saturated fat possible. The Essential Fatty Acids -EFAs- in those fats are essential to your body’s metabolism. The interval training is smart for you. Good luck!

  4. QUESTION:
    Can you explain the psychology behind a parent who want you to be overweight?
    I had been obese growing up. In high school I would try to go on a diet but my mom would sabotage by keeping cookies or fried goodies laying around the kitchen in front view. I finally lost the weight in college. Since then, I stayed at my mother’s for 2 months. She refused to let me prepare my own food. If I begged her please no she would throw a fit. I realize now that she would secretly put sugar in my food. I would confront her about the extra sweetness and she said it was Splenda. Spenda in fruit? I just took her word for it, even though my gut said otherwise, but why would she? She would do such things like open up my yogurt and put a spoon in it and the yogurt would be mixed. Anyway, the skyrocketed weight gain despite my working out confirmed that she indeed was doing so. (I have hypothyroidism and PCOS, daily healthy diet & exercise regime is pertinent to keep my weight in a healthy range) Strangely, during this time, my mother had been starving herself and has become
    anorexic. It is not about body image though (or is it?) My whole life I would overhear her complaining to just about everyone that her life was soo tragic that she was treated like a servant at home (her weight loss was supposedly due to the intense stress not the fact that she would starve herself) and the kids were obese b/c of their laziness.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like one crazy lady to me. Apparently anoerexics love feeding their families and friends. She sounds like she needs therapy. And quickly.

  5. QUESTION:
    How is it possible for me to have hypothyroidsm and be underweight by about 30 pounds?
    My doctor just told me that I have hypothyroidism. I am 22 years old and have a healthy diet but don’t seem to gain weight at all. In fact, I’ve lost 15 pounds in the last few months without changing my diet.

    • ANSWER:
      I have hypothyroidism and I am not overweight… You probably only require a LOW level of the hormone replacement, Levothyroxine or Synthroid, Because your condition isn’t as severe. If you were to not take your meds you would start experiencing the symptoms of hypothyroidism over time, such as fatigue, weight gain, painful/irregular menses, hair loss, itchy dry skin, muscle aches/pains, constipation etc…

  6. QUESTION:
    I quit meth. I quit smoking. in the last year i gained 70 pounds. Need to lose at least 50! am trying a diet..
    I was on meth 24/7 for a year.Have now been clean for 1 yr, and quit smoking cigarettes 4 months ago. Have gained so much weight…now excercising, eating dry toast for breakfast, 2 apples for a snack, leancuisine for lunch, an apple and a lowfat granola bar for snack, and another lean cuisine for dinner.I eat dinner around 5:00, jog half a mile, then have another apple.I also have an hypothyroidism which I am on medication for.Is this a healthy diet? Is it low enough in fat and calories that I should lose weight? My eating was out of control, since getting clean, food has taken on a whole new meaning and has never been so good! and of course, since quitting smoking, i ate instead of smoked. now the cravings are under control, but i am up to 200 pounds!hope someone can make some suggestions!

    • ANSWER:
      first off I will congratulate in making the right choice that you do want to lose some 200 pounds.

      if you do exactly what I tell you, I guarantee you that you will see results.

      you must do the following:

      1. food.
      (a) unhealthy foods – - -please say good bye to any form of unhealthy food including junk foods whatsoever.
      (b) healthy foods – - – - please consult with a doctor about nutrition and diets to see what forms of foods you are allowed to eat.
      2. liquids.
      (a) because you will go to the gym, every single day, you will be required to drink at least a gallons worth of liquids (excluding sodas of any sort and mineral water) such as water, milk, orange juices, etc., etc., etc.
      3. exercise
      (a) I suggest that you do at least between 2 or 3 miles in the treadmill in which it should be approximate about 40 to 60 minutes

  7. QUESTION:
    How to cope with weight gain associated with hypothyroidism? Please help?
    I usually weigh 135 pounds and I am 5’5. I was diagnosed with Graves disease last year and struggled a lot with losing over 40 pounds and looking anorexic. Now I am glad I am recovering, but I have take medication for hypothyroidism. The doctor reassured me that with my active lifestyle and healthy diet, I will be back to my normal size in no time. I am thankful to have pulled through but I work at a fashion magazine and unfortunalely, it means weight issues. I never really cared about my weight cause I was fine, now I feel so self-conscious because I gained over 60 pounds and I’m trying to get rid of it. It’s taken a toll on my self-esteem. I feel so depressed.

    • ANSWER:
      I understand the way you are feeling being that you work for a fashion magazine. However, people do have health problems from time to time. If the people you work with know what you went through, then they should be able to appreciate your struggle to get back to your normal weight. You have to realize that you are one of the few people who do feel insecure about their weight but are actually doing something about it. I hate it when an overweight person complains about their weight and does nothing about, not one thing. You said you are active and are on a healthy diet. You have to keep looking forward to that day when you will start to lose the weight, especially if your doc thinks it will go back to normal.

      Sometimes when I used to feel bad a friend of mine would tell me “Even if you don’t want to, smile. I guarantee you will feel at least a little better.” And actually it works. Forcing myself to smile made me think about the things that would make me smile, and then I smiled cause I wanted to.

      It’s all about controlling your mind and its thoughts. You can control what you think about. So if you think about something that makes you in that depressed state, realize it and then change it and think about things you like. And I know this is the cheesy part, but also remember the things God has blessed you with (if you are a believer). Even if you’re not a believer, we sometimes need to realize we have a roof over our head, food to eat, beautiful nature to bask in, and internet…who doesn’t like the internet?! :)

      Oh…and you work for a fashion magazine…that’s something to smile about in itself. You’ll get your weight back to normal if you put your mind to it and keep your head up. I don’t want to go into repeating myself so I’ll cut off here, but good luck!

      =]

  8. QUESTION:
    Community Take on Diet Alternatives. What do you think?
    What is your educated or experienced opinion on why people go for alternatives to healthy diets, rather then do the diets themselves; which in fact, is the only true way to get to and maintain a healthy weight.

    Alternatives include:

    - Lap-Band Procedure
    - Diet Pills
    - Cut-Out Diets (low-carb, low-fat, low-sugar…)
    - Low Calorie Diets ( set aside because of its recent publicity in the press without knowledgeable reasoning)
    - Crash Diets (not eating)
    - Match diets ( eating 500 calories while attempting to burn off the complete 500 calories)
    - et al

    I am just curious about different opinions people have as to why one would avoid the obvious (a healthy diet) for more expensive and often health endangering alternatives.

    Also disorders such as hypothyroidism would be unavoidable and therefore irrelevant in an argument.

    • ANSWER:
      Because people want instant gratification and are more interested in the weight then being healthy.

      I have been losing weight slowly[just had a baby] with a healthy diet.
      We follow a traditional diet, steak, chicken, fish, raw, milk, butter, etc.
      The reason it works even with all the ‘fat’, there is no processed food! no fast food! no MSG! I make everything from scratch, its hard work, but the fact that its a healthier lifestyle is what matters. People need to care about their health rather than being skinny.

      http://www.westonaprice.org/splash_2.htm

  9. QUESTION:
    Starvation to healthy.?
    Alright, I recently discovered that I have hypothyroidism.. So, it’s made me overweight for a long time, no matter how hard I tried to work out. I’m 5’9″, seventeen, and I was about 230. I’m fairly porportinate, just.. overweight. But, I’ve dropped down to 205, from severely cutting my calories. I eat an apple, some grapes, lots of water, peanut butter and maybe a slice of ham/chicken. I lost 25 pounds in a very unhealthy time limit, maybe a couple months? Anyways. I want to loose weight the healthy way, so I have a question. If I continue eating like this until I’m out ot the 200′s, (maybe 195), then continue loosing weight on a healthy diet… Will that work? I’m afraid to eat more, because I don’t want to gain it all back, and I do NOT want to become anorexic. I’ve noticed that I’m showing signs of going down that path. I do exercise, I’m a swimming and kickboxer, and then I try to get some weight training in. And I know that if you starve your body and then eat, you gain the weight back.. So is there a way to reintroduce myself to eating healthy without becoming so far overweight. I can’t eat if I know I’ll gain it all back. It makes me cringe. HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Awesome I actually properly have the best advice.

      Ive been there, I got meds for it and it REALLY helped.
      Also, eating that little makes your thyroid worse which will make it harder and harder.
      What I recomend is start low carb =D best thing I ever did, search atkins diet on google.
      You might gain a little at first, but only cause you’ve been starving yourself, then you should start losing again, and though it was alittle slow because of the thyroid it still managed to come off and I feel great.

  10. QUESTION:
    My wife has hypothyroidism, she is in her mid 30′s. She can’t seem to lose weightt.?
    She takes 100mgs of Eltroxin a day, eats a very healthy diet, which when her Endocrinologist saw it, didn’t have to change anything about it. Fresh fruit, vegetables, fish and occasionally good red meat or chicken. She walks for an hour almost every day, again as recommended by the doctor. She seems to be gaining weight instead of losing it, even though her blood tests are showing that her Thyroid is doing well on the medication and is almost at normal level.
    Is there anything anyone can recommend. She has been like this for a couple of years now and is really unhappy about it. She is thinking of looking into liposuction, and may try alli diet supplement?
    EDIT: Thank you for the replies so far. I’d be interested in hearing some more, especially about the possibilities of liposuction or diet supplements such as ALLI.
    The T3 that is mentioned below? Is there any way of getting that naturally, from vitamins or certain foods, or avoiding certain foods, or should she consider mentioning it to the endocrinologist? If she takes T3 meds as well as T4 will it help her to get her weight back to what is ought to be, or at least in the ball park of what it used to be? Thanks guys.
    Second Edit: Thanks for the new reply Dr Frank. The thing is that she walks an hour a day and eats really really well. When she was diagnosed, by blood tests, it was only very slightly under-active, so I presume this is caught early?
    I see that you have said that Liposuction, while successful in removing fat is not a healthy or long-term solution? But I wonder if she had Liposuction, and then carried on with the healthy eating and maybe kept the hour long walks or even stepped them up a little, surely this, along with her eltroxin would help her to keep the weight off? Or should she be taking T3 and T4 meds? Would that help?
    I really want to try to help her with this as it really is getting to her. So any suggestions at all would be considered.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately most patients with hypothyroidism are in fact detected very early these days, often at almost the sub-clinical stage. This means that in most cases their reasons for being overweight or obese are unrelated to their disease and simply the result of too high a calorie intake and too little exercise.

      Though orlistat (Alli or Xenical,) performs very well in clinical trials in practice it is pretty unsuccessful as a weight loss drug. Currently millions are spent on it worldwide as an over the counter drug, and, as the most common prescribed NHS weight loss drug, tens of thousands of pounds are wasted on it each year. It has been broadly found that 2 in 3 pill dieters, whichever drug is selected, actually end up heavier in the long term.

      Liposuction certainly does remove fat, but it also seldom provides a healthy or successfull long term answer either.

      I am afraid it is at the end of the day a case of diet and exercise or remain doomed to be overweight.

  11. QUESTION:
    Is it hypothyroidism or a food allergy?
    For the past year I’ve been struggling with digestive problems. Constipation, bloating, gas, etc. I’ve also recently been experiencing swelling in my ankles, feet and legs, especially after drinking alcohol. Often feeling cold when others are not. Feeling of fatigue, exhaustion and some unexplained weight gain. I work out 6 days a week with at least 40 minutes of cardio. I don’t eat red meat and maintain a very healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, only whole wheat, whole grains and very little to no dairy. I was given a medication by my gastronologist for chronic constipation but feel this is not the right diagnosis for me as this is not the major problem. He also mentioned there might be some underlying thyroid problems which I am thinking of getting checked but wondering if acupuncture or looking into food allergies might be the better cure. Any advice?

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    Is it possible I have hypothyroidism?
    It runs in my family and I don’t know if I might have it, or if I scared myself into thinking I do. My hair has become thin and dry and is falling out. I’ve also gained a lot of weight despite my healthy diet and daily exercise that has kept me in shape up until these past few months. Those are the only symptoms I know about, but here are some other things that are going on with me:

    -Constant headaches
    -irregular periods
    -stiff, sore muscles (especially in my arm)
    -loss of appitite.
    -Insomnia (although this isn’t the first time. I had it my freshman year of highschool and was put on sleeping pills for a little while)

    I’m 16.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello. I have hypothyroidism, and have all the symptoms that you listed. With your family history, i’d say you have a pretty good chance of having a thyroid problem. You need to see a doctor, and ask for a full thyroid panel blood test ( TSH, T3, T4, and an Antibodies test ). Don’t put it off. The longer you wait, the worse your symptoms will get. Feel better soon :-)

  13. QUESTION:
    Can being on the low side of normal with hypothyroidism be too low for some?
    I recently had an blood test and my thyroid levels were abnormal. They didn’t say low but that is what I have been expecting. I have always been on a very healthy diet and exercise nearly everyday but I have gained nearly 30 pounds in two years. I have to stay below 1200 calories a day to not continue gaining. I have absolutely no energy and have no tolerance for cold, as well as other symptoms, dry skin, legs swelling, brittle hair and nails. My real question is, if my doctor determines that I am just on the low side of normal and doesn’t put me on meds, can normal still be too low for some?
    another detail, I have been on high cholesterol meds for over a year, and I just turned 23.

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    I am so anxious. I have recently been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, and I know I have been posting?
    alot, but I just don’t know what to do. I am having anxiety attacks in class and it really makes me not want to go. I am fine at home and going out especially if I am with someone I know, but I am so tired of this. I have been dealing with it for over a year now and am wondering if anyone else feels this way…I want to finish my degree and be productive but I am terrified of going to class and i know that sounds crazy, but that is just the way it is. I am tired of feeling like a failure about not being able to control this. What helps? Will the thyroid meds help? What do I do in the meantime? My mom says “just drop all your classes, maybe you can get a job at a gas station” which is very hurtful because obviously I want to finish my degree and be productive, but is it possible that I am just not capable of that? I know I am tired of struggling with this. I have spent entire semesters puking before class and sweating my a** off during because I was so nervous…here is what I’ve tried:
    counseling
    relaxation tapes several times a day
    healthy diet
    working out
    no caffeine/stimulants
    anti depressants and other meds (ineffective)
    Seriously, what is left that is not addictive? And no sarcasm please this is hard enough without it. Anyone feel the same, or felt the same and changed?

    • ANSWER:
      People who don’t have certain issues really can’t empathize with you. Your mom, likely not having hyperthyroidism, is being insensitive. I’m actually sitting in a dorm right now facing a lot of what you’re facing. Instead of it being hyperthyroidism, though, it’s social anxiety. I know that beyond nervous feeling that makes everything ten times harder; your mom doesn’t. So listen to me when I say that you’re doing great to even be in school right now. College is a challenge for anyone, much less people with health problems. Get thorough information on the medications they’re recommending and consider taking them. You have a health problem that’s interfering with your life, so why not try everything you can? Also, these things you’ve tried aren’t one shot attempts. You’ve got to be persistent. If one counselor is ineffective, move on to another therapist. Follow a special diet for hyperthyroidism if you can. All in all, believe in yourself. Believe that you’re going to feel better and push through these days. I have to tell myself this before my classes: “It sucks and it’s hard; I’m so nervous I feel like I could faint, but if I run from here I’m going to keep running. Before I know it, I’ll be 35 with no degree and nothing to show.” You have this opportunity to learn something that no one can take away from you. Struggle through these few years to avoid struggling much more in the long run, without a degree. You can do this. Contact the disability services department at your college and get all of the help you can. Nervous taking tests? Get extended time limits. Need to sit near the front of the class or by the door? Ask to have it done for you. That’s what they’re there for. Just remember when you’re sitting in class that there’s some girl (me) sitting in a class miles away from you, battling through it with you. Best wishes.

  15. QUESTION:
    My red blood cell count has been dropping slowly but steadily over the last year …?
    and I would appreciate some suggestions as to possible causes, and treatments. I’m a 57 yr old male diabetic, with a healthy diet, taking diaformin & diamicron, and thyroxine for hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      Anaemia – a decrease in the number of red blood cells which lead to low red blood count. I had anaemia from iron deficiency. Taking iron supplements will increase levels..but check the vitamin test first! many supplements do not absorb which i why i take under the tongue spray and liquid vitamins.

      Pancytopenia – a lowering of all three types of blood cells; red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, which may lead to low red blood cell count, low blood platelet count, and/or low white blood cell count. I personally had pancytopenia from vitamin B12 deficiency.

      Thrombocytopenia – a decrease in the number of platelets which may lead to low blood platlet count. There are many reasons as listed on the website below. Tranfusions may be needed.

      Anyone with hypothyroidism is at risk vitamin B12 deficiency, iron deficiency and vitamin D. This article lists the 10 things to improve your hypothyroid symptoms.

      10 reasons you may still feel bad:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/2009/01/15/ten-reasons-you-may-still-feel-bad/

      Thrombocytopenia:

      http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec14/ch173/ch173d.html

      Vitamin Test:

  16. QUESTION:
    I have just been diagnosed with hypothyroidism. This makes alot of sense because I work out all the time?
    and eat a very healthy balanced diet. I have not had weight issues in the past and have always lost weight more easily than I gain it. Recently (last year or so) I have noticed that no matter how much I work out I cannot loose weight and no matter how strictly I control my calorie intake I stay the same or gain!! I have had a host of other symptoms that go along with hypothyroidism and now that it is confirmed my main concern is this…Will getting on medication help significantly with the symptoms? How long will it take? Any similar experiences where getting on medication helped you? I have fought this for a couple of years and was thinking it was just me and pretty much heard from others (including Dr.s) that it is all in my head. Well, anatomically speaking I guess they were close!!! anyway, help if you can, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      i’ve had it for 6 years now all the side effects remain with me even though i take meds every day for it. it just balances it out. other than that you just have to get used to the side effects and believe me when i say i hate them too

  17. QUESTION:
    what is a very nutritious diet for someone with..?
    What is the best healthy and nutritious diet for someone who:

    1.is a vegetarian (yet eats seafood),
    2.has hypothyroidism,
    3.has PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) which means also needs to cut down sugar and starches
    4.is really poor presently and cannot afford most organic and such at the moment…as in counts every penny
    5. has poor sleep
    6. is dehydrated most of the time
    7. has very very cracking bones but can’t stand milk

    • ANSWER:
      Milk isn’t as good as yoghurt for your bones,so if you can stand yoghurt try it cause it has worked miracles on me!
      Other than that,I can only suggest lots of fruit and vegetable because you get all the water you need and it’s better absorbed by your body than just drinking water…you know…all the fibre and stuff really helps!
      You could maybe try reiki to help with your sleep and health problems.
      I’m not a doctor but in my experience all of these stuff really work if you want to be healthy and energetic during the day.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why does it seem like when you are fat….?
    The very people who are critical and discriminatory of your weight are fat people themselves? It seems like ironically if someone is the same size of you or bigger they are critical of you?

    I’m 5’0 and over 220 lbs (which I know is super obese) and I have psychological reasons why I overeat and I’m trying to work on it, but right now I’m under so much stress and chaotic-ness in my own household that it’s just too much. However I have an older sister who is 5’4 and 100 or 200 lbs more than me and on her way to getting gastric bypass surgery (she has mental and psychological issues as well but more severe) and she has picked on me about my weight, saying I”m fat enough for gastric bypass. I’ve had at least 2 professionals (one or two of them being a doctor I’ve seen suggest against gastric bypass and promoted healthy diet and exercise and gave me medication for mild hypothyroidism) so to me that would mean I’m not a candidate for the surgery and why would my sister berate me knowing the psychological issues I’ve had with my weight and food, like I’ve tried making myself throw up and I’ve considered starvation. I wish I didn’t have to eat really. But why does it seem like just because I’m the opposite of an anorexic when it comes to body weight/proportions and eating habits but similar psychological issues, I’m treated like an evil criminal but not a good girl in pain?

    • ANSWER:
      i think your sister treats you the way she treats you because she knows she is bigger than you & she doesn’t want you to end up like her. i think she thinks if she pisses you off enough about it, that you will be more willing to lose the weight in a more healthy way than to have to get the gastric bypass surgery she has to get. surgery is not the easy way to go. i have seen 3 people struggle with the after-effects of this surgery. only you can take control of your eating and what you are eating. watch the biggest loser to get some tips and maybe even some motivation. being fat isn’t easy, but many people (especially with psychological issues) hide behind all that fat in order to not have to deal with the ‘real’ issues… i hope you can find yourself some help. the best thing for you to do is to be there for your sister even if she berating you. good luck to you.

  19. QUESTION:
    Could I have Hashimoto’s?
    Hi all.

    I’m 5’1 and 130 pounds, and trying to lose about 20 pounds. I’ve been exercising consistently since May of 2008. Over the summer, I worked out with a trainer a couple times a week and did about 45 minutes of cardio a day (usually elliptical) or one to two group fitness classes each day (step, cardio kickboxing, or cycling). My diet is extremely healthy and controlled.

    I went to my doctor to get tested for hypothyroidism and my levels were in the normal range, but leaned more toward hypothyroidism. My doctor told me to eat 1200 calories a day, and then later advised me to 1000 calories. Even eating this little amount and exercising as much as I was, I still couldn’t lose weight or tone up.

    I am continuing to have the same problem – frequent workouts, healthy diet, and no results. I have some symptoms of Hashimoto’s – frequently cold, pale skin, puffy face at times, and symptoms of depression.

    Does anyone have Hashimoto’s or know more about it that could tell me if this could be a possibility?
    I should add that I started out at 140 pounds in May, but due to a serious, life changing event, I lost ten pounds in September, mostly because I was so stressed out and ate almost nothing for about 3 weeks. That’s all the weight loss I’ve seen since then.

    • ANSWER:
      Could be.

  20. QUESTION:
    question for people who have thyroid problems?
    I have been diagnosed as having a thyroid nodule on the right side of my neck. it is moderate in size and so it has been suggested by the doctor ( my gyno found it during a routine exam, sent me for an ultrasound and sure enough there it is) that I see a regular MD and have it further evaluated.. I must admit that after reading about nodules that I have a lot of the symptoms that could be assosciated with hypothyroidism, specifically the constipation, depression,fatigue, heavy mentral cycles,musle aches and pains,very pale dry skin,thin brittle hair and nails, weekness and also unintentional weight gain. or rather i should say that since giving birth to my baby boy about 11 months ago even being on a good healthy diet i am still holding on to the weight gain.. I am trying to find a MD to go and have the nodule looked at, but what I want to know, and am curious about is if it comes back benign and that i do in fact have hypothyroidism what is the treatment, medications ect.? and also, any of you who have been diagnosed with this in the past, how successful was the treatment been for you, meaning have your symptoms eased up or gone away entirely? have you been able to control or lose the weight gain successfully with the meds and or treatments added to a healthy diet? what about the other symptoms like the fatigue and the problems with skin, nail and hair? are those better now? I guess i want to know what I can expect to get better for me once I am diagnosed. I can’t say 100% but I have a feeling that is exactly what is wrong with me and what is causing all of my issues.. I appreciate any and all info that anyone can give me on your personal experiences.. Thank you!! =)

    • ANSWER:
      First, don’t put off having the nodule taken care of! It can be very dangerous if it’s cancer! In any case, it probably needs to come out.

      I have recurrent painless thyroiditis that ends up killing a part of my thyroid with every bout. There is no way to make your thyroid consistently put out more thyroxin once it’s damaged (it can grow back sometimes on its own, however). There is no treatment–there is only replacement. To replace the needed thyroxin, I take Armour Thyroid (if it’s available) or synthroid (if it’s not). By monitoring your blood levels every few months, your doctor can adjust the amount of replacement you need. Symptoms caused by low thyroxin should go away COMPLETELY if your levels are adjusted correctly.

  21. QUESTION:
    can someone help me with my weight and fitness problem?
    Over a year and a half I have gained about 13 pounds and I have been trying to lose it. I started a diet and fitness regimen almost 3 weeks ago and I have lost only 2 pounds. I love running but my shins bother me a lot so I have to be very careful. I usually run ~3 miles/4 days a week. I also strength train with moderate weights and I eat a healthy diet. No white flour, limit carbs, moderate amount of protein, no fried foods and sweets. I don’t drink soda and I sometimes drink black coffee.

    What is bothering me the most is that even though I lost 3 pounds I look a lot bigger. My thighs are touching even more but they do look more toned. My arms and hips look like they are getting bigger and the weight is not coming off as fast as it used to.

    I did have hypothyroidism for a short time a couple years ago and the last time I had a blood test they said it was normal. I do suffer from PMS in which I get very bloated, irritable, sore, hot flashes, and everything else. It gets so bad.

    Does anyone know what might be wrong? Am I doing something wrong with my diet/fitness? Or could this be a hormonal problem? It’s getting me very frustrated and I don’t know what to do.

    Here are my stats:
    height: 5’2″
    weight: 143 lbs
    As you can see I am overweight so shouldn’t the weight be coming off if you gained weight and decide to lose it? I get a lot of people telling me that I am losing fat and gaining muscle but you have to lose weight if you are overweight. There’s no way someone overweight can eat right and exercise and stay the same weight. They have to at least get to the average range.

    Any help will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to add muscle, not just tone up or burn calories..
      When you add muscle, you add calorie burning tissue to your body, which causes your metabolism to speed up and that can result in a 10-15 lb change in your weight over a year, and that is a very good thing.

      Don’t be doing cardio. Cardio is counterproductive. It helps train your body to burn calories more efficiently, which is great if you are starving and don’t want to lose weight, or want to be able to run a half marathon. But that isn’t our case here. We want our body to BURN as many as possible. So, stop running for distance…

      Do high intensity interval training instead.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-intensity_interval_training

      In other words, sprint for 45 seconds. Walk for 2 minutes, sprint for 45 seconds, walk for 2 minutes. repeat that five times. I do this on an elliptical machine at the gym. You can do it at the high school track if you want. the goal is to absolutely hit the wall and then recover, then do it over. It is grueling, but not as grueling as 45 minutes of “jogging”.

      Most people eat way too much junk.
      Cut the sugar as low as you can. Reduce the amount of bread you eat each day to maybe 2 slices a day or less. Drop the butter, milk and ice cream. No soda, not even diet. Drink water and lots of it, like 3 liters a day. Eat 6 times a day, make certain you have an endless supply of apples and bananas. You can’t get real fat eating a 70 calorie fruit:-) Snack on that instead of 400 calories of potato chips. Now, increase the amount of protein you eat, which for you would run about 80 grams a day, or more if you can find it. Do not eat protein free salads. It will hinder your goal of fitness.

      You need to track your overall calorie intake, and target a 500 calorie deficit, which is probably about 1500 calories a day for you. Keep track of everything you eat, and the calories that consume. Put it into a spreadsheet, or track it on a sheet of paper. You can find out the calorie counts of most foods either on the product itself or on the web at http://www.calorieking.com and other places out there as well.

      You could start doing body weight workouts, push ups, crunches, sprints, squats, lunges etc.
      Take up a sport this summer. Swimming is great, bicycling is great too.

      For some great body weight exercises, go to http://bodyrock.tv

      Go to youtube.com and search for core exercises. I like planks and working with a fitness ball, lots of variations on the theme.

      You need to lose just a few lbs and add muscle so that you are lean and fit, as opposed to bony and sickly looking. You can really start to look good in just a month or so, looking great in 2 or 3. But it is HARD work, there is no easy option. It is hard work. Is it worth it? I bet you will say that it is, when you get there.

      Don’t sweat it when you seem to gain weight, or when you plateau for as much as two weeks. I have lost 27 lbs in the last 12 weeks, and I have gone 13 days between hitting a new low weight marker. Then, pop, five lbs drop. I am telling you that I am disciplined and I don’t cheat, and I work my tail off at the gym. I have dropped 27 lbs total, but easily 35-37 lbs of fat, since I have gained so much muscle mass, and I feel really good for the first time in a long time.
      So stick with it and be patient and persistent. It will come…

      Good luck!

  22. QUESTION:
    Will I continue to lose weight with my thyroid condition?
    About a year ago I started gaining weight rapidly despite a healthy diet and exercise. I also had extreme fatigue, constipation, stiff joints, muscle weakness, brittle fingernails and hair. A few months ago I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. My doctor prescribed Synthroid and within 6 weeks, I’d dropped 15 lbs.

    Does this mean I will continue to lose weight? He says my thyroid levels are normal, does that mean my metabolism is working correctly? I’ve tried to find information on this, but I just can’t find exactly what I’m looking for. I still need to lose about 50 lbs, but I’m still having issues with fatigue and it makes it extremely difficult to exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 15 years ago and experienced the same thing as you when I started Synthroid. I didn’t continue to lose weight once my thyroid hormone level was stabilized. I am pleased to add that over the years my body has responded as a normal body would to my eating habits. A book that I found helpful in the beginning and return to occasionally is “Living Well With Hypothyroidism” by Mary J Shomon

  23. QUESTION:
    Getting pregnant with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism?
    After 10 years my doctor finally diagnosed my failure to start my period as Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism. I am hoping to start trying to conceive in January 2011, so right now I’m on birth control to give me regular periods, synthroid for hypothyroidism, metformin to control blood sugar to increase my chances of getting pregnant, and I’m taking a complete multivitamin. I’m exercising and on a very healthy diet to prepare for future pregnancy, and I’m monitoring my BBT and fertile signs for practice. My doctor says I need gonadotropin therapy, or at the very least to take clomid. Unfortunately, neither of these medications are covered by my insurance. I am wondering if there are any other females with IHH, and if they successfully conceived and how. Are there any alternatives to gonadotropin therapy or clomid? Any hope and support is greatly appreciated!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Check with your pharmacist and see how much it will cost you for the clomid. My insurance will not cover any treatments and for a generic clomid it only costs me a month. good luck and lots of baby dust for the both of us,

  24. QUESTION:
    Do I have hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism earlier in the year, and they scheduled an MRI scan for me, but I was too afraid to attend due to my agoraphobia. I had a second blood test a few weeks ago, and my TSH blood results for hypothyroidism returned as normal, but they were also the same results as I received earlier in the year. A friend of mine said that different doctors think of different TSH levels as normal; for instance, a 3.5 may be excessive to 1 practice but average for another. Is that slight difference possibly the reason to my excessive weight gain, or it too slight to matter? I went on a 1300 cal diet with healthy food and regular exercise for a month, and lost 7 kilograms. I continued it for a second month and lost 0 kilograms.
    I’ve used 3 scales, all of which give me the same results; I fluctuate from gaining 0 to 5 kilograms every day. For example, yesterday I could weight 70 kilograms but today I could weigh 75. If it isn’t hypothyroidism, could this abnormal body activity be something else? I’m a 17 year old female if it helps. I’m so sorry for asking so many questions! I’m just so worried.

    • ANSWER:
      No

      TSH : Normal ————-> no hypothyroidism

  25. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism!?
    I am a 16 years old female. I am about 5’4” and 145 pounds. I have been monitoring my eating and ingest less than 2000 calories a day and I eat fairly healthy. I work out at the gym and run about three times a week and I burn around 300-400 calories from exercise. I have always been fairly active, but I have been staying to that routine for the past 5 months and I have not lost any weight. I have the disfortune to have a very bad metabolism for someone my age. I am always tired, even when I wake up for 10-12 hours of sleep (I typically get about 7 hours M-F). This spring I have developed allergies and I frequently get sinus infections. I also have puffiness and circles under my eyes. Do you think I should get tested for hypothyroidism? I do not have any family history that I know of of any thyroid problems and I am pretty sure I have enough iodine in my diet.

    • ANSWER:
      See a doctor and tell him your symptoms.

      You could have an underactive thyroid, you could have sleep apnea, but all these are guesses, so see a doctor.

  26. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism medication, diet, exercise, weight loss…?
    Hi. I went to the doctor a while ago and she told me that my thyroid levels were a bit high. I also have some hairloss in the front of my head, achy muscles, fatigue, anxiety, panic attacks, and cant get my period on my own (the dr. gave me birth control pills which are working for my period). I have been overweight for my entire life, but for the past month I have been doing weight watchers and going to the gym 4-5 times a week. My mom is also doing weight watchers–eating and and exercising the same way I am–and she seems to be losing weight faster than me even though she weighed less to begin with. I cant seem to get past 231 lbs. I dont know if my slight hypothyroidism is that big of a deal, but if it is then would medication make that much of a difference with healthy eating and exercise? Could a thyroid problem be holding me back even if I’m eating healthy and exercising. By the way, I’m 19 yrs old, female, 5 foot 4, 231 lbs
    I already eat around 1500 calories a day and exercise 4-5 times a week. My question is could about whether or not a thyroid problem can actually make that much of a difference.

    • ANSWER:
      Hang in there, everybody is different. do a good deal of cardio and take some fun classes that mix it up and not seem dull stay focused and dont expect dramatic results in a month, everyones is different get on a 1500 calorie a day diet. 5 meals a day three meals and two snacks to speed up your metabolism. stay away from sodas and limit you sugar intake it will take alot of hard work but dont give up. look into a personal trainer.dont look for a dangerous (quick fix) if you know what i mean. work for it and you will see results.

  27. QUESTION:
    What are risks for pregnant women with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering if someone could give me sights to explain what hypothyroidism is.? The doctor said I was perfectly healthy other than that. I know weight loss is an issue, but can it cause infertility or the inability to concieve right away? I really love my doctor but he did not explain what it was. I am 10 weeks and 4 days pregnant and wanted to know if it could cause any complications in pregnancy. I know this is alot to ask but I wanted to know whether other than tyroid medication whether there was anything in my diet I needed to change. Any help would be appreciated. I only would like advice. I know that you are not doctors but any helpful sites or input would be useful.

    Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Just do everything that they tell you too and keep taking your medicine. My cousin has that and she has had 2 perfectly healthy baby girls, but did have a very hard pregnancy. Here is a link about pregnancy and thyroidism.

  28. QUESTION:
    Diet for Pre-Diabetes and Hypothyroidism?
    I have recently been seeing a reproductive endocrinologist for fertility issues. Through testing he has found that I have PCOS (which I have known for years), I am pre-diabetic, AND I have hypothyroidism. I am going on Metformin, which I have been on before, and Synthroid. I am going to be meeting with a nutritionist in a few weeks to arrange a proper diet that meets the restrictions of my pre-diabetes as well as my hypothyroidism.
    I’m just wondering if anyone else with both conditions has met with a nutritionist. If so, what was the diet like? What types of foods (besides the obvious white breads, potatoes, starches) were you told to avoid? What types of foods did you learn were beneficial for both conditions? I would like to know so I can start getting myself healthy now rather than waiting two more weeks and eating potentially dangerous foods.
    I definitely don’t think that I’m going to really harm myself in a few weeks, but I would like to stay away from the foods that have put me in this position and I would like to start ASAP. I have even heard that for hyothyroidism that foods like broccoli and spinache can be no-no’s. Who knows if that’s true, but I already about sugars, starches, and white processed breads and pastas. I’m looking for those foods that one might not expect, but cause harm to people with hypo and pre-diabetes.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m on the same medications. I never saw a nutritionist, but here’s what I eat. I cut out grains, rice, corn, potatoes and most sources of starch. I severely limit fruit, and only eat a handful of berries (most raspberries and blueberries) a few times a week at most because they’re relatively low in sugar. I’ve read that soy can really throw off the thyroid, so I don’t eat much soy. Maybe some soy sauce once or twice a month. I eat a lot of spinach and broccoli because my vegetables all come from non-starchy sources and those are two of my favorites, and my thyroid hasn’t been affected. Thyroid levels seem to fluctuate all the time and a dosage that works for you one year might not the next. I recently had my thyroid medication adjusted because my thyroid came back slightly elevated at my last checkup, but I’d been on the medication for over a year without a problem. Nothing in my diet had changed.

      Because you’re pre-diabetic, exercise will probably have a profound effect on your blood sugar. The nutritionist will likely follow the ADA diet recommendations of 30-40 grams of carbohydrates per meal, 15 grams per snack, with lots of whole wheat grains and fruit. As a pre-diabetic, you might be able to get away with that, but many diabetics cannot, and I am generally distrustful of this low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet since carbohydrates are really the driving engine of high blood sugar in diabetics. The ADA is just very concerned about heart disease and they believe restricting your fats and upping your fruits and grains is good for your heart, but when I saw the benefits of a high-fat and moderate-protein diet on my meter, and in my blood work later (my cholesterol and trigs plummeted), I stopped listening to my doctor’s pleas that I incorporate brown rice and brown bread into my daily diet.

      So, my main recommendations are that you buy a meter, test yourself regularly and experiment with food to see what spikes you, what doesn’t, and what your portions should be. Also, consider limiting all your grains, even whole grains, as well as starchy foods and even fruit. You might be able to delay the progress of diabetes by losing weight if you need to and sticking to a low-carbohydrate and low-glycemic diet, but be warned: the low-glycemic diet is based on how non-diabetics react to foods. As a diabetic, what the low glycemic index tells you may not work for your body.

  29. QUESTION:
    I have Hypothyroidism and on meds. I exercise and eat healthy, but I’m gaining weight?
    Hello, I have to ask others, aside from doctors (who seem to know NOTHING about this!) I have Hypothyroidism, I’m 22 yrs old and I’m 5’5-5’6 ft. I weigh at last count 158-160lbs. I have been to the doctors and am currently on medication for the problem (Levothyroxine). I diet and exercise, and I’ll explain what it is I do, I walk over 3 miles a day and hit the dumbbells, I eat healthy foods, and never exceed 1200 calories a day. I am very frustrated and just flat out sick of this!!! I do all that I do and somehow I KEEP GAINING.. well I do hit platos at times, as that can be frustrating as well!!! I have been on this medication for almost a year now, and have only seen a change in my hunger. Now don’t get me wrong I have made an appointment with the doctors, but I would still like some input, from maybe those with the same or similar problems. Now there has been some sudden changes not only with my weight gain, but my breasts are bigger and I AM NOT PMS’s when I PMS I cramp and there is no cramping?! I also cannot be pregnant for my bf has had a vasectomy along time ago. I figure it’s hormones for why the breasts are bigger (which sucks for I have small D’s :( and they are bigger now… have I mentioned this!) Anyways, I need some advice, what am I doing wrong? If I’m doing it all right then why am I gaining????!?!?!?!??!?!?! Please any advice is helpful, I’ll take all!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I am afraid that some 50% of the population of the UK is now overweight and getting heavier. Provided your dose of levothyroxine is correct, your failure to lose weight will be unrelated to your corrected thyroid status. Walking though better than nothing neither improves cardiovascular status, nor uses up all that many calories. Try increasing the amount of vigorous exercise that you take and you may move on from your plateau.

  30. QUESTION:
    Just took my first CELLUCOR D4 thermal shock diet pill and i had weird results please reply if you have tried!?
    I’m 5’3 and im weighing in a lil more than i should. I’m not fat yet but i don’t want to get there either. I went to a diet supplement store and the guy strongly suggested the D4 thermal shock from CELLUCOR. I took one pill today ( even though it suggest to take 4) and I had a crazy intense burst of energy! I felt amazing all day and was so motivated to just keep moving, and be active. Im changing my diet to really healthy hearty foods and once it got to night i felt a strange come down i felt i was getting a little hotter and was a LIL dizzy. I drank plenty of water today but still unsure if this pill is right for me. I also have MILD hypothyroidism but havent got my medicine for this yet because i really really wanted to loose some pounds before sticking to a medicine i’m gonna be forced to take for a LONG while and i cant take both at the same time. Any tips or expereices with this product??

    please real answers, no rude comments/spam or I will report. THANKS!

    • ANSWER:
      Stay away from any type of diet pills, they really mess your system up. What you need to do is just eat healthier foods without them.

  31. QUESTION:
    How can I shed some pounds if I have hypothyroidism?
    I don’t want to loose much,since I’m pretty sure I have just baby fat(I’m 13),and that’s what’s making me sort of heavy,and I am a pretty normal weight for my height.

    But I was in my 150′s last time I checked,around 2 months ago,so I want to shed like 10 pounds.

    But,how?
    My diet is pretty healthy,I don’t eat sugar much and I don’t eat junk food. And,I’m vegetarian. I don’t go to gym in school however,due to medical reasons,and I hardly go outside(though,I plan to go out more starting this summer)

    ?
    Anyway,should I even be worrying?

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    Getting an underactive thyroid diagnosed?
    I am hoping for some help. I have been having hellish problems for the last year and despite seeing 3 doctors, none will help. I have developed very irregular periods, lasting between 6 weeks and 3 months, then having gaps in between lasting between 5 weeks and currently 9 weeks. My weight, despite eating a healthy, calorie controlled diet and going to the gym 5 times a week, is continuing to rise (a stone since July 06). I am constantly sleeping, whatever time of day, and when working I will struggle to get thru the day because I can’t nap. I have checked out the symptoms of hypothyroidism and have 8 of 10 symptoms. I had a test Nov 06 which was normal, so the doc won’t re-test. I am now on my second batch of diet pills because the doctor just thinks I am over-eating when it is quite the opposite! I have got diet and exercise diaries to prove this. I am trying to get into the RAF and if I can’t lose the weight I will be rejected. Can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      Go to an endocrinologist and get your TSH levels checked. This is the true test for hypothyroidism.

      I have it – and take medicine daily. An untreated thyroid condition is not a joke. Trust your gut and get the help you need.

  33. QUESTION:
    Been trying to conceive for awhile but then I found out I had thyroid problem. Been struggling with PCOS.?
    About 9 yrs ago diagnosed with PCOS had an ovarian cyst removed. Tried birth control, nothing helped, periods unnormal, now I just dont have one, just gained alot of weight. Two years found out I have Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). My life has just been more overwhelming, I’m so depressed, I’ve gained weight almost every month, when I take my medicine I’m either hot or extremley cold. I havent been able to lose any weight or even have a child. I eat three meals a day, healthy ones, diet and excerise. Because I have chronic back pain, I cant work out to the extreme. But I take lots of water aerobics classes at school and use the elipitcal and treadmill machine at the gym. I have no idea what else to do. My doctor tests me every three mths and moves up my dosages for my thyroid medcine. I have maintain a steady weight but I have no idea what else to do about my other problems. I know there have to be other people that have had similar problems like me. Any help??
    I am only seeing my general doctor and have been told I do not have diabetes, but there is a history of it.

    • ANSWER:

  34. QUESTION:
    Please enlighten me :( Hypothyroidism?
    I’m only 17 and I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4months ago, though I’ve probably had it since I was about 13 , thats when I started getting the symptoms.
    In the last 4 years I’ve gained 2 stone :(
    I’ve tried absolutely everything to lose weight and nothings working.
    My mums a nutritionist so my diet is very very healthy and I never go over 1200 calories.
    I started on eltroxin 3weeks ago.

    I’m really freaking out that I’m going to be fat for ever, I dread the thought of going to the beach this summer.
    Someone please enlighten me if I keep up my healthy eating and exercise since I’m on medication will I be able to lose weight like a normal person?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      The answer is probably, but not definitely. If your medication is effective you should begin to see weight loss over the next few months. Your doctor may have to adjust your medications though, so if you don’t lose as much as you want as quickly as you want then definitely DO NOT get discouraged. There are many medications out there to treat your condition, and not every medicine works just right for every person, we are all different. The most important thing is to keep your head up and keep working hard, you CAN overcome this.

  35. QUESTION:
    Taking Thyroxine to lose weight?
    I was diagnosed with an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) when I was 16. I am now 27 and over the years have slowly been putting on weight, despite doctors apparently giving me the right amount of thyroxine.
    I’ve been on numerous diets/healthy eating plans/had lifestyle changes/active lifestyle etc etc etc but it seems no matter what I do, I’ll lose a small amount of weight and then just stay at that weight.
    I’m so depressed, I hate being overweight, and it’s got to the point where I’ve started taking 250mg of thyroxine daily instead of my correct dosage of 150mg. Now I know it is ‘dangerous’ but I’m now so desperate. Can somebody please give me the facts on this – I don’t need a lecture, I know it’s no good for me, but can somebody (medical professional/student/etc) tell me exactly why it is dangerous? All I know is that it speeds up your metabolism and causes you to go hyperthyroid… but for a short term fix to lose weight surely this isn’t such a bad thing?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi – I’m a medical student and also have an underactive thyroid – I do understand why you might want to put your dose up, but the people who have told you it is dangerous are right. Thyroid hormone (thyroxine) does more than just speed up your metabolism – it can give you palpitations and heart problems from overworking your heart, can damage your eyes by causing proteins to be deposited behind them, and can give you severe anxiety or even a psychotic illness. Some people can even die from something called a ‘thyroid storm’, where the body basically goes into overdrive and then shuts down completely – it’s rare, but it does happen. It may be that you do need a higher dose, but that needs to be done slowly and under advice from your doctor. Some people do need to run at a higher level of thyroid hormone than others – the range is quite wide. Ask your doctor where your blood tests are in that range – it may be that you’re near the bottom of the acceptable limit and putting your dose up a bit would help. But I must emphasise, you need to do that slowly and under medical advice. If that’s not the issue, it’s possible that your doctor can prescribe something else to help you lose weight – there are various different options available now, and if you’re really committed to losing weight then a good doctor will do all they can to support you.

      Good luck with all of this – I do know how horrible it feels to be overweight. Let your doctor help you to sort it out safely!

  36. QUESTION:
    How do I even begin to get healthy and lose this fat?
    I am EXTREMELY overweight and really want to lose it but I have no idea how to REALLY begin to be healthy. I always try diets (low fat or Atkins) but I always end up falling off of the wagon. I am trying to get my thyroid stabilized (I have hypothyroidism). I am just drained of all energy and am light headed much of the time anymore so exercise is a daunting task. I just feel like I’m walking through cement and don’t know how to dig my way out of this hole. I’d love to hear from others who have experienced a similar situation or from someone who has some good ideas for me to try.

    • ANSWER:
      I would start off very slow. I am sort of going through the same thing right now. Make one change at a time. Try one new thing a week. For instance you could start one week making sure that you get enough sleep every night. The next week you could trade soft drinks for water and take a 30 min walk every other day. Just add on to it as you go. It will get easier as you go. You will be proud of yourself for making those changes and you will want to do more to improve your health. It is a lifestyle change so you can’t expect to do it all at once. When you go and drastically change your diet it stresses you out and usually has a counter effect. Just try to take it slow and see how it works out. Good luck!

  37. QUESTION:
    How can I control my high cholesterol?
    I have hypothyroidism and I take levothyroxine daily, I try to eat healthy but sometimes I eat junk food, I really would like to start being a healthier person in diet and exercise both. Any tips on what to eat or supplements to take for overall nutrition any good tips on working out to lose 30 stubborn pounds that came with my hypothyroidism? I use to be in top shape before I was diagnosed, but now I need to drop these unhealthy and unwanted pounds! I need to stay motivated too. Any good advice that I will stick to daily?

    • ANSWER:
      cut your junk food if you still want to live longer.

      high cholesterol and obesity is not a joke coz not only hypothyroidism, but will also cause you diabetes and several heart problems too. severe diabetes problem can cause you your entire leg and eyes.

      theres nothing in the world can solve your problem and remove all your fat intake if you keep on having such poor diets.

      cardio, make it at least 30 minutes for 3 times a week and start controlling your diet.

      search for a pills called “Reductil” which helps control your appetite, and another one called “Nopal” which is some fibre material with vitamin supplements that soak up the oil of your food intake inside your stomach.

      Yet i’d really recommend you to get a serious consultation with a fitness pro and a dietitian, you can find one easily and get LIVE consultation (video conferencing) at

      http://www.qualifo.com

      just enter your problem and you WILL get detailed answers from the certified pros.

      hope these help!

  38. QUESTION:
    What’s the best way to lose weight when you have Hypothyroidism (preferably without medications)?
    Ok. I’m a 20 year old girl with Hypothyroidism. I’ve been over weight for years because of this, and I can’t afford the medications. I really want/need to lose weight and get into shape. I exercise a lot and eat as healthy as a college student with no money can. So my question is this: What would be the best way for me to lose the weight?
    Are there any specific foods that I should eat or vitamins I should take?
    What are some exercises that I should do? (the weight’s pretty evenly distributed, so anything helps).
    Is there a special diet for people with Hypothyroidism?
    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Everyone is different but here’s what I am taking after reading up on it

      L-Tyrosine
      Iodoral (which is Lugol’s solution in pill form)
      There are doctor’s who believe that Iodine Deficiency is why the thyroid malfunctions.
      I feel better with the Iodoral. Here’s a link to read up and good luck. I hope you feel better soon. I hated being UNDER medicated and having those awful symptoms.
      Also AVOID soy like the plague since you are hypo.

      http://www.soyonlineservice.co.nz/

      http://www.qfac.com/articles/august/iodine.html

      http://www.qfac.com/articles/august/iodine.html

      http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/122714-overview

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

  39. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that a thin person could not be as healthy as a sinificantly overweight person?
    My hubby is very thin. I am 230 pounds (was 275 before pregnancy due to an underactive thyroid (known as hypothyroidism) and walk for at more than a mile in the morning and afternoon, and evening (so about 3 miles a day). My hubby said he wanted to start walking with me as well. Well, at the first walk around (our complex is about 1/4 of a mile each lap) he asked if we could stop. I told him that we would be walking 4 laps each time we walked. I alsoI told him that it’s not good to stop being active just because I was pregnant and the doctor said as long as I watch my signals and do not overdo it then it was perfectly safe. I am 17 weeks pregnant and continue to lose weight. I do not diet as in try to lose weight, but I have always eaten healthy and do not eat fast food or anything super high in fat. I get my needed 300-500 more calories a day being pregnant and am aware that I should not over exert myself. I imagine that being healthy I will continue to lose even in pregnancy
    Also, my hubby does eat alot of fast food and other things. I have gotten looks because I am overweight. My hubby works but even though he works 8 hours a day, it seems like he is gaining weight (I don’t mind that at all) and I am worried it could lead to a heart attack of something like that. He is 30 and I am just worried that he may not be able to see our child grow into an adult. Of course I know anything can happen but I just want him to be a little more careful, especially since his father is suffering a mild heart attack a year and he is in his late 40′s but has had heart attacks since he was 20. Does anyone have any input on how I can help him as well.
    When I say 20′s I mean late (29) 20′s

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it’s possible. Did you know that sumo wrestlers are actually really healthy? It’s because they exercise.

      Thin people who have unhealthy habits, especially men, tend to store fat around their organs, which is really really bad.

      Congrats on your gradual weight loss! So healthy, so healthy!

      As long as you continue to bring your husband along with you, he will eventually gain endurance.

  40. QUESTION:
    Is my diet causing headaches and fatigue? Please help?
    I consume no more than 1200 calories a day. I usually get 1000-1200. I always eat the same thing. I eat 1/3cup oatmeal with milk and cinnamon, one apple, and small cup of coffee for breakfast. 1/2 cup V8 vegetable soup with another fruit for lunch. Piece of meat and some veggies for dinner. I only drink water and green tea and coffee on some mornings. I also have hypothyroidism but I am on Synthyroid for it. I also take prenatal vitamins(not pregnant though), fish oil, and biotin. I’ve always been a healthy eater but the past 3 months I have had this diet change. But the past two weeks I have been feeling tired all the time with headaches towards the evening.

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe you’re low on iron or something else? If you go to the doctor’s and request a blood test that should be able to tell if there’s something missing…

      Raw foods are amazing for your energy levels. Just fruits, and vegetables. Less grains, meat and processed foods that slow you down. Dairy can also cause fatigue too… along with those other things, which is why so many people are going vegan. But there are two types of vegans. One that eat cookies and barely anything with nutritional value, and one’s like Dan…

      There’s this guy, on YouTube, Dan “The Life Regenerator” and he eats nothing but 100% healthy stuff that literally gives you energy and “radiant health.” You should check out some of his videos, and the stuff he makes is delicious, and usually really easy.

  41. QUESTION:
    Can a doctor perscribe diet pills? Are there diet pills out there that are actually good?
    My doctor mentioned to me it was an option but he did put me on synthoid for hypothyroidism but I’m thinking about taking diet pills but I know a lot of them have a bad reputation and aren’t healthy for you. But are there some a doctor may reccommend?
    Actually I am well versed on health and how to lose weight properly but when it comes down to it, it’s too difficult to do.
    Well I am very obese so yes, I could probably take medically perscribed diet pills. I do try to work on my weight issues but I’m going through so much stress and psychological issues that keep me from trying to be healthy. I wish I could just stop eating period and become so skinny I would be considered attractive and elegant.

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors won’t recommend diet pills unless you’re morbidly obese because they all come with risks, and it’s only once you get to be massive that the risks of the pills are outweighed by the medical risks of you staying at that weight.

      Also, diet pills don’t fix the root problem – whatever it was that got you to where you were overweight or obese. If it’s not managing your hypothyroidism than you need to learn to do that. If it’s not eating properly, eating too much, or not being active enough, then one needs to learn to do those things. Taking drugs won’t help you fix those problems and you’ll end up right back where you started when you stop taking them. Yo-yo dieting is even more dangerous that many of those drugs are.

  42. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism information?
    So I began doing a little research on hypothyroidism and I wanted to be sure of a couple things, because I’m considering getting tested for it but it depends on if you think my symptoms match or not. It would be more helpful if the answer came from a doctor or someone being able to relate to this somehow.

    I’m 14 years old, if that really affects it.
    My grandmother was diagnosed with hypothyroidism after finally getting tested at about 60, but died months later because of the extra weight she put on.
    My mom considered having hyperthyroidism for she lost so much weight to where she was down to 104 lbs at 5’1″ but didn’t make any changes to her diet or exercise routine, but after getting tested, she learned she didn’t actually have it.
    So if its possible for me to have a better chance of having either problem because my parents and grandparents went through having a thyroid problem, that would be great to know.

    I also would say that I have weight I can’t seem to get rid of…I’m 138 lbs average and 5’5″ tall, and I carry around a pretty chubby body which I can’t stand at all. Just 7 or 8 months ago, I became a vegetarian due to several reasons including the hope of loosing weight, I ride the exercise bike for 60 minutes at least 3 times a week and play the Biggest Loser game for the wii at least once a week. I eat around 500-900 calories a day (I restricted them because I just couldn’t make any changes with eating about 1600 a day) which includes microwaved vegetables my dad buys with soysauce, little dinners he also buys from Kashi and Healthy Choice and stuff, veggie burgers from morningstar, wheat bread toasted and peanut butter, fruit such as bananas, watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, blueberries, and oranges. I drink Silk original light with my coffee, but for lent I gave up coffee so I’m switching to green tea. The only junk food I’ll usually eat would be french fries occasionally, cream cheese, creamer in my drinks or chips once in a while.
    The slightest change or mistake I make brings me up on the scale and its terrifying to have this happen since it’s so hard to get back to where I was at. Being at 134 was a miracle but the next day I somehow shot back up.
    So if this is the weight problem they mention, then thats one of my symptoms.

    I’ll shorten this up and say that I am tired quite a lot, I wake up and have the crawl out of bed and can’t pay attention in school because of I’m tired with terrible dark circles under my eyes, my periods are abnormal since I normally begin at the very start of the month and I just got mine two days ago, and this happens quite a bit in the year. As far as cold sensitivity goes, I get cold easily, and I can’t work if I’m cold. i don’t get stuff or turn blue, it just bothers me, but it probably bothers everyone.

    If I should get tested for this, please let me know, I’d rather not get stuck with a needle for nothing haha. I’ll also answer anything else if it comes up…

    • ANSWER:
      Signs, symptoms & indicators of Hyperthyroidism: Rapid pulse rate

      Counter-indicators:
      Slowed/normal pulse rate

      Low TSH
      High T3 free level
      Elevated free T4
      Elevated DHEA level

      Women with primary hyperthyroidism have elevated DHEA-S levels.

      Counter-indicators:
      (Mildly) elevated TSH or normal TSH

      (Very) frequent stools or normal stool frequency
      Having loose/having very watery stools

      Counter-indicators:
      Having hard stools
      (Very/tendency to) infrequent stools

      Heart racing/palpitations

      Poor tolerance of heat

      Counter-indicators:
      Good tolerance of heat

      Strong appetite

      Fatigue on light exertion

      Bulging eyes
      Vision disturbances
      Irritated eyes

      Counter-indicators:
      Eyes bulge not from hyperthyroidism

      Inner trembling
      (Occasional) daytime sweating
      Cold spells

      Counter-indicators:
      Low body temperature

      Inability to work under pressure
      Irritability
      Impatient/hostile disposition

      Trouble concentrating

      Poor muscular strength

      Brittle fingernails

      Thyroid diseases may produce brittle nails or splitting of the nail bed from the nail plate.

      Constant hot flashes or hot flashes between period

      Weak sexual desire

      Excess perspiration

      Unsound sleep
      (Frequent) difficulty falling asleep

      However, I would need to know pattern of your health.
      Our body, just like the universe, has a pattern which evolves through time. Therefore by including the concept of “time” into the diagnosis, we can predict the pattern of our body, like the way we can predict the patterns in the universe. I am a Licensed Acupuncturist who practices what I call “Time Medicine”. For years, I perform my diagnosis by using your gender, birthdate, time of birth, and city and country of birth. I am able to immediately see the pattern, such as the physical appearance, the preference of food, the personality, and most importantly, accurately predict the time of event, and the type of disorder this person has. By understanding the constitution, I am able give my clients awareness as to how to prevent many ailments that may occur in their own pattern.
      So did I answer your question?
      Send a reply with the information of your gender, birthdate, time of birth, and city and country of birth.
      Look forward to conversing with you.

  43. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have hypothyroidism? or know enough about it? PLEASE read if you do :(?
    Sorry this is alot to read but i really would like somebody who knows about this to help me :(

    I am almost positive i have it, but i think my doctor is just blowing it off as high blood pressure. Because symptoms of high blood pressure can mimic a few of hypothyroidism, the only thing is that High blood pressure is also a symptom of hypothyroidism..

    But i have alot more symptoms of hypothyroidism. Including feeling weak, sore, tired, confused, very dry skin. I could probably go on but it is really getting worse. When my daughter is in daycare i come home and sleep literally all day i need an alarm to wake me up. I have to drink like 3-4 cans of diet coke a day so i can be awake and able to take care of my daughter. I do feel fine sometimes but the majority i feel like crap. And I feel like if i didnt set an alarm i wouldnt wake up, it sucks because i go back to school on monday and i know it is going to be extremely hard with how bad i feel. I never felt like this until i was pregnant and after i had my daughter but it has been 3 months since she was born :(

    My moms boyfriend is a pediatrition and thinks my doctor is being an idiot and is trying to help me out, i am just trying to get all my test results from the doctor so he can see them. My doctor told me that one of my tests showed i had low thyroid levels and he said it was fine.. obviously it isnt. I am on high blood pressure medication which IS making my blood pressure go down, because it gets water out of my bloodstream to make the pressure go down, it is still above the normal blood pressure though, it probably averages about 125/185 which isnt bad but not as low as it should be. but i still feel like crap! i am going crazy i really wish somebody could help me figure out what to do to make myself feel better. I have already asked a few questions about this and got some answers that pretty much assured me this really is the problem i am dealing with.

    I just want to know what i can do to feel better in the meantime? Especially with starting school on monday. And i plan on seeing another doctor but i just dont have time right now i dont know what to do

    I dont expect to get alot of answers i am just hoping somebody will be able to help me out a little bit? i probably sound pathetic but i feel awful.

    Not to mention i am a pretty young mom so it is hard enough as it is, i do not need another thing like this added on top of it . I want to be healthy for my daughter, and for myself i just dont know what to do :(

    • ANSWER:
      If you have an under active thyroid, there is nothing you can do to feel better until you are diagnosed and being treated. That silly little gland helps regulate just about every system in your body, and the only treatment for hypothyroidism is replacement hormones. You should try to get daily exercise to help keep your metabolism from taking a complete nosedive, and make sure you’re not dehydrated, which can cause/worsen those symptoms as well.

  44. QUESTION:
    Could it be hypothyroidism?
    A few yours ago i had my thyroid levels tested and the doctor said it was normal. Since then i have been to other doctors who have said i have insomnia, or anxiety problems. My symtoms are being extremely tired, ive gained 35 pounds over the past 3 years even though i eat extremely healthy and worked daily, depression.

    I’ve cut out caffine, i drink lots of water, i eat a high fiber, high protein low fat diet but the weight doesn’t come off, although i think i have gain muscle mass, will all my hard work i feel like im just maintaining weight.

    I’m making an appointmet with a new doctor next week but for any on that has hypothyroidism does it sound like i have it?

    • ANSWER:
      I have some of those same symptoms, but it’s not hypothyroidism. It’s all of the above, seperately. I also will get very cold for someone big. It’s still not that.

  45. QUESTION:
    Eating a lot but losing weight—why? What should I do?
    I’ve been really hungry a lot of the time since the beginning of august.
    I’m 19. Im not growing.
    I haven’t changed my exercise regimine.
    I’ll eat a meal, and then just an hour later I’ll be hungry again.
    And on top of this…im losing weight. Since august, I’ve went down 4 holes on my belt, and my pants that fit well are literally falling off of my body. I used to be an XL ladies shirt (I liked the baggyness), but now i get the same amount of bagginess in a L t-shirt, and sometimes even a medium. I can’t walk more than 5-10 steps without my pants practically being at the bottom of my butt.

    I’ve always been a bit on the heavy side. Pre-august, I was about 25 pounds overweight. I’d go through spells where I could lose weight easy (however, it’d always be when dieting and exercising) and some where no matter how I regulated my diet & exercise id simply maintain my weight. When I’d manage to lose the weight, then something like christmas always came, which meant a lot of fancy & fattening dinners, and then all of a sudden, id be heavy again. I’d try so hard to stop fluctuating but it happened anyway.

    My dad has a hyperactive thyroid. but like i said…i seem to always end up on the heavy side. So i figured if i ever suffered a thyroid problem, it’d be hyPOthyroidism.

    I feel hungry even 1hr after eating. im still eating 3 meals a day, but of course im hungry in between meals. When ive been hungry between, I do eat. Im not sure if I should or not. When I try to ignore it, I cant concentrate as well and feel slightly dizzy. The reason I do it is because im in university, and i can’t afford to always feel light headed and sickish because of “lack of food” feeling. I need to be able to concentrate. I have an A- average to maintain if I want to be able to continue in my studies (that is the grade required for my program & university for progressing into further years).

    Why is this happening? Im afraid to weigh myself… I don’t usually believing in dieting (just a healthy lifestyle), and I don’t like weighing myself. I feel im happier knowing that im comfortable in my own skin, rather than comparing myself & getting depressed over numbers on a scale.

    • ANSWER:
      Go to the doc and get your thyroid checked, and rule out all other possiblities as well.

      You may not have changed your exercise, but have other things changed?

  46. QUESTION:
    Eating a lot but losing weight ?!?!?
    I’ve been really hungry a lot of the time since the beginning of august.
    I’m 19. Im not growing.
    I haven’t changed my exercise regimine.
    I’ll eat a meal, and then just an hour later I’ll be hungry again.
    And on top of this…im losing weight. Since august, I’ve went down 4 holes on my belt, and my pants that fit well are literally falling off of my body. I used to be an XL ladies shirt (I liked the baggyness), but now i get the same amount of bagginess in a L t-shirt, and sometimes even a medium. I can’t walk more than 5-10 steps without my pants practically being at the bottom of my butt.

    I’ve always been a bit on the heavy side. Pre-august, I was about 25 pounds overweight. I’d go through spells where I could lose weight easy (however, it’d always be when dieting and exercising) and some where no matter how I regulated my diet & exercise id simply maintain my weight. When I’d manage to lose the weight, then something like christmas always came, which meant a lot of fancy & fattening dinners, and then all of a sudden, id be heavy again. I’d try so hard to stop fluctuating but it happened anyway.

    My dad has a hyperactive thyroid. but like i said…i seem to always end up on the heavy side. So i figured if i ever suffered a thyroid problem, it’d be hyPOthyroidism.

    I feel hungry even 1hr after eating. im still eating 3 meals a day, but of course im hungry in between meals. When ive been hungry between, I do eat. Im not sure if I should or not. When I try to ignore it, I cant concentrate as well and feel slightly dizzy. The reason I do it is because im in university, and i can’t afford to always feel light headed and sickish because of “lack of food” feeling. I need to be able to concentrate. I have an A- average to maintain if I want to be able to continue in my studies (that is the grade required for my program & university for progressing into further years).

    Why is this happening? Im afraid to weigh myself… I don’t usually believing in dieting (just a healthy lifestyle), and I don’t like weighing myself. I feel im happier knowing that im comfortable in my own skin, rather than comparing myself & getting depressed over numbers on a scale.

    P.S. I put this in “singles & dating” to try and get more answers. Im worried. Thanks for your help in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      It might be due to your digestion system that cannot adapt your new habit of eating every hour. Your digestion system may need time to adapt to it and hence what ever nutrition or “fat” that you should have gained all go in vain.

      Some people may think they are consuming a lot of calories per day but if you’re not putting on weight that shows that you are eating enough calories to maintain your current body type and sometimes even enough to make you loose weight.

      Depending on the speed of your metabolism you will need to start consuming higher levels of carbohydrates and protein and space out your meals around every 2 – 3 hours. The easy way to monitor yourself is to eat a lot of carbohydrates for around a week and monitor your weight gain and if your happy with the weight gain and notice a good improvement keep you’re eating patterns similar otherwise increase or decrease depending on your visual goals.

      Some tips for you to gain weight:

      Foods to Naturally Gain Weight ( Healthy)

      There are many healthy foods you can use to gain weight naturally some of which you probably already eat regularly , pasta, brown rice, fish, red meats, potatoes…..

  47. QUESTION:
    Why am I tired all the time?
    Well I a 15 year old girl and I am tired ALL the time. And yes, I do have Hypothyroidism. I take 0.88 grams daily. My doctor checks my blood level twice a year and he says my levels are where they are suppose to be. I also have Celiac Disease. I am very slightly overweight and I play Tennis on nice days and work out at the gym 3 times a week, do Zumba once a week, and swim when ever I can. My diet is very healthy. I eat some grains, meat, vegetables, and fruit. I hate junk food, and pop. I drink water throughout the day, but with my breakfast I drink a small glass of orange juice and dinner I will drink grape juice. Now I am adding fruit shakes into my diet as a snack between breakfast and lunch. (I usually have a little milk, raspberries, bananas and a dash of all natural honey. If I don’t have a shake then I will have a bowl of fruit with little sugar. Or I will have vegetables.) Because I am Celiac I take a multiple vitamin everyday for the vitamins I do not get through out the day. I take about 1200 calories a day. (Some days a little more depending on what I eat.) I get 7-9 hours of sleep every-night. I always feel like I need to take a nap. My doctor ran some tests and says I am perfectly fine and doesn’t worry about it any more. He is giving me an amphetamine for a temporary fix to see if that helps. (It only helps a little bit.) I do have a little stress in my life from school and tests, but I always take deep breaths and calm myself down and tell myself I am going to do fine. I have been tired everyday for about three-four years now and I don’t know what to do anymore. (I started my menstrual cycle when I turned 9 and it is heavy, so I have to take a pill to help regulate it.) I have been a little sad for the past 2 days from family drama, but other than that I am a happy go lucky teenage girl who hangs out with her friends. (who stays away from the drama) I am open for any suggestions, I don’t want to be tired anymore because it affects my daily life.

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroid patients.. tell me what you think.?
    I’ve had low energy and a terrible time losing weight. I work out hard 4-5 times a week and my diet is incredibly healthy and balanced. Despite this, I’m having a very difficult time losing weight. My TSH counts were 2.75 (which is high, but “within range” to the outdated Quest diagnostics numbers). My primary care physician was useless and went simply by this range in saying that everything was normal.. Needless to say, I’m frustrated. A normal 28 year old should lose weight when exercising and eating well. I’m not going strictly by numbers on the scale either (because I do strength training also). I’m going by how my clothes fit. It’s also been many months. It’s not like I’ve only worked out for two weeks and expect results.
    I’m also zapped by 2:00 and can’t go without a nap. I’ve noticed that I’m losing more hair than usual too. I do have women with hypothyroidism in my family also.
    My questions are: are there supplements I could take to boost my thyroid function? I intend to go to an endocrinologist. What can I expect at the first appointment? Any other advice or insight will be very helpful. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    Is this arthritis or something else?
    I’ve been to the doctor about both swollen knees, and have had water drained once from each knee, I also have swelling in ankle.
    My doctor says arthritis, but I thought arthritis was painful, my knees don’t really hurt, very minimal mostly discomfort from swelling. My ankle hurts more, but doc never looked at my ankle, because swelling in knee was worse and wants me to go to arthritis specialist with “evidence”. I have it, 1 knee was drained just 2 months ago, got steroids in it, now my other knee is swelling AGAIN, that one was drained already 9mnths ago. The swelling never seems to completely go away.
    FYI..I have hypothyroidism (synthroid), alopecia, ashma(advair), eczema on hands and feet, “arthritis”(diclophenac) and I’ve started taking claratin and tagamet for unexplainable hives for 4 mths.
    Is it arthritis, something else, or any helpful advice would be appreciated? Or if anyone knows a lifestyle change that may help. I have an avrage american diet. not to healthy,not to bad

    • ANSWER:
      Seems you have a number of health issues that are affecting your joints, your skin, your hair, and some allergic reactions. And you are taking a lot of different meds that may be interacting negatively. This is a severe combination of things that may require the services of several specialists. Ask your doctor to recommend a dermatologist, an allergist and an endocrinologist. Tell each specialist about the others you are seeing, as they will need to work as a team to moderate the medicines you’re taking, and hopefully formulate a plan that will improve your overall health. Good luck!

  50. QUESTION:
    Why am i fat?this is my diet,exercise and health?
    Your Open QuestionShow me another »
    AM I FAT??????????????????????
    A typical day is..
    Morning-(a bowl of grapes) or (2 hard boiled egg w/o yellow part and 1/2 cup of cabbage or less) or (A serving size of Koshi heart healthy cereal w/ organic milk) or (a bowl of pasta) and sometimes I have a bowl of grapes with one of the breakfasts.
    Lunch-(a small cup of soup with a bagel and a tsp of creamecheese and a small amount of strawberries with added sugar)or a (bagel with a 1/4 cup serving of macaroni salad and sugar added strawberries 1/4 cup or peach pear stuff) what they serve at lunch at the healthiest.
    Liquids-(water all day usual tap[tap is good quality not fluoridated and comes from underground]) and some days (V8 witch is 50cal per serving and its pureed vegetables)
    Snacks-when I get home I usual have a (1-4 servings bowl of grapes with other fruit) and/or (1-3 servings…if no fruit in the house 2-6 Koshi cereal milk less)
    Dinner-(bowl of soup)or (pasta with sauce piled on the plate because my mom cooks too much damn pasta and I eat most of it) or (less pasta but still a lot with meatballs) or (steak with baked potato that’s actually baked not microwaved) or (organic canned rice and beans with peeper stuffed)
    -One fault is I eat snacks late-
    -I almost never touch touch junk food unless its cookies but i only eat home cooked cookies-
    -I eat a lot but the foods are usually the same-
    -this covers a weekday food schedule-

    Weekend Scedeual
    Breakfast-(none when I wake up late)or(same as weekdays)
    Lunch-(pasta w/tsp sauce and a pinch organic butter)or(a bowl of soup)/or(koshi cereal a bowl no milk) or(a bowl of grapes) or(a bowl of grapes with other fruits) or (3 or 4 glasses of V8)or (koshi cereal bowl with 3 or 4 glasses of V8) or (some cabbage)
    Dinner-(same as weekdays)
    snack-(same as weekdays but it varies more)

    okay that’s my diet.

    Now for exercise.

    I walk to all 9 high school classes.
    I go to track for 2 hours.(depending on the day I face extreme temps and run around the track 2 times and do drills and depending on the day I either do more running/drills or stand for an hour and throw+ heaving balls or disks while stretching and occasionally running/jogging a bit)
    at home i usually sit on the computer from 5:00-12:30 or watch a toddler for 20min-2hrs on some occasional days.

    As for medical stuff
    when i was 12, 5’3 I weighed 193
    I found out I had hypothyroidism which is an extremely slow metabolism
    and ever since taking the pills I lost weight.

    Miscellanies- I drink 2cups-8cups a day and im trying to drink more water,
    I’m trying to eat more veggies
    I poop 1nce a day, sometimes none, sometimes twice
    I sleep about 7hrs on schooldays and 10hrs+ on weekends
    I’m a health food fanatic and hope to be a dietitian(or nanny)
    i told u i dont drink soda and i listed what i drink, water and v8

    • ANSWER:
      unfortunate metabolism…and possibly too much pasta and eating snacks late…if you’re drinking soda that will hold you back. Drink green tea (no sugar – maybe some lemon) it’s high in antioxidants and speeds the metabolism…be careful w/ weight loss pills…i wouldn’t recommend them…you may find out a few years later they cause tumors or something…some ppl just weren’t mean to be thin and lean…maybe you should make your goals more realistic? I dunno how much you weigh or how tall you are now..only how tall and how much you weighed at 12

      —-additional info—-

      a thousand apologizes…i read water and v8 and mentioned soda incase i happened to miss it in the enormous amount of text you typed….you didn’t answer the question about how much you weigh now or how tall you are. bottom line some ppl are just meant to be kinda big, better start working on other areas of your being like personality…like how not to be rude and snippy to someone who’s trying to give you advice


Help For Hypothyroidism

By hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is producing too less hormones to stimulate the metabolism or the body is not able to utilize the hormones. The lack of thyroid hormones slows down the metabolism and thus all the activities in the body, giving a combination of many symptoms related to slowness of bodily processes.

Hypothyroidism is common, but the frequency of the condition is not well determined. Some authorities estimate that 0.5% of the total American population have the disease to some degree. The frequency is much greater among people over 50 years of age than among young people.

THE SYMPTOMS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

The most common early symptoms are: Mental and physical fatigue, weakness, weight gain or over-weight, and depression.

One or more of these symptoms also use to appear early: Constipation, sensitivity to coldness, cold hands and feet, thick tongue, decreased sweating, dry hair, thin brittle hair, thin brittle nails, muscle and joint pain, pale or yellowish skin.

One or more of these symptoms usually appear later: Poor memory, slow thought process, drowsiness, slow speech, thinning of eyebrows, hoarseness, poor circulation, dry and flaky skin, decreased taste and smell, menstrual irregularities, skin thickening, puffy face, puffy hands and feet, swelling of extremities, overall swelling, muscle spasms, muscle atrophy, joint stiffness.

In children or young persons hypothyroidism may give developmental problems, like disturbed tooth development and short stature.

Hypothyroidism increases the risk of elevated cholesterol levels, heart disease and diabetes (diabetes mellitus). This occurs even by moderately decreased thyroid production.

THE THYROID GLAND AND ITS HORMONES

To understand the hypothyroidism, some knowledge about the thyroid gland and its hormones is essential.

The thyroid gland produces hormones that accelerate and in other wise regulate metabolism. A part of metabolism is the process of breaking down energy containing nutrients, and using the energy to produce molecules that all the processes and activities in the body use as fuel. Another part is the production of molecules that the body use as building materials.

The thyroid makes four hormones: Thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), diiodothyronine (T2) and monoiodothyronine (T1). The hormones contain iodine, and the figures tell about the number of iodine atoms in each hormone molecule. T3 is not made directly, but is produced from T4. T3 is a more efficient hormone than T4. Therefore this conversion is important.

The pituitary, a gland under the brain, produces a hormone called thyrotropin or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) that enhances the activity of the thyroid gland. If the body has too less thyroid hormone in the blood, the pituitary produces more thyrotropin. This makes the thyroid gland speed up its own production. By a too heavy thyroid hormone concentration, less thyrotropin is produced by the pituitary, and the thyroid gland slows down. This feed-back mechanism regulates the metabolism of the whole body.

THE MECHANISMS AND CAUSES OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

By hypothyroidism the body does not get enough thyroid hormone, or the hormones do not work effectively in the body. This causes the metabolism to slow down. When the metabolism decreases, the processes in the body do not get enough fuel and building materials, and all the body activities will therefore slow down. Energy containing nutrient will also be stored as fat, since they are not broken down.

Serious variants of hypothyroidism are called myxedema. This is a rare condition. However, less serious, but painful variants are common. There are several reasons for hypothyroidism, each giving a variant of the disease:

* An autoimmune reaction against the thyroid tissue can destroy the capability of the thyroid gland to produce hormones (for example Hashimoto’s disease).

* Sometimes the production of T3 by conversion from T4 is impaired. The total amount of hormones may be normal in these cases, but the body is still lacking T3, and gets the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

* Iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, since the thyroid hormones contain iodine. In Europe and America the food is seldom short in iodine, but bad nutrition may result in iodine deficiency.

* Surgery or radiation at the thyroid area can destroy enough tissue to cause hypothyroidism.

* Injury or disease in the pituitary or of the part of the brain controlling the pituitary may cause a decrease in secreted thyrotropin, and then the thyroid will respond by producing less of its own hormones with hypothyroidism as a result.

* Some people have symptoms of hypothyroidism even though the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood is normal. One of the symptoms is raised levels of thyrotropin, indicating that the body signals need for more thyroid hormones. This variant may be caused by conditions elsewhere in the body that make it difficult for the hormone to reach their destination in the cells. In many of these cases the immune system produces anti-bodies against the thyroid hormones. This variant is called sub-clinical hypothyroidism, and responds to the same treatment as ordinary hypothyroidism.

* Some types of food can contribute to a depressed thyroid function or aggravate hypothyroidism when eaten raw in great amounts: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy and turnips. By cooking these vegetables, the depressing effect is decreased.

* Factors suspected for causing hypothyroidism are: The artificial sweetener aspartame, mercury pollution, dental fillings containing mercury, fluoride and heavy metal pollution.

HOW CAN HYPOTHYROIDISM BE TREATED

For serious hypothyroidism caused by tissue destruction, external supplement of thyroid hormones is necessary.

When the condition is caused by lack of iodine in the diet, dietary changes and iodine supplements will be a part of the treatment.

Less serious, but painful hypothyroidism is sometimes also treated with hormone supplements. In these cases it is difficult to find the right dose, and treatment may result in hormone poisoning.

You can sometimes alleviate hypothyroidism by reducing the amount of food suspected for depressing the thyroid function: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, corn oil, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, radishes, rutabaga, soy, soy products and turnips. However, these food types are valuable in many ways, so it is probably not wise to cut them out totally. Also try to avoid artificial ingredients like the sweetener aspartame, conserving additives and fluoride.

Changing out mercury dental fillings and avoiding mercury or heavy metal exposure may help to ameliorate the condition.

You may also alleviate the condition by eating food that stimulates the thyroid function according to practical experience: Chia seed, dulse, fish from the ocean, flax seed, pumpkin seed, seaweed, coconut and brewer yeast.

You can find nutritional supplements to help for hypothyroidism. The compositions of these products vary:

* They may contain building materials that the thyroid uses to make its hormones, for example: iodine, acetyl-L-tyrosine or L-phenylalanine.

* They may also contain vitamins and minerals that stimulate the mechanism of hormone production by being a part of necessary enzymes, or by helping the absorption of the ingredients that hormones are made from, like: Magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper and vitamin E.

* They may furthermore contain constituents that stimulate tissue regeneration by being part of tissue building enzymes, and thus helping to restore a degraded thyroid, for example: Folic acid or folate, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cyanocobalamin) and molybdenum.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Please help, looking for testosterone increasing pills at 14?
    Ok so lots my friends seem like they are totally full of testosterone. They are all muscly (even just my one friends hands you can tell), always like to get in fights, are extremely aggressive, dont care what people think about them, have tons and tons of energy, and have the biggest amount of libido than any other people on earth. They are also people who are so extremely confident. On the other hand, I’m completely opposite. I have NO energy, NO libido, ABSOLUTELY NO MUSCLES AND NO CONFIDENCE!! I’m 14 years old, 5’9″ and a half, and 165 pounds. Yes i know, i’m fat because its all fat and not muscle, and i also kinda have “man boobs”. I have tried to ask my doctor at many times to be able to take these testosterone boosting pills but never succeeded to ask. I found these Anti-Estrogen & Anti-Aromatase Complex Testosterone Booster Tribulus Chrysin pills. The problem is im also currently taking other pills. Zoloft for anti anxiety, Seriquel xr for ocd, and levothyroxine or something like that for thyroid hypothyroidism or something like that and have an extremely slow metabolism. Would it be safe if i take those pills with the other ones?!?!?! Id really like to get an idea before i ask her. Also, the reason why i want them is like i said before…im looking to defiantly increase muscle mass, get rid of “man boobs”, look fit, maybe even broader shoulders and a more manly face….also i hope to gain more confidence, aggressiveness, maybe even a faster metabolism, better libido (ik im young…but i swear i dont have any libido at all), and just to be like my friends, and any other benefits i can get! please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      I’m sorry to hear about your problems buddy.

      If your aim is to achieve a more sculpted body and lose your man boobs, you should consider taking Gynexin alongside doing chest exercises.

      I’ve included a link to a good review done on Gynexin and also a set of 18 chest exercises designed to work out your chest. There’s also a product on body ripping if you want to check it out on the page.

      Good luck! :)

      http://ihatemanboobs.com/gynexin-alpha-formula-review

      http://ihatemanboobs.com/exercises-for-man-boobs

      http://ihatemanboobs.com/man-boobs-product-reviews

  2. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    Does anyone suffer from this – if so what were your symptoms and were you given any medication and treatment? Did it help?

    I know what hypothyroidism is, and don’t need links to info thanks – I’m just looking for first-hand experience and/or advice if you’re a medical professional.

    • ANSWER:
      It runs in my family.

      The symptoms vary but generally include: dry skin or hair, intolerance to cold, weight gain up to 20 lbs or not, and low T3 or T4 levels. You may be very fatigued or have memory problems.

      Long term hypothyroidism can lead to heart problems, or other significant health problems that require medical attention.

      It is easily treated. Just go to your physician, have a thyroid panel taken. The results are clearly indicative, and worse case scenario, you will take one or two pills a day.

      Get it checked out. Not a big deal. And treatment greatly enhances your quality of life. Not all medical problems are so easily treatable.

  3. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism?
    what are the symptoms of hypothyroidism? i’ve asked a similar question before, because i’ve found out that the disease can mimic bipolar disorder…and even though my Lamictal helps most of the time, i feel as if i should get a test just to make sure. although, i went to the doctor a month ago because of my unknown chest pain that recently started the first week of january, and i’ve NEVER had chest problems before…so i thought that was weird, but when they were checking for things they took a thyroid test, but i read that when they’re taking a blood sample they only do one test for thyroid problems….if the patient isn’t going in to ask about hypothyroidism or something.
    i stopped growing my 9th grade year (even though most guys don’t stop growing until they are in their 20′s). i gained about 25 pounds somehow but i never pigged out back then because i was on a basketball team. ever since that year ive had a lot of muscle aches, i can easily
    Hurt myself. (I do take multi vitamins, so that shouldn’t be happening), I’ve had several bone contusions to my wrists and sprained my knee an awful lot ( I haven’t been playing sports since 9th grade, and I don’t do things that can be dangerous, but somehow I rack up the thickness of my folder at the childrens hospital, I’m 16 by the way) my moods shift from happy/hyperness to depression sometimes, and my irritability levels are kindda shaky (symptoms of bipolar disorder) and my chest hurts a lot and I don’t know if it’s because of my triglyceride level or a symptom of hypothyroidism. There are times when I’m super sleepy even though I get enough sleep and sometimes I have insomnia…my glucose level is borderline bad, cause it’s 80..and that is obviously by the bad glucose level (I know it’s 80-120 which is good, but right on 80 is kindda scary) ever since 9th grade I’ve been battling with dry skin a lot of the times, I stay inside during the winter for as long as I can because the col

    • ANSWER:
      You sound like you are deficient in water for starters. If you do not drink enough water each day, you will have muscle aches, be fatigued, and not be processing your nutrients well that you eat.

      In regard to the hypothyroidism issue, I would make sure you are hydrated properly first.

      Do a quick test. Stand up straight, put your left hand on your chest like you are doing a pledge of alliegence and have someone look at your veins on the top of your right hand wrist. Push on the veins and see if they are popping out a little. Then have them lift your right arm to about the height of your left hand that is still over your heart.

      Look to see if the veins are still there and puffy. If they disappear or are greatly diminished, you are dehydrated.

      The following formula is what you should be drinking each day:

      Take your total body weight and divide by 2. That number is the total number of ounces you should be drinking each day.

      Now if you drink sodas, tea, coffee, fruit juices, all these will dehydrate you. So you have to compensate for this dehydration. Take the total ounces of each of these drinks and multiply by 1.5. That is the number of ounces you will have to ADD to the total ounces you got from dividing by 2 formula.

      200 pound person divided by 2 = 100 ounces

      16 ounce coke. x 1.5 = 24 ounces.

      100 + 24 ounces = 124 ounces of water each day.

      If your problems persist after about a week of getting hydrated, you can check your thyroid by doing an iodine test. Rub a patch of “tincture of iodine” 2″ x 3″ wide on your forearm and note the time of day. If the patch is visible after 24 hours, you are fine. If the patch cannot be seen after a few hours, you need iodine.

      Avoid all things with fluoride in them. Fluoride toothpaste is really bad, fluoridated water, sodas, beer, all contain fluoride that depletes your body of iodine. This deficiency will make it very difficult for you to make T3 & T4 thyroid hormones and your metabolism will be greatly affected.

      I would strongly suggest you get checked out thoroughly by a Certified Nutritional Therapist (not a dietitian or M.D.) for specific nutrient deficiencies specific to you. They can recommend diets that will help you greatly.

      good luck to you

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about a year and a half ago. I have since been trying to find a stable dose of synthyroid with my endocrinologist. He believes that the 100 mg dose I am on now may be suffienct. I only have to see him twice a year now, instead of blood work every 6 weeks and an office visit every three months. I still don’t feel like my old self. I will admit that I feel about 80% better than I did, but the feelings of anxiety and depression are still lingering, worse sometimes than others. I am looking for your experineces with the illness, how you coped with it all, and how long after you were stable on your medication that you felt like your old self again. I have thought this whole time that something more serious is wrong with me, only my doctors can’t find out what it is. Did any of you feel this way? Thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      My husband and my daughter have hypothyroidism. Both of them are stabilized with 1.25. My daughter has different symptoms than my husband. My daughter does get depressed, weight gain, etc. Not being able to take most over the counter medicine she suffers with allergies and cold. Stay with synthroid. I have used generic med on her and it was like she wasn’t taking any medicine at all.
      My husband has the mood swings. They are the worse. He also had weight loss that was very low. That was before the medication. If your test show you are stable them from there you will be able to cope with anything. My husband’s blood work is good. I wish mine was as good. My daughter is pregnant. This mess with your medication. The baby needs more than you realize. My daughter has had this since 8 years old. It interferred with her growth. My husband had it for years but wasn’t diagnosed until last year. He didn’t think anything was wrong. I was the one that had to deal with his mood swings. He was about to go into a coma when the dr. finally found what was wrong. Take your medicine and do your tests regular and you will be fine.

  5. QUESTION:
    What exactly do the meds for hypothyroidism do?
    I have had trouble losing weight forever. I finally went to the doctor to see if there was something wrong with me. It turns out, i have hypothyroidism. I just started the medication today. Will it help me lose weight? or what exactly do the meds do? I don’t really know anything about hypothyroidism except that my thyroid isn’t producing enough hormones to keep my metabolism working at a steady rate. any information about hypothyroidism would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment for hypothyroidism restores your metabolism back to normal. However regular check up of the hormonal levels, TSH, T3, T4, etc., are very important to regulate your treatment. Please consult your Doctor if you have any symptoms like palpitations, tremors, too much increase in apatite, loss of weight etc., to enable him to control the dose.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are risks for pregnant women with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering if someone could give me sights to explain what hypothyroidism is.? The doctor said I was perfectly healthy other than that. I know weight loss is an issue, but can it cause infertility or the inability to concieve right away? I really love my doctor but he did not explain what it was. I am 10 weeks and 4 days pregnant and wanted to know if it could cause any complications in pregnancy. I know this is alot to ask but I wanted to know whether other than tyroid medication whether there was anything in my diet I needed to change. Any help would be appreciated. I only would like advice. I know that you are not doctors but any helpful sites or input would be useful.

    Thank you in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Just do everything that they tell you too and keep taking your medicine. My cousin has that and she has had 2 perfectly healthy baby girls, but did have a very hard pregnancy. Here is a link about pregnancy and thyroidism.

  7. QUESTION:
    How to lose weight with type ONE diabetes and hypothyroidism?
    Ive been trying extremely hard to lose weight but the scale reads the same number. I have type ONE( not adult on set diabetes you get from poor lifestyle) and hypothyroidism which I think is the problem. I’m so tired of bring in twice the effort as a normal person and not seeing ANYTHING change(not a decimal number, nothing) so does anyone out there know of a diet and exercise plan or trick to help a person with my glitches lose weight? Thanks for the answers!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey there! I am in the same boat as you. I also have hypothyroidism and type ONE. While weight loss has been excruciatingly hard, I can offer some tips that I have been doing that have helped me slowly but surely get on the fast track to losing some weight.

      1. Take a multivitamin: Our bodies are always fighting off so much. If you take a vitamin, you will ensure that your body will be getting the vitamins and minerals it needs to fight off infection and allow your body MORE energy to do other things, such as losing weight. Look for multivitamins that promote a health heart and strong bones, as well as a good immune system.

      2. Count your calories: This is hard, but when there is a will, there is a way. Ever look on the nutrition facts of food and note the servings? Follow that! Record your total calories, fat, sodium, etc. Keep a journal and do this. I started out by just recording what I ate in a normal day, evaluating it (weaknesses: eat too big portions, not enough meat, too much bread/sugar, etc) and then seeing what I can do to improve it. Try to keep your calories to about 2,300 per day, and then whittle it down. I’m currently at 2,245 at the most per day, and I’m noting a change in my energy.

      3. EXERCISE: Speaking of energy, hypothyroidism simply kills your metabolism with an AK-47. :( RIght here, you just need a little more willpower. Think of living longer. At least that’s what I do. Don’t use elevators: instead, use the stairs. Walk a little more than you need to. Have Nintendo Wii? Do WiiFit. It works out muscles you never thought you could work out! Walk around your neighborhood every day. Go to a track at a school and walk the curves and jog the straights for thirty minutes to an hour. I totally understand taht your energy will deter you from doing this, but even a little effort should help.

      4. Stay happy! SOmething you love to do that doesn’t compromise your health or well being? Indulge in it! I like to draw and sew among other things. If you keep your feelings and personality up, then you can do all i have listed above and more.

      5. Go to sleep on time. Yes this is very important. Your sleep helps regulate SO much.

      While ALL are important, the integral plan is to choose a method and STICK WITH IT! Watch your portions, and work out every day for at least thirty minutes. Take that vitamin, get some sleep, and remember to do something you enjoy.

      From one hypobetes dealer to another, I HAVE FAITH IN YOU!

      And a last note: I’ve been doing this very method for the past week and a half, and I lost four pounds. Just keep going, and with a little patience you’ll get there!

  8. QUESTION:
    Is it true people loose weight with hypothyroidism medication? If so how does it work?
    I am a 22 year old female with hypothyroidism and am being referred to an endocrinologist. I am not sure what to expect. For a little over a year now I have not changed my diet or exercise and I slowly gained weight. With hypothyroid hormone treatment will it help or make it easier to loose weight? How does that work?

    • ANSWER:
      The answer to your question is yes. Hypothyroidism is caused by the thyroid’s inability to produced a hormone. By replacing the hormone with a synthetic one it will speed up the body’s metabolism and thus burn off more calories. This will result in weight loss, although not quickly.
      Hope this helps.

  9. QUESTION:
    How can I lose weight when I have hypothyroidism?
    I am a youngish person, and I am tired of weighing 200 pounds. I just reached that weight yesterday, and it is depressing. I wanted to know what kinds of exercise should I do that would be most effective, and what kind of diet plan would be best. None of the pills for hypothyroidism will work fo rme, so please do not suggest those. Thanks, and any help is greatly appriciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I know exactly how you feel! I also am youngish and suffer from hypothyroidism. I gained weight like crazy and could not get rid of it no matter what I did. Plus, the side effects are you’re tired all the time and it leads to depression.

      I’ve been losing weight recently (20 lbs over the past year) through a combination of ways to break the metabolism curse that is hypothyroidism. Firstly, you need to see an endocrinologist to see what replacement thyroid drug you need, they come out with new ones every so often. I’m on Synthroid and it works, but it takes at least two weeks to kick in. You take those every morning before you eat! This is important because anything you eat/take will interfere with thyroid pills!

      Also, you may be deficient in vitamins, most of us are. I take a multivitamin and vitamin D, and trust me IT HELPS. Just take them 2-4 hours after your pills because they will block absorption.

      I suggest seeing a nutritionist as well, a lot of endo offices have one or two that work with the patients. Once you get the vitamins and the thyroid pills right, it should be easier to lose weight. Unfortunately, losing weight for us is not just a numbers game (calories in vs calories out), it’s a chemical equation.

      As for exercise, try earlier in the morning right after you take your pill. Aim for 30-60 minutes of moderate-to-high intensity cardio four times a week. Normal people can get away with less, but for us it takes more effort. I would suggest going most days and alternating days of weight training. The weight training is just as important as the cardio because muscles will burn 20X more calories than fat tissue does, thus revving the saggy metabolism.

      As for type of cardio, just make sure you crosstrain to avoid muscle memory. Try jogging one day, the bike the next. It’s important to keep your body guessing because if you can’t adjust, you’ll burn more calories with effort.

      And finally, water. Drink lots of water to keep your body flushing out the toxins.

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have a very bad hormonal and thyroid issues so I need to get this under control immediately so I appreciate anyone w/ HYPOthyroidism to give me any advice or foods that help

    Thank you so MUCH!!!

    • ANSWER:
      If you indeed do have a thyroid problem you need to see your doctor for synthetic thyroid replacement. First, your doctor will do a simple blood test to find out how low your thyroid actually is. There is no diet which will fully get your thyroid back to normal. Many women take synthetic thyroid. I have for 8 years.

  11. QUESTION:
    How long after bein diagnosed with hypothyroidism do you need pills?is is hereditAry? Can my daughter be test?
    I’m 17 with a 6 month old and i’m a stay at home mother. I’ve just been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and I wanted to know how it could have possibly came on and how soon after bein diagnosed do I need pills? And can my daughter be tested this young? Any answers would really help I’m scared out of my mind for my daughters sake.

    • ANSWER:
      As soon as you are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, your physician should begin Synthroid. Although most patients taking thyroid supplementation need it forever, a few, especially those who developed hypothyroidism following a pregnancy might need it for a shorter period. Your physician needs to order a test called an anti-thyroid antibody test. If this test is positive, then you should be supplemented with thyroid hormone, in some amount, for the rest of your life. If the test is negative, the possibility of discontinuation at a later date exists.
      Yes, hypothyroidism and other thyroid diseases can and does run in families. You need to mention your recent diagnosis to your child’s pediatrician who can decide whether your child requires any testing at this time. Most do not, although your daughter should be tested again at 12 or 13, as thyroids in susceptible individuals tend to decompensate or fail during periods of hormonal upheaval. Best wishes.

  12. QUESTION:
    Would growth hormones be effective to grow taller for somebody who has hypothyroidism?
    I am a 21 year old who has been taking thyroid pills for about 3 1/2 years now (I have hypothyroidism). I haven’t grown taller since I started taking the pills. I’m still 4’11″.

    I heard recently that taking growth hormones would help people who have an under active thyroid to increase their height. At 21, do you think it would have any effect on me if I took those growth hormones – or do you think it’s too late for me?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately , at your age artificial or human growth hormone (hgh) that injected into your body will not be effective. What it is that can be effective at your age is Super-Growth .This product will regenerate your fused bones and boost your natural growth, without side-effects, besides It is during deep sleep that growth hormone does its job of thickening and lengthening your bones. So appropriate sleeping time (not the longer, the better) and correct sleeping posture is very important for your body to grow. Sleep is defined as a natural periodic state of rest for the mind and body, in which the eyes usually close and consciousness is completely or partially lost, so that there is a decrease in bodily movement and responsiveness to external stimuli.

      During deep sleep, growth hormone produced by your pituitary gland is released into your blood stream and travel through your body and causes the thickening and lengthening of your bones. Therefore, you should achieve “deep level” sleep on a daily basis in order to coordinate your affords of exercises and proper diet. The following are some helpful tips on how to easily achieve deep level sleep.

      Sleep in a comfortable and firm mattress.
      Sleep in a room that is dark, quiet and fresh smelling.
      Sleep with clean, soft, and comfortable clothes.
      Keep your hands and feet warm. Scientific studies have shown that warm hands and feet will help induce REM (rapid eye movement) deep sleep. Cold hands and feet will keep you from deep sleep.
      Drink a big glass of water before going to bed and when you wake up; this will help clean out your system.
      Practice total relaxation and deep breathing for a few minutes before you go to bed.
      Relax from head to toe. Close your eyes and relax every part of your body.
      Maintain a habit of sleeping at the same time everyday, including weekends.
      Sleep on your back with a flat pillow under your knees. This will align your spine properly and prevent any back aches caused by sleeping in a bent position.

      Undoubtedly, the quality, quantity, and type of food we eat affect our height, growth, and health. We cannot emphasize enough how important your food intake is in determining how much growth you can possibly obtain. The types of food you eat will either improve or decrease your growth potential.
      After careful consideration and research, the daily content of protein, carbohydrates, fats and water can be achieved if the following items were taken regularly. Please take note that this is a guideline and you are free to your own thoughts.

      Carrots Fish Liver
      Egg Yolk Beef Red Meat
      Milk Cheese Apples
      Green Vegetables Potatoes Nuts
      Yellow Vegetables Almonds Bananas
      Peanuts Chicken Beans
      Peas Salt 6-8 glasses of water per day

      If you eat a lot of peanut butter, your height will not necessarily stop. Neither does masturbation stop height.
      What might stop you from growing is smoking, drugs, alcohol, lack of sleep, stress, digestive problems, or lack of exercise.

      Height Growth Products : The first approved natural product for height increase is Super-Growth wwww.super-growth.info with this product it is possible to gain additional height growth even after puberty.

  13. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to oxyelite pro with hypothyroidism?
    I take synthroid for hypothyroidism and would like to take oxyelite pro to help lose some excess weight. Would it be safe to take the fat burner even though I have thyroid issues?

    • ANSWER:
      I’d really check with your physician. These products have those kind of disclaimers for a reason.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can a more serious disease by mistaken for hypothyroidism?
    I was just wondering if anybody knows if there is something worse that could be mistaken for hypothyroidism. I am a 24-year-old male and I know quite a few people who have been diagnosed with it, but they are all older women. Is it odd that I have been diagnosed with it? Could it be mistaken for another, more serious, disease. Any feedback would help. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Guys get it too haha, my dad has it

      its not a gender disease, it can hit anyone
      its not even a big deal

      best thing you can do is get it treated early so it doesnt affect your growth bro

      relax a little :D

  15. QUESTION:
    What meds are safe to take with Hypothyroidism disease?
    I am 18 and just got diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. I know it’s not a HUGE deal, but I am on Synthroid for it and on 40 mg of Adderall for ADD… but my adderall doesn’t work anymore since I’ve had hypothyroidism! I used to just take 20mg and I would work like crazy and I couldn’t go to sleep for days on it, but I tried taking 60mg and I was still tired, sluggish, and unfocused! Does anyone know why? Or if it is safe to even mix these drugs?! I am also on Zoloft for anxiety. Please help!
    My doctor KNOWS all the meds I am on. Im not retarded. Im just asking if anyone else has had this happen with Adderall.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of possibilities of what may be happening based on my experiences:

      1) if you were just diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, it may not be regulated yet and it’s the Hypothyroidism that is making you tired, sluggish, and unfocused; afterall these are major symptoms of the disease.

      2) Your drugs may be interacting with each other. I’m only guessing, but perhaps the Adderall is preventing the Synthroid from working.

      There are quite a few drugs that interact with Synthroid and keep it from working (and doctors and pharmacists don’t always know about them). There is quite a list of drugs on my Pharmacy info sheet that say they may interact with Synthroid. I’ve taken Synthroid for a few years now and have discovered that there are even more medications than what’s listed on my info sheet that prevent the Synthroid from working.

      I don’t know if you take all your medicines at one time, or not, but if you do…stop! Take the Synthroid by itself, and take your other medications about 2 hours later. Sometimes you may have to wait longer, but 2 hours is what works with my meds. Don’t ever take Calcium or magnesium within 4 hours of taking the Synthroid. So if you take a multi-vitamin or take calcium and magnesium alone, don’t do it within 4 hours of the Synthroid.

      And remember Synthroid needs to be taken on an empty stomach and at least 1/2 to 1 hour before eating.

      From now on, keep in mind that just about every pill/medication and supplement you can swallow may interact with the Synthroid when taken at the same time and you need a 2-4 hour time space between them. I learned the hard way a couple times and made myself quite ill. When the Synthroid isn’t working, it makes you feel so ill and run-down, and you just can’t figure out what’s wrong.

  16. QUESTION:
    What connections are there between hypothyroidism and sinus problems?
    My son has been diagnosed with HSP and, as a result, kidney disease. It is believed that some autoimmune disorder is the cause. He takes prednisone and still suffers illness from coughing and sinus congestion. I have hypothyroidism and was wondering if this might be the cause for his problems as well. His thyroid tests came back on the low side of normal range which mine did as well. They treated me anyway. Please help.
    Please note that I do not feel that my hypothyroidism is like a virus attacking his body. I want to know if he might have hypothyroidism. I know that my condition is not contagious.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think that you having hypothyroidism is the cause for your son’s Henoch-Schloin Purpura. True, both hypothyroidism and HSP have an autoimmune cause, but I don’t think that your hypothyroidism is causing your son’s sinus problems directly. You can ask your doctor to provide you with more literature and maybe do some searches yourself. Hope this helps.

  17. QUESTION:
    What would happen if I took medicine for hypothyroidism and didnt really have it?
    I have tried everything to lose weight excersize and dieting dont help,last year a friend of mine was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism he lost alot of weight if I take hypothyroidism medicine will I get hyperthyroidism what are the possible side effects?

    • ANSWER:
      If you try this method of losing weight you run a very strong risk of causing permanent damage to your heart.
      Severe damage to the thyroid gland itself.

      It’s a very dangerous way to try and lose weight

  18. QUESTION:
    What tips can you give me, a woman, for being with a man that has Hypothyroidism?
    I am in a very serious relationship with a man that has hypothyroidism and it is hard to deal with his actions and his symptoms. I just want to learn more and find ways to make his life easier and mine as well. I just want us to get along beautifully. And if I understand more I can make us better. Plz Help

    • ANSWER:

  19. QUESTION:
    Why is soy bad for someone with hypothyroidism?
    I was wondering why so is so bad if you have hypothyroidism and are there things that can help counteract the hypothyroidism besides medicine?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is one article about it:

      http://www.westonaprice.org/soy/thyroidproblems.html

  20. QUESTION:
    Can non-virgin coconut oil aid in weight loss and help hypothyroidism?
    I couldn’t find virgin coconut oil near me so I bought the non-virgin type instead. Is it just as good as the virgin ones? Does it work exactly like the virgin ones for weight loss and hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      i doubt very seriously if there is enough difference between the two that they wouldn’t have similiar results. whether even virgin coconut oil aids in weight loss and helping hypothyroidism i have no idea. if you don’t get the desired results i wouldn’t blame it on your oil being non virgin.

  21. QUESTION:
    Is a rash a common symptom of hypothyroidism?
    I have a red raised rash on my upper left leg. It covers most of my thigh in the front. I first noticed this about 4-6 months ago and at that time it was the size of a quarter. I switched soaps and lotions and it went away. Within the last week it has redeveloped and is much bigger. I hesitate to call it a rash because it seems to be more like dry skin but it does have a rash like appearence to it. I am wondering if my medication needs to be adjusted for my hypothyroidism or what is going on. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      A rash isn’t a symptom but dry skin is…If it does look like dry skin try an oatmeal bath or some oatmeal lotion and see if that helps…But don’t use the lotion if you have been scratching…it will burn…If you have thyroid problems and you haven’t been tested in a while go ahead and get a test it can’t hurt to have one and find out if you are on the right dosage.

      Good luck.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can the hypothyroidism be a cause of hiv infection?
    recently I in one incident I got symptoms of hypothyroidism like headache, bulging eyes when I am hungry, weight loss and a little heat always in my body. I am feeling something on my thyroid glands also. That incident is that I had sex with a girl. But I used protection. But we had tongue kiss. I am afraid if I suffered from hiv now. Am I guessing right. Please somebody help me. I am afraid to go for hiv test. At this situation what I need to do?

    • ANSWER:
      You lose weight when you have hyperthyroidism. If you have hypothyroidism then you gain weight or have trouble losing weight. “Left untreated, the symptoms of hypothyroidism will usually progress. Rarely, complications can result in severe life-threatening depression, heart failure, or coma.” Even if you are scared, the best thing to do is to get tested for both hiv and thyroids disease.

  23. QUESTION:
    can treating hypothyroidism with medicine get rid of the headache sympotm?
    I have early stages of hypothyroidism… I also have chronic daily headaches that we think it’s related to the thyroid levels- but there are many other reason’s for my headaches so it’s complicated. Anyways does anyone else have this combination of problems (hypothyroidism and headaches) AND does taking the thyroid medicine help the headaches???

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. But you need a good doctor that knows what s/he is doing. Read this book http://www.amazon.com/Living-Well-Hypothyroidism-Doctor-Doesnt/dp/0380808986
      It is abundant with important and useful information that will explain how to handle the symptoms of thyroid disease. Many doctors don’t (usually because they don’t know about it) adjust the medicine to help eliminate all the symptoms, so you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable of how to do so.

      I wish you the best of luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    Any natural cures or natural meds for Hypothyroidism?
    I’m 18 and I have had Hypothyroidism for over 5 years. I have been on Synthroid since I’ve been diagnosed with it. It doesn’t seem to help with a lot of the issues plus I hate taking it. It’s such and inconvenience. Does anyone know anything natural that I could use in place of Synthroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes there are natural substitutes for thyroid medication. A lot of people find a good difference when they switch over from Synthroid to natural ones. The natural ones are: Armour Thyroid (also known as Naturethroid and Westhroid. They all basically have the same core ingredient, they just differ in the fillers and binders.) Like someone mentioned here, many pharmacies in US don’t have stock. You can find a lot more details about natural remedies (including Armour Thyroid) and potential places to buy them from the following site.

      http://www.healthandcures.net/hypothyroidism-treatment.html

      If you are successful at getting Armour or the other natural meds, don’t just abruptly change over from Synthroid to that. Ask your ND how to do it comfortably.

      You could also try “Raw Thyroid” which is usually available in good stock at most places. There are other things like iodine supplements, yoga and organic virgin coconut oil all of which help a good deal.

      You are just 18, all the best for a good active life! Hope the info (this answer and the website) helps.

  25. QUESTION:
    If I had hypothyroidism, how much does the medicine help with sluggishness and inability to concentrate?
    For those of you in similar situations. I have been having some serious problems with concentrating, being cold, and being sluggish. I went to the doctor for irregular periods and she is testing me for it. Was the medicine a life-saver for you if you have hypothyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely a life saver for me. I could get up off my couch and feel human again. It takes a little while for it to kick in, but I highly recommend it.

  26. QUESTION:
    What is the best diet for someone who has hypothyroidism and high cholesterol/triglycerides?
    I just got diagnosed with all three of these and need to change my diet. I already am on an exercise regime, but I need some guidelines for my diet. I’d appreciate any help I can get. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Did you know that high cholesterol is associated with having hypothyroidism? Talk with your doc about prioritizing the treatment of your thyroid problem over the other two. Once your thyroid level is brought back into line, ask about having the cholesterol checked. You may find that it is then at a level that makes the doc happy.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is there other options besides taking synthroid that can help my hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with Graves disease when I was 17 and had my thyroid removed my radiation. I went through many thyroid perscriptions for about 4 years and had a hard time finding a balanced level. I haven’t taken my synthroid medication for over 2 years. Over the past couple months, I’ve been experiencing sympthoms of hypothyrodism. Is there other options other than going back to the synthroid that I can take?

    • ANSWER:
      You could try ARmour. It contains both T4 and T3, where Synthroid is only T4. Many people don’t convert enough of the T4 to T3, so they still have some of the hypothyroid symptoms. Armour is a natural thyroid medication that has been around for over 100 years. Many who switch to it, feel so much better. Me included. Link below

  28. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight if you have hypothyroidism?
    I am hypothyroid and also bipolar for which I take lithium. Is there anything to help in this situation? No regular diet plans have helped.

    • ANSWER:
      hi :) am not sure whats available in the markets…but, this is what i did to lose weight… PLEASE DONT TAKE PILLS… pills are nothing but anorectic agents… they make you feel less hungry… there is no way to loose weight fast… though , sauna , steam and massages help slightly… it has to be combined with diet and excercise… pills are very bad in the long run… can lead to impotency and infertility…

      Also… short term diets are no good because , they terribly pull down your body metabolism rate since you dont eat much during that period … Because of this , once you break your diet , you’ll start putting on more weight, the reduced body metabolism will take longer and slower to burn the food you take in…

      They also dont work because once you break your diet and start eating normally, you will get back to your normal weight as you might not be cautious as to how many cals you take in per day…

      i lost 10 kgs in about 5 months time… i am getting married in august and i desperately needed to loose weight… i was 65 kilos when i started… according to my BMI , i was 10kgs + overweight… i stand 5’2.odd and 65 kilos is grossly overweight…

      just dieting wont help like i found out in my case… diet + exercise will do the trick…

      i’ll tell you what i did… it worked for me… hope it works for you too :)

      the trick is not to starve but to eat smart :) and stay healthy :)

      what you should cut down :
      oil , butter , cheese , margarine , mayonisse , sauces (depends , will get back to that a bit later), chips , crisps, nuts , chocolates , sugar , cola, fizz , areated drinks ,ice creams , chocolate , alcohol , cakes and everything else thats hi – cal… you’ll need to avoid everything thats sweet , oily and sticky… if you are not sure about what foods to avoid… check the net…loads of info available…

      vegetables / meat to avoid :
      potatoes – very very important , beetroot (its a root and has concenterated sugar in it) , all kinds of roots basically except carrot… avoid lamb, mutton , pork , beef, and prawns… all these put on weight… eat only lean meats… thats fish and chicken.. avoid eating egg yolk… eat just the egg white…

      fruits to avoid :
      mangoes , bananas , jackfruit

      now that we had a look at what foodstuff is to be avoided…you might be wondering if there is anythig at all that you can eat… thats how i felt… there is loads of stuff you can eat actually :)

      here they come :)

      fast foods are a big no no… you can order salads and special lo cal foods that are avaailable in most outlets…

      its best to eat at home for the period you are dieting and trying to lose weight…after those few months… once you’ve shed your load…you can get back to your usual lifestyle… of course with some caution…

      my diet…
      breakfast:

      skimmed milk (use skimmmed milk , is low in fat , other typer of milk are higher in fat content) , fruit… i am from India… am not sure where you are from and hence you might not understand certain food types we consume here… but let me tell you something… Indian food is very very oily and very difficult to diet…

      and try cereal in the mornings… oats, weetabix… etc… have a good breakfast…alwaays use brown bread… whole wheat brown bread is very good for weight reduction…

      for lunch , we are staple rice eaters… rice is bad for fat reduction… but i still took rice because its a habit tht cant be changed… everyone takes rice here… so… rice – one cup – 100gms and lots of veggies cooked in less oil.. and absolutely no coconut and curry with less oil… all in all keep your oil intake to 2 tea spoons everyday… that would be just for seasoning… also using olive oil helps a lot…

      then for dinner… compulsarily have wheat… pasta is a good option…but make sure you buy wheat pasta… check before buying… and of course in pasta absolutely no sauces… some varities of sauces are acceptable… as far as they dont have cheese , butter , oil ,mayonisse and fattening substances in general… you can use tomato spicy sauces etc… make sure your sugar intake doesnt cross 2 – 3 spoons per day… (not tablespoons) and no butter and ghee of course… eat a lot of fruits and vegetables… and all kinds of cereal… if you are hungry… eat a fruit… or you can eat stuff like puffed wheat and puffed rice… but no puffed corn… corn products again put on weight…

      eat sandwiches as much as possible… i dont know which part of the world you are from and hence cant suggest much for you in terms of recepies…

      and combined with dieting… you need to excercise for atleast an hour everyday… you’ll see the difference…defenitely… if you think gym is boring… take up dance classes… or run along the beach… if you have one… or skate… or just about any physical activity… brisk walking will also help…
      the key is to stay healthy while you diet and lose weight…

      drink loads of water…atleast 6 glasses per day… and do a lot of physical activity…. take the stairwy instead of the lift…. and small things like that…
      if you have any more queries…mail me… cheers :) and good luck :) its not difficult…you’ll get used to it in a few days… and of course the results are fab:) who doesnt want a great looking body…

      you can get back to your normal lifestyle once you slim down… after that… its just eating what you like and burning it out the next day with just a little bit of excercise :) also check your weight everyday… its a great way to motivate and monitor your progres :)

      Source(s):

      personal exp :)

  29. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i don’t take my medicine correctly. Can it make you lose your sex drive completely?
    I use to have a huge sex drive even when i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but maybe it’s gotten more out of whack i don’t know. It’s hard for me to even make out with my husband anymore and that makes me so upset. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      You are NOT alone my dear. Low fat, Low salt diets are a major contributor to this problem. A low thyroid is an indication of an endocrine problem and taking that medication is giving you “MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH” that is damaging your body, while not addressing the “root cause” of your thyroid problem is very likely causing endocrine problems as well.

      Have you ever known ANYONE to be deficient in drugs? Your doctor that prescribed the medication most likely took a blood test and saw that your TSH hormone was a little high, so he prescribed that junk for you and took the easy way out and left you with the booby prize.

      Don’t you think if your doctor knew what he was doing and was really concerned about your health he would find out what was causing the thyroid output to be low? Instead, he treated the symptom and whatever caused the thyroid to not be able to produce T3 and T4 hormones is still there. Your endocrine is a system of complex relationships much like a spider web where if you touch one part of the web, the whole web shakes. Your thyroid, adrenal glands, ovaries, liver, etc. are all part of that endocrine system.

      What typically happens with low libido in Americans especially, is that you get on a low fat diet, low salt and then abuse your adrenal glands with high carbs, sugars, and cause lots of cortisol to be produced. The precursor hormone, pregnenalone is limited in supply and is produced in the adrenal glands. This hormone is required to produce steroid hormones in the liver; sex hormones. When the body requires lots of cortisol, you get what is called the “pregnenalone steal” where the limited supply is used to produce cortisol, leaving the body deficient and NO steroid hormones get produced. Our genetics have only changed about 0.1% in the last 12,000 years, so our bodies are still operating like primitive people’s did. When a sabor tooth tiger is chasing you through the village, you need that cortisol to power up those muscles and give you quick instant energy. That’s what our adrenal glands were designed to do, but when you eat sugar, white flour, lots of carbs, your body has to produce lots of insulin to unlock the insulin receptor sites at each cell to allow glucose in. Excess consumption of these things cause this spiking. Now your body says, whoa, too much glucose, so the pancreas produces lots of glucagon and your liver goes to work changing the glucose into glycogen for storage. This drives your blood sugar down quickly and says, “EMERGENCY” and your body goes into stress and produces lots of CORTISOL. Now the liver is reprioritized to deal with the emergency and your ESTROGEN does NOT get reconjugated and you become DEFICIENT. Low Lidido.

      All this is a result of your diet and your lazy doctor or maybe just ignorance, who knows.

      The first thing is to decide which is more important, the thyroid issue or the libido issue. Both are related, but it’s important to understand your priorities. They are both very fixable and you may even get healthy during the process.

      Do a quick test on yourself and then e-mail me the results and I will help you. Get some “Tincture of Iodine” from the drug store and paint a patch 2″ x 3″ on your forearm. Do this in the morning. Then watch it during the day and note the time of day when it disappeared. Count the hours it took to disappear. It should be visible after 24 hours. If it goes away in a few hours, you are very deficient in iodine. Since your thyroid uses only about 4% of the iodine you have in your body, if you are deficient it takes time to correct this. A few months. Since the T3 and T4 hormones require iodine, if you are deficient, this is a major cause of the low thyroid issue, but ALL your organs and skin require iodine, so the deficiency is affecting not just your thyroid, if you are truly deficient.

      good luck

  30. QUESTION:
    where can i find a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    i would like any help i can get without having to take diet pills.. i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4 years ago. since then i have put on almost 40lbs. i would like some input on what foods to eat that would help speed up my metabolism. also a good workout regimen would help too. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      According to Dr. Todd Nippoldt of the Mayo Clinic, “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.”

      Question asked of Dr. Nippoldt: “Can iodine supplements help regulate thyroid function in a person with hypothyroidism?”

      Dr. Nippoldt: “No. Some alternative medicine practitioners recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements — which are high in iodine — for people with hypothyroidism. It is true that severe iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism. But iodine deficiency is extremely rare in the United States and other developed countries since the addition of iodine to salt (iodized salt) and other foods. If iodine deficiency is not the cause of hypothyroidism, then iodine supplements provide no benefit.

      “Hypothyroidism is safely and effectively treated with the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine.”

      Walking a couple of miles twice a day would help keep your metabolism revved up naturally. If your health is good enough, try it. My prayers are with you. The main thing is not to forget to take the synthetic thyroid hormone your doctor prescribes for you.

  31. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have hypothyroidism at 23 yrs old?
    I’m a 23-year-old female and have been experiencing most of the symptoms for a couple of years now (fatigue, weakness, coarse and dry hair, constipation, irritability, pale skin, memory loss, decreased libido). The onset of some of the symptoms seemed OK a while back, but they have persisted for years. I am a normal weight, but I do find it harder to lose weight now, which I thought was just normal as I got older. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible. You’d better make an appointment to have it checked. In the meantime, get some Kelp supplements. The iodine they contain promotes a healthy thyroid (but it’s not a long-term solution for serious thyroid problems).

  32. QUESTION:
    Does taking medicine for hypothyroidism actually help with weight loss?
    I workout everyday and eat right but i find myself gaining weight that is not muscle. I was told I may have hypothyroidism but further investigation is needed. I was wondering what is the name of the medicine most commonly prescribed, and also does it help with weight loss? if so how much of an affect does it have?

    • ANSWER:
      The symptoms of hypothryoidism include weight gain due to slow metabolism. Hypothyroidism can only be diagnosed by a doctor from a blood test. There are three main types of thyroid medications given:

      Generic name – levothyroxine sodium (T4) Brand name – Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid
      Generic name – liothyronine sodium (T3) Brand name – Cytomel
      Generic name – liotrix (T3 and T4) Brand name – Euthroid, Thyrolar

      The T3 & T4 hormones will increase your metabolism and weight loss is likely. The amount of weight loss really depends on your own body chemistry and how much of your obesity has to do with a slow metabolism and how much has to do with genetics and lifestyle. Your doctor who prescribes the medications should be able to answer more specific questions.

      If you don’t have hypothyroidism, you should NEVER consider taking thyroid hormones to simply lose weight. Your normal thyroid production in combination with external thyroid hormone could combine to cause a myriad of health problems including arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, increased stroke risk, increased risk of heart disease and kidney disease. There are healthier ways to lose weight.

  33. QUESTION:
    How can Hypothyroidism affect my vision?
    Here’s the scenario: I’m 26 years old, female, no children, and I’ve had hypothyroidism related to pernicious anemia for about 5 1/2 years. I decided to do some research- just out of curiosity- and I’ve had trouble finding documentation of how hypothyroidism affects vision. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Mainly with dry eyes…which can make it difficult to focus and possibly lead to scratched/ulcerated corneas.

  34. QUESTION:
    Symptoms of hypothyroidism and the tests needed?
    For the past few years I’ve had an extreme problem with fatigue, insomnia, and being very sensitive to cold weather, along with low body temps all the time. Thyroid problems are hereditary in my family, and I’ve BEEN tested (TSH and T-4 which showed as “normal”) but I suspect there are tests they didn’t perform. What other blood tests should I get done? What other symptoms should I look out for? My body is beginning to malfunction right and left from these low body temperatures! Help!

    • ANSWER:
      You should get TSH, FT4, FT3, TPO, TgAB.

  35. QUESTION:
    Anyone with hypothyroidism: What are the best foods to help thyroid function?
    Thank you in advance for your answers!
    While I appreciate all the info, seriously, all I’m asking for is a list of foods. Thank you! :)
    My doc has told me everything except foods and I keep forgetting to ask him. :(

    • ANSWER:
      Be careful if trying something other than the thyroid medicine a doctor prescribes. A lot of people will tell you to increase the iodine you get in foods, but that doesn’t work. Your thyroid is not making enough of the hormone, thyroxine, and other than the prescription pills do NOT take its place. Too much iodine, in addition, can actually make hypothyroidism worse.

      Exercise CAN increase your metabolism, but is still NO replacement for the hormone.

  36. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism & am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help me lose weight. Any suggestions?
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    I have read about hoodia and wonder if this is a viable option for me and if it would interfere with the medication I am on. I have gained about 40 pounds of unexplained weight over the last few months. My thyroid has been recently tested and my thyroid med adjusted, but still the weight seems to be adding up. I have lost more than 100 pounds and I have not changed my diet to justify this weight gain. I am also finding my energy level greatly diminished. I am looking for a diet pill and/or supplement to help aid in the reduction of my weight. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      A good hoodia product will definitely help your weight loss program, but I’d get a supplement that has a metabolism booster as well.

      I take a supplement called Herbalean, and it contains hoodia and the recently un-banned ephedra Ma Huang. It’s made by the people that originally made MetaboLife 356, and their new fomula works very well for me. I have a lot of energy, and have completely stopped snacking between meals.

  37. QUESTION:
    how to lose weight with Polycystic Ovaries and Hypothyroidism?
    i have been diagnosed with PCOS about 8 months ago and have been on birth control since then and it seemed to have been working for awhile but now i have been feeling really dizzy, breaking out in hives, losing my hair and cant lose weight. My doctor told me i have hypothyroidism and i have found it 10x harder to lose weight now. help!!

    • ANSWER:
      It is very important to loose weight if you are having PCOS, it may go to infertility also, I know one site wher you can have natural and permanant solution for both PCOS and overweight. Visit this site:
      cystpcos.blogspot.com

      I hope you shall be happy.

  38. QUESTION:
    Is having hypothyroidism a good excuse for being a jerk and overweight?
    My Sister, who has always been extremely emotional, mean, anger prone, and overweight recently went to a “natural” health specialist who said her thyroid is underperforming.

    Does having hypothyrodism really make people obese and unpleasant and can they can’t help it?

    • ANSWER:
      I wouldn’t believe any “health specialist” who has not done a blood test. You can not diagnose a thyroid problem without blood tests. And you can’t treat a thyroid problem without prescription medicine.

      But from the symptoms you describe, the person sounds more hyperthyroid than hypothyroid.

      Being emotional, mean, and anger prone are symptoms of hyperthyroidism. And it is a real problem. And it is a huge problem. It made me suicidal

  39. QUESTION:
    Would a thyroidectomy resolve the problems I have due to my hypothyroidism?
    For many years I have had extreme problems due to my hypothyroidism. I have dark course hair on my face, stomach, back, buttock, and legs(I am female so this is not normal.) I also get hot flashes, overactive sweating, extreme weight loss and weight gain. I have been on Synthroid medication int he past and this hasn’t helped wtih any of these things. Would a thyroidectomy solve these problems for me?

    • ANSWER:
      NO, I have hypothyroidism, not to the extremes like you, but you need to see and Endocrinologist. Your hormones sound way out of balance. So before you make a decision that cannot be reversed, seek out another doctor and get more than one opinion. I believe the Endocrinologist should be your first step. Good luck.

  40. QUESTION:
    Can someone tell me the symptoms to hypothyroidism?
    I think I have it, plus I am a 13 year old girl. Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    Could the reason I can’t get sleepy at night be my hypothyroidism?
    I Just simply can’t get sleepy and go to sleep like most people, I have to take 2 tylenol and sometimes that doesn’t help, I have blood work done for my hypothyroidism about twice a year but should I see a Thyroid specialist?

    • ANSWER:
      Usually thyroid problems cause you to become very fatigued and tired all the time. So I would say no.

  42. QUESTION:
    What is the lowdown on hypothyroidism?
    I plan to test for it this week. I have all the symptoms yet lack information regarding treatment. I’ve heard about hormone therapy but the steroids concern me. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      I am hypothyroid. I have never in my life heard of taking steroids for it. I take levothyroxine, I take a small pill each morning and get blood work done every 6 weeks to check the levels and that is it. I feel great. If you are hypo and begin taking hte meds at the right level you will feel so much better.

  43. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    My TSH levels are elevated but not to the point of needing medication in my Endocrinologist opinion. I am rapidly gaining weight without changing my eating habits. I was wondering if anyone knew of a diet that would help loose weight while you are caught in that ‘grey’ area.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.

      if you have hypothyroidism, take thyroid hormone replacement as directed by your doctor — generally on an empty stomach. It’s also important to note that too much dietary fiber can impair the absorption of synthetic thyroid hormone. Certain foods, supplements and medications can have the same effect, including:

      Walnuts
      Soybean flour
      Cottonseed meal
      Iron supplements or multivitamins containing iron
      Calcium supplements
      Antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium
      Some ulcer medications, such as sucralfate
      Some cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as cholestyramine and colestipol
      To avoid potential interactions, avoid these products or use them several hours before or after you take your thyroid medication.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does medication for hypothyroidism make you gain weight or will it help you lose weight?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism today. I have been dieting and have lost 10.5lbs in the last 5 weeks… will the medication that I am put on help with the diet or will I gain that all back? I’ve seen many different things on the internet saying that I will put it back on!!

    • ANSWER:
      hypothyroidism makes it difficult to loose wieght. The medication should raise your thyroid levels, thus making it easier to lose weight. But it takes quite a while for the medication to have an effect. My boyfriend has been taking his thyroid meds for about 2 weeks and he isn’t really feeling better yet.

      If your thyroid levels were dropping before the meds,they will likely continue to drop for a while before the meds kick in. So it might get harder to lose weight before it starts to get easier.

  45. QUESTION:
    Are there any natural treatments for Hypothyroidism?
    I tried synthroid but it didnt help and really screwed up my hormones. I have tried some herbs and supplements, and am now taking melatonin.

    • ANSWER:

  46. QUESTION:
    Does hypothyroidism affect your mental state?
    So I’ve heard it can cause mental problems, is this true? And what kinda mental problems exactly? What if the person isn’t taking the medication for their condition, will the mental problems worsen?

    Thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      It can do if the thyroid hormone levels are particularly low and the condition is left untreated for long periods. This used to be called ‘myxoedematous madness’. It is a psychotic illness. More recently described is a syndrome of subacute encephalopathy, associated with high titres of thyroid autoantibodies, raised CSF protein, EEG abnormalities, and perfusion deficits in the presence of normal structural neuroimaging. In most cases, the encephalopathy occurs without any gross change in circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones, suggesting that an inflammatory process is responsible for the cerebral dysfunction. In the absence of pathological data, the evidence for a specific pathogenetic mechanism is largely circumstantial: a small vessel vasculitis and immune complex deposition have both been suggested.

  47. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and just found out yesterday I am pregnant (about 2 Wkes). Will the baby by okay?
    I am being treated for my condition but has not been normalized yet. I am debating whether to have the child or not. I would hate myself for bringing a baby into the world only to suffer. I need help. I do not believe in abortions but right now I am petrified of everything I’ve been reading that may happen to me or the baby. I already have 3 kids; 5,3&1. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      The baby will be fine. I went through hyperthyroidism (the opposite) during my lst 2 pregnancies and everything was fine. they may monitor the baby and you a little close, but with proper medical care, everything will be just fine! Please do not do something you regret! Thank God for all your children and this one as well! Good luck!

  48. QUESTION:
    Can i go for laser hair removal for facial hair if i have hypothyroidism?
    i have problems with thyroid so this means hormonal imbalance, is it an important factor to consider if i go for laser treatment to remove hair? how does it effect this treatment? plz help
    Are u satisfied with this treatment?
    How many sessions did u require?
    Is it painful?
    Any additional information based on ur experience is welcomed

    • ANSWER:
      <>< I have hypothyroidism and I have had laser treatments to remove hair. Why would you think that you would have problems with this?? It helped somewhat. After about 8 treatments, she told me the rest did not have a dark root so that they laser would not pick it up anymore. So, it did not get rid of the problem as well as I had hoped it would.

      Well...it helped somewhat. My mustache is not nearly as dark as it was. Again, I had about 8 treatments but she then told me that it would be pointless doing any more treatments because the roots on the ones left were not dark and the laser would not be able to find them. Yes, it stung a bit..not too bad. Helps if you do not have any caffiene for 24 hours before the treatment. Hope this helps!

      Also, the lady below may be right. I had been diagnosed with hypo about 7 years before I had this hair problem. I did have some problems with ovaries (not diagnosed with PCOS) but could be something other than hypo. Good to be tested just in case.

  49. QUESTION:
    Are athletes at higher risk of hypothyroidism?
    I am a distance runner and I run around 10-15 miles a day. For two years I have consistently gained weight and lost no fat. My hunger s out of control most of the time even though I eat healthy. When I talked to a doctor , he said endurance athletes are at higher risk of hypothyroidism. I don’t know if that statement is true because exercise helps regulate thyroid function, doesnt it?

    • ANSWER:
      No, that is not true. Exercise does not regulate thyroid function. The pituitary gland regulates thyroid function. And athletes are at no more or less risk to get hypothyroidism.

      What kind of a doctor did you go to who would tell you that, but not do a simple blood test to see if you actually have hypothyroidism or not???

  50. QUESTION:
    What foods should I eat/avoid with Hypothyroidism, Hypercortisolism, Pernicious Anemia, Vitamin D2 deficiency?
    I am being treated for them all, but I’m wondering if with the right diet I can get better faster.

    Currently taking Synthroid 75 mcg, vitamin B12 injections weekly, vitamin D2 vitamins weekly, and getting help for high cortisol (possible Cushing’s– undergoing more testing)

    • ANSWER:
      Of course a good diet will help you recover, but there aren’t any magic foods. Your body is doing its best with the slightly odd chemical system it inherited.

      Your doctor will be thrilled if you maintain your weight at a healthy level and eat a balanced diet. Lots of fresh veggies, some fruit, whole grains, and your choice of proteins (but not too much meat).


Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism

“Your thyroid levels are in the normal range now, take these antidepressant’s, they will help with your depression.” These may be some of the most dangerous words a low thyroid sufferer will ever hear.

According to the Endocrine Society, upwards to 80 or 90 percent of hypothyroidism in the United States, is caused from an autoimmune mechanism called Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid. This means the cause of the hypofunction is the immune system attacking your own gland.

Literally the immune system slowly chews up the thyroid gland and you lose normal thyroid hormone output. Over time your hormone levels will slowly decrease because it continually loses cells from the immune attack.

Here are 5 Warning Signs that you may have hypothyroidism from an immune mechanism, and that the treatment your are currently receiving is not adequate or complete enough for your particular condition:

1) The dose of your thyroid replacement hormone continually goes up over time.

If you are continually having your thyroid medication increased, this means that your are losing more and more thyroid function. Your immune system is most likely the culprit. Hormone replacement does not address the continual immune attack against the gland. If your doctor is not addressing the immune attack, you are going to continue to suffer.

2) You still suffer with hypothyroid symptoms, yet your doctor tells you that your thyroid is now “normal”.

If your latest labs show that your hormone levels are in the “normal range”, yet you continue to suffer with the same symptoms, you are most likely not getting the proper management of your condition.

This is a huge sign that you have Hashimoto’s disease. The proteins, called cytokines, that are used by the immune system to communicate amongst each other, block the hormone receptor sites. This means you can have normal hormone levels showing on a lab report, and still not have a normal thyroid metabolic responses. Working on the immune system is the only way to fix this problem.

3) Your doctor never checked for antibodies against the gland.

If you suffer with hypothyroidism, then you have a high probability of having Autoimmune Thyroid. If your doctor didn’t bother to check antibody levels, or refuses to check antibody levels, you are most likely not receiving the proper treatment. The two most important antibodies to check are Thyroid Perioxidase Antibodies (TPO Ab) and Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TBG Ab).

4) Your doctor continually checks your antibody levels.

This may seem counter-intuitive since I just mentioned that you should have your antibody levels checked. I include this because, replacement hormones do not affect the immune system. It makes no sense to continually check antibodies if the doctor is not doing any treatment to affect the immune system. If your doctor is trying to decrease your antibody levels with replacement therapy, you are not getting the proper treatment. Watch for this. It is a sign that your doctor really doesn’t understand the mechanisms causing your problem.

5) You begin to get individual prescriptions for various thyroid symptoms.

If you are getting treated with antidepressants for hypothyroid based depression, it means that the replacement hormone treatment is most likely not working. With Hashimoto’s you can have normal thyroid hormone levels and still suffer with symptoms, including depression. Treatment needs to be focused on immune modulation, if you want to fix the actual cause of the problem.

If you suffer with hypothyroidism, and you live in the United States, then the most likely reason you have this condition is from an autoimmune reaction called Hashimoto’s Disease. Treating this condition with replacement hormone, while ignoring the immune component, is like treating a slow bleed with blood transfusions and failing to stop the site of the bleed. Without immune modulation then the viscious cycle of thyroid gland destruction, by the immune system, will continue. You can use the warning signs outlined as a guide to help you determine if you are receiving the proper management of your hypothyroid condition.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Getting pregnant with hypothyroidism / Hashimoto’s?
    Anyone out there have experiences they can share about getting pregnant with hypothyroidism / Hashimoto’s? I’ve been off the pill for a year and stil no pregnancy. I know there can sometimes be issues in women with hypothyroidism. I would love to hear your experiences and what worked for you.

    • ANSWER:
      Let your endocrinologist know that you are attempting to get pregnant so that he can adjust your medication (sinthroid).

      If your medication hasn’t been adjusted, studies in recent years have indicated that your dosage should be increased by 33% the moment you find out you are pregnant.

      Otherwise, if it has been over a year, it is time to find a certified RE (reproductive endocrynologist). These are the “getting pregnant” doctors. That’s all they do. Once you’re about 10 wks pregnant, they release you back to the OB. REs are the doctors that do IUI and IVF, but they do a lot more than that.

  2. QUESTION:
    What’s a satisfactory TSH count for all you out there with Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s thryroiditis?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are on a T4 medication like Synthyroid or Levoxyl, you should be shooting for a TSH around 1.0 (morning reading)

      If you are on a T4/T3 medication, the TSH should not be used to adust the medication because T3 suppresses TSH. Tests that should be used are the free t4 and free t3, not the TSH>

  3. QUESTION:
    Mystery Diagnosis: Tall and thin with Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism?
    I have a dilemma. I am 18 years old, 120 pounds, no muscle mass, skinny, super fast metabolism and I have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis along with Hypothyroidism as a result. I can’t eat healthy because my metabolism causes me to need a high fat high protein diet and I cant exercise because it makes me loose weight. Hypothyroidism causes me to become fatigued which made me stop exercising and now I am trying to get in shape but cant because Im scared of loosing more weight and my medication increases my metabolism which is already very high.

    Any advice?

    Symptoms include: Fatigue, Sluggishness, Sensitivity to coldd, pale/dry skin, swollen or inflamed joints, muscle aches, tenderness in shoulders and hips, pain in joints, muscle weakness, depression, forgetfulness, slow thought process, poor muscle tone, poor circulation, slow fingernail/ hair growth, and memory loss.
    IN ADDITION: My read question is, how can I develop a fitness/diet routine that will help me obtain proper muscle/fat mass with my disease?

    I understand it may not seem bad that I am skinny naturally and medically, however, I get tired simply walking up the stairs. Usually if you are thin you are in shape, however, I am thin and in terrible shape. I have an appointment with a new endocrinologist early November but was wondering if there was another anomaly out there who could offer advice.
    My doses have ranged from 55 of T4/T3 mixture, strictly armor, and now strictly synthroid. I am currently on 100mcg of Levothyroxine and my TSH has been wildly erratic, usually ranging around 30 and has been at 60 but is more recently in the tens. Thank you for the advice, once I get an updated dosage I will try more simple exercises and start building a routine. Best of Luck with anyone else who has Hashimotos and YES Im sure I don’t have Hyperthyroidism though I have a strange case of hypo.

    • ANSWER:
      Cool…

      So this IS a real case… absolutely fascinating. Well by now you should be on levothyroxine to balance out your thyroid hormones. Your TSH levels need to be kept under control. It’ll be almost impossible to function otherwise.

      It’ll take almost pure willpower to exercise up until then, and I would NOT recommend trying it. Until you can get your system put together, it could be dangerous to stress your system any more than it is. This is a serious disorder, and should not be thought of as a minor condition. Untreated, it can lead to muscle failure, including heart failure.

      I would not recommend exercising yourself to a heart attack. You need to just bulk up on the food and do only minor exercise until you can get in to see your new physician.

      Try walking, maybe light handweights, but nothing more physically draining than that.

  4. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I found out a few months ago that i have Hashimoto’s disease(the graudal attacking of my thyroid by my body, causing it to slowly fail), which results in hypothyroidism. I’ve been put on levoxyl, but have gained a significant amount of weight in the past year and a half (about 65lbs). My family (parents mostly) are making me feel awful about this, though I’m not significantly obese (I was in the middle of my weight range when I started gaining) and it’s not interferring with my every day.

    Does anyone else have htis problem, or a similar one? How do you cope with these people, and your feeling self conscious? The weight will come off, I know that, but it will take time. I plan on starting to work out soon, but I work full time and go to school, and it’s very difficult. Can anyone give me some suggestions on what I can do? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have hashimoto’s disease, but i do have panhypopituarism, which also includes hypothyroidism and have had it since birth. I’ve never felt like I looked that overweight, but also never been skinny either. It is hard for me to lose weight also. I try to do weights,stretching, and run or walk daily. Often 3 miles a day and I eat pretty healthily. Sometimes its hard to keep up this exercise schedule and actually most people recommend not exercising every day of the week. I know what its like to try really hard to lose weight and not have much success.

      Sometimes it takes awhile. I used to try for a few weeks and then give up when I wasn’t seeing the results I wanted. Keep positive, pretend it doesn’t matter and keep exercising. Eventually you will get results.

      Its something you have to find a way to fit into your schedule if its something you want to do. I know its hard to find the time.

      It sounds like you pretty much know this stuff I just wanted to offer my support. I know you can do it. Don’t let other people bother you. There are an astronomical number of people that are overweight that do not have this problem.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  6. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism,hashimoto’s and weight loss?
    I’m 32 year old female that just got diagnosed with hashimoto’s disease last year and got so depressed that i gained 30 pounds in 1 year and i heard that losing weight is impossible when you have this disease is it even worth trying? I don’t feel like eating right and working out if it isnt gonna payoff
    p.s. the weight i gained wasnt because of the disease it was because i fiqured if i was going to be fat anyway why not eat everything that i wanted…what a bad idea..

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Valerie,

      First let me say that I feel for what you’re going through. Feeling hopeless is no way to live life. As to your question… the short answer is that it is possible to lose weight with this condition. Additionally, it is “always” worth eating right and exercising even if it doesn’t pay off with a slim waistline. Please keep this in mind.

      Now for the long answer…It is possible to lose weight provided you are being treated for your condition. If you are already on hormone therapy you may need to make sure that you aren’t being under-treated. To lose weight your levels may need to be between the low to normal levels.

      Once your levels are established and stable you need to get yourself on a proper diet and exercise program. Low-fat proteins and complex carbohydrates should be the basis for your plan. Eat several “smaller” meals throughout the day to keep your metabolism up. Instead of 3 larger meals go with 4 – 6 small ones.

      Exercise should consist of a mix of some muscle building and some cardio. By adding muscle you add more tissue that needs to be fed and will help you to consume the calories you take in or are already storing.

      Regardless of the hypothyroidism, if you don’t start to take care of yourself you will get other conditions that will just make you feel even worse and do more damage to your body. Stop the downward spiral and start taking care of yourself.

      You can do it! Good Luck!

  7. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease… Multinodular Goiter… Hypothyroidism?
    I am so confused. Depending on which doctor I talk to, I seem to get a different answer. If someone can correct all this for me I’d be so appreciative. I am ready to scream with all the back and forth… yes and no.. one doctor contradicting another… so here goes:

    About 9 years ago I started having menstrual cycle irregularities. I was all over the place, late, early.. very early (like a week after period ended it was back) and very late (like 7 weeks later and she still hasn’t come and not pregnant). After bloodwork and ultrasound my ob/gyn said the only thing she could think causing it was early perimenopause, I was only 30. So off I went waiting for full blown menopause to arrive. In the meantime other things began happening. I started losing hair.. even my eyebrows.. I was tired constantly. I was constipated or had diarrhea. My periods continued to be all over the place. I would feel sick all the time. To the point people (still to this day) think I was full of it. Then I got married. We decided to go for fertility treatments. My reproductive endo did a bunch of tests and found nothing. I was still fertile, but why I wasn’t ovulating she had no clue. My thyroid was fine she said – though she did not give me the lab number. I stopped seeing her after it was determined I would only get pregnant with IVF. If I wasn’t ovulating and the ovulation drugs weren’t making it happen, I felt this was a waste of time and money. I went for a physical with my primary doctor who found a suspicious lump on my neck. After asking me questions that seemed unrelated (i.e. periods, reflexes, hair, tired etc) she tested my thyroid and said I had a high tsh of 9.9 (not high though, right?) and prescribed synthroid and referred me to an endo. After several more tests of my thyroid it was determined I had a multinodular goiter and Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism. UGH.

    After being on meds for 3 months, my periods came back… my hair stopped falling out… and I got pregnant! But later miscarried due to high TSH. My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.

    WTH? Can someone enlighten me on this “disease” it seems I may or may not have? Who should I believe? I have read extensively and it seems I DO have characteristics… but why would a doctor tell me another doctor is wrong? I DO have a goiter – you can see/feel it. Even a radiologist called it a goiter when doing the test. HELP!! Why did I get pregnant if the only thing I changed was the meds? Can anyone help me understand?

    • ANSWER:
      “My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.” YOU NEED A NEW OB/GYN NOW!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  8. QUESTION:
    How many times should i be tested for Hypothyroidism?
    My mother has a history of Hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism. I’m going for my first test of hypothyroidism, but i’m pretty sure that hypothyroidism may only show up later in my life if i don’t have it now. How often should i be tested to be safe and make sure that i don’t have it?

    • ANSWER:
      as far as i know – if you ever test positive, you’ve always had it. i am 19 and i was diagnosed a few years ago for reverse T3. the problem was that my regular doctor didn’t order specific tests for that – they just ran the general, run of the mill thyroid tests and nothing came back. it wasn’t until i saw a specialist that he ran the right ones. my reverse T3 mimics hashimoto’s, so that’s why it was so hard to pinpoint. good luck!

  9. QUESTION:
    Recurrant Miscarriage & Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism?
    I am a 22 year old with recurrant miscarriages. I am 5’5 140 lbs and exercise daily. I had my first in 2009 at 7 weeks, one at 4 weeks (blighted ovum) also in 2009, and my latest in October of 2010 at 8 weeks. The last one was diagnosed as a Partial mole. I had a d&c and hcg returned to normal within 2 weeks. I had weekly, bi weekly and finally monthly quants drawn to make sure hcg remained the same in which they did. The baby had Trisomy 7. After this, just to make sure my husband and I had the basic infertility workup done. Everything showed normal. ALong with me having a diagnostic Lap, Hysteroscopy, and HSG procedures which showed a thinner than normal left tube, a few adhesions that were removed and a cyst. Other than that everything was perfect. Autoimmune Diseases like Lupus, Celiac, and Hashimotos run in my family and my mother was diagnosed with ITP a year before I was born. Between my mother grandmother, 2 aunts, great grandmother and great aunt, there were 12 miscarriages, and 2 stillbirths. I have had widespread pain ever since I can remember. To the point where in childhood people thought I was making it up. I wake up at 6 am,get dressed, eat, drive to school, and by lunchtime when I am at clinicals, I find myself feeling as if I havent slept in days. I am always cold, and fluctuate b/w anemia and borderline anemia. I sweat more than average woman and my breasts leak on occasion with no stimulation. (prolactin was normal )My TSH levels were checked a month ago and they were normal I didnt get an actual number but just that they were normal, however my grandmothers TSH levels were “normal” while still having debilitating symptoms for 3 years before they finally diagnosed her with Hashimotos. I do not want to go through another miscarraige and am so confused as to what to do. My OBgyn is a good DR. but not so attentitive. What do I need to do and what steps should I take to get there. I am so lost in all the mounds of research I have done within the past year. Please help :l Thank you in advance!
    Thank you all.. I have not been tested for Celiac the only sound test is a biopsy of the S.I and I dont want to have a scope inless absolutely everything else is negative. The basic line of infertility tests, including some autoimmune and clotting disorders, came back fine, but I just feel like they need to run more in depth tests.Some of our patients at the hospital I work at with recurrant m/c’s have autoimmune disorders but the ones I know off hand, had other health problems as well. My obgyn is also my employer and I am starting to feel as if she doesnt want me to get pregnant because I have only been out of nursing school since december and she thinks its important to work first. But somewhere I have to draw the line b/w personal and work related :l I just know if I switch she ll have hard feelings and I work FOR her. ha. Well thanks again.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been tested for autoimmune diseases? It sounds like you might have something going on. Have you been tested for Celiac Disease or Lupus? If your doctor is not attentive, you might like to find a new one. It’s important you have a good relationship with your doctor. Speak to your GP about your problems and they may refer you to a specialist.

      ….

  10. QUESTION:
    How can Hashimoto’s thyroiditis cause panic attacks?
    I have Hypothyroidism, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. I am very curious as to how Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can cause panic attacks. Because I believe I have experienced some. Also, how can it cause memory loss? I never had the best memory, but lately it seems to be getting worse. [I am seeing the doctor soon]

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (roller coaster of HypO then HypER etc etc, til it finally stays HypO). It is an autoimmune disease. I too have it and I have panic attacks, memory problems, and MANY other symptoms that I once thought were separate but have since learned that they are a part of having the Hashi’s. Evidently you have seen a doctor to have the diagnosis…did they not put you on Synthroid. Or was it like me, they took a wait-and-see approach. Some doctors do not want to do the meds until your body gets to being hypOthyroid all the time. It is something that has to be monitored by regular TSH tests. You will most likely want an Endocrinologist for this. They are the ones who specialize in the thyroid disease.

      There are many good support groups on Yahoo Groups. Also google ‘Mary Shomon’ and also ‘Stop the Thyroid Madness’.

      Hang in as there is that med that may help you get better.

      God bless you

  11. QUESTION:
    Can you have hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s or other thyroid dysfunction without weight gain/obesity?
    If by some miracle there’s a health professional who knows the answer to this question, I’ll be forever grateful.

    I experience a lot of symptoms of hypothyroidism but I’m not obese and there’s no indication of abnormal thyroid levels on any of the blood tests I’ve taken. And I’ve retaken them at different times too to try to catch any variations or cycles of my thyroid levels. Is it still possible for me to have thyroid dysfunction? It may run in my family.

    My endocrinologists and general practitioner can’t seem to figure out anything to help me. They basically ran out of ideas right away and are no help at all. I’m stuck trying to find out what’s wrong with me on my own!

    • ANSWER:
      If a person has hypothyroidism and is taking thyroxine they should not put on weight. If that person was to overeat they would put on weight.

      I have hypothyroidism and do not put on weight. I have on 3 occasions over the past 16 years suddenly lost 5 – 7 kg very quickly within 3 days to a week. I then eventually returned to my normal weight. Nurse.

  12. QUESTION:
    Recently diagnosed with Hypothyroidism disease– should I be tested for Hashimoto’s disease?
    Before being diagnosed, I would always tell my mother of various symptoms I was having. From extreme fatigue, to lethargy and brain fog…to achiness all over to weight gain.. I would tell her these different symptoms and because it wasn’t just /one/ symptom and instead, many, she started calling me a hypochondriac and treated me in a manner that suggested she believed I was making it up and was “just being lazy”.

    Well, I went to the doctor and was notified that I had Hypothyroidism and was recently put on the drug, Levothyroxine. I didn’t know much about the disease, so I went searching online (to legitimate health websites, nothing taboo with a bunch of woohoo) and discovered that it was common for young people with Hypothyroidism to actually have Hashimoto’s disease. (I’m 20)

    I told my mom because I wasn’t tested for Hashimoto’s and now she thinks I’m being a hypochondriac. Should I get tested and is my concern reasonable?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, absolutely! You are not a hypochondriac…you are being proactive about your health. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is the leading cause of hypothyroidism. As hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, lowering thyroid antibodies is a must to prevent more damage to the thyroid gland not to mention reduce hypothyroidism symptoms.

      “In the new study, researchers noted the symptom levels of more than 400 women with thyroid conditions, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. They theorized that higher levels of antithyroperoxidase antibody – an immune cell associated with Hashimoto’s – would correspond with more severe symptoms.

      While this was found to be the case, the team made an unexpected secondary discovery. Women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis often experienced its symptoms even when their levels of thyroid hormone were within a healthy range.” >>>

      Autoimmune thyroid disease may cause symptoms even when hormone levels are normal >>>

      http://www.endocrineweb.com/news/hypothyroidism/4599-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-may-cause-symptoms-even-when-hormone-levels-are-

      Studies show 200mcg of selenium (a few brazil nuts) daily lowers TPO antibody levels up to 40% in 3 months and “…researchers found that…organ-specific autoantibodies (i.e., thyroid antibodies) — will disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet.” Natural desiccated thyroid hormone can lower thyroid antibodies if the dosage is high enough.

      There is a genetic defect in the ability to process vitamin D with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which means higher supplemention of vitamin D is needed. It is recommended to take 5000IU – 20 000IU daily. Other deficiencies or low levels commonly seen with hypothyroidism include iron, vitamin B12, folate, magnesium, potassium.

      Recommended labwork >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Selenium for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis >>>

      http://jeffreydach.com/2009/11/07/selenium-for-hashimotos-thyroiditis-by-jeffrey-dach-md.aspx

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection >>>

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      Revolutionary way to treat Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism >>>

      http://thyroidbook.com/

      Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Vitamin D deficiency >>>

      http://www.yourthyroidsolutions.com/hashimotos-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-vitamin-deficiency

  13. QUESTION:
    Anyone have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (Hypothyroidism)?
    Why is it so hard to lose weight when having this? I am 18 years old and I have had this for a couple years or so and it is so hard for me to lose weight. I am 155lbs and 5ft3in. Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Im hypothyroid…The losing weight is hard because of getting the right dose of thyroid med, im always changing and im taking to much or to little…It a never ending battle. Have you blood checked every 6 to 8 weeks. Check all meds your taking and see it they mess with thyroid med, it will give the wrong reading on test. But girl you find a way to lose weight with this please post it, i have 30 pounds i need to shed….

  14. QUESTION:
    Are Graves disease and Hashimoto’s disease the opposite of each other?
    So you get Hashimoto’s if you have hypothyroidism (i.e., either too little T3 & T4, or your pituitary gland isn’t producing enough TSH to make it to the thyroid gland)

    And you get Graves disease if you have hyperthyroidism (i.e., too much T3 & T4, or your pituitary gland’s churning out too much TSH)

    So aren’t the two diseases just mirror images of each other?

    • ANSWER:
      Not really. If there is an ‘opposite’ to Graves disease it must be myxedema. Hashimoto’s disease has a wide spectrum, and strange as it may seem, it can on a rare occasions cause thyrotoxicosis.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s disease, which causes my hypothyroidism, or does it ever go into remission?
    3 years ago, at the age of 36, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. It totally came out of nowhere. I had also gained about 30 pounds and I’m wondering if there’s a connection. Plus, I’m a male, and Hashimoto’s is most common in women. I’m trying to get off of all prescription drugs, but my Endocrinologist has told me that I will need to be on my Synthroid medication for the rest of my life. I haven’t lost the weight either.

    My little sister had thyroid cancer and had her thyroid removed, and a female cousin and an Aunt of mine also have Hashimoto’s so it runs in my family. But the WOMEN in my family. So why me?

    I just don’t want to have to wake up and take a pill for the rest of my life.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, where your own immune system attacks your thyroid for an unknown reason. Since you have had damage to your thyroid, there is no cure. There is no other treatment other than to take the synthroid. I know it is inconvenient, but it is the same hormone that your thyroid is supposed to make. As to why you, that’s impossible to answer. I’m sorry I can’t give you a better answer. Good luck.

  16. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of having low T4 levels specifically (and NOT just hypothyroidism in general)?
    I know what the symptoms are for hypothyroidism but I want to know if there are specific symptoms for having low T4 levels, regardless of T3 levels or other aspects of hypothyroidism. I have Hashimoto’s disease and have HIGH T3 levels but LOW T4 levels. Since I have other health issues, I want to know what symptoms I should be expecting from the low T4. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroxine is the body’s main metabolic hormone, regulating the rate of oxygen use by cells, and the generation of body heat. In the liver, T4 promotes glucose metabolism to pyruvate, gluconeogenesis from fats, and increases release of cholesterol. In the digestive system, T4 increases secretion of digestive juices, and promotes smooth muscle contractions for motility. In skeletal and in cardiac muscles, T4 promotes normal development, tone and function. In bones, T4 promotes growth and coordinates maturation with age. In the nervous system, T4 promotes normal development of the system during youth, and maintains it’s functions during adulthood. In the reproductive system, T4 promotes the ability for conception, and secretion of milk by the breasts. In the skin, T4 promotes hydration, secretions of exocrine glands, and the growth of hair. With low serum levels, you might experience the opposite of the normal effects.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is there anything specific about Hashimoto’s thyroiditis ?
    Apart from it being a hypothyrodism condition.

    I am asking specifically in clinical testing of the disease, it is likely that all suspected hypothyroidism will have TSH and free T4 and T3 level measured, but a low concentration of the T’s and elevated TSH will just point towards a confirmed diagnosis on hypothyroidism, without specifically indicating it to be Hashimoto’s

    Any knowledge or explanation appreciated.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      If I am understanding correctly, you are asking how garden variety hypothyroidism is differentiated from the Hashimoto’s thyroiditis variety.

      Hashimoto’s thyroiiditis patients have elevated anti-thyroid antibodies . This is important to confirm in cases of primary hypothyroidism because general hypothyroidism may require only short term supplementation of thyroid and because Hashimoto’s variety requires some dose of thyroid and follow up FOR A LIFETIME.

      This is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in North America and used to be felt to be rare. There is excellent information at:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashimoto%27s_thyroiditis

      Managed by an endocrinologist, these patients do well. Managed poorly by a physician who does not understand this disorder, they may not. Best wishes.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are my treatment options for hashimoto’s disease?
    I have Hashimoto’s disease and was told today by my endocrinologist that my body will ultimately “kill” my thyroid. Until it does, I have no treatment options! I have so many symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and am desperate for some type of relief! I have gained 30 + lbs, am constantly tired and don’t menstruate regularly (I am a newlywed and would like to have children within the next couple of years), etc. I was told the “death” of my thyroid could take years and the thought of continuing in my current state for what would feel like an eternity is devastating, please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Artsy

      Go to this website and read the testimonials. There are some good ideas on how to attach your issue. You’ll have to learn a lot more about natural healing, but you are at the point of doing anything I can tell. Be open minded and get cure yourself because you can. Dont let anyone tell you it cant be fixed! Answers are out there. Keep seeking and you wont be disappointed.

      Best of health to you.

      Cheers

      http://curezone.com/forums/s.asp?f=25&ob=s&c=0&t=150

  19. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and hair loss: is there a way to stop hair loss associated with Hashimoto’s disease? Also,?
    what do you think is the best brand of thyroid medication–no ‘health/herb’ treatments please. My case is too severe for that.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with you that herbal and nutritional treatments are a waste of money. Hypothyroidism is a hormone based immune system disease requiring medical care–it is not just “stress!” When I read your question, I was hoping you might get some helpful answers since I have the same problem.
      I’ve tried a variety of shampoos, conditioners, herbal, and other nutritional mumbo-jumbo, to no avail.
      I’m assuming that you, like me, eat a healthy diet. I hope you get an answer that gives more information than just a link to yet another hebal . . site.
      Don’t you wish people would read your question before giving answers you don’t want?

  20. QUESTION:
    What are the risks or not taking my meds. for hypothyroidism?
    I have had hypothyroidism for about 4 or 5 years now and I was just diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. I take 125 mcg of synthroid. Is that alot? What happens if I quit taking it other than my symptoms come back?

    • ANSWER:
      My sister in law has Hashimoto’s disease. If you quit taking your meds, you will eventually get really sick and die. You can’t live without your thyroid. Synthroid gives you the chemicals that your thyroid produces. Why would you quit taking the medication? You can’t possibly be thinking rationally here. Your meds are about average also. You are just taking something that naturally occurs in most people’s bodies, yours just doesn’t make it any more. So if you want to get sick and probably die, just don’t take your meds. But I suggest you talk to your doctor who will hopefully talk some sense into you!

  21. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?

    And especially when caused by Hashimoto’s disease? I’ve heard is an autoimmune disease, which I imagine would affect one’s immune system.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it’s related to a poor immune system. I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism myself, and all my bloodwork was normal except for having a TSH level of 132. Other than my thyroid issue, I’m healthy as can be. I just hope the synthroid pills kick in soon :)

  22. QUESTION:
    Can your blood tests come back neg. with the progression of Hashimoto’s disease? At what point is it detected?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease:
    Characterized by the immune system attacking the thyroid gland; it occurs by the body producing antibodies, which is usually good to fight off viruses, germs, pollen etc. In hypothyroidism, the antibodies attack the thyroid gland. This disease progresses slowly over a number of years.

    I always complained of its symptoms (extremely fatigued, cold, muscle aches and weakness, difficulty concentrating, sore joints, heart murmurs occasionally) to many specialists, but none of them ever brought up that it could be my thyroid. You would think someone would come up with a diagnosis or even a hint of what it could be after 12 years of complaining about its symptoms (blood test were taken too). My last doctor I saw (infertility doctor) was the one who sent me to a endocrinologist!

    Back to my question: Do test usually come back normal and then suddenly appear abnormal? I am on medication for the rest of my life! Thanks for your feedback! :)

    • ANSWER:
      The disease may still be there. You are treated for hypothyroidism so yr thyroid function may become normal.

  23. QUESTION:
    How long will it take to lose 50 lbs this way?
    If you are 185 lbs, 5’4″, 38 yrs old, female, with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, walking 5 – 6 miles a day, occasionally jogging or running along the way, occasionally lift weights & eat healthy about 1200 cals a day on avg – no red meats, how long do you think it would take to hit a goal weight of 135 lbs? In weeks or months.

    • ANSWER:
      its safest, and easiest for your body to adjust to losing about 2 lbs a week. Its good you’re walking a lot, and have a low calorie intake. Make sure your diet consits of lots of veggies and lean protien. Dense fibrous carbs are good, but not large quantities of them.

      You should calculate how many calories you are buring with your level of physical activity. If you’re buring more than you’re consuming, you will definitely lose 2 lbs a week. Which would in turn be approx. 25 weeks or a little less than 6 months.

      That may seem like a long time, but if you lose it slowly and safely, you will be more likely to keep it off!

      Kudos to you on desiring to live healthier!!! Best Wishes!

  24. QUESTION:
    What are the risks associated with pregnancy & hypothyroidism?
    I am rapidly aproaching 35 years of age & have been treating my Hashimoto’s with Armour for 5 years with a great deal of success. What should I do before I attempt to get pregnant?

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend asking your doctor about testing for other possible hormone issues that could play a role as well as what other ways your thyroid problem can be treated during pregnancy if the Armour is a risk factor for the baby.

      I also did a search on this and have included the link that may help you find even more information:

      http://search.yahoo.com/search?search=pregnancy+and+hypothyroidism&ei=UTF-8&fr=ks-ans&ico-yahoo-search-value=http%3A%2F%2Frds.yahoo.com%2F_ylt%3DAn.OlbSv3oi60hBp_XG_1QAazKIX%3B_ylv%3D0%2FSIG%3D11i10rbdn%2FEXP%3D1203854131%2F*-http%253A%2F%2Fsearch.yahoo.com%2Fsearch&ico-wikipedia-search-value=http%3A%2F%2Frds.yahoo.com%2F_ylt%3DArE4VEaipX1ocgL8.Vwlch0azKIX%3B_ylv%3D0%2FSIG%3D121atovu7%2FEXP%3D1203854131%2F*-http%253A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSpecial%253aSearch&p=pregnancy+and+hypothyroidism

  25. QUESTION:
    What is a good healthy food to eat in the morning that doesn’t contain iron or calcium? ?
    I have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism and take levothyroxine first thing in the morning. But iron and calcium interfere with the body’s ability to absorb the medication. Practically all the foods I have contain calcium (cereal, yogurt, even bananas!)

    What is a food you can recommend that does NOT contain iron or calcium, and will not interfere with the medication?

    • ANSWER:
      First, cereal??? Everyone eats cereal with milk (full of calcium, obviously)
      But you could do cereal if you switched over to almond milk. I switched over awhile ago because supposedly cows milk is no longer good for you. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but almond milk definitely is good. It does take some getting use to though.

  26. QUESTION:
    Why is my afternoon/evening temperature ALWAYS lower than my waking basal body temperature?
    Nowhere can I find an explanation for having a lower afternoon/evening temperature than my waking basal body temp. I do have Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism and do have a low basal body temperature and am on Levothyroxine and Propranolol but from what I can see everybody seems to have a temperature increase during the day.

    • ANSWER:
      im no medical expert, but do you awake sweating? have someone check the way you sleep. things like sleeping completely under a heavy blanket without fresh air could be a cause. i dont know anything about your prescriptions, but they might also factor. id check up the side effects doing a simple google “Levothyroxine side effects”.

  27. QUESTION:
    Quitting Medication with Hashimoto’s Disease?
    What could happen if you have Hashimoto’s Disease and stop taking your medication? Nothing, right? I ask because I am recently diagnosed. For years I’ve felt poorly and my “symptoms” were all over the place. I was misdiagnosed (and probably was yet again) several times before a regular physical found a goiter and tsh levels elevated. After many more (un-necessary) tests my endo says I have Hashimoto’s and not Hypothyroidism. My husband isn’t buying. I am not buying it. My family is not buying it. The symptoms are the same as getting older. I have gotten into many arguments trying to get people to believe this “illness” was diagnosed and have decided they may be right – this is all a symptom of hypochondria and not a real illness. I’ve read other peoples stories who have it and I am sorry, but they sound crazy. I know how I must have sounded now to everyone who is refusing to believe a doctor diagnosed me with anything at all. I don’t want to see the doctor or take the meds anymore. If there really is such an illness – that’s not in your head – what would really happen? Would I just get tired and all that other stuff again? I can live with that. I can’t live with people shaking their heads and laughing at me and my fake illness. I really do think this is all in my head like everyone else does. You can’t die from this, right? I mean, it’s not even real…

    • ANSWER:
      “my endo says I have Hashimoto’s and not Hypothyroidism” – Hashi’s cycles hyper to hypo to hyper etc until it finally gets to HypO and stays!

      “Would I just get tired and all that other stuff again? I can live with that.”
      If you can live w/ the symptoms rather than what people think…you are a better woman than me! My symptoms are so severe that I do not care one bit what anyone thinks…most of them are not in my shoes and many that are, do not know it! I am soooooo thankful to be diagnosed and to have recently been able (financially) to go back to the doctor and get on the meds….I now feel as though I am ‘rising from the ashes’! Praise the Lord!

      Yes you can die from untreated hypothyroidism and YES, it is very real!

      Read about all of us ‘hypochondriacs’:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  28. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism -but now fluctuating thyroid test?
    So I was told that i have hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s), and so I started taking low dosage synthroid. Well it’s been a good 4-5 months now. I took a blood test a while ago and it stated taht my thyroid was pretty normal, meaning that the pills were working.So I took a blood test last week and now the tests state that my thyroid levels are actually depleting now…as in it is going the opposite way. As in my thyroid is probably normal and because I am still on the pills, they are creating a hyperthyroid affect. has this ever happened to anyone? I thought that i would have this forever and that I would have to me on meds forever, so now i’m confused.My doc told me that I could basically get off meds now and check my blood in another 6 weeks to see if it is normal or back to hypo mode. normally I would love to get off of meds, but I really don’t want to keep switching back and forth between being on them and not, so do you think it would be ok to stay on them and check in a month 4change?
    well, my doc said that it is really up to me, that I could stop it now and check in 6 weeks to see if it is back normal, or if I really want to, I could keep on it and see if it is still going hyper mode or normal in 6 weeks. He didn’t seem too concerned either way…but i am. have any of you dealt with this before? I don’t understand how my thyroid could have just changed to normal all of a sudden…I mean for good… i’m worried that if I stop meds now, i will only develope it again and have to go back on them. or would it be worse to keep the meds? ah i dont know…

    Also I have PCOS, so I have to get on meds for that soon..i think it’s called metformin. I havn’t asked my doc if thyroid pills affect metformin or vice-versa yet.
    Valy, I do go to an endo. And it’s not that my med is not working, it’s that it did work, and then I became normal, and then it crossed to the opposite, to hyper-like mode.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid disease is so complicated and frustrating, isn’t it? Learning more about the disease is helpful. I recently subscribed to a newsletter that brings me up to date on the latest news and offers tips on how to live with my condition. I hope you’ll take the time to check the links below. If you scroll to the bottom of the first one, you’ll see that it specifically addresses your issue. The second link provides other information and also provides additional links on the left side that will further help you in learning more about what’s going on with your thyroid. I hope this helps. Good luck!

  29. QUESTION:
    hashimoto’s disease help? severe pain?
    Hey everyone!
    I have something very strange happening to me. If I don’t sleep well enough my muscles will start hurting. The pain gradually grows, and usually starts at night, making falling asleep almost impossible. sometimes the pain is deeper, more in the bone. I have asked my mom if this is normal, but all she says is that i am just being whiny. I don’t remember when it started but i fell like it’s been a couple of years now. Also I have hypothyroidism, caused by Hashimoto’s, could this be related?
    Is this normal?
    thank you very much!! :)))

    • ANSWER:
      This can come from Hashi’s. I assume that you are on meds. Are you rechecked regularly, like at least every 6 mos?

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  30. QUESTION:
    is it true that soy is bad for people with hypothyroidism?
    what about for someone like me? i have hashimoto’s so my thyroid isn’t low all the time, it fluctuates between normal and low.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, soy is a goitregen. That means that it inhibits thyroid function by blocking the incorporation of iodine into thyroxine precursors and by suppressing thyroxine secretion from the thyroid. This will make your thyroid work even harder, and burn out even sooner.

  31. QUESTION:
    Intuitive people: Will I ever lose weight? I have Hashimoto’s Thyroidits, which is a severe form of…?
    hypothyroidism. It is much more difficult to lose weight with this medical disorder.
    I am on thyroid medication. But, being on thyroid medication isn’t always enough to fight weight gain.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I have the same Disorder & i cannot loose weight even if i starve myself & do cardio every single day. When i tried that i passed out, the doctors say that i need to get surgery.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can someone be hypothyroid (Hashimoto’s) and experience bouts of hyperthyrodism (hashitoxicosis)?
    I’ve looked high and low on the internet and have not found conclusive RELIABLE information on this, so I’m seeking input from a doctor on here who might know. The reason I ask is because I have some symptoms of both (not necessarily at the same time). Right now I do have confirmed hashitoxicosis (mild) but what I really want to know is whether I’ve already been experiencing hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto’s, or is hashitoxicosis evidence that my thyroid is still fully functioning and that hypo will develop in future. Rationally, it seems possible that my thyroid is already low functioning but that occasionally a flurry of thyroid cells is released into the bloodstream, due to my immune system attacking my thyroid. I may have viable thyroid cells, but just not enough for normal levels. I will ask my endo but my appointment is not for a few weeks…..

    • ANSWER:
      I have Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism and have had hyperthyroid symptoms. I have an extensive medical history. Doctors have told me it can be quite common.

  33. QUESTION:
    Can blood testing for hypothyroidism detect birth control pills?
    I’m 16. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis when I was 14 and now I get regular blood testing every 3 months to tell if my thyroid is working properly/if my meds(synthroid) need to be adjusted. If I go on the pill, will these tests be able to tell? My parents are Catholic and wouldn’t exactly be pleased with the news.
    ps. I’m not interested in your speeches on abstinence or involving my parents in my personal life.

    • ANSWER:
      Due to the fact that your thyroid helps to regulate the same hormones that the birth control pill interuppt, it is not a good idea to start taking birth control pills. It would cause fluctuations in your test results (such as increased proteins in the results of the test that looks for TSH or thyroid stimulating hormone), and this would be investigated by your doctor. Due to the fact that you are still a minor, your parents would be informed of these fluctuations and/or anything else your doctor would find in his investigations. (Doctor needs to know if you go on birth control so that he/she can adjust your medication dosages and such accordingly.)

  34. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s disease help?
    So a while ago I was diagnosed Hashimoto’s disease which resulted in hypothyroidism. Now i’m 15 and I go to school and all that and I find that the disease is really affecting me. My memory is terrible, once, before I was diagnosed, I remember suddenly finding myself in the kitchen and not knowing how I got there, and other memory problems. Also, if say I run my head feels like it’s going to explode, And concentrating is extremely heard, and my grades have really dropped in the past year and I try not to make excuses, i know i got it easy, and some kids my age put up with far more but it’s terrible. If any of you have had this issue, do you have any tips/ advices that helped you? Thank you so much :)

    • ANSWER:
      You poor child. I am older & it is very hard but has to be even harder on you young folks…my grandson also has it.

      You did not say, but I assume that you are on meds like Synthroid and are being rechecked at least every 6 wks to get the dosage right. You might also ask to have Cytomel added.There are supplements that may help as well…Selenium, Folic Acid, B Complex, D3, Zinc and for memory, CoQ10.

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  35. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy?? OMG!?
    I have posted before about some health problems, but I just ran across this and I am in awe about how similar the symptoms are to mine. I do have other problems that don’t coincide with this. But I’ll explain a little about the ones that (I think) do. About a year ago I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis after showing symptoms of hypothyroidism (hair loss, fatigue sensitivity to cold, fatigue, etc.). At the time my TSH levels were abnormal, but when I saw the endocrinologist a month later the TSH levels were normal. They were normal again a few months later so the doctors felt that no treatment was necessary. Since then I have had some neurological symptoms arise that until now I believed were unrelated. (vision changes, numbness/weakness on the right side of my body, forgetfulness, confusion, some severe and some nagging but not too painful headaches) Unfortunately this is a rare and under diagnosed problem and I am looking for any information that may help.
    This was recently aired on an episode of Mystery Diagnosis. I didn’t see the show myself so I’m really unsure of the symptoms the subject experienced. My mother called me after watching the show and said my symptoms match identically. I am going to make an appointment next week (I have some other problems that need to be addressed as well), but in the meantime I am looking for any information from anyone who has experienced or knows anything about this.
    Funny you should ask. My blood pressure has always been 120/78 with rarely any variation unless it went down a bit. Over the last several months though, it has been around 150/100. The top number varies both up and down, but the bottom is always near 100. I didn’t know high blood pressure was a symptom though and have been thinking it is unrelated.
    I forgot, no I’m not taking medication for the blood pressure. I haven’t seen a doctor in quite a while though. Did you experience hair loss? Mine came out in clumps until I eventually lost it all. It has grown back in (not long, but covers my head), but just a week or so ago I found two new bald spots starting out the exact same way as a year ago when these problems first started : (
    Wow, thanks for the information! I am going to the doctor next Thursday and I am very interested to see what course of action we are going to take. I’m not sure if it goes along with my other problems, but I have also had some kidney problems. I have had recurrent kidney infections that come back even with the strongest antibiotics. I ended up in the ER a couple months ago from a very severe kidney infection and the doctor strongly advised me to see a urologist after the test results along with his exam and my description of symptoms. He said he can’t tell me anything as he isn’t a urologist, but he would suspect kidney failure. I wonder if this could also be related?
    Weight loss is a big issue for me too. I gained a lot of weight when the thyroid problems first started and have been slowly but steadily gaining since. I gained about 30 lbs over the first couple months and another 20 over the last year. I have just noticed hair loss starting again as well as extreme fatigue and along with it I am gaining weight again. : (

    • ANSWER:
      I am having the EXACT symptoms that you are and i also have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. My TSH levels are normal and I am not currently on medication. At first I didn’t know what was wrong and I did some research. I am pretty sure that I am having seizures and this fits into what it says about this disease. (since seizures are a neurological side effect) I have many other autoimmune related problems and I had long suspected that the neurological problems were also autoimmune related.

      The thing that I am concerned about is that the main thing that they are using to slow it down and get it into remission is Prednisone, which is not a pleasant drug. I did some other research though and I have an idea. First, I have a question for you though. Do you have high blood pressure or borderline high blood pressure and/or are you already taking a medication for it?

      ADDED RESPONSE:

      Yes I have had some hair loss. I just assumed it was because of the Hashimoto’s. I also get hair on my face which is not fun.

      The reason I asked about the blood pressure was two-fold. I have noticed that my blood pressure goes up when my thyroid goes into hyperthyroid mode which to me signals changes in my thyroid which I have to watch. The second is kind of complicated I’ll try to make this as direct as I can.

      First, I might have mentioned that I have other autoimmune disorders and a whole host of problems (including really resistant Diabetes) so I have spent a great deal of time researching things and coming back to the same point for almost all of them:

      1. Most of them have a digestive deficiency and metabolic basis. This causes all sorts of problems such as food allergies and a whole host of related problems. If the digestion isn’t working then your PH will be off and your electrolytes.So dietary changes are necessary to correct a PH problem. That is something I am working on currently. Something about a diet being too acidic causes problems and making yourself more alkaline has been shown to have incredible results. There is a doctor that claims to have cured diabetes by correcting PH balance. There very well may be something to what he claims since gastric bypass surgery which takes out a portion of the stomach and small intestines and then limits the stomach acid also seems to cure diabetes within a week of the surgery. Here is info about that:

      http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/55/Supplement_2/S92

      I have some really extensive info on enzymes and digestion so if you’d like that let me know. I’m still plowing through the info my husband has gathered myself.

      In regards to electrolytes: the imbalance of the electrolytes can cause seizures and many other of the symptoms that we are experiencing. (by the way, the forgetfulness, confusion, head pain, sudden vision changes, and any trembling if they are happening in clusters could be small seizures. Most people think of seizures as the grand mal fall on the floor type but there are a whole variety of types. You might want to check out wikipedia for info but here is another website that talks about problems with food, especially those that illicit an estrogen-like response which can be a problem for people with thyroid disorders.

      http://www.litalee.com/shopexd.asp?id=208 )

      Okay, so one of the things I got from that website was that it’s important to control the 3 channels of electrolytes (calcium, potassium, and magnesium) to reduce the neurological problems. One thing you might find out is if you have too much calcium in your blood stream or urine. For whatever reason alot of people with thyroid problems do. Alot of those people incidentally have issues with dairy. I don’t know what the connection exactly but I do know that it was suggested to me to add a magnesium supplement to my diet because calcium is unable to be properly absorbed without magnesium. Potassium is not a good idea to take as a supplement and just eating a banana covers that problem.

      2. Anything autoimmune related means exactly one thing: the self is fighting against the self. It’s so symbolic isn’t it? The most important thing to do is get your stress level down as much as possible. Or at least get your stress tolerance up. I am a big fan of meditation of any sort and breathing exercises for helping with that. I feel like whenever I forget to do those two things and my life gets hectic I seem to have all the autoimmune stuff pop up.

      ***Also I wanted to mention the importance of just carefully chronically what you eat and making whatever corrections necessary. I eat every three hours to keep my thyroid from going hypothyroid and this seems to help. Just cutting out some things seemed to have an effect on the symptoms. ALSO, it’s important to note that whatever things boost the immune system should be avoided. If you take vitamin supplements ONLY take the ones you have to correct a deficiency. I’m planning on experimenting with digestive enzymes but I have to get the acidity down first. This seems important to do first.

      FINALLY, the reason I asked you about the blood pressure is this: There is an article about a doctor that I came across that is a medical researcher. He thinks that chronic fatique syndrome is actually an autoimmune disorder. Anyway, he speculates that a number of disorders have one thing in common: the overactivity of a particular enzyme- “ACE”. He feels that simply using an ace inhibitor can get many of them under control. Ace inhibitors are for blood pressure. So theoretically using this blood pressure medication could potentially help. Since you already have elevated blood pressure your doctor can’t say no and it would be a good experiment. I would like to try it but I am allergic to the ace-inhibitors. Maybe it could help you. Here is a quote from him and below is the website.
      ” I began studying the angiotensin I-converting enzyme or “ACE” gene ten years ago, while still in academia. My lab found that over-activity of ACE was responsible for kidney failure due to diabetes and high blood pressure. What was surprising was that another 150 or so diseases seemed to be caused by too much ACE activity.

      Genomed is a disease management company, meaning that our business model is to get paid for taking better care of patients. We use existing drugs, especially generic drugs, whenever possible, because they’re the ones which have the most known about them, in terms of possible side effects.

      Our approach is to attack diseases at their source, so as to achieve regression (“cure”). It just so happens that ACE appears to be at the source of virtually all common diseases except prostate cancer. In particular, all autoimmune diseases, such as Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, and even allergies to penicillin and sulfa drugs, start with overactivity of ACE. The logical treatment to try, then, especially for diseases with no good treatment yet, is an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II blocker (ACE makes angiotensin II).”

      http://www.immunesupport.com/library/showarticle.cfm/id/5007

      ADDED DETAIL: I was also getting problems with urinary tract infections/kidney infections and kidney stones. The kidney stones were calcium stones and uric acid stones (again too much acidity in the diet). The thing is I would go into the doctor and they would say “you show bacteria in the urine test” and they would give me antibiotics but the symptoms often didn’t go away with the antibiotics. Later when they cultured out the specimens the results would show nothing. In other words: No significant infection. My doctor finally sent me to a urologist and she told me about a autoimmune disorder called Interstitial Cystitis which mimics those symptoms exactly. It also causes other problems as well. Here is some info about that:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstitial_cystitus

      By the way the ACE inhibitors are also good for relieving pressure in the kidneys and helping them to last longer if you have problems. When you become diabetic they very often put you on that medication even if you do not have high blood pressure just to work to save your kidneys. Unfortunately I am allergic to them so I couldn’t take them.

      BY THE WAY, sorry the info was so scattered. People kept coming in and distracting me while I was writing. I know I mentioned alot of things but in my experience the people that tend to have one metabolic or autoimmune problem tend to have several and diabetes is prevelant among all of those groups.

      I had an appointment with this one endocrinologist whose viewpoint was that many of these problems happened simply because most people were genetically designed to eat very little. I would add that we were also genetically designed to eat different foods than most of us are currently eating. The average person’s diet in America has so drastically changed over the last hundred years that the genetic modifications needed to sustain this dietary change have not happened. We are killing ourselves with this historically new abundance of food and variety.

      So I think she was right and I can often get my body into a remission state. Big problem though is that I ALSO need to lose weight and the old dietary model of eating very little does not support weight loss as well.

  36. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease with strange symptoms…?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. My TSH levels are around 8 or higher and my Thyroid levels are sitting at around 1 or so. I have also been tested for the antibodies that my indicate Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. My Peroxidase levels are >1000 and my Thyroglobulin levels are 302.0. I was told these were significantly high numbers and everything I have read indicates that this is Hashimoto’s (please correct me if I am wrong) the rest of my symptoms include:

    No Goiter
    Weight Gain
    Constipation
    Heart Palpitations (hyperthyroid?)
    High Blood Pressure
    Joint Pain
    Always seem to be tired
    Seem to have headaches increasingly more often (I very rarely ever got headaches)

    My Army PA told me that I would be very sick if I actually had Hashimoto’s Disease, and that I had no goiter, I don’t have the disease. I am not hoping I have it (obviously), but everything I have read and have researched points to it minus a few symptoms. Can anyone give me any help or advice on what to tell my new Army doctor this Tuesday? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Those symptoms aren’t so strange if you have Hashimoto Disease. You can swing between hypothyroidism and hyperthryoidism.

      “Hashimoto’s Disease
      Also called “Hashi’s” or “thyroiditis”, this is an autoimmune disorder in which one’s immune system attacks it’s own thyroid cells, causing inflammation and eventually resulting in hypothyroid. In many cases a goiter develops because of the inflammation, but sometimes the thyroid gland can actually shrink. Patients with Hashi’s can vascillate between hypo and hyper. There is a genetic predisposition to autoimmune disease, so if you have one, you are more at risk to have others, including Hashi’s thyroiditis. It is proposed that a lack of iodine also plays a role in autoimmune attacks on the thyroid.”

      Stop the thyroid madness:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/causes-of-hypo/

  37. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Thyroid, started Armour, when will it kick in?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism February of 09, my doc put me on synthroid after taking a THS test, synthroid made matters worse so I quit taking it. I went to a different doctor and he did more tests and diagnosed me with Hashimoto’s disease and prescribed me Armour. I started taking Armour on November 7th 09, so I have been taking it for about a week and a half. I have felt a little better, but lately I have been tired and brain foggy. I have also had ringing in my ears and eye twitches, not sure if this has anything to do with Hashimoto’s disease. I was wondering if I should give it more time or call my doctor?

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s and normal tsh levels? Possible to feel hypo?
    Any tips from others dealing with this would be greatly appreciated and would make me feel like I’m not crazy. :)
    I had doctors telling me my thyroid gland felt enlarged since January 2010,they’d test my tsh and everything was normal. Finally this May a different doctor ordered an ultrasound of my thyroid gland, radiologist and my doctor agreed it is “mildly enlarged”, they also found that 2 of my parathyroid glands are also enlarged. I was sent to an endocrinologist late May and she ordered a load of labs, parathyroid function, kidney function,tsh, metabolic panel, vitamin d and tested for thyroid antibodies.My tsh was .93 (late may), my last tsh was this january and was 1.9. I tested positive for thyroid antibodies and my level was 69, my vitamin d is also low and is the supposed reason for my parathyroid glands being enlarged,am now taking 1000 units of vitamin d daily now.
    At my initial appt. with my endo she talked to me mainly about hyperthyroidism because of they way my level dropped, I told her I have none of those symptoms. She called me at work to tell me I have Hashimoto’s and low vit d levels, take vitamin d daily and she will recheck my tsh and vit d in 6 months. She had no time to answer any questions and said absolutely no to any medication.. so I did my own research. I have just about every symptom of HYPOthyroidism and have had them for years. My mother had hashimotos and no longer has a thyroid gland, almost every one of her siblings is hypo and a few are hyper (there are 9 total). I called her back w/my concerns and still said absolutely no to treating it.
    I’ve had pain in the joints of my fingers x 3 years
    pain/swelling in my knees x 8-9 yrs (i do not have lymes or arthritis, mri and xray done on my knees show nothing wrong at all) I’ve seen orthopedic doctors for this.
    my muscles ache all the time in all sorts of places, legs,arms, back.
    my skin is very dry and seems to be bad yr round, am now using a prescription scalp solution for my horribly dry scalp that seemed to come out of no where 2 yrs ago.
    I cannot get pregnant again (5 yrs of trying-finally gave up and decided it was’nt meant to be), i missed 2 days of birth control 9 yrs ago and got pregnant instantly.
    I could sleep all day if I did’nt have a life, I am tired all the time and feel like I’m in a fog. I have been on 3 antidepressants (over 5 yrs) the doctors threw at me and nothing really worked so I just stopped them.
    I used to be someone who never really got nervous or scared about things..over the past few yrs I have anxiety over many stupid little things that shouldnt bother me,even meeting w/friends for dinner and sometimes break out in hives on my chest and back when my anxiety is bad.
    my weight fluctuates every couple months w/ no change in diet. I gain about 10 lbs and a month or so later I lose that plus maybe some more. (i am not a large person, so this usually goes unnoticed by most people)
    I have and have had bad menorrhagia for many yrs. but usually don’t get anything to stop the bleeding because I have a clotting disorder already and extra hormones puts me at higher risk for a clot.
    the list goes on…
    If my tsh was only .93 in May, why do I feel like someone with hypothyroidism? Maybe it’s just coincidence? I have a very slim neck and my enlarged thyroid is a tiny bit noticeable (by my endo and now me since she showed me) Why is this a “wait and see” disease? Why would they allow your thyroid gland to get bigger? It does’nt make sense.I would rather feel hyper than hypo any day, I have felt like crap for way too long.
    (fyi- i am 28 yrs old..going on 80) I have an appt with a new endo on Thursday but he works alongside with the last one I saw so I’m guessing he wont be of any help either and just a waste of another copay.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, the TSH test as the only thyroid test, and no treatment? ugh
      This is NOT a wait-and-see disease. The thyroid is one of the most
      important glands in the body. It regulates the entire metabolism, and when
      the thyroid is not functioning properly it can affect everything from
      adrenals, sex hormones, bones, circulation, hair, and weight, to energy,
      mental acuity, eyesight, and so on…

      Here is an article that might help you find a better doctor:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

      Here is the Hashimotos article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos

      Lots of great thyroid treatment info:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      Recommended tests:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      What the test results mean:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      There are a couple of thyroid groups that I think will benefit you:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones/

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless (co-mod has Hashis)

      I sincerely hope this info helps you.

  39. QUESTION:
    Could I have Hashimoto’s?
    Hi all.

    I’m 5’1 and 130 pounds, and trying to lose about 20 pounds. I’ve been exercising consistently since May of 2008. Over the summer, I worked out with a trainer a couple times a week and did about 45 minutes of cardio a day (usually elliptical) or one to two group fitness classes each day (step, cardio kickboxing, or cycling). My diet is extremely healthy and controlled.

    I went to my doctor to get tested for hypothyroidism and my levels were in the normal range, but leaned more toward hypothyroidism. My doctor told me to eat 1200 calories a day, and then later advised me to 1000 calories. Even eating this little amount and exercising as much as I was, I still couldn’t lose weight or tone up.

    I am continuing to have the same problem – frequent workouts, healthy diet, and no results. I have some symptoms of Hashimoto’s – frequently cold, pale skin, puffy face at times, and symptoms of depression.

    Does anyone have Hashimoto’s or know more about it that could tell me if this could be a possibility?
    I should add that I started out at 140 pounds in May, but due to a serious, life changing event, I lost ten pounds in September, mostly because I was so stressed out and ate almost nothing for about 3 weeks. That’s all the weight loss I’ve seen since then.

    • ANSWER:
      Could be.

  40. QUESTION:
    How can I lose weight with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?
    I’m only 17 years old and just two days ago, I found out I have Hashimoto’s. I have practically all of the symptoms of it plus the hypothyroidism symptoms. However my doctor won’t give me the medication for it because my hypothyroidism “isn’t bad enough”. I want/need to lose 25 lbs. before graduation, which gives me about 7 months. I’m going to start WeightWatchers soon. As of right now, I weight 165 lbs, and I’m only 5’4″. Overweight, to say the least. I would like to know what kind of foods I should and shouldn’t be eating. I know that most people with Hashimoto’s are sensitive to gluten, so I’m going to try to avoid that. And for about 3 weeks now, I haven’t been eating sweets (cakes, cookies, chocolate, candy, etc.) I’m hoping that helps. Also, I’m always extremely tired from this, and I’m having a hard time exercising because I always feel weak. Any tips? I would also like any recommendations on some kind of supplements I can take since I can’t have the medication. My grandma suggested a good multivitamin, but I don’t know how to choose that or even what kinds of vitamins I need for this disease.

    Please and thank you:) And any extra advice is welcome!

    • ANSWER:
      Your calorie intake will need to be limited to prevent additional weight gain. A multivitamin (your basic multi) would be helpful in this, at your age it might also be beneficial to supplement vitamin D. Calcium is unnecessary because if you are eating a balanced diet you should get adequate amounts (calcium is mostly in dairy products and dark green vegetables).

      I would look to cut calorie intake where it is easiest for you to do so. Many people find it beneficial to cut soft drink/soda intake, and limit their beverages to low-fat milk, water, or non-calorie drinks. Limiting sweets is also a good idea. High-fat foods like fried foods can also be a good place to look to cut calories. Keep in mind, though, that unless you are clearly out of puberty (unlikely @ 17) you can grow further, so losing weight at a rapid rate may be a bad idea – you could, conceivably, in 7 months, grow an inch or two.

      It’s important that you get an adequate iodine intake (iodine is a major component of thyroid hormone), and a multivitamin will help insure that. You may also find it beneficial to LIMIT foods with goitrogens – basically, foods that prevent your body from absorbing iodine effectively. Cabbages, peanuts, soy products, cauliflower, and broccoli are among the foods containing goitrogens. It’s not to say that you shouldn’t eat these foods, just don’t go crazy with them. There are ton of other leafy green vegetables out there that are just as good, though.

      As far as exercise goes, exercise as you are able to do so. Sluggishness is a major factor related to hypothyroidism, and you don’t need to do anything crazy. A brisk walk, light weight training, whatever you feel you can handle and won’t push you to your extremes and make you pass out.

      Oh, and one last note. “Healthy” weight loss is no more than 1 lb a week (at your age I’d aim for 1/2 lb), so with seven months to go you have more than enough time – ESPECIALLY because you could grow taller. I’d aim for a calorie intake between 1900-2100 kcal/day (This is a VERY rough estimate, it’s always tricky estimating with people who have hypothyroid). If you don’t see a loss after a couple of weeks, shave about 200 calories off of that number. Weigh yourself the same time once a week (usually after waking up and urinating is a good time)

  41. QUESTION:
    Armour Thyroid medication? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism February of 09, my doc put me on synthroid after taking a THS test, synthroid made matters worse so I quit taking it. I went to a different doctor and he did more tests and diagnosed me with Hashimoto’s disease and prescribed me Armour. I started taking Armour on November 7th 09, so I have been taking it for about a week and a half. I have felt a little better, but lately I have been tired and brain foggy. I have also had ringing in my ears and eye twitches, not sure if this has anything to do with Hashimoto’s disease. I was wondering if I should give it more time or call my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      If I’m not mistaken, Armour is an older version of Synthroid, and because they are both synthetic versions of bodies natural Thyroid hormone I’m not sure that they are terribly different. You can always call your pharmacist anytime with your medication concerns, he/she is the best person to ask, they have so much information at their fingertips!

      As far as your medical diagnoses, Hypothyroidism is a condition that results in low levels of thyroid hormone (T3 and T4) and Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disorder that causes a persons own immune system to attact the thyroid gland thus causing Hypothyroidsim.

      So, if I were you I would call the pharmacist and lay out all of my symptoms so he/she can tell you if you are having a reaction from too little or too much of the medication. From what I understand, it is unlikely to be allergic to either of these medications because they are pretty identical to our own thyroid hormones. But, I am not a doctor or pharmacist.

      Then, you could call your doctor and have him/her reevaluate you or you could look for another doctor? an endocrinologist or rheumatologist may be a good idea. Endocrinology specializes in endocrine disorders and rheumatology specializes in autoimmune disorders (a good idea any ways).

      I hope you feel better soon! It can be very stressful to continue to feel bad after a diagnosis has been made and medication has been prescribed. But, don’t give up! The best defense is knowledge and the internet has a lot of great information out there!

  42. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s so why won’t doctors treat me?
    About a year ago I had all of the tests done(including an aspiration because I had nodes on my thyroid which turned out benign thankfully.) and I have Hashimoto’s. My level then was 5.1 so I’ve been to two doctors who have chosen not to medicate me. The problem is, I am having a lot of the symptoms. Now it’s progressed to depression, panic attacks and sometimes paranoia. I’ve done a lot of research that says all of these can occur because of hypothyroidism. How do I get a doctor to treat me? I don’t understand. I feel terrible and my mood swings are starting to affect people that I love. I was never like this before and its progressively getting worse. I’ve been freaking out on my bf all weekend for no reason and it’s really upsetting him because he says I’m never like this. He’s worried about me. I know I need another blood test because levels could have changed but how do I find someone who’s willing to at least try and treat me? They downplay my symptoms like it can’t be that bad because my levels aren’t over 6. I just can’t keep living like this.

    • ANSWER:

  43. QUESTION:
    Do You Know How Your Thyroid Gland Affects Your Entire Body?
    Your Thyroid Gland affects your entire body. Thyroid disease can cause ‘Graves’ Disease, a goiter, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Thyroid Cancer and so much more. This is an Autoimmune Disorder. Visit www.isityourthyroid.webs.com

    • ANSWER:
      i have graves’/hashimoto’s. it’s debilitating, mentally and physically.

  44. QUESTION:
    Anyone know anything about Hashimoto’s Thyroidism and its symptoms?
    I was diagnosed around age 11/12 with Hashimoto disease at Toronto sick Kids Hospital. A large goiter was found at my annual check up. My thyroid was then hyperactive, and I was treated with radioactive iodine at approx age 14/15 – which resulted in Hypothyroidism. From a very early age I suffered with joint problems, and throughout the years they have progressively gotten worse. I suffer from many symptoms that coincide with Hashimoto disease (especially Musculoskeletal symptoms, dry skin, muscle weakness, weight gain, chronic fatigue, migraines) , and I have also been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I have been X-rayed by three different doctors, each giving me a different diagnoses. Due to my many debilitating symptoms, I’m looking to apply for the Ontario disability Support Program. Unfortunately I was told by the last Dr. I saw, that symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease would not affect me now – due to my past treatment of radioactive iodine, even though many of my symptoms started after the treatment.
    I was wondering if there is any truth to this statement? – as many things that I have read have contradicted this.
    Is there any literature that you can provide/recommend for me, that can help to back up my claim; As well as help me to understand this disease and it’s symptoms better?

    Any advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    I’m on 200 mg Levothyroxine for hypothyroidism and still feeling sluggish and having severe headaches.?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s Disease about 3 years ago. I am STILL trying to get my thyroid level back on track. My dr has continued to increase my dosage of Levothyroxine to no avail. I was on 175 mg of Levothyroxine up until 2 months ago and my bloodwork showed a TSH level of 20. So he upped my dosage to 200 mg saying that this is near the highest level normally prescribed. I have been taking it for 2 months and felt good for about 3 days and now am back to feeling very sluggish, having severe headaches, brain fog, weight gain (lots), mood swings, etc.
    It feels like I’m not taking anything…no effects whatsoever. (I’m taking it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with water. I don’t eat or drink for at least 1 hour afterwards…just like my dr instructed.)
    Has anyone experienced this difficulty of getting results from thyroid meds? What will the dr end up doing if this high dose doesn’t work? I just want my old life back…so does my husband…tired of the mood swings, I’m sure but he’s been really supportive!

    Thanks for any info or experiences you can share!

    • ANSWER:
      maybe you need to try b12 vitamins.. b12 is for your energy and such ppl use them to help lose weight as well and you medication might not be making you gain weight it could b from your hypothyrodism cuz it can cause weight gain

      ask your doctor if you can mix b12 vitamins (if you choose to try to) with your medication just incase it could do something to you

  46. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what are symptoms of thyroid disease?
    please tell me about any symptoms you know of from Hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, Grave’s disease, or thyroid storm

    • ANSWER:
      HypOthyroid symptoms:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic

      HypErthyroidism and Graves Disease:
      Some of the symptoms are rapid unexplained weight loss, rapid heart rate, hair loss, shaking, diarrhea, sweating, etc.

      Hashimotos symptoms:
      HypEr and hypO symptoms – see above.

      Thyroid storm is sudden excessive thyroids hormones for whatever reason and is similar to hypErthyroid symptoms.

      Read about thyroid stuff here:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  47. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism- dull facial expression?
    I have hashimoto’s thyroiditis. I was researching about it and i read from several sources that chronic hypothyroidism can lead to a dull facial expression. I want to know why this happens.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of myxedema – accumulation of hydrophilic mucopolysaccharides in subcutaneous tissues. This means fluid infiltrates the tissues causing puffiness which leads to symptoms of dull facial expression and change in facial appearance.

      http://books.google.com.au/books?id=bIZvJPcSEXMC&pg=PA800&lpg=PA800&dq=hydrophilic+mucopolysac-+charide+changes+facial+expression&source=bl&ots=arFVmyjWge&sig=q9Wnc7lMjoCphT6kMRJtCePHQvU&hl=en&ei=vm1zTa_cDoqwuAPbpeS9AQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/m/myxedema/symptoms.htm

  48. QUESTION:
    Why does hypothyroidism cause…?
    why does hypothyroidism produce the following symptoms:
    -coarse hair
    -sensitivity to cold
    -thick skin
    -husky voice

    i need the homeostatic malfunctions that could have caused these. I figured out why it causes weight gain and fatigue…but yea. I think the cold has to do with the autoimmune disorder hashimoto’s disease…but what about the husky voice? and the thick hair and skin?

    thanks!

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article from the University of Maryland is what you’re looking for:

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_causes_hypothyroidism_000038_2.htm

  49. QUESTION:
    Okay. I have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and I am taking Synthroid. Can I take it at night? Any more advice!?
    I am taking synthoid and my swelling is not as bad when I take it. I also take Advil 3 time a day. My dumb butt stopped it for one day because I was so tired throughout the day. Can anyone offer any advice who actually has been through this where they may go through periods of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism when the thyroid is inflammed? I have read about it but this is a difficult disease to understand. If was diabetes I could tell you all about it. Heck even some of my doctor friends are afraid to touch this subject. I have found it helpful to get advice from people who experience this. Thank you and please only real advice here because I am very afraid.

    • ANSWER:

  50. QUESTION:
    Losing weight with hypothyroidism, HELP!?
    I am a 250 lb 18-year old girl. I have just been diagnosed with autoimmune thyroid disease, also known as Hashimoto’s Disease, which in turn led to me developing insulin resistance and hypothyroidism. I am eating low-carb, low-fat, cutting out sweets and sodas, and doing an hour of racquetball at LEAST 4 days a week. I am also on Metformin and Levothyroxine to help regulate my insulin and hormones. I tried Hydroxycut in addition to my diet and exercise, but to no avail. The scale has not budged in nearly three weeks. What else can I do? Why am I failing?
    Also, I’d appreciate you not peddling your disgusting diet pills to me. I’m interested in a lifestyle change, not a quick fix that gives me a heart attack. (:

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I have Hashimotos Disease as well. It’s more common than you realise. Alot of people have variations of this such as Graves Disease. It is controlled with the Thyroxin you are taking daily.
      Although the Thyroxin should be combatting this directly to help you lose weight – you and me both know it doesn’t.
      With research I have found that if you can get some iodine into your diet, it will help. This is in fish and seaweed.
      Coconut also contains an enzyme which assists with the function of the thyroid. So try to have coconut on deserts/meals when you can. I know, not an easy ingredient to add.
      Also, cut out red meat – you don’t have the digestive abilities to obtain all the nutrional elements anyway but you will certainly obtain all the fats.
      Also remember your 5 fruits and vegetables per day. This should be taking up the majority of your foods. Its actually really hard to fit in 5 fruits and vegetables. But this means you need to replace other foods with these healthy alternatives.

      Your body may take some time to give in and let the fat burn, so do persevere, when it starts happening, you will start to lose weight easily as you’ve done the hard yards. But most importantly, be realistic in your diet and exercise. After all the dieting, you wont be able to keep up a diet of starvation and an overexcercising routine. And you’ll put it all back on.

      Good luck.


Hashimoto’s Disease Hypothyroidism

“Your thyroid levels are in the normal range now, take these antidepressant’s, they will help with your depression.” These may be some of the most dangerous words a low thyroid sufferer will ever hear.

According to the Endocrine Society, upwards to 80 or 90 percent of hypothyroidism in the United States, is caused from an autoimmune mechanism called Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid. This means the cause of the hypofunction is the immune system attacking your own gland.

Literally the immune system slowly chews up the thyroid gland and you lose normal thyroid hormone output. Over time your hormone levels will slowly decrease because it continually loses cells from the immune attack.

Here are 5 Warning Signs that you may have hypothyroidism from an immune mechanism, and that the treatment your are currently receiving is not adequate or complete enough for your particular condition:

1) The dose of your thyroid replacement hormone continually goes up over time.

If you are continually having your thyroid medication increased, this means that your are losing more and more thyroid function. Your immune system is most likely the culprit. Hormone replacement does not address the continual immune attack against the gland. If your doctor is not addressing the immune attack, you are going to continue to suffer.

2) You still suffer with hypothyroid symptoms, yet your doctor tells you that your thyroid is now “normal”.

If your latest labs show that your hormone levels are in the “normal range”, yet you continue to suffer with the same symptoms, you are most likely not getting the proper management of your condition.

This is a huge sign that you have Hashimoto’s disease. The proteins, called cytokines, that are used by the immune system to communicate amongst each other, block the hormone receptor sites. This means you can have normal hormone levels showing on a lab report, and still not have a normal thyroid metabolic responses. Working on the immune system is the only way to fix this problem.

3) Your doctor never checked for antibodies against the gland.

If you suffer with hypothyroidism, then you have a high probability of having Autoimmune Thyroid. If your doctor didn’t bother to check antibody levels, or refuses to check antibody levels, you are most likely not receiving the proper treatment. The two most important antibodies to check are Thyroid Perioxidase Antibodies (TPO Ab) and Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TBG Ab).

4) Your doctor continually checks your antibody levels.

This may seem counter-intuitive since I just mentioned that you should have your antibody levels checked. I include this because, replacement hormones do not affect the immune system. It makes no sense to continually check antibodies if the doctor is not doing any treatment to affect the immune system. If your doctor is trying to decrease your antibody levels with replacement therapy, you are not getting the proper treatment. Watch for this. It is a sign that your doctor really doesn’t understand the mechanisms causing your problem.

5) You begin to get individual prescriptions for various thyroid symptoms.

If you are getting treated with antidepressants for hypothyroid based depression, it means that the replacement hormone treatment is most likely not working. With Hashimoto’s you can have normal thyroid hormone levels and still suffer with symptoms, including depression. Treatment needs to be focused on immune modulation, if you want to fix the actual cause of the problem.

If you suffer with hypothyroidism, and you live in the United States, then the most likely reason you have this condition is from an autoimmune reaction called Hashimoto’s Disease. Treating this condition with replacement hormone, while ignoring the immune component, is like treating a slow bleed with blood transfusions and failing to stop the site of the bleed. Without immune modulation then the viscious cycle of thyroid gland destruction, by the immune system, will continue. You can use the warning signs outlined as a guide to help you determine if you are receiving the proper management of your hypothyroid condition.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  2. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease… Multinodular Goiter… Hypothyroidism?
    I am so confused. Depending on which doctor I talk to, I seem to get a different answer. If someone can correct all this for me I’d be so appreciative. I am ready to scream with all the back and forth… yes and no.. one doctor contradicting another… so here goes:

    About 9 years ago I started having menstrual cycle irregularities. I was all over the place, late, early.. very early (like a week after period ended it was back) and very late (like 7 weeks later and she still hasn’t come and not pregnant). After bloodwork and ultrasound my ob/gyn said the only thing she could think causing it was early perimenopause, I was only 30. So off I went waiting for full blown menopause to arrive. In the meantime other things began happening. I started losing hair.. even my eyebrows.. I was tired constantly. I was constipated or had diarrhea. My periods continued to be all over the place. I would feel sick all the time. To the point people (still to this day) think I was full of it. Then I got married. We decided to go for fertility treatments. My reproductive endo did a bunch of tests and found nothing. I was still fertile, but why I wasn’t ovulating she had no clue. My thyroid was fine she said – though she did not give me the lab number. I stopped seeing her after it was determined I would only get pregnant with IVF. If I wasn’t ovulating and the ovulation drugs weren’t making it happen, I felt this was a waste of time and money. I went for a physical with my primary doctor who found a suspicious lump on my neck. After asking me questions that seemed unrelated (i.e. periods, reflexes, hair, tired etc) she tested my thyroid and said I had a high tsh of 9.9 (not high though, right?) and prescribed synthroid and referred me to an endo. After several more tests of my thyroid it was determined I had a multinodular goiter and Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism. UGH.

    After being on meds for 3 months, my periods came back… my hair stopped falling out… and I got pregnant! But later miscarried due to high TSH. My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.

    WTH? Can someone enlighten me on this “disease” it seems I may or may not have? Who should I believe? I have read extensively and it seems I DO have characteristics… but why would a doctor tell me another doctor is wrong? I DO have a goiter – you can see/feel it. Even a radiologist called it a goiter when doing the test. HELP!! Why did I get pregnant if the only thing I changed was the meds? Can anyone help me understand?

    • ANSWER:
      “My ob/gyn said my thyroid is fine. I do not have hypothyroid OR hashimoto’s and that I had low progesterone. Stop the synthroid I don’t need it. My tsh was 21.4 now. I did not stop the med – I called the endo who explained I m/c because of the tsh levels. My ob/gyn still says my thyroid is fine. It’s my endo I need to change.” YOU NEED A NEW OB/GYN NOW!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  3. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I found out a few months ago that i have Hashimoto’s disease(the graudal attacking of my thyroid by my body, causing it to slowly fail), which results in hypothyroidism. I’ve been put on levoxyl, but have gained a significant amount of weight in the past year and a half (about 65lbs). My family (parents mostly) are making me feel awful about this, though I’m not significantly obese (I was in the middle of my weight range when I started gaining) and it’s not interferring with my every day.

    Does anyone else have htis problem, or a similar one? How do you cope with these people, and your feeling self conscious? The weight will come off, I know that, but it will take time. I plan on starting to work out soon, but I work full time and go to school, and it’s very difficult. Can anyone give me some suggestions on what I can do? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have hashimoto’s disease, but i do have panhypopituarism, which also includes hypothyroidism and have had it since birth. I’ve never felt like I looked that overweight, but also never been skinny either. It is hard for me to lose weight also. I try to do weights,stretching, and run or walk daily. Often 3 miles a day and I eat pretty healthily. Sometimes its hard to keep up this exercise schedule and actually most people recommend not exercising every day of the week. I know what its like to try really hard to lose weight and not have much success.

      Sometimes it takes awhile. I used to try for a few weeks and then give up when I wasn’t seeing the results I wanted. Keep positive, pretend it doesn’t matter and keep exercising. Eventually you will get results.

      Its something you have to find a way to fit into your schedule if its something you want to do. I know its hard to find the time.

      It sounds like you pretty much know this stuff I just wanted to offer my support. I know you can do it. Don’t let other people bother you. There are an astronomical number of people that are overweight that do not have this problem.

  4. QUESTION:
    Recently diagnosed with Hypothyroidism disease– should I be tested for Hashimoto’s disease?
    Before being diagnosed, I would always tell my mother of various symptoms I was having. From extreme fatigue, to lethargy and brain fog…to achiness all over to weight gain.. I would tell her these different symptoms and because it wasn’t just /one/ symptom and instead, many, she started calling me a hypochondriac and treated me in a manner that suggested she believed I was making it up and was “just being lazy”.

    Well, I went to the doctor and was notified that I had Hypothyroidism and was recently put on the drug, Levothyroxine. I didn’t know much about the disease, so I went searching online (to legitimate health websites, nothing taboo with a bunch of woohoo) and discovered that it was common for young people with Hypothyroidism to actually have Hashimoto’s disease. (I’m 20)

    I told my mom because I wasn’t tested for Hashimoto’s and now she thinks I’m being a hypochondriac. Should I get tested and is my concern reasonable?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, absolutely! You are not a hypochondriac…you are being proactive about your health. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is the leading cause of hypothyroidism. As hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, lowering thyroid antibodies is a must to prevent more damage to the thyroid gland not to mention reduce hypothyroidism symptoms.

      “In the new study, researchers noted the symptom levels of more than 400 women with thyroid conditions, including Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. They theorized that higher levels of antithyroperoxidase antibody – an immune cell associated with Hashimoto’s – would correspond with more severe symptoms.

      While this was found to be the case, the team made an unexpected secondary discovery. Women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis often experienced its symptoms even when their levels of thyroid hormone were within a healthy range.” >>>

      Autoimmune thyroid disease may cause symptoms even when hormone levels are normal >>>

      http://www.endocrineweb.com/news/hypothyroidism/4599-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-may-cause-symptoms-even-when-hormone-levels-are-

      Studies show 200mcg of selenium (a few brazil nuts) daily lowers TPO antibody levels up to 40% in 3 months and “…researchers found that…organ-specific autoantibodies (i.e., thyroid antibodies) — will disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet.” Natural desiccated thyroid hormone can lower thyroid antibodies if the dosage is high enough.

      There is a genetic defect in the ability to process vitamin D with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which means higher supplemention of vitamin D is needed. It is recommended to take 5000IU – 20 000IU daily. Other deficiencies or low levels commonly seen with hypothyroidism include iron, vitamin B12, folate, magnesium, potassium.

      Recommended labwork >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Selenium for Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis >>>

      http://jeffreydach.com/2009/11/07/selenium-for-hashimotos-thyroiditis-by-jeffrey-dach-md.aspx

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection >>>

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      Revolutionary way to treat Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism >>>

      http://thyroidbook.com/

      Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Vitamin D deficiency >>>

      http://www.yourthyroidsolutions.com/hashimotos-autoimmune-thyroid-disease-vitamin-deficiency

  5. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for Hashimoto’s disease, which causes my hypothyroidism, or does it ever go into remission?
    3 years ago, at the age of 36, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. It totally came out of nowhere. I had also gained about 30 pounds and I’m wondering if there’s a connection. Plus, I’m a male, and Hashimoto’s is most common in women. I’m trying to get off of all prescription drugs, but my Endocrinologist has told me that I will need to be on my Synthroid medication for the rest of my life. I haven’t lost the weight either.

    My little sister had thyroid cancer and had her thyroid removed, and a female cousin and an Aunt of mine also have Hashimoto’s so it runs in my family. But the WOMEN in my family. So why me?

    I just don’t want to have to wake up and take a pill for the rest of my life.

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease, where your own immune system attacks your thyroid for an unknown reason. Since you have had damage to your thyroid, there is no cure. There is no other treatment other than to take the synthroid. I know it is inconvenient, but it is the same hormone that your thyroid is supposed to make. As to why you, that’s impossible to answer. I’m sorry I can’t give you a better answer. Good luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    Are Graves disease and Hashimoto’s disease the opposite of each other?
    So you get Hashimoto’s if you have hypothyroidism (i.e., either too little T3 & T4, or your pituitary gland isn’t producing enough TSH to make it to the thyroid gland)

    And you get Graves disease if you have hyperthyroidism (i.e., too much T3 & T4, or your pituitary gland’s churning out too much TSH)

    So aren’t the two diseases just mirror images of each other?

    • ANSWER:
      Not really. If there is an ‘opposite’ to Graves disease it must be myxedema. Hashimoto’s disease has a wide spectrum, and strange as it may seem, it can on a rare occasions cause thyrotoxicosis.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are my treatment options for hashimoto’s disease?
    I have Hashimoto’s disease and was told today by my endocrinologist that my body will ultimately “kill” my thyroid. Until it does, I have no treatment options! I have so many symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and am desperate for some type of relief! I have gained 30 + lbs, am constantly tired and don’t menstruate regularly (I am a newlywed and would like to have children within the next couple of years), etc. I was told the “death” of my thyroid could take years and the thought of continuing in my current state for what would feel like an eternity is devastating, please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Artsy

      Go to this website and read the testimonials. There are some good ideas on how to attach your issue. You’ll have to learn a lot more about natural healing, but you are at the point of doing anything I can tell. Be open minded and get cure yourself because you can. Dont let anyone tell you it cant be fixed! Answers are out there. Keep seeking and you wont be disappointed.

      Best of health to you.

      Cheers

      http://curezone.com/forums/s.asp?f=25&ob=s&c=0&t=150

  8. QUESTION:
    Can your blood tests come back neg. with the progression of Hashimoto’s disease? At what point is it detected?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease:
    Characterized by the immune system attacking the thyroid gland; it occurs by the body producing antibodies, which is usually good to fight off viruses, germs, pollen etc. In hypothyroidism, the antibodies attack the thyroid gland. This disease progresses slowly over a number of years.

    I always complained of its symptoms (extremely fatigued, cold, muscle aches and weakness, difficulty concentrating, sore joints, heart murmurs occasionally) to many specialists, but none of them ever brought up that it could be my thyroid. You would think someone would come up with a diagnosis or even a hint of what it could be after 12 years of complaining about its symptoms (blood test were taken too). My last doctor I saw (infertility doctor) was the one who sent me to a endocrinologist!

    Back to my question: Do test usually come back normal and then suddenly appear abnormal? I am on medication for the rest of my life! Thanks for your feedback! :)

    • ANSWER:
      The disease may still be there. You are treated for hypothyroidism so yr thyroid function may become normal.

  9. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and hair loss: is there a way to stop hair loss associated with Hashimoto’s disease? Also,?
    what do you think is the best brand of thyroid medication–no ‘health/herb’ treatments please. My case is too severe for that.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with you that herbal and nutritional treatments are a waste of money. Hypothyroidism is a hormone based immune system disease requiring medical care–it is not just “stress!” When I read your question, I was hoping you might get some helpful answers since I have the same problem.
      I’ve tried a variety of shampoos, conditioners, herbal, and other nutritional mumbo-jumbo, to no avail.
      I’m assuming that you, like me, eat a healthy diet. I hope you get an answer that gives more information than just a link to yet another hebal . . site.
      Don’t you wish people would read your question before giving answers you don’t want?

  10. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism,hashimoto’s and weight loss?
    I’m 32 year old female that just got diagnosed with hashimoto’s disease last year and got so depressed that i gained 30 pounds in 1 year and i heard that losing weight is impossible when you have this disease is it even worth trying? I don’t feel like eating right and working out if it isnt gonna payoff
    p.s. the weight i gained wasnt because of the disease it was because i fiqured if i was going to be fat anyway why not eat everything that i wanted…what a bad idea..

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Valerie,

      First let me say that I feel for what you’re going through. Feeling hopeless is no way to live life. As to your question… the short answer is that it is possible to lose weight with this condition. Additionally, it is “always” worth eating right and exercising even if it doesn’t pay off with a slim waistline. Please keep this in mind.

      Now for the long answer…It is possible to lose weight provided you are being treated for your condition. If you are already on hormone therapy you may need to make sure that you aren’t being under-treated. To lose weight your levels may need to be between the low to normal levels.

      Once your levels are established and stable you need to get yourself on a proper diet and exercise program. Low-fat proteins and complex carbohydrates should be the basis for your plan. Eat several “smaller” meals throughout the day to keep your metabolism up. Instead of 3 larger meals go with 4 – 6 small ones.

      Exercise should consist of a mix of some muscle building and some cardio. By adding muscle you add more tissue that needs to be fed and will help you to consume the calories you take in or are already storing.

      Regardless of the hypothyroidism, if you don’t start to take care of yourself you will get other conditions that will just make you feel even worse and do more damage to your body. Stop the downward spiral and start taking care of yourself.

      You can do it! Good Luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s disease help?
    So a while ago I was diagnosed Hashimoto’s disease which resulted in hypothyroidism. Now i’m 15 and I go to school and all that and I find that the disease is really affecting me. My memory is terrible, once, before I was diagnosed, I remember suddenly finding myself in the kitchen and not knowing how I got there, and other memory problems. Also, if say I run my head feels like it’s going to explode, And concentrating is extremely heard, and my grades have really dropped in the past year and I try not to make excuses, i know i got it easy, and some kids my age put up with far more but it’s terrible. If any of you have had this issue, do you have any tips/ advices that helped you? Thank you so much :)

    • ANSWER:
      You poor child. I am older & it is very hard but has to be even harder on you young folks…my grandson also has it.

      You did not say, but I assume that you are on meds like Synthroid and are being rechecked at least every 6 wks to get the dosage right. You might also ask to have Cytomel added.There are supplements that may help as well…Selenium, Folic Acid, B Complex, D3, Zinc and for memory, CoQ10.

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  12. QUESTION:
    Quitting Medication with Hashimoto’s Disease?
    What could happen if you have Hashimoto’s Disease and stop taking your medication? Nothing, right? I ask because I am recently diagnosed. For years I’ve felt poorly and my “symptoms” were all over the place. I was misdiagnosed (and probably was yet again) several times before a regular physical found a goiter and tsh levels elevated. After many more (un-necessary) tests my endo says I have Hashimoto’s and not Hypothyroidism. My husband isn’t buying. I am not buying it. My family is not buying it. The symptoms are the same as getting older. I have gotten into many arguments trying to get people to believe this “illness” was diagnosed and have decided they may be right – this is all a symptom of hypochondria and not a real illness. I’ve read other peoples stories who have it and I am sorry, but they sound crazy. I know how I must have sounded now to everyone who is refusing to believe a doctor diagnosed me with anything at all. I don’t want to see the doctor or take the meds anymore. If there really is such an illness – that’s not in your head – what would really happen? Would I just get tired and all that other stuff again? I can live with that. I can’t live with people shaking their heads and laughing at me and my fake illness. I really do think this is all in my head like everyone else does. You can’t die from this, right? I mean, it’s not even real…

    • ANSWER:
      “my endo says I have Hashimoto’s and not Hypothyroidism” – Hashi’s cycles hyper to hypo to hyper etc until it finally gets to HypO and stays!

      “Would I just get tired and all that other stuff again? I can live with that.”
      If you can live w/ the symptoms rather than what people think…you are a better woman than me! My symptoms are so severe that I do not care one bit what anyone thinks…most of them are not in my shoes and many that are, do not know it! I am soooooo thankful to be diagnosed and to have recently been able (financially) to go back to the doctor and get on the meds….I now feel as though I am ‘rising from the ashes’! Praise the Lord!

      Yes you can die from untreated hypothyroidism and YES, it is very real!

      Read about all of us ‘hypochondriacs’:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  13. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of having low T4 levels specifically (and NOT just hypothyroidism in general)?
    I know what the symptoms are for hypothyroidism but I want to know if there are specific symptoms for having low T4 levels, regardless of T3 levels or other aspects of hypothyroidism. I have Hashimoto’s disease and have HIGH T3 levels but LOW T4 levels. Since I have other health issues, I want to know what symptoms I should be expecting from the low T4. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroxine is the body’s main metabolic hormone, regulating the rate of oxygen use by cells, and the generation of body heat. In the liver, T4 promotes glucose metabolism to pyruvate, gluconeogenesis from fats, and increases release of cholesterol. In the digestive system, T4 increases secretion of digestive juices, and promotes smooth muscle contractions for motility. In skeletal and in cardiac muscles, T4 promotes normal development, tone and function. In bones, T4 promotes growth and coordinates maturation with age. In the nervous system, T4 promotes normal development of the system during youth, and maintains it’s functions during adulthood. In the reproductive system, T4 promotes the ability for conception, and secretion of milk by the breasts. In the skin, T4 promotes hydration, secretions of exocrine glands, and the growth of hair. With low serum levels, you might experience the opposite of the normal effects.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what are symptoms of thyroid disease?
    please tell me about any symptoms you know of from Hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, Grave’s disease, or thyroid storm

    • ANSWER:
      HypOthyroid symptoms:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic

      HypErthyroidism and Graves Disease:
      Some of the symptoms are rapid unexplained weight loss, rapid heart rate, hair loss, shaking, diarrhea, sweating, etc.

      Hashimotos symptoms:
      HypEr and hypO symptoms – see above.

      Thyroid storm is sudden excessive thyroids hormones for whatever reason and is similar to hypErthyroid symptoms.

      Read about thyroid stuff here:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  15. QUESTION:
    hashimoto’s disease help? severe pain?
    Hey everyone!
    I have something very strange happening to me. If I don’t sleep well enough my muscles will start hurting. The pain gradually grows, and usually starts at night, making falling asleep almost impossible. sometimes the pain is deeper, more in the bone. I have asked my mom if this is normal, but all she says is that i am just being whiny. I don’t remember when it started but i fell like it’s been a couple of years now. Also I have hypothyroidism, caused by Hashimoto’s, could this be related?
    Is this normal?
    thank you very much!! :)))

    • ANSWER:
      This can come from Hashi’s. I assume that you are on meds. Are you rechecked regularly, like at least every 6 mos?

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  16. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease with strange symptoms…?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. My TSH levels are around 8 or higher and my Thyroid levels are sitting at around 1 or so. I have also been tested for the antibodies that my indicate Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. My Peroxidase levels are >1000 and my Thyroglobulin levels are 302.0. I was told these were significantly high numbers and everything I have read indicates that this is Hashimoto’s (please correct me if I am wrong) the rest of my symptoms include:

    No Goiter
    Weight Gain
    Constipation
    Heart Palpitations (hyperthyroid?)
    High Blood Pressure
    Joint Pain
    Always seem to be tired
    Seem to have headaches increasingly more often (I very rarely ever got headaches)

    My Army PA told me that I would be very sick if I actually had Hashimoto’s Disease, and that I had no goiter, I don’t have the disease. I am not hoping I have it (obviously), but everything I have read and have researched points to it minus a few symptoms. Can anyone give me any help or advice on what to tell my new Army doctor this Tuesday? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Those symptoms aren’t so strange if you have Hashimoto Disease. You can swing between hypothyroidism and hyperthryoidism.

      “Hashimoto’s Disease
      Also called “Hashi’s” or “thyroiditis”, this is an autoimmune disorder in which one’s immune system attacks it’s own thyroid cells, causing inflammation and eventually resulting in hypothyroid. In many cases a goiter develops because of the inflammation, but sometimes the thyroid gland can actually shrink. Patients with Hashi’s can vascillate between hypo and hyper. There is a genetic predisposition to autoimmune disease, so if you have one, you are more at risk to have others, including Hashi’s thyroiditis. It is proposed that a lack of iodine also plays a role in autoimmune attacks on the thyroid.”

      Stop the thyroid madness:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/causes-of-hypo/

  17. QUESTION:
    Armour Thyroid medication? Hashimoto’s Disease?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism February of 09, my doc put me on synthroid after taking a THS test, synthroid made matters worse so I quit taking it. I went to a different doctor and he did more tests and diagnosed me with Hashimoto’s disease and prescribed me Armour. I started taking Armour on November 7th 09, so I have been taking it for about a week and a half. I have felt a little better, but lately I have been tired and brain foggy. I have also had ringing in my ears and eye twitches, not sure if this has anything to do with Hashimoto’s disease. I was wondering if I should give it more time or call my doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      If I’m not mistaken, Armour is an older version of Synthroid, and because they are both synthetic versions of bodies natural Thyroid hormone I’m not sure that they are terribly different. You can always call your pharmacist anytime with your medication concerns, he/she is the best person to ask, they have so much information at their fingertips!

      As far as your medical diagnoses, Hypothyroidism is a condition that results in low levels of thyroid hormone (T3 and T4) and Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disorder that causes a persons own immune system to attact the thyroid gland thus causing Hypothyroidsim.

      So, if I were you I would call the pharmacist and lay out all of my symptoms so he/she can tell you if you are having a reaction from too little or too much of the medication. From what I understand, it is unlikely to be allergic to either of these medications because they are pretty identical to our own thyroid hormones. But, I am not a doctor or pharmacist.

      Then, you could call your doctor and have him/her reevaluate you or you could look for another doctor? an endocrinologist or rheumatologist may be a good idea. Endocrinology specializes in endocrine disorders and rheumatology specializes in autoimmune disorders (a good idea any ways).

      I hope you feel better soon! It can be very stressful to continue to feel bad after a diagnosis has been made and medication has been prescribed. But, don’t give up! The best defense is knowledge and the internet has a lot of great information out there!

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the risks or not taking my meds. for hypothyroidism?
    I have had hypothyroidism for about 4 or 5 years now and I was just diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. I take 125 mcg of synthroid. Is that alot? What happens if I quit taking it other than my symptoms come back?

    • ANSWER:
      My sister in law has Hashimoto’s disease. If you quit taking your meds, you will eventually get really sick and die. You can’t live without your thyroid. Synthroid gives you the chemicals that your thyroid produces. Why would you quit taking the medication? You can’t possibly be thinking rationally here. Your meds are about average also. You are just taking something that naturally occurs in most people’s bodies, yours just doesn’t make it any more. So if you want to get sick and probably die, just don’t take your meds. But I suggest you talk to your doctor who will hopefully talk some sense into you!

  19. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?
    Is hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism associated with a poor immune system?

    And especially when caused by Hashimoto’s disease? I’ve heard is an autoimmune disease, which I imagine would affect one’s immune system.

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t think it’s related to a poor immune system. I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism myself, and all my bloodwork was normal except for having a TSH level of 132. Other than my thyroid issue, I’m healthy as can be. I just hope the synthroid pills kick in soon :)

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there anything specific about Hashimoto’s thyroiditis ?
    Apart from it being a hypothyrodism condition.

    I am asking specifically in clinical testing of the disease, it is likely that all suspected hypothyroidism will have TSH and free T4 and T3 level measured, but a low concentration of the T’s and elevated TSH will just point towards a confirmed diagnosis on hypothyroidism, without specifically indicating it to be Hashimoto’s

    Any knowledge or explanation appreciated.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      If I am understanding correctly, you are asking how garden variety hypothyroidism is differentiated from the Hashimoto’s thyroiditis variety.

      Hashimoto’s thyroiiditis patients have elevated anti-thyroid antibodies . This is important to confirm in cases of primary hypothyroidism because general hypothyroidism may require only short term supplementation of thyroid and because Hashimoto’s variety requires some dose of thyroid and follow up FOR A LIFETIME.

      This is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in North America and used to be felt to be rare. There is excellent information at:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashimoto%27s_thyroiditis

      Managed by an endocrinologist, these patients do well. Managed poorly by a physician who does not understand this disorder, they may not. Best wishes.

  21. QUESTION:
    Recurrant Miscarriage & Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism?
    I am a 22 year old with recurrant miscarriages. I am 5’5 140 lbs and exercise daily. I had my first in 2009 at 7 weeks, one at 4 weeks (blighted ovum) also in 2009, and my latest in October of 2010 at 8 weeks. The last one was diagnosed as a Partial mole. I had a d&c and hcg returned to normal within 2 weeks. I had weekly, bi weekly and finally monthly quants drawn to make sure hcg remained the same in which they did. The baby had Trisomy 7. After this, just to make sure my husband and I had the basic infertility workup done. Everything showed normal. ALong with me having a diagnostic Lap, Hysteroscopy, and HSG procedures which showed a thinner than normal left tube, a few adhesions that were removed and a cyst. Other than that everything was perfect. Autoimmune Diseases like Lupus, Celiac, and Hashimotos run in my family and my mother was diagnosed with ITP a year before I was born. Between my mother grandmother, 2 aunts, great grandmother and great aunt, there were 12 miscarriages, and 2 stillbirths. I have had widespread pain ever since I can remember. To the point where in childhood people thought I was making it up. I wake up at 6 am,get dressed, eat, drive to school, and by lunchtime when I am at clinicals, I find myself feeling as if I havent slept in days. I am always cold, and fluctuate b/w anemia and borderline anemia. I sweat more than average woman and my breasts leak on occasion with no stimulation. (prolactin was normal )My TSH levels were checked a month ago and they were normal I didnt get an actual number but just that they were normal, however my grandmothers TSH levels were “normal” while still having debilitating symptoms for 3 years before they finally diagnosed her with Hashimotos. I do not want to go through another miscarraige and am so confused as to what to do. My OBgyn is a good DR. but not so attentitive. What do I need to do and what steps should I take to get there. I am so lost in all the mounds of research I have done within the past year. Please help :l Thank you in advance!
    Thank you all.. I have not been tested for Celiac the only sound test is a biopsy of the S.I and I dont want to have a scope inless absolutely everything else is negative. The basic line of infertility tests, including some autoimmune and clotting disorders, came back fine, but I just feel like they need to run more in depth tests.Some of our patients at the hospital I work at with recurrant m/c’s have autoimmune disorders but the ones I know off hand, had other health problems as well. My obgyn is also my employer and I am starting to feel as if she doesnt want me to get pregnant because I have only been out of nursing school since december and she thinks its important to work first. But somewhere I have to draw the line b/w personal and work related :l I just know if I switch she ll have hard feelings and I work FOR her. ha. Well thanks again.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been tested for autoimmune diseases? It sounds like you might have something going on. Have you been tested for Celiac Disease or Lupus? If your doctor is not attentive, you might like to find a new one. It’s important you have a good relationship with your doctor. Speak to your GP about your problems and they may refer you to a specialist.

      ….

  22. QUESTION:
    I’m on 200 mg Levothyroxine for hypothyroidism and still feeling sluggish and having severe headaches.?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s Disease about 3 years ago. I am STILL trying to get my thyroid level back on track. My dr has continued to increase my dosage of Levothyroxine to no avail. I was on 175 mg of Levothyroxine up until 2 months ago and my bloodwork showed a TSH level of 20. So he upped my dosage to 200 mg saying that this is near the highest level normally prescribed. I have been taking it for 2 months and felt good for about 3 days and now am back to feeling very sluggish, having severe headaches, brain fog, weight gain (lots), mood swings, etc.
    It feels like I’m not taking anything…no effects whatsoever. (I’m taking it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with water. I don’t eat or drink for at least 1 hour afterwards…just like my dr instructed.)
    Has anyone experienced this difficulty of getting results from thyroid meds? What will the dr end up doing if this high dose doesn’t work? I just want my old life back…so does my husband…tired of the mood swings, I’m sure but he’s been really supportive!

    Thanks for any info or experiences you can share!

    • ANSWER:
      maybe you need to try b12 vitamins.. b12 is for your energy and such ppl use them to help lose weight as well and you medication might not be making you gain weight it could b from your hypothyrodism cuz it can cause weight gain

      ask your doctor if you can mix b12 vitamins (if you choose to try to) with your medication just incase it could do something to you

  23. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Thyroid, started Armour, when will it kick in?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism February of 09, my doc put me on synthroid after taking a THS test, synthroid made matters worse so I quit taking it. I went to a different doctor and he did more tests and diagnosed me with Hashimoto’s disease and prescribed me Armour. I started taking Armour on November 7th 09, so I have been taking it for about a week and a half. I have felt a little better, but lately I have been tired and brain foggy. I have also had ringing in my ears and eye twitches, not sure if this has anything to do with Hashimoto’s disease. I was wondering if I should give it more time or call my doctor?

    • ANSWER:

  24. QUESTION:
    How do you know if its senioritis or depression?
    I half-way my senior year in high school and have noticed that I’ve been having some continuing problems from last semester. Around November I started becoming extremely tired and uninterested in everything, including things I used to enjoy like reading. I went to my doc think their was something wrong with my thyroid (I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease/Hypothyroidism 8 years ago) so I figured that a change in meds would make me feel better. But I have yet to see any changes; in fact its getting worse. I have to set my alarm an hour early just to make sure I wake up in time to get to school, where I used to be an attentive student I now find myself either falling alseep or lost in a daze in almost all my classes, and I have no energy or desire to do my homework. I haven’t seen any change in my grades yet, I’m still ranked 3rd in my class and am managing to keep up with my advanced classes. If anybody could give some advice it would be very helpful.
    Right now I’m taking sythroid for my hypothyroidism nad Verapamil for high blood pressure I used to take a low-level birth control for cramps but I stopped taking it thinking it was cause my problems months ago

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been accepted to any colleges yet? (from what it sounds like, you shouldnt have much trouble getting into a nice college) If you have been, and you’re becoming disinterested in work because you have college to look forward to mext year, then its probably senioritis

      If youre disinterested in school work because you just dont care (or some other reason), it may be depression- it could be some other disease or problem, but i dont know enough about your situation. One of the warning signs of depression is a loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy the best, so the note about losing interest in reading makes it sound like you could have mild depression. I would talk to a doctor with whom youre comfortable- they could give a more specific (and hopefully correct) diagnosis

      Good luck with the rest of senior year!

  25. QUESTION:
    Why are my legs always tingly and crampy?
    I am 18 years old with Hashimoto’s Disease (Hypothyroidism), anemia, and vitamin D deficiencies (probably some other ones too). I went away to college in the fall, and while diet has stayed pretty good, I’m exercising much less than I used too. I mean, I still swim laps 2x a week, I walk across campus to all my classes, I live on the 3rd floor so I go up and down lots of stairs, and I have a 2 hour dance rehearsal every Saturday. Lately though every time I sit or lie down in bed, my legs get really tingly and crampy, almost as if they’re falling asleep but also having constant charlie horses (so pretty painful and uncomfortable). They never did this before, and only started doing it after I’d been away at school for a few months. What could be causing this? I don’t think I’m that severely out of shape that this would happen, do you? And it can’t be cramping because I’m exercising a ton, because that’s not the case.

    • ANSWER:
      Unless it is something more serious it is most likely your vitamin D deficiency. Your symptoms are the symptoms of this deficiency. Remember you also need Calcium for Vitamin D to work properly. The cramps may also be a magnesium deficiency.
      Try a really good multivitamin like Centrum.
      I personally prefer any brand of chewable multivitamins because as chewables…the ingredients are usually of a very high quality and easily absorbed. Chewable multivitamins are becoming more popular and easy to find because of all the Gastric Bypass surgeries being performed. These people have serious absorption problems and cannot take regular vitamins.

      You also mentioned that you are exercising much less than normal…when muscle atrophy (break down from lack of use) it also causes all your symptoms.

  26. QUESTION:
    Normal fasting glucose, yet elevated insulin levels???
    My endocrinologist did bloodwork to try to determine if I am insulin resistant. They checked my glucose levels and insulin. My fasting glucose was 78. At 30 minutes it was 111, at 60 minutes it was 70, and at 120 minutes it was 70. However, my insulin was 34. The nurse said it should be no higher than 27, but didn’t feel at liberty to divulge much else. My appt with my doc isn’t for another 3 weeks. I just want to know what this means??? Am I inuslin resistant? Is it an indicator of something else? For the record, I have had enormous difficulty with weight loss despite the fact I diet and exercise. My lipid panel is ideal, normal BP, currently taking medication for Hashimoto’s Disease/hypothyroidism. If anyone can lend any insight, I’d appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      You have insulin resistance, which is why you need to make more insulin to keep your blood sugars normal. As you allude to, this is a result of your weight. I appreciate it’s difficult, but weight loss will help, as insulin resistance is often considered a precursor to diabetes, as well as the metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

  27. QUESTION:
    Anyone know anything about Hashimoto’s Thyroidism and its symptoms?
    I was diagnosed around age 11/12 with Hashimoto disease at Toronto sick Kids Hospital. A large goiter was found at my annual check up. My thyroid was then hyperactive, and I was treated with radioactive iodine at approx age 14/15 – which resulted in Hypothyroidism. From a very early age I suffered with joint problems, and throughout the years they have progressively gotten worse. I suffer from many symptoms that coincide with Hashimoto disease (especially Musculoskeletal symptoms, dry skin, muscle weakness, weight gain, chronic fatigue, migraines) , and I have also been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I have been X-rayed by three different doctors, each giving me a different diagnoses. Due to my many debilitating symptoms, I’m looking to apply for the Ontario disability Support Program. Unfortunately I was told by the last Dr. I saw, that symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease would not affect me now – due to my past treatment of radioactive iodine, even though many of my symptoms started after the treatment.
    I was wondering if there is any truth to this statement? – as many things that I have read have contradicted this.
    Is there any literature that you can provide/recommend for me, that can help to back up my claim; As well as help me to understand this disease and it’s symptoms better?

    Any advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:

  28. QUESTION:
    Hashimotos Disease?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. I think the underlying cause might be Hashimoto’s Disease. But my ANA levels were normal. So, is it possible to have Hashimotos and have a normal ANA test?

    P.S. I don’t normally use Y!A for medical advice, but my Doctor’s nurse is an idiot and can’t correctly ask my questions to the Dr.

    • ANSWER:
      its autoimmune thyroiditis ,the ana isnt relevant,more auto thyroid antiboides are more important ,and yes its normal

  29. QUESTION:
    Why does hypothyroidism cause…?
    why does hypothyroidism produce the following symptoms:
    -coarse hair
    -sensitivity to cold
    -thick skin
    -husky voice

    i need the homeostatic malfunctions that could have caused these. I figured out why it causes weight gain and fatigue…but yea. I think the cold has to do with the autoimmune disorder hashimoto’s disease…but what about the husky voice? and the thick hair and skin?

    thanks!

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article from the University of Maryland is what you’re looking for:

      http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_causes_hypothyroidism_000038_2.htm

  30. QUESTION:
    Losing weight with hypothyroidism, HELP!?
    I am a 250 lb 18-year old girl. I have just been diagnosed with autoimmune thyroid disease, also known as Hashimoto’s Disease, which in turn led to me developing insulin resistance and hypothyroidism. I am eating low-carb, low-fat, cutting out sweets and sodas, and doing an hour of racquetball at LEAST 4 days a week. I am also on Metformin and Levothyroxine to help regulate my insulin and hormones. I tried Hydroxycut in addition to my diet and exercise, but to no avail. The scale has not budged in nearly three weeks. What else can I do? Why am I failing?
    Also, I’d appreciate you not peddling your disgusting diet pills to me. I’m interested in a lifestyle change, not a quick fix that gives me a heart attack. (:

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I have Hashimotos Disease as well. It’s more common than you realise. Alot of people have variations of this such as Graves Disease. It is controlled with the Thyroxin you are taking daily.
      Although the Thyroxin should be combatting this directly to help you lose weight – you and me both know it doesn’t.
      With research I have found that if you can get some iodine into your diet, it will help. This is in fish and seaweed.
      Coconut also contains an enzyme which assists with the function of the thyroid. So try to have coconut on deserts/meals when you can. I know, not an easy ingredient to add.
      Also, cut out red meat – you don’t have the digestive abilities to obtain all the nutrional elements anyway but you will certainly obtain all the fats.
      Also remember your 5 fruits and vegetables per day. This should be taking up the majority of your foods. Its actually really hard to fit in 5 fruits and vegetables. But this means you need to replace other foods with these healthy alternatives.

      Your body may take some time to give in and let the fat burn, so do persevere, when it starts happening, you will start to lose weight easily as you’ve done the hard yards. But most importantly, be realistic in your diet and exercise. After all the dieting, you wont be able to keep up a diet of starvation and an overexcercising routine. And you’ll put it all back on.

      Good luck.

  31. QUESTION:
    Pain in my back and triceps?
    Earlier today I had a small pain in the middle of my back on a small portion of my spinal cord. At the same time I felt a slight paralysis (harder to move) in my arms with cramping in my triceps. All this lasted for about 5 minutes. If you need more info. I am 23 years old, female, and have severe hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Disease. Does anybody know what happened?

    • ANSWER:
      might be a reaction to stress, overuse, underused, atrophy even…

      cant make a very clear diagnosis from the info you provided.

      it was most likely just a freak incident, don’t worry and don’t turn into a hypochondrite. you are fine, don’t worry.

  32. QUESTION:
    Do You Know How Your Thyroid Gland Affects Your Entire Body?
    Your Thyroid Gland affects your entire body. Thyroid disease can cause ‘Graves’ Disease, a goiter, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Thyroid Cancer and so much more. This is an Autoimmune Disorder. Visit www.isityourthyroid.webs.com

    • ANSWER:
      i have graves’/hashimoto’s. it’s debilitating, mentally and physically.

  33. QUESTION:
    Why am I NEVER Thirsty?
    I am 25 and was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease w/Hypothyroidism, which seemed to account for most if not all of my symptoms. But i am still struggling with one- I am *never* thirsty, and i mean never. I’d have to jog or walk for a mile before i actually crave a drink. My husband is always angry with me because i will open a can of soda and it usually goes flat and warm before i’m even halfway done with it. I do drink with my meals but that is the only exception. I can go days and days without drinking actual water and usually go all day and night at work off of only a single mt. dew. or water. I just do not crave liquids like everyone else does. I see other people going through 4 and 5 20 ounce drinks and at the end of the night i’m still working on one.
    Is it possible that this could be a DIFFERENT health condition? Or is it normal??

    • ANSWER:
      Alot of people never get thirsty..
      Did you drink alot as a kid?? if not your body could get use to the fact it doesn’t get much water.
      Or eating a lot of fruit and vegetables will make you less thirsty because they are full of water.

      Otherwise im not sure sorry :]

  34. QUESTION:
    For Anyone Hypothyroid and Pregnant please answer?
    Theres not many stories online about it so I figured I would try here. I hope i get some feedback because I was just diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease with Hypothyroidism and don’t know anyone else who has it and especially not anyone TTC with it.. i have no idea what to expect. I’m kind of frightened! So i have just a few questions to those of you who have been through this.

    Were you medicated when you conceived and if so, what dose were you on and how many medicated cycles did it take? Please share any and all details about your particular case if you are willing. Thanks so much!

    ~Jess

    • ANSWER:

  35. QUESTION:
    What autoimmune disorder(s) do you think I am most likely suffering from?
    I am currently waiting on lab results and am wondering if you could help me pinpoint which auto-immune disorder(s) I am MOST LIKELY suffering from??

    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease with Hypothyroidism and most recently, Fibromyalgia. I am currently waiting for the results on a ton of bloodwork, but wanted to get some opinions if anyone is knowledgeable about this stuff. I will leave you with my master list of symptoms that i have compiled over the last 2 months:

    I am unable to sleep less than 10 hours a night. If i do, i wake up completely sore, exhausted and crabby.
    My weight fluctuates greatly. Last week I weighed 145, this week 152.
    Have been trying to conceive for 3 years with no success using charting/opks and perfect timing for over 30 cycles (without medical intervention)
    Dermatitis on right foot, scalp and behind ears
    Extreme sensitivity to cold, anything below 76 degrees causes numbness and pain in extremities
    Sensitivity to light (prefer to sit in darkened rooms, have been this way since i was a child, can’t stand bright lights or glare)
    Night blindness (unable to drive at night, no depth perception at night, etc)
    Irregular periods made less irregular with Synthroid, but still different lengths every cycle
    Very delicate skin, light touch causes bruising, always have bruises. Some of them are without pain.
    (severe)Mental fog, extremely bad memory and worsening. Unable to do mental math. I can set something down and then spend two hours looking for it and this happens every day. I also
    forget what i am doing ALL THE TIME!
    Have had a slight studder since I was a child.
    Sometimes I read numbers backwards
    Have to reread sentences or paragraphs to comprehend it
    I write in an “uphill” fashion, i cannot write on the line unless i turn the paper completely sideways, this developed in middle-school.
    (severe)Have problems saying what i mean, the words come out in the wrong order or i will accidently use a word that is similar to what i mean but not exactly and it won’t sound right. Husband calls me yoda!
    Constantly crave sweet or salty food, worse with period
    Terrible depth perception, always walking into table corners and door frames and unable to judge distances

    feet hurt (after 5 or more hours of standing activities)
    tingling and cold sensations below knees
    stiff knees
    sore knees
    sore thigh muscles
    aching hip pain
    stiff hips
    (severe)sore hips (feels like walking will pop them out of socket- can’t walk straight)
    (severe)stiff & sore forearms (can’t lift objects without pain & shaking)
    stiff shoulders
    (severe)sore shoulders
    (severe)sore shoulder muscles/tendons (can’t lay on sides to sleep, makes pain worse)
    (severe)unable to lift or flex shoulders due to pain
    (severe)During flare-ups i have immense weakness in hips, arms & wrists
    (severe)stiff fingers
    (severe)pain in fingers (swollen feeling, sometimes unable to move them upon waking)
    shaky hands
    alternating constipation/diarrhea
    abdominal pains
    abdominal cramps
    gas

    MOST RECENT
    popping muscles/tendons all over body
    random nearsightedness
    random chest pain
    left eye twitching at random and happens every day now

    Thyroid Panel is NORMAL, TSH at 0.9. So it’s not hypo symptoms :/

    • ANSWER:
      With a list like that, I would expect them to come back and tell you Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, if not also including the possibility of Lupus. I would say I don’t want to scare you, but I doubt very much having lived with this much that anything I say would do that. A lot of your list can readily be attributed to Fibromyalgia (which I have, as well as connective tissue disease & suspicion of SLE), including the digestive & female problems. IBS and various issues such as PCOS commonly run with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. So does neuropathy, which you’ve also aptly described.

      The sensitivity to cold you’re describing screams of Raynaud’s Syndrome (which I also likely have). Along with all that, if your light sensitivity includes being photosensitive w/ or w/out a malar rash… and you’ve got an elevated ANA, then your Dr should be considering Lupus. You should be seen by a rheumatologist if you haven’t already. You *might* need a neurologist at some point.

      There are treatment options, whatever the case. You clearly look like a classic case of SOME kind of autoimmune disease. No matter what anyone says about it, Fibromyalgia is in that category as well. There is scientific proof of that. It’s just that some “professionals” want to turn a blind eye to the genetic markers that have been identified. Hashimotos is already accepted as being autoimmune anyway. Plaquenil is the usual first offering, and it’s very effective for a lot of people. If it’s tolerated well, it can be a literal lifesaver. Just discuss low-dose options to reduce the risks of toxicity. (Over 400mg is the danger zone for potential retina damage, even though it’s not common… why risk it?)

      Be aware that a firm diagnosis can be drawn out and frustrating to obtain. Just take a deep breath and know that it may take some commitment on your own part to get answers. If a Dr doesn’t work well with you, move on to another. You may need to repeat labs to catch it in the act as well, as the results can vary wildly… Try to go when you feel your worst or close to it, if they come back negative the first time. Inflammation can be elusive in some people’s profiles when it comes to that paper confirmation.

      I hope you get sound medical answers, and I wish you well.

  36. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto/Hypothyroid and Pregnancy?
    Recently I miscarried and a few days later was told I had hypothyroidism. I underwent many tests and I have Hashimoto’s Disease. This is the primary cause of my miscarriage according to my doctors. When my husband told his family that I lost the baby due to my thyroid issues they were skeptical saying that one thing has nothing to do with the other and the thyroid is useless like an appendix. Well… it’s been several weeks now and my meds are working my TSH is lowering and stablizing and my husband’s sister in law called to say that her friend has had her thyroid removed entirely and does not take any meds (not synthroid or cytomel or levothyroxine, NOTHING) and she’s 7 months pregnant with a healthy baby and never had a miscarriage threat. Is this BS? I thought if you had no thyroid you MUST be on meds. Am I wrong? Could my docs be wrong? Or is his sister in law just trying to stir s hi t up? I wouldn’t be surprised if she was… What do you think? Is it possible? Can you be 7 months pregnant with no thyroid at all and no replacement meds?
    I know it was the Hashimoto that caused it. I say it was too, I didn’t say it was my thyroid.
    I do have Hashimoto’s. I had a biopsy, ultrasound and nuclear scan to confirm it. I have a multinodular goiter.

    • ANSWER:
      Well sounds like she’s lying because if you have your thyroid removed you will have to see a doctor for the rest of your life and take medications my aunt had hers removed yrs ago and she takes medicine and sees a doctor. And if you are pregnant and have thyroid problems you are more likely to miscarry, have preterm labor, pre-eclampsia and have high blood pressure. Thyroid disorder increases your baby’s risk of having retardation of growth or even death. Your child may also develop hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, which can affect their future intellectual, emotional, and physical development, if left unnoticed. Your child’s risk of having developmental problems and having a low IQ is also high. So yes I say she’s lying if a pregnant woman has her thyroid removed she HAS to take the medicine if she doesn’t a lot of problems can happen during her pregnancy. So your sister in law is lying and full of it tell her what can happen if you are pregnant and have a thyroid problem and what can happen if a pregnant girl doesn’t take her meds and see with what kind of lame excuse she comes with.

      “If you have had your whole thyroid removed, you will have to take thyroxine tablets to replace the hormones that would normally be made by the thyroid gland. The thyroid hormones are necessary to keep your body processes going at the right rate. This is called your ‘metabolism’. Without thyroid hormones, you feel extremely tired and lacking in energy. You will need to take these tablets every day for the rest of your life. The tablets are small – about the same size as an artificial sweetener. Your specialist or GP will keep a close eye on you and you will need to have regular blood tests to keep a check on the hormone levels in your blood. Your doctor may alter the dose of your tablet if your hormone levels are too high or too low. Generally, this is not a problem and shouldn’t stop you from doing all the daily activities that you were doing before your surgery.”

  37. QUESTION:
    One swollen tonsil, swollen lymph nodes on one side of neck? Should I worry?
    I’m only 16. I have hypothyroidism/hashimoto’s disease [different diagnoses from different doctors].

    In the past few weeks I’ve gotten what I thought was the flu twice, 3 times over the past 2 months. The last bout of the “flu”[flu is in quotes because I'm not sure what it was] my temperature ONCE AGAIN hit 102. It feels as though I have a recurrent fever of around 102 but it lasts for different durations each time I have it[and is sometimes accompanied by other feelings of illness, sometimes not]. This time it only lasted around 2 days [last time lasted around 4(when NOT on ibuprofen)]. This was my schedule of sickness:
    Day one: Two nights before a musical audition-began losing voice [kept practicing]
    Day 2: Day before musical audition-scratchy throat
    Day 3: Musical audition-once again scratchy throat
    Day 4: Dance auditions-at the end felt terrible. Had chills right after. Went home to a 102 fever.
    Day 5: Musical callbacks-on ibuprofen, felt terrible, voice scratchy
    Day 6: Sick. Sick. Sick. 102 fever
    Day 7: Different performance [voice was almost gone, I think my fever was gone by then]
    Day 8: Voice gone throat pain-noticed swollen tonsil and lymph nodes
    Day 9-13[5 days]-Voice pretty gone, throat KILLING me, still only one swollen tonsil and swollen lymph nodes

    I have one REALLY swollen tonsil and the others a bit red but nowhere near the other.
    Over the past few weeks [ironic, because it happened when I was NOT sick] I’ve lost weight. Seeing as I am hypothyroid I usually slowly gain weight, and never lose [even when I try hard to.] I’ve went from 157/159 to 150/152. It might just be a lot of stress.

    Is this any concern? I never went to the doctor when I thought I had the flu previous times. I assumed it was the flu, stayed home, drank fluids, and rested.

    It is possible I just completely over used and overworked my voice and my body with all the singing and dancing. But would the symptoms last THIS long? I’ve now had a sore throat, and swollen tonsil [one], for around 12-13 days. [Not sure when the tonsil became swollen but I assume since my throat began hurting]
    Over the past few years I’ve been tested for mono mutiple times[having many symptoms] and NEVER had it. It ended up being my thyroid.

    I DO have an endocrinologist. I’ve been to 3 because 2 at one location were very behind in work and never returned calls. I’ve only had once appointment with the new one so far.

    • ANSWER:
      hello there! i’ve been in the same place- don’t worry! it sounds to me like not only do you have hypo-thyroid and possibly hashimoto’s (i had both) but that you most likely have a goiter or other growth. i was around the same age when i started experiencing the same problems. i was treated for nearly 2 years for both hypo and hashimotos when they finally did a thyroid ultrasound and some other tests and found my thyroid had several goiters (small growths that can hinder your voice andf cause swelling) a lot of times these are treatable with meds, but in my case i had to have my thryoid removed. they thought it was cancer and removed the entire thing immediately, leaving only my calcium glands.. thankfully they were not cancerous but there were several growths that had been hindering my voice, swallowing, singing, etc. APart from that, the Hashimotos had nearly killed my entire thyroid. For that reaosn I had kept gaining weight and experience so many symptoms- the doc said that the thyroid was literally almost dead and therefore just absorbing the medicine but to no affect.

      do you see an endocronologist or just your family doctor for your treatment of your thyroid? defintiely see an endocronologist and tell him your trouble singing, etc. that is usually one of the first signs of a goiter. it can cause a scratchy voice, hoarseness, etc don’t worry- it is something very common and easily treatable. you just need to talk to him abotu it as soon as possible so you can decide on the best course of treatment.

      by the way, i’ve been doign great since having my thyroid removed. have finally lost weight (although it took me a while and is still a struggle at times) i feel tons better!!! i encourage you to get this starightened out soon=- you won’t regret it!

  38. QUESTION:
    Is this a 50/50 chance or is it set in stone?
    My mother’s side of the family has thyroid issues…hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease). Her siblings all had it and so did both of her parents. The thing is, knowing I get 50% from my dad, he seems to have good genes and my brother and I don’t have any symptoms of it, and I really don’t want this to happen. My mother was married before and my half-sister recently got tested for it but I think it came back negative and she had my nieces tested for everything that runs in my family. So could it just be 50/50?
    edit: I meant my dad’s side doesn’t have it.
    indie,
    I never mentioned general anxiety. In one of my previous questions I was asking about my BROTHER who possibly has Bipolar disorder which is not even similar to general anxiety.
    @ indie:

    Well that’s really creepy to go looking for other info about me. The anxiety disorder isn’t related to it.

    • ANSWER:
      Well Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease. I won’t lie and say that you aren’t at risk, because there is a genetic component to it. However, these autoimmune diseases are not set in stone. In the same way that Type I diabetes doesn’t always get passed down from generation to generation, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis does not always occur if your parent has it.

  39. QUESTION:
    I hate myself, being fat, just life in general lately?
    I’ve battled depression since 7th grade. I always came out on top in high school, I would NEVER let it keep me down. That was until I turned 18, it just got so unbearable. I couldn’t even play basketball or softball and they meant everything to me. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s (hypothyroidism, autoimmune disease) and that added a good 30 lbs. I don’t leave my house, I make up excuses on why I can’t hangout with friends, they ask to come over and I lie and say I’m going out with my boyfriend’s family for the day, etc. I can’t function. I’ve come to the point I can’t even look at myself in the mirror and I only wear sweatpants and hoodies; it’s 100 degrees outside!! I eat really healthy. Organic veggies, portion control, I eat 1,500 calories a day, I don’t skip meals. I used to skip meals. When I was depressed I would only eat dinner. I’m getting a treadmill this week because there is noway I’m running around my neighborhood or joining a gym where people I know can see me.

    I am now 19, 5’5″, 188lbs. I used to be 150. I’ve always had a lot of muscle. I’m so depressed and I honestly feel like I’m pushing everyone away. I’m ready to make a huge change; I don’t want to live like this.

    :( Please help.
    I have self control, portion control, calorie control, etc. I actually eat closer to about 1,200 calories a day. I know I said 1,500 but that’s too high. All fresh fruit and veggies. Turkey burgers, grilled chicken, wheat bread. etc. I don’t eat sweet foods, I don’t eat chips or tasty cakes. None of that. I used a calorie tracker two days and I noticed I actually only ate 933 calories. That includes my morning coffee. 1,500 is what’s recommended by this one website but I’m never that hungry.

    • ANSWER:
      It would be the easiest thing in the world for us to allow your opinion of yourself to influence how we perceive you but that would be a mistake on all our parts as the most difficult thing there is for a truly “human” being to do is to see themselves as others see them. It is our lot in life to distort our perceptions by either over thinking them or under thinking them. Such is your present view at this juncture of your life. The only inspiration I can offer is that many have been where you are now and survived to live a fuller and richer life as a result. You know that to be true as you see evidence of it everywhere you look. The real question left for you to answer, then, is can I do what so many before me have done and the answer is “of course I can if I wish to do it as much as they did”.

      It is not what they put into their experience then that will determine your success or failure, but rather, what you are are willing to put into your experience now. One consideration worth focusing on is that if you wish to preserve your status quo, you must keep doing what you’ve been doing. If you want things to change, you must change. The best place to start that process would be for you to start with your thinking — both about how you see yourself and how you think others see you. Right now, you are dwelling in the negative of it all at the expense of the positives you encounter and ignore.

      There is a lot of heart in what you want for yourself and that is a good thing you aren’t giving yourself credit for at the moment. You are giving yourself a dual burden to bear with your depression on the one shoulder and your view of your weight on the other. But it is you shouldering those too heavy to lift simultaneously weights with your attitude instead of lightening the load of what they represent by focusing your attention with an attitude of gratitude for what is good in your life that could supplant your woes. Such a change in your thinking would be a great first step in the direction of reviving the old you you used to enjoy being.

      At 19, you have a lot of life yet to be lived and no one worth listening to would wish for you anything less than complete success and enjoyment in the living of it. Anyone who says otherwise should be avoided by you at all costs. The thrust of all this counsel is simply this: Do not allow the negativism of self doubt that now plagues you to win out over the positivism that will lead you to becoming the woman you wish to be. You deserve better than that. Let there be peace in your world and let it begin with you.

  40. QUESTION:
    Autoimmune diseases ?
    I have hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, an autoimmune disease. Will my anitbodies travel to other body parts in time? If not, why not? If my immune system is dysfunctioning in one area, does it not make sense that it will dysfunction in other areas in time? Help me understand? My sister had just this, and not has lupus. Am I next?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone ( thyroxin) . Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to “run the body’s metabolism”, it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism.

      The most common cause of thyroid gland failure is called autoimmune thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto’s thyroiditisor chronic thyroiditis) , a form of on-going thyroid inflammation caused by the patient’s own immune system. It is caused by a reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland.

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis frequently results in hypothyroidism or lowered thyroid function.

      The outcome is usually very good because the disease remains stable for years or progresses slowly to a condition of thyroid hormone deficiency (hypothyroidism) that can be treated with thyroid replacement therapy.

      Chronic thyroiditis is most common in women and individuals with a family history of thyroid disease. It is estimated to affect between 0.1% and 5% of all adults in Western countries. This thyroid gland disorder can occur at any age, but it is most often seen in middle aged women.

      tThyroid hormones – The two major hormones produced and released by the thyroid gland are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones travel to other body tissues through the bloodstream and play a key role in regulating metabolism, growth, and many other body functions

      One of the most common symptoms thyroid patients on treatment complain of, is “fatigue”. Other symptoms they continue to experience include joint/muscle pain, mild emotional symptoms and decreased libido. Why is this? What aspect of autoimmune hypothyroidism would continue to cause a degree of continuing symptoms, despite treatment?

      Research articles concluded that elevated levels of these antibodies can cause fibromyalgia type symptoms in persons with only sub-clinical hypothyroidism. Other articles stated that the autoimmune thyroid disease can have a degree of systemic (system wide) effect, so that the immune system response affects not only the thyroid area but other parts of the body as well. This may explain in part as to why autoimmune thyroid disease patients are at HIGHER RISK for developing other autoimmune diseases than the general population

      I was amazed that other Doctors I had seen and even the drug manufacturer’s websites, do not mention the role of thyroid antibodies, in causing ongoing symptoms, despite proper hormone replacement medication treatment

      I am not sure why more is not being said about this area because it makes complete sense that highly activated immune system activity, means a bodily response manifesting in different degrees of symptoms, depending upon how highly elevated antibody levels are. Inflammation from the autoimmune disease process also manifests in symptoms, which means the disease process itself is also what causes the illness and not the resulting hypothyroidism alone

      Hopefully, this won’t happen to you. It’s the lack of the draw when it comes to autoimmune and genetics disorders. The best way to prevent aside from taking thyroid meds is to fortify you immune system. Bombard yourself with vitamins,e.g. Vit C) minerals,( e.g. calcium with magnesium and zinc) and a good nutrition.

      I found the article below on coconut oil which is good for hypothyrodism:

      http://www.coconutdiet.com/thyroid_health.htm?gad&gclid=CLfY7LPYq5ECFScXagodfDuadw

  41. QUESTION:
    After I eat, i throw up. But i don’t have bulimia or anorexia, any help?
    I’ve had a series of tests done including an upper gi, ultrasounds, x-rays, blood work, and even an endoscopy.The doctors can’t seem to find out whats wrong, (or it’s taking them a really long time) and after I eat I get really sick. (My stomach hurts and I feel nauseous.) But even with all these symptoms, I know for sure that I don’t have bulimia or anorexia. I am 15 years old and my mom sees what happens. It just comes straight up from my stomach, i don’t make myself, or starve myself. I actually try to eat more than the doctors want me to because I’m hungry. (I haven’t eaten much in almost two months.) Sometimes the force of it coming up is so strong it comes out of my nose too. (Not to be gross.) About 3 years ago I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease, which is hypothyroidism. After some blood work, (and I’m guessing because of my situation now,) my endocrinoligist told my mom that I am now slighty hyperthyriod and that I should only take my medicine (Cynthriod) 6 out of normally 7 days a week. Today in an ultrasound, I was tested for gall bladder and liver diseases or disorders. I haven’t gotten the results back yet and the nurse said it looked like it was normal. I’m sorry for blabbering, but I don’t know what to do, can somebody please help me? =(

    • ANSWER:
      well, You have to test H. Pylori antigen reaction. I am sure its just a Hylicobactar pylori infection in your stomach.
      I can advise you of not eating too much, donot eat pepper and all other hot, fries, do not drink alcohol and try Famotidine 20 mg, take one pill 30mins before meal twice daily untill the result of H. Pylori appears.

  42. QUESTION:
    Why can’t I get pregnant? :( ????????
    My husband and I have been ttc for a year now. I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease (aka subclinical hypothyroidism). In July I started taking medication for it, back then my TSH was around 3, close to 4. I had bloodwork done last week and it showed my TSH increased! I was taking 25 mcg of levothyroxine, now they upped it to 100 mcg. Not sure if this dose will work or not, but here’s for hoping. What I don’t understand is even with this disease I’m still ovulating. The medication has helped my cycles go from 40-42 days to 30 which is a great start. But, every cycle I’m getting a nice, dark positive ovulation test. Why can’t I get pregnant? This is so frustrating and depressing :(
    Jesse-i’m a firm believer in what goes around comes around. so go ahead, be rude to others, we’ll only be rude in return!

    • ANSWER:
      It is probably just your body preparing itself for pregnancy. It is not uncommon for people to be TTC for over a year. I can’t offer you a solid medical reason for why it is not happening for you, I can only offer you hope. My husband and I tried for 2 years to get pregnant before we will conceived. Just be patient and trust your God to give you the gift of a child when they want you to.

  43. QUESTION:
    Anyone with thyroid problems trying to concieve/or have concieved?
    In July I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease (aka subclinical hypothyroidism). I’m starting to believe I’m full blown hypo as my TSH has been consistenly high each time I get blood work. So, i’m on levothyroxine and my doctor is trying to determine the right dose for me. I started out on 25 mcg, but just recently have been bumped up to 100 mcg. My husband and I have been trying for a year, not sure if it’s because of my high TSH levels, or if there is another contributing factor…but, I was just wondering if there was anyone else with a thyroid problem that is trying to conceive or did conceive? Any answers are greatly appreciated!

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    Some encouraging words?
    My husband and I have been ttc for a year now. Along the way we discovered I have a thyroid condition called Hashimoto’s disease-aka subclinical hypothyroidism. I started medication (levothyroxine) back in July, and just recently have to up my dose, as it’s not helping as much as it should. I try to avoid alcohol, I don’t smoke (never have), use ovulation strips, have sex regularly, exercise and try to eat right. I remember to take my medicine every day because i know the thyroid plays a huge part in my hormones-which could hinder my ttc process. I also take prenatal vitamins. What am I doing wrong? I know there are several other tests my husband and I are going to have to go through…but, why us? Why can’t we fall pregnant naturally like most others? Why do we have all of these obstacles in our way? I want a baby so badly, more than anything, but it feels like it’s never going to happen for us. I’m losing hope :(

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid hormone is a growth hormone and it is one the hormone of the ENDOCRINE ORCHESTRA.
      First of all you need to be followed up closely with the Endocrinologist. Once your thyroid is taken care off, then they might refer you to the infertility people, who will analyse the sex hormonal level and suggest the next level of action.
      Now, you tell me about your menstruation. Are they regular?
      If regular and comes monthly = if it so your body is ovulating regularly.
      If not, your ovum production is in jeopardy and you have to be guided to the endocrinologist or ob/gyn.
      Taking the Prenatal vitamin doesn’t guarantee pregnancy.

      I know there are several other tests my husband and I are going to have to go through…but, why us?
      I definitely can’t answer that question. If I know the answer, God would not have asked me to answer your question.
      Rich and poor, health and unhealthy, good and bad people are part and partial of God’s creation. Or let me put a similar question to you –> Why only petroleum wealth is given to the Middle East only?. Sure, you don’t have any answer to my question.
      So instead of worrying and depressing yourself, think positive and see how you can overcome your problem.

  45. QUESTION:
    Anyone with thyroid problems that are trying to conceive/or have conceived?
    In July I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease (aka subclinical hypothyroidism). I’m starting to believe I’m full blown hypo as my TSH has been consistenly high each time I get blood work. So, i’m on levothyroxine and my doctor is trying to determine the right dose for me. I started out on 25 mcg, but just recently have been bumped up to 100 mcg. My husband and I have been trying for a year, not sure if it’s because of my high TSH levels, or if there is another contributing factor…but, I was just wondering if there was anyone else with a thyroid problem that is trying to conceive or did conceive? Any answers are greatly appreciated!

    • ANSWER:

  46. QUESTION:
    Medical question – Doctor’s help please!!!?
    Hi! I’m an 18 year old female from Texas but I currently live in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Recently I’ve been experiencing a really weird combination of symptoms that I haven’t ever had before. It started with excess sweating, which I am not usually prone to…It would happen on and off and even with my A/C on blasting, I would be cold but also still be sweating & if I turned it off I would melt. I also started to have an intermittent cough, not really coughing up drainage but I can feel it in my throat. Like 2 days after that, I began to get some intense pain on the inside of my right shoulder blade that followed my spine up my neck and ended in the base of my head where the pain was centralized. This pain was only on the right side of my body and at that time it seemed to be connected to the way that I would move my right arm. About 12 hours (at least) later the pain completely subsided. I felt pretty good, even though I was feeling fairly fatigued still. However, maybe 6 hours later I began to develop the same pain but on my left side! It started a little bit higher, on top of the shoulder, & it didn’t seem to be connected to the movement of my arm. From that point on the pain was really on and off and would switch between my right & left side, but never both at the same time, affecting my spine up through my neck into my head. I went to the doctor that same evening (yesterday) and he diagnosed me with a mild form of salmonella… he prescribed me an antibiotic and I’m going to have blood work down. I however don’t know how accurate that diagnosis is…I know I’m not a doctor but I am not experiencing any nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, etc. and I do not think that my symptoms definitely line up with that. He told me I could have contracted it from Subway, which is possible but I eat there frequently and I have never been sick before. On top of everything, today the pain still centralized on one side at a time but it is now apparent in my arms…particularly in my forearm and elbow, where it feels like to me, in my bones. The pain is intermittent but when it comes it is aching and intense, from my forearm to my shoulder blade area, to my lower head. I am really at a loss for what this might be, because I haven’t ever experienced anything like this before. I also have zero appetite, but I am drinking lots of fluids. If you have any useful input, I’d love to hear your thoughts! Because I am not in my home country, I cannot visit my regular dependable doctor.

    Side note: I have a form of hypothyroidism called Hashimoto’s disease that is treated with levothyroxine. I don’t think it’s related. I am also taking the oral birth control, Yasmin.

    Please help!!!

    • ANSWER:

  47. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s and normal tsh levels? Possible to feel hypo?
    Any tips from others dealing with this would be greatly appreciated and would make me feel like I’m not crazy. :)
    I had doctors telling me my thyroid gland felt enlarged since January 2010,they’d test my tsh and everything was normal. Finally this May a different doctor ordered an ultrasound of my thyroid gland, radiologist and my doctor agreed it is “mildly enlarged”, they also found that 2 of my parathyroid glands are also enlarged. I was sent to an endocrinologist late May and she ordered a load of labs, parathyroid function, kidney function,tsh, metabolic panel, vitamin d and tested for thyroid antibodies.My tsh was .93 (late may), my last tsh was this january and was 1.9. I tested positive for thyroid antibodies and my level was 69, my vitamin d is also low and is the supposed reason for my parathyroid glands being enlarged,am now taking 1000 units of vitamin d daily now.
    At my initial appt. with my endo she talked to me mainly about hyperthyroidism because of they way my level dropped, I told her I have none of those symptoms. She called me at work to tell me I have Hashimoto’s and low vit d levels, take vitamin d daily and she will recheck my tsh and vit d in 6 months. She had no time to answer any questions and said absolutely no to any medication.. so I did my own research. I have just about every symptom of HYPOthyroidism and have had them for years. My mother had hashimotos and no longer has a thyroid gland, almost every one of her siblings is hypo and a few are hyper (there are 9 total). I called her back w/my concerns and still said absolutely no to treating it.
    I’ve had pain in the joints of my fingers x 3 years
    pain/swelling in my knees x 8-9 yrs (i do not have lymes or arthritis, mri and xray done on my knees show nothing wrong at all) I’ve seen orthopedic doctors for this.
    my muscles ache all the time in all sorts of places, legs,arms, back.
    my skin is very dry and seems to be bad yr round, am now using a prescription scalp solution for my horribly dry scalp that seemed to come out of no where 2 yrs ago.
    I cannot get pregnant again (5 yrs of trying-finally gave up and decided it was’nt meant to be), i missed 2 days of birth control 9 yrs ago and got pregnant instantly.
    I could sleep all day if I did’nt have a life, I am tired all the time and feel like I’m in a fog. I have been on 3 antidepressants (over 5 yrs) the doctors threw at me and nothing really worked so I just stopped them.
    I used to be someone who never really got nervous or scared about things..over the past few yrs I have anxiety over many stupid little things that shouldnt bother me,even meeting w/friends for dinner and sometimes break out in hives on my chest and back when my anxiety is bad.
    my weight fluctuates every couple months w/ no change in diet. I gain about 10 lbs and a month or so later I lose that plus maybe some more. (i am not a large person, so this usually goes unnoticed by most people)
    I have and have had bad menorrhagia for many yrs. but usually don’t get anything to stop the bleeding because I have a clotting disorder already and extra hormones puts me at higher risk for a clot.
    the list goes on…
    If my tsh was only .93 in May, why do I feel like someone with hypothyroidism? Maybe it’s just coincidence? I have a very slim neck and my enlarged thyroid is a tiny bit noticeable (by my endo and now me since she showed me) Why is this a “wait and see” disease? Why would they allow your thyroid gland to get bigger? It does’nt make sense.I would rather feel hyper than hypo any day, I have felt like crap for way too long.
    (fyi- i am 28 yrs old..going on 80) I have an appt with a new endo on Thursday but he works alongside with the last one I saw so I’m guessing he wont be of any help either and just a waste of another copay.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, the TSH test as the only thyroid test, and no treatment? ugh
      This is NOT a wait-and-see disease. The thyroid is one of the most
      important glands in the body. It regulates the entire metabolism, and when
      the thyroid is not functioning properly it can affect everything from
      adrenals, sex hormones, bones, circulation, hair, and weight, to energy,
      mental acuity, eyesight, and so on…

      Here is an article that might help you find a better doctor:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

      Here is the Hashimotos article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos

      Lots of great thyroid treatment info:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      Recommended tests:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      What the test results mean:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      There are a couple of thyroid groups that I think will benefit you:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones/

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless (co-mod has Hashis)

      I sincerely hope this info helps you.

  48. QUESTION:
    How can I lose weight with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?
    I’m only 17 years old and just two days ago, I found out I have Hashimoto’s. I have practically all of the symptoms of it plus the hypothyroidism symptoms. However my doctor won’t give me the medication for it because my hypothyroidism “isn’t bad enough”. I want/need to lose 25 lbs. before graduation, which gives me about 7 months. I’m going to start WeightWatchers soon. As of right now, I weight 165 lbs, and I’m only 5’4″. Overweight, to say the least. I would like to know what kind of foods I should and shouldn’t be eating. I know that most people with Hashimoto’s are sensitive to gluten, so I’m going to try to avoid that. And for about 3 weeks now, I haven’t been eating sweets (cakes, cookies, chocolate, candy, etc.) I’m hoping that helps. Also, I’m always extremely tired from this, and I’m having a hard time exercising because I always feel weak. Any tips? I would also like any recommendations on some kind of supplements I can take since I can’t have the medication. My grandma suggested a good multivitamin, but I don’t know how to choose that or even what kinds of vitamins I need for this disease.

    Please and thank you:) And any extra advice is welcome!

    • ANSWER:
      Your calorie intake will need to be limited to prevent additional weight gain. A multivitamin (your basic multi) would be helpful in this, at your age it might also be beneficial to supplement vitamin D. Calcium is unnecessary because if you are eating a balanced diet you should get adequate amounts (calcium is mostly in dairy products and dark green vegetables).

      I would look to cut calorie intake where it is easiest for you to do so. Many people find it beneficial to cut soft drink/soda intake, and limit their beverages to low-fat milk, water, or non-calorie drinks. Limiting sweets is also a good idea. High-fat foods like fried foods can also be a good place to look to cut calories. Keep in mind, though, that unless you are clearly out of puberty (unlikely @ 17) you can grow further, so losing weight at a rapid rate may be a bad idea – you could, conceivably, in 7 months, grow an inch or two.

      It’s important that you get an adequate iodine intake (iodine is a major component of thyroid hormone), and a multivitamin will help insure that. You may also find it beneficial to LIMIT foods with goitrogens – basically, foods that prevent your body from absorbing iodine effectively. Cabbages, peanuts, soy products, cauliflower, and broccoli are among the foods containing goitrogens. It’s not to say that you shouldn’t eat these foods, just don’t go crazy with them. There are ton of other leafy green vegetables out there that are just as good, though.

      As far as exercise goes, exercise as you are able to do so. Sluggishness is a major factor related to hypothyroidism, and you don’t need to do anything crazy. A brisk walk, light weight training, whatever you feel you can handle and won’t push you to your extremes and make you pass out.

      Oh, and one last note. “Healthy” weight loss is no more than 1 lb a week (at your age I’d aim for 1/2 lb), so with seven months to go you have more than enough time – ESPECIALLY because you could grow taller. I’d aim for a calorie intake between 1900-2100 kcal/day (This is a VERY rough estimate, it’s always tricky estimating with people who have hypothyroid). If you don’t see a loss after a couple of weeks, shave about 200 calories off of that number. Weigh yourself the same time once a week (usually after waking up and urinating is a good time)

  49. QUESTION:
    What’s wrong with my endocrine system?
    I’m 19, and I haven’t had my period in more than a year. I know that it’s probably caused by the fact that I’m overweight (the doc told me), and it’s been suggested that I have PCOS. The fact that I’m overweight has to do with nutrition, the fact that I am insulin resistant, and the fact that I have hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto’s disease. On top of that, I have moderate acne and I’m vitamin D deficient.

    What the hell is wrong with my body? I feel like I’m falling apart at the seams. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Being overweight and insulin resistant could have been caused by your hypothyroidism being left untreated for a long period of time. PCOS is usually genetic, and you could be deficient in vitamin D because you aren’t spending enough time out in the sun. Most of the vitamin D we need comes from the sun.

      If you aren’t having your periods it is probably because of your thyroid either being under medicated or not medicated. (you didn’t say if you were taking anything) PCOS usually causes heavy periods with severe cramping.

      If I were a doc, I would advise you to get your thyroid regulated, and see if you other issues go away.

  50. QUESTION:
    What disease do these symptoms indicate?
    I’ve been having some weird symptoms lately but they don’t stay constant, they seem to change day to day.
    They include:
    Joint Pain
    Muscle soreness and I don’t lift weights or exercise much so it doesn’t make sense
    Fatigue
    Sleeping much more than usual like 9+ hours
    Hair Falling out not localized to one spot but more thinning out
    My hands will turn dead white and get really cold
    My eyes are really red all the time and they’re achy but they don’t feel itchy or watery like allergy eyes
    I have bad mood swings and anxiety

    I had Grave’s disease but took methimazole and ended up going into remission but my endocrinologist said there was a possibility of my thyroid reverting into Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which I know hypothyroidism can produce some of those symptoms but I had my thyroid hormone levels checked and they are completely normal so that rules that out. What does all of this sound like?

    • ANSWER:
      you could have anemia.
      however, with the history of Grave’s disease, it more likely is sluggish thyroid. sometimes, the basic tests of the thyroid don’t register a hypothyroid condition. Tell your Dr. your symptoms and ask that you be further tested.


Hashimoto Thyroid Disease Symptoms

Hashimoto’s disease is a disease characterized by the immune system attacking the thyroid gland. . A family history of thyroid disorders is common, with the HLADR5 gene most strongly implicated conferring a relative risk of 3 in the UK. The person may experience symptoms of hyperthyroidism at first when the thyroid may actually produce too much thyroid hormones. It is caused by a reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland. Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Hashimoto’s disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, causes inflammation of your thyroid gland that often leads to underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Lymphocytic thyroiditis may also occur as a self-limited condition which lasts 2-6 months, resolving spontaneously, and leaving most patients with normal thyroid function. Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto’s disease is a common thyroid gland disorder that can occur at any age, but it is most often seen in middle aged women. It is more prevalent in women than in men (8:1), and its incidence increases with age Blood tests of thyroid function are used to detect Hashimoto’s disease. Patients with this form of thyroiditis sometimes exhibit so few symptoms that the disease may go unnoticed for many years, but eventually it may destroy so much thyroid tissue that hypothyroidism develops.

Many people with this disease have no symptoms. Hashimoto’s Disease is often referred to as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, autoimmune thyroiditis, lymphadenoid goiter, struma lymphomatosa, and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is not uncommon. Many people with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis have other endocrine disorders, such as diabetes, an underactive adrenal gland, or underactive parathyroid glands, and other autoimmune diseases, such as pernicious anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjgren’s syndrome, or systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). In many cases, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis usually results in hypothyroidism, although in its acute phase, it can cause a transient thyrotoxic state. Hashimoto’s disease progresses slowly over a number of years and causes chronic thyroid damage, leading to a drop in thyroid hormone levels in your blood. Less commonly, Hashimoto’s disease occurs with hypoparathyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and fungal infections of the mouth and nails in a condition called type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. The thyroid gland typically becomes and the antibodies the body normally produces to protect the body and fight foreign substances such as bacteria, are found to ‘attack’ their own thyroid tissue. Treatment with synthetic thyroid hormone replacement medication usually is simple and effective. Natural treatment options also exist.

Causes of Hashimoto’s disease

The common causes and risk factor’s of Hashimoto’s disease include the following:

The exact cause of Hashimoto’s disease is unknown.

A reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland.

If someone in your family has had thyroid disease, you may have an increased risk for Hashimoto’s disease.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is most common among women, particularly older women, and tends to run in families.

It may rarely be associated with other endocrine disorders caused by the immune system.

A combination of factors including heredity, and age may determine your likelihood of developing the disorder.

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is seen more frequently in people taking extra iodine in their diets.

Symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease

Some sign and symptoms related to Hashimoto’s disease are as follows:

Fatigue.

Enlarged neck or presence of goiter.

Small or atrophic thyroid gland.

Dry skin.

Joint stiffness.

Excessive sleepiness.

Dry, coarse hair.

Facial swelling.

Hair loss.

Heavy and irregular menses.

Hoarse voice.

An elevated blood cholesterol level.

Intolerance to cold.

Most often, people with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis suffer from symptoms of Hypothyroidism (fatigue, lethargy, decreased metabolic rate).

Treatment of Hashimoto’s disease

Here is list of the methods for treating Hashimoto’s disease:

Iron supplements.

If Hashimoto’s disease causes thyroid hormone deficiency, you may need replacement therapy with thyroid hormone.

Antibiotics to fight infection.

Hormones to suppress or replace thyroid function.

Sucralfate, an ulcer medication.

Long-term prognosis is very good. Most people with the disease can be easily treated.

Cholestyramine (Questran), a medication used to lower blood cholesterol levels.

Replacement therapy with thyroid hormone is given if the hormone is deficient or may be given if there is evidence of mild thyroid failure.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what are symptoms of thyroid disease?
    please tell me about any symptoms you know of from Hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, Grave’s disease, or thyroid storm

    • ANSWER:
      HypOthyroid symptoms:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic

      HypErthyroidism and Graves Disease:
      Some of the symptoms are rapid unexplained weight loss, rapid heart rate, hair loss, shaking, diarrhea, sweating, etc.

      Hashimotos symptoms:
      HypEr and hypO symptoms – see above.

      Thyroid storm is sudden excessive thyroids hormones for whatever reason and is similar to hypErthyroid symptoms.

      Read about thyroid stuff here:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  2. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s Disease with strange symptoms…?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism. My TSH levels are around 8 or higher and my Thyroid levels are sitting at around 1 or so. I have also been tested for the antibodies that my indicate Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. My Peroxidase levels are >1000 and my Thyroglobulin levels are 302.0. I was told these were significantly high numbers and everything I have read indicates that this is Hashimoto’s (please correct me if I am wrong) the rest of my symptoms include:

    No Goiter
    Weight Gain
    Constipation
    Heart Palpitations (hyperthyroid?)
    High Blood Pressure
    Joint Pain
    Always seem to be tired
    Seem to have headaches increasingly more often (I very rarely ever got headaches)

    My Army PA told me that I would be very sick if I actually had Hashimoto’s Disease, and that I had no goiter, I don’t have the disease. I am not hoping I have it (obviously), but everything I have read and have researched points to it minus a few symptoms. Can anyone give me any help or advice on what to tell my new Army doctor this Tuesday? Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Those symptoms aren’t so strange if you have Hashimoto Disease. You can swing between hypothyroidism and hyperthryoidism.

      “Hashimoto’s Disease
      Also called “Hashi’s” or “thyroiditis”, this is an autoimmune disorder in which one’s immune system attacks it’s own thyroid cells, causing inflammation and eventually resulting in hypothyroid. In many cases a goiter develops because of the inflammation, but sometimes the thyroid gland can actually shrink. Patients with Hashi’s can vascillate between hypo and hyper. There is a genetic predisposition to autoimmune disease, so if you have one, you are more at risk to have others, including Hashi’s thyroiditis. It is proposed that a lack of iodine also plays a role in autoimmune attacks on the thyroid.”

      Stop the thyroid madness:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/causes-of-hypo/

  3. QUESTION:
    Do you have Hashimoto’s disease (Low thyroid)?
    I know its a genetic disease, and some family members of mine have it. I have been experiencing symptoms similar to theirs. However, after a blood test, the results for low thyroid turned up negative. My question is, what were your syptoms before being diagnosed? also, Did you take a specific test for low thyroid? If so, What kind of test was it?

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have Hashimoto’s disease or hypothyroidism, but I know that the usual tests are for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, T3, and free thyroxine levels (free T4). Additionally, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease and you can get tested for the antibodies if the first tests are positive for hypothyroidism. All the symptoms come from low T3 and T4 levels, so there would be no reason to suspect hypothyroidism if those hormones are normal.

      What symptoms do you have? Hypothyroidism shares many symptoms with depression, or other medical diseases.

  4. QUESTION:
    Having pregnancy symptoms but my bf had a vasectomey done 6 years ago.?
    Hi, I’m having pregnacy symptoms even though my bf had a vasectomy done 6 years ago. I’m having nausea, headaches, tender breasts, night urination and I’m a week late. He said the vasectomy he had done is supposed to be 100% for sure. I have hashimoto thyroid disease and I’m 41. Could the thyroid be making me have pregancy symptoms? I’m never late….

    • ANSWER:
      Go to the doctor and/or take a home pregnancy test. Pregnant or not, this sounds like a legitimate medical concern that you should have checked out, especially if you already have thyroid problems.

      Good luck!

  5. QUESTION:
    Do you have Thyroid Problems? Were you diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease?
    A little over 1 year ago I was breaking out in hives from head to toe. It was to the point when I was swelling up; my hands, my eyes, my face, my lips. I went to 5 doctors and finally I went to a doctor who figured it out. It was my thyroid. My thyroid activity was low. The anti-bodies were killing off my thyroid so in case they were killing my histamine in my body too. This was causing me to break out and hives and cause the swelling. They say this Hashimoto’s is very rare. My mission is to find someone with these same symptoms and work through this disease together. I still sometimes wake up a bit swollen or with a few hives. I would just like to know that I am not alone in the world….

    • ANSWER:
      i do… loll. i have thyroid disease, and all the other girls in my family do too

  6. QUESTION:
    Anyone know anything about Hashimoto’s Thyroidism and its symptoms?
    I was diagnosed around age 11/12 with Hashimoto disease at Toronto sick Kids Hospital. A large goiter was found at my annual check up. My thyroid was then hyperactive, and I was treated with radioactive iodine at approx age 14/15 – which resulted in Hypothyroidism. From a very early age I suffered with joint problems, and throughout the years they have progressively gotten worse. I suffer from many symptoms that coincide with Hashimoto disease (especially Musculoskeletal symptoms, dry skin, muscle weakness, weight gain, chronic fatigue, migraines) , and I have also been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I have been X-rayed by three different doctors, each giving me a different diagnoses. Due to my many debilitating symptoms, I’m looking to apply for the Ontario disability Support Program. Unfortunately I was told by the last Dr. I saw, that symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease would not affect me now – due to my past treatment of radioactive iodine, even though many of my symptoms started after the treatment.
    I was wondering if there is any truth to this statement? – as many things that I have read have contradicted this.
    Is there any literature that you can provide/recommend for me, that can help to back up my claim; As well as help me to understand this disease and it’s symptoms better?

    Any advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Can your blood tests come back neg. with the progression of Hashimoto’s disease? At what point is it detected?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease:
    Characterized by the immune system attacking the thyroid gland; it occurs by the body producing antibodies, which is usually good to fight off viruses, germs, pollen etc. In hypothyroidism, the antibodies attack the thyroid gland. This disease progresses slowly over a number of years.

    I always complained of its symptoms (extremely fatigued, cold, muscle aches and weakness, difficulty concentrating, sore joints, heart murmurs occasionally) to many specialists, but none of them ever brought up that it could be my thyroid. You would think someone would come up with a diagnosis or even a hint of what it could be after 12 years of complaining about its symptoms (blood test were taken too). My last doctor I saw (infertility doctor) was the one who sent me to a endocrinologist!

    Back to my question: Do test usually come back normal and then suddenly appear abnormal? I am on medication for the rest of my life! Thanks for your feedback! :)

    • ANSWER:
      The disease may still be there. You are treated for hypothyroidism so yr thyroid function may become normal.

  8. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease….I have just discovered I have that my thyroid is very enlarged…?
    How long will it be before I can get my thyroid removed if it indeed needs to come out….in the public health system in Australia. Got a Docs appointment this afternoon, and have been suffering alot of differnent symptoms that fit and the lump in my neck would explain my irrational behaviour over the last two weeks, thank god!

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    I’ve just been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease. I’ve gained 30 lbs. due to under-active thyroid.
    Even though my thyroid is dying, my doctor won’t treat with medicine until my T-3 levels drop more. Any advice from someone who has been through this?

    I am tired, sluggish, losing hair, gaining weight–symptoms of under-active thyroid. I DO need meds, maybe a new doc?

    • ANSWER:
      Find a new doctor right away. This one does not care if you are suffering. Why should you have to wait for T3 levels to drop when most doctors treat based on TSH or T4 levels. Find a new doctor and get morning only testing of TSH, Free T4, and Free T3 and get on medication asap or you will keep gaing weight. I gained 50 pounds from the condition because the stupid TSH test did not diagnose me right away. I have managed to lose 30 of the pounds, but it took years to do so.

      BTW, below is a link to a thyroid forum where we talk about weight diet, exercise, medication, etc….

  10. QUESTION:
    What are my treatment options for hashimoto’s disease?
    I have Hashimoto’s disease and was told today by my endocrinologist that my body will ultimately “kill” my thyroid. Until it does, I have no treatment options! I have so many symptoms associated with hypothyroidism and am desperate for some type of relief! I have gained 30 + lbs, am constantly tired and don’t menstruate regularly (I am a newlywed and would like to have children within the next couple of years), etc. I was told the “death” of my thyroid could take years and the thought of continuing in my current state for what would feel like an eternity is devastating, please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Artsy

      Go to this website and read the testimonials. There are some good ideas on how to attach your issue. You’ll have to learn a lot more about natural healing, but you are at the point of doing anything I can tell. Be open minded and get cure yourself because you can. Dont let anyone tell you it cant be fixed! Answers are out there. Keep seeking and you wont be disappointed.

      Best of health to you.

      Cheers

      http://curezone.com/forums/s.asp?f=25&ob=s&c=0&t=150

  11. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Disease and Tachycardia……….?
    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyrioditis (Autoimmune Thyroid disease) about 5 years ago The Doctor gave me Synthetic thyroid hormones… Synthroid and Levoxyl about 6 months later I would develope chest pain with in an hour of taking my meds. Over the years it got worse. To the point I went to the ER for treatment they said, my meds were working too well and that my symptoms were Tachycardia. They took me off all meds, but I am now feelings the effects from my thyroid and even after stopping I still have heart episodes. I never have had heart problems until I started taking meds. Is there anyway I can treat one condition without affecting the other?
    I went to the ER for treatment for the pain from the tachycardia. I don’t rely on them for my treatment of my illness. My regular Doctor took me off of my meds after the ER doctor discovered the Tachycardia. I thought I was having a heart attack.

    • ANSWER:
      You see your doctor is a very competent , he knew that Synthroid was accumulating in your blood resulting in false (Pseudo hyperthyroidism) symptoms, he had to do an ABRUPT WITH DRAWL. Kindly tell him to have the level of Synthroid in your blood/serum if facility is available.

      Recheck with your doctor, these ER don’t take proper history or satisfy the patients.

  12. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s disease but only hyperthyroid?
    Over the past 3 years, I’ve had hyperthyroidism. My tests have always shown mild to moderate overactivity, only one of those has been done when I wasn’t pregnant. However, my doctor says I have Hashimoto’s. This doesn’t make sense to me, shouldn’t I have come up hypothyroid at some point in my life (my levels were always fine until after I first got pregnant, about 9 months after I miscarried my tests showed a hyperactive thyroid).
    I do show all the symptoms of Hashimoto’s, but I don’t remember my doctor ever testing me for the antibodies, etc. He just told me I have an abnormal protein in my blood that attacks my thyroid. He thinks it runs in my family and usually causes hypothyroid, but for some reason it does the opposite in me. I have no symptoms of Graves. My thyroid was slightly enlarged 3 years ago when I first got tested, but became normal quickly and has never been enlarged since. Thyroid uptake scans and ultrasounds have all been normal.
    Does this really sound like Hashimoto’s? Granted, due to job changes (and therefore, waiting for insurance to kick in at new jobs), I haven’t been able to get tested properly. I am pregnant again, (3rd pregnancy, 1 birth), and during my last one, my levels went to normal in the third trimester and stayed that way for at least a month after the birth. My baby never had any issues with her levels.

    Should I switch doctors?

    • ANSWER:
      Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (enlarged thyroid) can cause bouts of hyperthyroidism. The Hashimoto’s causes the thyroid to attack itself, it can then cause the thyroid to over work itself, which causes the occasional hyperthyroid symptoms. It swings back and forth between hyper and hypo, eventually causing permanent hypothyroidism. It’s probably a good idea to see an endocrinologist (if you don’t already) since they can tell you what is the best treatment.

  13. QUESTION:
    Is 2.25 a normal TSH level for thyroid function?
    I have a lot of symptoms of thyroid disease: cold, hair loss, dry skin, brittle nails, can’t loose weight, fatigue. As there is a family history of Hashimoto’s, including my daughter, I asked my doctor to check my thyroid, which he reluctantly did. His advice was take a good multivitamin and use Rogain for my thinning hair.
    I wasn’t tested for T3 or T4, even though I requested it.

    • ANSWER:
      No, a TSH of 2.25 is a bit high and should be considered a sign of a problem,
      and more tests are indicated.

      Please check out this article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned

      I hope this helps.

  14. QUESTION:
    Advice about Hashimoto’s disease?
    Alrighty, I have this disease and I was wondering if you really do become more forgetful and your thought process becomes more slow. I’ve had this disease for at least 6 years now (I’m almost 18) and I’m not sure if I should start taking medication for it. I’m quite worried about it since I have almost all of the symptoms listed here: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=symptoms
    and here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashimoto%27s_thyroiditis

    If you do have it, what do you think I should do and how has your life been affected by it?

    Thanks a bunch =D

    Additional Details:
    I have been diagnosed with this by a doctor, and I have it monitored by three doctors: my regular doctor (the one I see when I have a cold or something), a thyroid specialist, and my gynecologist

    • ANSWER:
      My mother has that disease. Yes take your medicine now. Because it could present with more symptoms. My mom has been taking it for about 5 years now and is doing way better than she was before.

  15. QUESTION:
    What disease do these symptoms indicate?
    I’ve been having some weird symptoms lately but they don’t stay constant, they seem to change day to day.
    They include:
    Joint Pain
    Muscle soreness and I don’t lift weights or exercise much so it doesn’t make sense
    Fatigue
    Sleeping much more than usual like 9+ hours
    Hair Falling out not localized to one spot but more thinning out
    My hands will turn dead white and get really cold
    My eyes are really red all the time and they’re achy but they don’t feel itchy or watery like allergy eyes
    I have bad mood swings and anxiety

    I had Grave’s disease but took methimazole and ended up going into remission but my endocrinologist said there was a possibility of my thyroid reverting into Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which I know hypothyroidism can produce some of those symptoms but I had my thyroid hormone levels checked and they are completely normal so that rules that out. What does all of this sound like?

    • ANSWER:
      you could have anemia.
      however, with the history of Grave’s disease, it more likely is sluggish thyroid. sometimes, the basic tests of the thyroid don’t register a hypothyroid condition. Tell your Dr. your symptoms and ask that you be further tested.

  16. QUESTION:
    will my thyroid disease get worse over time?
    i have hashimoto’s and it seems like as the years go by, my symptoms worsen. will they continue to just get worse??

    • ANSWER:
      Yes…… unless you are put on the PROPER dose of replacement hormone.

      If your dose is correct for your body’s needs it will suppress the activity of your remaining thyroid gland tissue.. that will reduce the antibody activity from the Hashi’s and cycles will be significantly reduced, or stopped.

      With each cycle your hyper phases are less, your hypo phases are more, and longer.. until enough of the gland has been destroyed where there is no longer any cycling.. you are flat out hypo.

  17. QUESTION:
    Thyroglobin and TPO Antibody Tests – Hashimoto’s Disease & Pregnancy?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease, my Thyroglobin 115 and TPO 99, antibodies positive on both sides.. My TSH is normal for now, 2.8 and T3 and T4 normal.

    I just got married and we want to have a baby.. Has anyone had children with Hashimoto’s Disease? I have the hypo & hyper symptoms, however the specialist I saw doesn’t believe in treatment until my thyroid has been completely destroyed! I’m trying to see a different doc. I’m wondering if treatment now (hormone therapy) will be beneficial to conceive and have a healthy pregnancy. I’m really concerned that it will be harmful to a baby (disease and/or meds). Please help ! Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      You do need a doctor. Waiting until the thyroid is completely destroyed before treating will put you through years of torture, and damage your body permanently. That’s malpractice.

      However. Since your TSH, T3, and T4 are all normal for now, there is no possible treatment for you at this time. You are fine for now. You need regular blood tests to make sure you are still fine. Pregnancy wreaks havoc with hormones, so get blood tests every 6 weeks for now to stay on top of things. After birth, and some time has passed to let your hormones settle down, you can cut back on the testing to every 6 months or so.

      By hormone therapy, I assume you men levothyroxine? That is not appropriate at this time. Being hyperthyroid is just as damaging as being hyperthyroid (if not more so). Taking levothyroxine when you are not currently hypothyroid will send you hyperthyroid.

  18. QUESTION:
    Doctor says that my thyroid pannel is somewhat normal, shoud I my antibodies tested?
    I have recently had two thyroid panels done. Once in July 07 and then in Jan 08. The doctor said that it is all normal, but the levels are confusing me.
    JULY 07
    TSH- .59
    T4 total- 12.6
    T3 Uptake- 25.7
    Free T4 – 3.24

    JAN 08
    TSH- 1.27
    Free T4- 1.3
    T4 total- 14.2
    My mother actually has Hashimoto’s thyroid disease, and I am experiencing a lot of the symptoms of hyperthyroid, and I have been to a few doctors, and I cannot find one who will work with me here, they think that I am just crazy, and I know that I am just not feeling right here. I know that this is not all in my head. Does anyone know if I would benefit from getting my antibody levels tested?

    • ANSWER:
      You would benefit far more from having your free T3 tested first. If you are having symptoms, it is the T3 causing them, because your other tests are normal. If your free T3 is high, then you will need antibody tests to properly diagnose the cause of the high T3.

  19. QUESTION:
    I have Hashimoto’s Disease and hypothyroidism, and I need to know…?
    I have 2 questions:

    1. I have had horrible memory problems for awhile (about 1 1/2 years) where I can’t even remember what I ate an hour ago and sometimes even something I said a few seconds ago. This has thus far been attributed to the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism.

    I have been taking Levothyroxine (thyroid replacement) since around August 2009, and my TSH levels are within the norm now, but I haven’t had any relief from symptoms, such as memory problems, fatigue, and weight issues, among others.

    Is there some point where this will actually start to help? I have read all over the place that it should help in 2-3 months, now it’s been 5 months and nothing. Any advice from those more experienced with this disease of this condition?

    2. Also, how much does this disease/condition affect my ability to get pregnant? I’m 23 and was fortunately very healthy (from what I know, I never had problems really, so I never went to the doctor, although if I had I might have avoided such damage to my thyroid, but hindsight is 20-20 and all that) until about a 1 1/2 years ago. I have somewhat regular periods, at least in their irregularity. My cycles go between 18 and 34 days roughly, but they tend to follow a pattern depending on my life (stress, sleep, etc), for example, if I sleep normally and am relatively unstressed, they are about every 20 days, where if I am really stressed they occur more frequently, and if I am fatigued from lack of sleep, they tend to happen more infrequently, about every 30 days. I’ve been on several different pills to try and normalize everything (my gyno is the one who originally diagnosed the thyroid issue, so she put me on a new pill to mesh with my thyroid treatment) and have been on the pill I’m on now for about 4 months.

    I have been diagnosed with the Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, plus osteoarthritis and an undecided heart issue (that most likely is caused by the thyroid issues) that gives me palpitations and makes my blood pressure drop when I stand up (I forget what it’s called, but it makes me lightheaded and dizzy for a moment; I saw a cardiologist and he didn’t really have any answers other than what it was not, such as an arrhythmia).

    I really want to start working on a family soon with my husband and have children once we’re settled, but seriously – what are my chances of actually being able to get pregnant? This weighs me down with sadness because of all I’ve read and heard, but I’d like to hear from people who may have experience with this issue.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure about the memory problem. Perhaps it will take a little longer – especially if you were hypothyroid for a long time. Also, though your TSH levels are in the normal range you may need to be in the upper normal range to benefit. Maybe a second opinion with another endocrinologist?

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is not a reason to avoid pregnancy. However, some women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis do have trouble conceiving. In some patients, supplementation with selenium is used to try and decrease antibody levels. (The theory is that lower antibody levels may lead to better success in conception.) Both before and during pregnancy, the levels of thyroid hormones need to be checked to make certain they are in the optimal range for pregnancy. This is usually within the range for nonpregnant women but at the higher end of the range.

      Good luck to you

  20. QUESTION:
    Can Hashimoto’s thyroiditis cause costochondritis?
    I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease and I have several symptoms, including an enlarged thyroid, high cholesterol, prematurely grey hair, fatigue and joint pain. I also have a hard lump on the tip of my sternum that I suspect is costochondritis and I was wondering if Hashimoto’s can cause that?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes you can develop costochondritis with hypothyroidism. Your grey hair can also be caused by vitamin B12 deficiency (common with hypothyroidism).

      Hypothyroidism symptoms >>>

      http://www.helium.com/items/343124-hypothyroidism-self-help

      A few good links to check out…

      Thyroid disease >>>

      http://www.sensible-alternative.com.au/metabolic-hormones/thyroid-article

      Selenium lowers TPO thyroid antibodies >>>

      http://jdach1.typepad.com/natural_thyroid/2011/02/selenium-for-hashimotos-thyroiditis-by-jeffrey-dach-md.html

      Cholesterol reduction >>>

      http://www.drgregemerson.com/fact-file/cholesterol-reduction

      Vitamin D deficiency in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis >>>

      Stop The Thyroid Madness >>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

  21. QUESTION:
    Could this be a thyroid problem?
    Hi everyone, I have a question about Hashimoto disease.
    I’ve been to my doctor and he will not let me take a blood test, or let me see the result from my previous blood test (taken over 2 years ago). I find this very odd and after talking to some people and describing my symptoms, all of them said that it is very likely a thyroid problem.

    My symptoms are the following: severe migraines, can’t stand cold or heat, severe pain in back around shoulders, some weight gain while not changing diet, have not had my period for over 9 months and am not pregnant, feeling down, extremely tired but sleep 8-10 hours at night, diarrhea for over 6 months, heart rate of 54 p minute (not an athlete), feeling confused (I even forgot my age just a few days ago, memory loss is getting worse), and overall feeling like I have a “cloud” in my head, not alert at all.

    I feel really frustrated because I’ve been having these symptoms for a while now and they keep getting worse, and my GP will not listen. I’m just wondering am I really crazy for asking for a blood test? Or are my symptoms not that serious?

    • ANSWER:

  22. QUESTION:
    Personal experience with thyroid problems?
    Last July, I noticed some swelling on the top of my foot. I didn’t think much of it because it didn’t hurt, and it eventually went back to normal size. After it reduced in size, though, the part of my foot that had been swollen became discolored (spots of pink and brown.) Then, just last month, my foot became swollen again. This time, though, it was different. Instead of the top of my foot just swelling to look like a lemon was under my skin, this time there are smaller swellings and nodules of different size scattered over the top of my foot. The discoloration is still there, and it looks to be spreading. There is some localized pain at different times, but it doesn’t hurt most of the time. I’ve noticed that my foot has been cramping a lot lately though, and I don’t EVER remember having a cramp in my foot in my life. (I’m only 20.)

    I decided to visit the doctor about it. The X-Rays came back normal, so I went to have an MRI. The MRI showed no tumors or cysts. Apparently, it’s just the skin of my foot acting funny. (I’m still waiting on my appointment to visit my orthopedic doctor.)

    After some research, I’m wondering if this could be pretibial myxedema that has just spread to my foot because I have since found a swollen spot on my shin. Upon researching this, I have found that I have almost every symptom of Hashimoto’s disease. Constipation, always cold, and depression have started to greatly affect my life. I also can’t seem to ever get enough sleep. And I absolutely cannot lose weight, which sucks. My mother and grandmother both had thyroid problems, and I have read that thyroid problems can be very hereditary.

    I was just wondering if anyone could tell me their symptoms that helped them discover that they had a thyroid problem, and if it sounds like I could have Hashimoto’s disease or something else.
    If it could be something besides thyroid problems, please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      I think you should do some research on celiac disease. I had all the symptoms of hypothyroidism and the doctor kept telling me it was nothing and that’s what it turned out to be. It’s an autoimmune disease caused by gluten intolerance. When you eat gluten your body produces antibodies which attack your intestines and other body organs. It attacks your thyroid too. It prevents you from absorbing nutrients so many of the symptoms are from massive vitamin and mineral deficiencies (especially b12). The reason you can’t lose weight is because your body thinks it’s starving to death so it slows down your metabolism (coldness!) and never shuts off the hunger signal. Even in the absence of thyroid dysfunction, you can still have all the symptoms of it because your body has lowered your metabolism so much. Another thing it does is prevent you from using the serotonin in your body. Most of it is located in your intestines and if they’re damaged, depression is a result. Depression is actually the most common symptom of it. I had horrible depression and anxiety and it went away in like 2 days on the diet. I also lost about 20 pounds without really trying. It’s super common, about 1 in 100 have celiac and about 1 in 7 have some other form of non-celiac gluten intolerance. Definitely try a gluten free diet to see if it helps.

      Another thing you should do is to get your medical records and look at the levels yourself. I was told for years that my thyroid levels were fine and it wasn’t until I got my records myself and looked them up that I saw that they were using an outdated scale. The current standards are that any TSH above 3 should be considered hypothyroidism. Mine was 5 and the doctor said I was fine. Obviously he was behind the times. Also, many physicians are now recognizing subclinical hypothyroidism which is where your labs are normal but you still have the symptoms of hypothyroidism. Call around and ask doctors if they recognize subclinical hypothyroidism. If you can find one who says yes, book an appointment with him. My doctor told me she knew my thyroid was low because my body temp was so low. I was running about 96.8 instead of 98.6. Also, when I stopped eating gluten, my TSH went down on it’s own. Hashimoto’s is hereditary and highly associated with celiac disease, so is celiac. Definitely a link there.

      And I’m not sure what’s happening with your foot, but probably a complication of the two I mentioned. Have you seen a dermatologist about it?

      Let me know if you have any questions, I accept pm’s!

      http://www.celiac.com/categories/Celiac-Disease-Research:-Associated-Diseases-and-Disorders/Obesity,-Overweight-&-Celiac-Disease/

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

      http://www.celiac.com/articles/1106/1/Celiac-Disease-Symptoms/Page1.html

      http://www.csaceliacs.org/celiac_symptoms.php

      http://www.celiac.com/categories/Celiac-Disease-Research:-Associated-Diseases-and-Disorders/Migraine-Headaches-and-Celiac-Disease/

  23. QUESTION:
    If it’s not hashimoto’s, what is it?
    For two years I have suffered with hypothyroid symptoms and eighteen months ago I developed a lump on my thyroid.

    Hashimoto’s thyroiditis runs in my family, my Mum was diagnosed at 32 and both my aunt and my Nana have it. I have TPO antibodies but my thyroid function tests have always been within reference range, therefore my GP says I don’t have hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an underactive thyroid or an autoimmune disease and I don’t need to be treated with thyroxine.

    My symptoms include; extreme tiredness, always very cold, dry skin, weight gain, hair loss, swollen ankles, puffy face, breathlessness, achey muscles, joint pain, tingly/numbness in fingers and toes, heavy periods, irritability, forgetfulness and weak/breaking nails.

    If it isn’t hashimoto’s, what could be wrong with me? I feel like I’m about seventy but I’m 33. I used to be very fit and active, now I struggle to climb the stairs.

    • ANSWER:
      What you just described is hypothyroidism. Here are some of the symptoms:
      Less stamina than others
      Less energy than others
      Long recovery period after any activity
      Inability to hold children for very long
      Arms feeling like dead weights after activity
      Chronic Low Grade Depression
      Suicidal Thoughts
      Often feeling cold
      Cold hands and feet
      High cholesterol
      Bizarre and Debilitating reaction to exercise
      Hard stools
      Constipation
      No eyebrows or thinning outer eyebrows
      Dry Hair
      Hair Loss
      Dry cracking skin
      Nodding off easily
      Requires naps in the afternoon
      Inability to concentrate or read long periods of time
      Forgetfulness
      Foggy thinking
      Inability to lose weight
      Always gaining weight
      Inability to function in a relationship with anyone
      NO sex drive
      Moody periods
      PMS
      Excruciating pain during period
      Nausea
      Swelling/edema/puffiness
      Aching bones/muscles
      Osteoporosis
      Bumps on legs
      Acne on face and in hair
      Breakout on chest and arms
      Hives
      Exhaustion in every dimension–physical, mental, spiritual, emotional
      Inability to work full-time
      Inability to stand on feet for long periods
      Complete lack of motivation
      Slowing to a snail’s pace when walking up slight grade
      Extremely crabby, irritable, intolerant of others
      Handwriting nearly illegible
      Internal itching of ears
      Broken/peeling fingernails
      Dry skin or snake skin
      Major anxiety/worry
      Ringing in ears
      Lactose Intolerance
      Inability to eat in the mornings
      No hair growth, breaks faster than it grows
      Joint pain
      Carpal tunnel symptoms
      No Appetite
      Fluid retention to the point of Congestive Heart Failure
      Swollen legs that prevented walking
      Blood Pressure problems
      Varicose Veins
      Dizziness from fluid on the inner ear
      Low body temperature
      Raised temperature
      Tightness in throat; sore throat
      Swollen lymph glands
      Allergies (which can also be a result of low cortisol–common with hypothyroid patients)
      sore feet (plantar fascitis); painful soles of feet
      now how do I put this one politely….a cold bum, butt, derriere, fanny, gluteus maximus, haunches, hindquarters, posterior, rear, and/or cheeks. Yup, really exists.

      By the way, my own experinence is that I was also in range whenever I was tested. However, I would go from hypo to hyperthyroid. It took my surgeon to finally diagnose me with Hashimoto’s over my Endo. I ended up have a total thyroidectomy due to a multi-nodule goiter caused by Hashi’s plus an iodine deficiency. I’m going to include a great web site for you to check out on all of this.

  24. QUESTION:
    is there anyone with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis who could give me more info about it?
    I would be interested to know what symptoms this may cause.. I’ve recently had a lot of joint pain (hips, knees), tiredness, anemia, can barely get up the stairs sometimes- are these related to thyroid disease? I am taking thyroxin 100mcg daily.

    • ANSWER:
      Doing more research through the internet search engines will give you your answers.
      It can make you tired ..no energy.
      It can effect your memory.
      It can make you get cold easier which is why you may have those joint aches, the body doesn’t regulate itself like it should. The brain is nor communicating signals correctly with the body.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is there a chance I have a thyroid disorder?
    These are my odd symptoms at age 20:

    - I am losing my hair, and I normally have very thick hair.

    - I have gained weight (though my diet has been less then good lately)

    - I have been nauseous for about 5 weeks (I am not pregnant. The only chance I could be pregnant happened 6 weeks ago, and I had a very normal period 2 weeks ago)

    - My mother has been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease (which is a hypothyroid disorder)

    - Headaches (Though I am not the best water drinker… I will admit)

    Do these sounds like thyroid disorder symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      Could VERY well be that you have a thyroid disorder – including Hashimoto’s since your Mom has it. BUT… Be aware – most doctors and endocrinologists will test your TSH levels to see if you’re hypothyroid. Unfortunately, this is NOT the best measure of your thyroid levels. Here is a list of MUCH better tests: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism at age 22. Unfortunately, I didn’t find this website (stopthethyroidmadness.com) until I had been on (crappy) synthetic thyroid hormones (Synthroid or Levoxyl) for 16 years. My hair never stopped falling out. I had crashing exhaustion, and the beginning symptoms of perimenopause. I was 38 at the time.

      After finding Stop The Thyroid Madness, I realized how wrong the management of my thyroid problems had been all those years. I changed doctors (to a doctor of internal medicine) to one who does the proper testing and he has me on Armour Thyroid (natural desiccated thyroid). Within 3 days of being on Armour, my symptoms began to improve.

      The keys are:
      (1) make SURE the doctor is doing the proper tests
      (2) make SURE the doctor is treating your symptoms as well as the test results
      (3) DON’T allow anyone to prescribe synthetic hormones. Use natural thyroid ONLY such as Armour, Naturethroid, natural compounded thyroid (done by compounding pharmacies), or even Canada’s Erfa Thyroid.

      You can go to the Armour Thyroid website (listed below) to find doctors who prescribe Armour (and will likely prescribe other natural desiccated thyroid, if necessary).

  26. QUESTION:
    Do i have an immune disease?
    Do you think i might have Grave’s Disease, or any other immune disease? I have been sick NON STOP since about last January. My symptoms are:

    -losing loads of school (36 days last year, 8 this year since August 25)
    -low grade fever whenever under the weather
    -general “ill” feeling
    -abdominal pain
    -irregular periods (i don’t know if this counts though because i am a teen most teens are irregular)
    -Dizzy feeling
    -Sore throats
    -Stomach pains
    -Loose stools almost everyday (diagnosed with possible IBS last year)
    -extra hungry
    -acid reflex
    -tired. fatigue.
    -anxious/nervous
    -being very hot all the time
    -irritability
    -weight gain

    i experience all of these symptoms everyday. i am getting a physical in the middle of October and they are going to do a test for an immune disease, but in the mean time, do you think i have one? and if i do, will they tell me to take time off of school?

    My mother has had Hashimoto’s Thyroids immune disease.
    There is not something called “auto immune” immune disease. an autoimmune disease is an immune disease there are different types of them

    • ANSWER:
      I think it is called “auto immune” disease.
      Have you asked your doctor?

      I think you might need to see a specialist

  27. QUESTION:
    Thyroid and weight gain?
    Hi, recently, I am diagnosed with hashimoto thyroiditis …but I didn’t had any particular symptoms except hair loss…now I am on medication…jst wondering that will I start gaining weight now as I have thyroid disease?

    • ANSWER:
      there is always a possibility!

      it would be better if you will do more sport activities!!

  28. QUESTION:
    Pituitary Gland, The Thyroid and Early Menopause?
    I need advice. I have been suffering unexplained infertility and in the meantime was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease. Alot of my symptoms mimic menopause, I’ve done research and sometimes an “undiagnosed” thyroid issue can be misdiagnosed as early menopause. I am only 5 months into treating the Hashimoto’s so my bloodwork is always a mess. Now my ob/gyn is saying the two are not connected because the pituitary gland controls your ovaries not your thyroid — I looked this up and actually the pituitary gland ALSO controls the thyroid. Wouldn’t a doctor need to do more testing, like 2 abnormal baselines before making such a determination? I ask because if only 1 year ago everything was ok I just couldn’t get pregnant because of my undiagnosed illness how can I suddenly be in menopause? Does that even make sense? Isn’t menopause a gradual process and not something that you just wake up with one day? Should I get a second opinion? I was pregnant after taking thyroid meds for only 6 weeks but miscarried because it wasn’t yet under control. So I AM ovulating as recently as 3 months ago!! What would you do?

    • ANSWER:
      Why does he say you’re in menopause? The way to diagnose it is to see what your FSH is (it’s made by the pituitary). Testing estrogen is also useful but given your thyroid situation, that could mess up your estrogen. It won’t mess up your FSH, though, so that’s why FSH can give you an indication of ovarian function. And yes, hypothyroid can make you not have any periods. But they should return when you get thyroid under control. Also, dont’ get pregnant until your thyroid is under control–it’s bad for the fetus.

      Definitely get a second opinion–go see a reproductive endocrinologist, who specializes in fertility and the endocrine system.

  29. QUESTION:
    Im always hungry. Why? Related to thyroid?
    I’m constantly hungry and never feel satisfied. I can’t remember the last time I felt full. It wasn’t always that way. I was skinny as can be until some time around puberty and then over the years I eventually got up to 300 pounds by age 21. I recently was able to lose 115 pounds over a year and a half. I quit diet and exercise and returned to a somewhat normal diet about 6 months ago and have since gained back nearly 40 pounds. I just got TSH checked and it appeared normal 1.24. I’ve been reading about hashimoto disease and finding a lot of common symptoms mainly the psychological ones (anxiety, mild depression, agitation, paranoia, delusion). Does Hashimoto’s sound likely?

    • ANSWER:
      Just the mental & the weight gain by themselves…not really…could be though.

      Were you checked for antibodies? That is what determines Hashimotos.

      God bless

  30. QUESTION:
    Trying T3 and having flu-like symptoms?
    Has anyone else experience flu-like symptoms (body ache, headache, fever, sinus drain) when attempting to try taking Armour thyroid medication or levothryonine? I have Hashimoto’s disease and was trying the T3 variations to see if they helped my symptoms as I have been on synthroid only for years and recently have not been stable and actually experiencing worse symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      No, these are not typical side effects from T3 therapy. It is likely a coincidence and you were infected with a virus. T3 therapy is not recommended for the treatment of hypothyroidism and T4 (Levothyroxine) is the preferred treatment. The reason why T3 therapy is no longer recommended is because the levels of T3 fluctuate widely during the day due to the rapid absorption of T3 and short half life of the drug. T4 therapy provides more steady levels of thyroid hormone and is the recommended agent by all experts in the medical field.

  31. QUESTION:
    thyroid, thyroiditis, hyperthyroidism, short of breath, food stuck in throat, swelling?
    I am a 24 year old woman. I was considerably healthy. Ive had asthma since birth.
    In June i noticed my throat swelling up, or inflammation. I couldn’t swallow pills or eat because food would get caught in my throat.
    This is now October. Within these four months I have been to an allergist im allergic to the world but the medicines they gave me do not work.

    i have had a ultrasound of my thyroid and i have nodules. I have had a needle biopsy aspiration. They were normal, but has features of Hashimoto’s disease. Doctors did nothing. I have had a thyroid scan and uptake and the results are complicated long story short nothing big enough to give me anything. I am stressing out now. Sometimes my thyroid blood work will be normal, and when i stopped my birth control, they were abnormal. Now they are normal again.They think its hyperthyroid but they arent doing anything

    I have seen a cardiologist for my heart problems , At first they wanted to chuck it up to stress but my white blood cells are high and my liver tests are a little off but no one is doing anything. Ive lost so much weight because i cant really eat. Doc has put me on propranolol for my heart but that makes my asthma act up. before they just put me on valium. I have been to the ER twice within the last month. I feel I am getting the run around can anyone help?

    Recent findings. I seen an ENT. He thinks it is thyroiditis, but they dont know what kind yet. He wants me to get a Baruim x-ray done, im scared about that. I don’t know why he wants me to get that done.
    Also, get a ct scan of my sinuses. What does thyroid have anything to do with sinuses? I am confused.

    my symptoms
    -food stuck in throat
    -post nasal drip
    -mucus in throat but never goes anywhere
    -ear pain with jaw pain
    -swollen glands, swollen throat tightness
    trouble speaking
    -heart palpitations, heart racing
    short of breath
    emotional
    cant eat wheat
    -cloudy urine
    -dizziness
    -tiredness
    -more i cant think of as the moment

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, all these symptoms of a thyroid imbalance. Allergies or more commonly food intolerance are symptoms of a thyroid imbalance which causes post nasal drip and excessive mucus. My mother had terrible 24/7 post nasal drip with hashimoto’s. So, she cut out all dairy (which caused an immediate mucus reaction), went on a candida diet for 2 months (no sugars or white flour etc) and took an anti fungal – Pau D’Arco daily. After two months, the post nasal drip is 80% better! She can now have a bit of dairy with no reaction.

      Candida diet and Pau D’Arco>>>

      http://www.thecandidadiet.com/paudarco.htm

      There are various reasons for thyroiditis
      >>>http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/thyroiditis/

      As you can see, hashimoto’s thyroiditis (autoimmune hypothyroidism) is the most common of all the thyroiditis conditions. This autoimmune disease swings between hyper and hypo symptoms and the TSH levels can be up one minute down the next or come back “normal”. The tests to confirm an autoimmune disease – anti TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and TgAb (thyroglobulin). TPO is elevated more so in hashimoto’s thyroiditis 90% compared to 64% with Graves Disease (autoimmune hyperthyroidism).

      There are 5 types of white blood cells. Eosinophils are higher due to allergies or parasites. Overall high white cell count can be from various conditions as listed
      >>>http://www.buzzle.com/articles/high-white-blood-cell-count.html

      If your thyroid antibodies do come back higher than normal, there are ways to lower them. Selenium (4 brazil nuts) = 200mcg a day has shown to lower TPO antibodies up to 40% in 3 months, gluten free diet “…researchers found that…organ-specific autoantibodies (i.e., thyroid antibodies) — will disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet.”

      http://thyroidbook.com

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      http://www.science20.com/natural_medicine_101_jeffrey_dach_md/blog/dr_dach_selenium_and_hashimotos

      Commonly seen deficiencies with a thyroid condition include vitamin B12 deficiency, iron, (both B12 and iron deficiencie cause palpitations), vitamin D and calcium (too low a calcium level can also cause palpitations), magnesium, potassium, low cortisol levels.

      As for urine, the most common reason is excess phosphate. To test for this, take a small sample of your urine and drop a bit of acetic acid (vinegar) in to it. If it is phosphates, the urine will become clear immediately. Other reasons listed on this link >>>http://www.helium.com/items/707936-cloudy-urine-when-to-worry

  32. QUESTION:
    Normal Thyroid tests, but I am still sick. Advice on what to ask Dr. needed please?
    Background: My mom had Addison’s disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and my sister has antibodies attacking her thyroid.Many other relatives on my maternal side have had a variety of thyroid andadrenall gland disorders.

    I think something is wrong w my endocrine system based on the following symptoms:

    Constant fatigue
    I keep forgetting more more things than in the past
    High ANA sed rate
    My hands have a constant tremor (I take propranol for this which helps). It was diagnosed was a benign familial tremor (my mom had shaky hands to)
    I don’t have an appitite (I was perscribed Remeron which took care of that issue)
    My heart tends to run a bit Tachycardic
    Diagnosed w Renold’s PPhenomenon(sorry about the spelling)
    Very cold intolerant
    Chronically feeling panicky even when there is nothing to panic about
    moodiness
    aches and pains w no known cause
    insomnia
    restlessness
    feeling like I am thinking thru a “fog” a lot

    My most concerning symptom is that my body overeacts to stressful situations. I have had 3 bouts of diarrhea that were so bad I could not make it to the bathroom before having an accident, and I was also vomiting. I had to go to the hospital, because I lost conciousness once, and was out of it the other 2 times due to dehydration. I also had extreme abdominal pain The meds the hospital gave me stoped the vomiting but did not stop the diarrhea, which typically last 5 to 10 days when I get sick w it..All three instances started as a result of moderate stressful events (like midterms, fight w exhusband, etc) and the hospital could not find any infections, viruses, or bad bacteria. They also made sure there weren’t any blockages. I have had the same thing happen less intensly and less often in the last 4 or 5 years. The last time I was in the hospital my urine had ketones, but doc tested for diabeties and I don’t have it.
    Also I will break out in stress hives at times.

    Currently I am diagnosed w depression, anxiety, insomnia, benign familial tremor, renold’s phanomina, and high cholesterol.I am on Cymbalta, Rememron, Propranol (for hand tremor only BP is fine), and Xanax XR, I am a 38 yr old female who is otherwise healthy. The tests that were run were T3, T4, and TSH tests which came back normal. I have also been tested for diabeties every year, which I do not have.

    My symptoms I listed above are getting worse. What additional tests should I request and/or what questions should I ask my doc?

    • ANSWER:
      I would think your doctor should be checking you for thyroid auto-antibodies, and possibly checking your adrenal hormones. It’s hard to say, because I don’t know exactly what you were tested for at the hospital. Most people don’t know the full extent of their testing, so it would be a good idea to get a copy of all your medical records.

      Keep in mind that the depression and anxiety can explain most of your symptoms, if not all.

      My suggestion to you is to schedule a meeting with your doctor. Sit down, have an open,honest conversation. Tell him how you feel regarding your health. Ask him what diagnoses he’s considered, and which ones he’s tested for. Ask him what else could be causing your symptoms, and what else you can do to figure out if you have anything wrong with you. Ask him what he would do if he had these symptoms. Don’t accept dismissive answers.

      Good luck.

  33. QUESTION:
    Thyroid tests normal, but I am still getting more sick. What other tests should I ask my doc to do?
    Background: My mom had Addison’s disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and my sister has antibodies attacking her thyroid.Many other relatives on my maternal side have had a variety of thyroid and adrenal gland disorders.

    The tests that were run on me were the T3, T4, and TSH tests which came back normal. I have also been tested for diabeties every year, which I do not have.

    I think something is wrong w my endocrine system based on the following symptoms:

    Constant fatigue
    I keep forgetting more more things than in the past
    High ANA sed rate
    My hands have a constant tremor (I take propranol for this which helps). It was diagnosed was a benign familial tremor (my mom had shaky hands to)
    I don’t have an appitite (I was perscribed Remeron which took care of that issue)
    My heart tends to run a bit Tachycardic
    Diagnosed w Renold’s PPhenomenon(sorry about the spelling)
    Very cold intolerant
    Chronically feeling panicky even when there is nothing to panic about
    moodiness
    aches and pains w no known cause
    insomnia
    restlessness
    feeling like I am thinking thru a “fog” a lot

    My most concerning symptom is that my body overeacts to stressful situations. I have had 3 bouts of diarrhea that were so bad I could not make it to the bathroom before having an accident, and I was also vomiting. I had to go to the hospital, because I lost conciousness once, and was out of it the other 2 times due to dehydration. I also had extreme abdominal pain The meds the hospital gave me stoped the vomiting but did not stop the diarrhea, which typically last 5 to 10 days when I get sick w it..All three instances started as a result of moderate stressful events (like midterms, fight w exhusband, etc) and the hospital could not find any infections, viruses, or bad bacteria. They also made sure there weren’t any blockages. I have had the same thing happen less intensly and less often in the last 4 or 5 years. The last time I was in the hospital my urine had ketones, but doc tested for diabeties and I don’t have it.
    Also I will break out in stress hives at times.

    Currently I am diagnosed w depression, anxiety, insomnia, benign familial tremor, renold’s phanomina, and high cholesterol.I am on Cymbalta, Rememron, Propranol (for hand tremor only BP is fine), and Xanax XR, I am a 38 yr old female who is otherwise healthy.

    My symptoms I listed above are getting worse. What additional tests should I request and/or what questions should I ask my doc?
    I definitly agree w the need for the ACTH stimulation tests and the electrolyte tests (especially since I can’t seem to have enought salt). I also want to make sure I have all my bases covered as it seems these days you have to tell the dr.’s what tests to run.
    Just went to dr. she won’t run the ACTH stim test because my electrolytes were fine at the time of the blood test. I tried telling her that is common if there is no Addisonian crisis occuring at that time. I guess whenever I have to go to the hospital again I’ll have them test for Addison’s while I am sick as it seems that is the only way they will run the ACTH stim test.

    • ANSWER:
      Just a thought– but have you yourself been tested for Addison’s Disease? The fact that your body responds so severely to stress is a kind of clue that it may be an issue. A lot of your symptoms seem consistent with this condition.

      The doctor can run some blood tests to check your electrolyte levels, ACTH ( a hormone) levels, etc. He may want to stimulate the release of ACTH with an injection and see how your body responds. Sometimes they do a scan of the kidneys to check the adrenal gland itself.

      Well, that would be the next thing I’d be checking for if I were you; for no other reason that to rule it out.

      Hope you get some answers and feel better soon!

  34. QUESTION:
    can you have thyroid problems and normal levels ?
    Please correct me if I’m wrong.
    Free T4 is how much thyroid hormone my thyroid is producing ? (mine is .8 – on the low side of normal range)
    TSH is what the hypothalmus is telling the pituitary to produce in order to stimulate the thyroid ? (mine is also .8 which is normal I guess) But, I have had many symptoms of hypothyroidism. My question is if you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto’s can you still have these “normal range” levels ? Also, I read it runs in families and my mom has hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      You are at the low end of the “normal range”, and if you are experiencing symptoms of hypothyroid, you should demand to be put on a low dosage of synthroid or levoxyl (10-20 mcgs) because normal for one person might be a .8 while someone else needs to be 1-2 to feel well. Most endocrinologists like to see patients towards the middle of the range and will prescribe, especially in women because your thyroid function decreases with age. Because of your family history especially, you are a good candidate. I know that my TSH needs to be around 2 to feel good. Be sure that you get your TSH tested every 4-6 weeks initially to find the right dosage for you. It can be a long process in finding the right dosage and reaping the full benefits of medication, so be patient.

      If your doctor doesn’t take you seriously, change doctors or ask for a second opinion. If you have a good HMO and are able to go directly to a specialist, see an endocrinologist. Endocrinologists specialize in endocrine diseases and I assure you will take your symptoms very seriously.

      Another suggestion is to have an antibody test. If your antibodies are elevated, it could be Hashimoto’s causing hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s causes antibodies to attach your thyroid. It’s rare, but the antibody test is the best way to diagnose if TSH doesn’t.

  35. QUESTION:
    CAN YOUR WHITE BLOOD CELL COUNT NOT SHOW SIGNS OF INFECTION?
    AND can herpes on your face look like acne, and not be near your mouth?
    im breaking out so bad! and im back on my acne medication which usually clears it up to like 90%!! i have mountain types of red painfull bumps(that dont pop like mine usually do) in all areas on my dermatologist says normal! and a few blisters types.
    BUT my dr’s and i have been doing all kinds of blood, urine and stool tests to figure out whats wrong w/ me because i have been quite sick W/ a ridiculous amount of symptoms……. my symptoms include(but not limited to): extreme weight loss(20%) over the past 7 months w/ no known reason, memory loss,fatigue,confusion, trouble finding words, constipation,blood clots in stool, extreme amount of mucus in stool, malabsorbtion,constant feeling of needing to move bowels, itchy scalp,dry hair and skin, dry mouth, large amounts of yeast in mouth, swollen tender glands throughout entire body(HARD IMMOBILE SLOW GROWING LYMPH NODES IN GROIN ABOUT 1MONTH NOW -now about 1cm-1in big), circulation changes(pigmentation in skin either very pale or red, varicoses veins pronounced in legs when im doing anything physically demanding,broken blood vessels appearing easily; eyes and nose)cold feet and hands, hot flashes(im 29YRS OLD!), pain(inside of knees, lower back, stiff neck, headaches), hands wrists ankles and feet swelling(bilaterally) w/ tingling sensation and numbness, muscle cramping and spams, few BLISTER TYPE canker sores, hair loss, dry eyes, abdominal swelling, appetite up and down but always feeling full quickly, excessive gas, ocd symptoms, behavior changes, THROAT feels full, itchy wet ears(get clogged alot), cuts on fingers and hands slow to heal, allergy type symptoms out of no-where, skin tag inside anus almost at edge, slight vaginal discharge(not strong odor) and swelling(looks as if the walls of vagina are closing in! swollen and low), bump on cervix(that has been there years but now growing fast and a new one just inside opening-purplish in color. i can see it bc cervix is so low and maybe swollen(2gynecologists examined me and said look normal!)
    IM ON SYNTHROID FOR LOW THYROID,CO LACE FOR CONSTIPATION AND ZANTAC FOR GAS
    I HAVE HASHIMOTO DISEASE(autoimmune low thyroid) I HAD A VERY LARGE TUMOR REMOVED FROM CHEST 15 YRS AGO(attached to my trachea,aorta,heart,esophagus and windpipe. but seems to not have grown back according to x rays
    im thinking i have a number of different problems and that’s whats confusing the dr’s-
    i had clear x chest x rays and only one abnormal ekg out of 3(Dr’s say no concern and no found heart probs) clear ultrasound of liver,heart,gall bladder, etc, all basic blood urine and stool tests plus extra thyroid tests, rheumatoid arthritis,lyme disease, celiac, HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydiae, and parasite tests and more.—— all normal so far! (w/ the exception of a slightly low sugar)
    *** im concerned my white blood cell counts are not showing up on tests accurately bc i must have SOME type of infection! LYMPHOMA, CANCER, HIV(that is not showing on test) BRAIN TUMOR! I DONT KNOW-SYPMTOMS ARE SO ALL OVER THE MAP!
    im stressed from all this worrying prb making my sypmtoms more severe and multiply, but i know something is wrong! SOMEONE ANYONE PLEASE HELP ME im seeing dr tom so hopefully some news(GOOD OR BAD AT THIS POINT IS GOOD TO ME!)

    • ANSWER:
      many of those symptoms lead to HIV, and it is not uncommon to have a negative test result when you are actually HIV positive. get retested.. but overall sounds like you just named everything you could think of.

      -vaginal discharge: normal
      -skin tags: normal
      -sores: possible STD
      - bump on cervix: might actually be the cervix, if you gyno can’t see it, im sure it’s fine
      - etc..

      start thinking about what’s changed recently versus worrying so much about the little things. that’s what confuses doctors, when you talk about 100 different things when really the worst symptom is the cause of everything else

      your thyroid problem is most likely causing your lymph nodes to be swollen, as well as most of the symptoms above

      as for the acne.. it is stress induced.. and you seem to be very stressed.

      i suggest stop taking so much medications, consult more doctors until you’re satisfied, they know what your blood work reveals, not us

  36. QUESTION:
    Throbbing/stabbing neck pain and Thyroid condition, related?
    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease. For the last week I have had the pressure and choking-like feeling in the front of my throat, which I expected, since that is common. However, just today I started having this intermittent throbbing pain on the left side of my neck right below my ear and down the side about halfway down my neck. It comes and goes and happens about every couple minutes, throbs for about a minute and goes away again. I have heard of the pressure/choking feeling in front due to thyroid, but is stabbing, throbbing pain in the side of the neck also a symptom of Hashi’s or hypothyroid? On a scale of 1-10 the pain is about a 6

    • ANSWER:
      Have it checked now. Call the doctor who is treating you. You may call your hospital and talk to the e.r. nurse and tell her everything that is going on, EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!!! If your doctor does not seem concerned, call other doctors and ask them about the problem. Go to goggle search and type in “Hashimoto’s Disease.” You should find not only information but support groups to help. If a support group wants money, it is not a support group. I have sharp stabbing pains and have for 20 years. It took 15 years and at many, many doctors and specialist, plus every test imaginable to finally get a diagnosis. My diagnosis is Fibromyalgia along with several other problems. Please get help now. I feel your pain.

  37. QUESTION:
    Disease made my hair thin out, will it go back to the way it used to be?
    I have a disease called Hashimoto’s Thyroditis , which basically means my immune system attacks my thyroid, leaving it under active. One symptom of a change in thyroid activity level (which recently happened to me) is hair loss. I used to have very thick, healthy, long hair that was naturally curly. Since my thyroid stopped working, it has become thin, weak, and limp. I’m wondering if it will go back to the way it was before when I start taking thyroid medicine. Any one with experience? Any ideas? I’m planning on asking my doctor but I’m impatient so I would like to know ahead of time.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Definitely ask your doctor! But vitamins really help :) Biotin works wonders! Get the one with the highest potency. Also if you head over to Whole Foods or a local vitamin shop they have vitamins for healthy hair. I would just recommend Biotin! :)

  38. QUESTION:
    thyroglobulin results 3000?
    Ok..I just got on the insurance at work. I went to a new doctor because I have been having some symptoms just like my mothers who has Hashimoto disease. After a full thyroid blood test and 0 later the only thing he could tell me today during my visit was that my thyroglobulin results were 3000 and 20 is normal. He said he would need to consult an Endocrinologist because my T4s were fine. This is all very confusing to me. I also told him that my gland behind my ear has been swollen for over a year now and I have numbing in my arms, hands, and legs. He didn’t seem concerened. Even though I told him I have been taking diet pills from the internet for the last four years. I gave that and redbull up 2 weeks ago. I am still having heart palpitations. I also have a history of bulemia. I told him this as well. Does anyone have any idea what the blood test results could mean. He said my liver and kidney functions were fine.

    • ANSWER:
      You don’t suppose to set the question here. You have to put ur question here===

      Home > All Categories > Health > Diseases & Conditions > Other – Diseases

  39. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what these test results might mean?
    Thyroglobulin results 3000?
    Ok..I just got on the insurance at work. I went to a new doctor because I have been having some symptoms just like my mothers who has Hashimoto disease. After a full thyroid blood test and 0 later the only thing he could tell me today during my visit was that my thyroglobulin results were 3000 and 20 is normal. He said he would need to consult an Endocrinologist because my T4s were fine. This is all very confusing to me. I also told him that my gland behind my ear has been swollen for over a year now and I have numbing in my arms, hands, and legs. He didn’t seem concerened. Even though I told him I have been taking diet pills from the internet for the last four years. I gave that and redbull up 2 weeks ago. I am still having heart palpitations. I also have a history of bulemia. I told him this as well. Does anyone have any idea what the blood test results could mean. He said my liver and kidney functions were fine.

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s experiences?
    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. I am interested to hear others experiences with the disease, because I don’t think mine is normal. See I have a goiter and I had everything checked three months ago and they told me my thyroid was normal, then it just went crazy and over that short time it has made me hypothyroid. But my symptoms were weight loss, insomnia, depression, fatigue, anxiety, infections, brittle hair, candida that won’t respond to treatment, diarrhoea, nausea and thats about all I can think of for now. These don’t seem to be normal hypo symptoms! Has anyone else had whacky symptoms? I think maybe (I read somewhere that when its attacking sometimes you get hyper symptoms before it destroys the thyroid) it could be because of this? Has anyone managed to be treated and then able to stop medication? I just want to hear what other people have gone through.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like something else going on…you should have your pituitary function tested. Pituitary dysfunction can cause hypothyroid (fatigue, dry hair, dry skin, hair falling out) and hypoadrenal (diarrhea, nausea, fatigue) which seem to be where your symptoms are falling. Have your endo do a cortisol test to check adrenal function as well as all other pituitary functions. Once you are hypothyroid, you will need to be on thyroid meds for a lifetime.

  41. QUESTION:
    Exzema SPREADING please help!?
    I was just recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease. It’s an auto-immune disease that effects the thyroid, which in turn affects EVERYthing..

    The rash started on my right foot and between my toe webbing and i have been seeing a dr who prescribes me hydrocortisone creams etc but nothing helps. But in the last 6 months or so i have started to get spots on my scalp suddenly, and now i have spots behind each ear, and in the last 2 weeks i have developed a spot around the folds of my nose on one side. Its red and sometimes itchy (looks diff from the spots on my scalp, its not getting the nasty yellow flakes) but it is shiny and kinda scaley feeling. The worst part is over the last 2 weeks i have noticed it’s getting bigger!! WHAT IS THIS? I don’t want it to spread any further but i don’t know how to stop it!

    I will be seeing my doctor in a week or two to discuss my thyroid and symptoms and i plan to inform him of the new developments, but i don’t know what to do in the mean time. I can’t cover it with makeup because it’s so scaly the makeup makes it look worse. I am very fair-skinned so this red spot on my face sticks out like a sore thumb. help! :(

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    If I stop taking my thyroid hormone, how long does it take to die from hypothyroidism…?
    …and what are the symptoms leading up to that point?

    I’ve been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditus. Apparently my thyroid is an enlarged lump of mostly scar tissue, and I must take 100mcg of synthroid each day. I’m also suspected to have Celiac Disease.

    If I were to stop taking my medication cold-turkey, how long would it take to die (if I would die from that), and what would be the symptoms up to that point. The answer evades my google searches.

    By the way, this is just for informational purposes. I like to study survival outside of domestic society and how it applies to emergency situations (Natural disasters, Nuclear war, apocalypse etc). Being a survival enthusiast, my thyroid is going to be a huge factor to determine how long I’ll last in a long-term survival situation (should domestic society collapse).

    I have NO intention of stopping my medication against the advice of my endocrinologist. I hear it would be a miserable experience anyway.

    Also while your here… Is it possible to “ration” thyroid hormone if it came down to it? Or is it truly necessary to keep full-dosage even when I’m short of supplies.

    • ANSWER:
      For most would take a long time.
      High cholesterol would block arteries causing strokes, heart attacks etc.
      Among many other events.

  43. QUESTION:
    Please help! Am I depressed?
    Well.
    First off. I don’t know if people my age can be depressed. I’m about to turn 13, but I just don’t know. I have a disease and it’s called Hashimoto’s. It is a thyroid disease where your cells attack your thyroid and stuff. You can read about it. Some of the symptoms can be mood swings and depression. So… I dunno.

    Here is more about it.
    It takes me around an hour to go to sleep no matter how tired I really am. I cry every single night and at least three times a day.
    I wake up at least two times a night and it takes me around ten minutes to get back to sleep.
    There’s been a decrease in my interest in things.
    And there’s been a decrease in my appetite and weight.
    It takes me longer to decide things and it’s hard for me to concentrate.
    I think about death every once in a while, but not suicide.

    I’m not sure what’s happened. I am usually really bubbly and everything and smile more than necessary. It started around a week or two ago.

    Well I don’t know if I have it or not and I’m not about to go to a doctor thirty minutes away for him just to tell me I’m not and I need more sleep or something stupid like that.

    Please tell me. And no stupid answers okay?

    Thanks a bunch,
    Kaylie

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds to me like you are having a bout of depression, which is one of the most common symptoms of Hashimoto’s. You can be depressed at any age. You definitely wouldn’t be wasting your time to make a trip to your doctor. You need to tell him exactly what you have said here. At very least, you need to talk to your school counselor. Depression is very serious. Especially at such a young age when you have hormones influencing you moods anyway. You have a long life ahead of you and I want it to be a happy one. It’s not just a matter of “cheering up”. Your chemicals in your brain are a little off. Nothing a little medication can’t handle. Keep your head up. It only gets better!

  44. QUESTION:
    Hashimoto’s and normal tsh levels? Possible to feel hypo?
    Any tips from others dealing with this would be greatly appreciated and would make me feel like I’m not crazy. :)
    I had doctors telling me my thyroid gland felt enlarged since January 2010,they’d test my tsh and everything was normal. Finally this May a different doctor ordered an ultrasound of my thyroid gland, radiologist and my doctor agreed it is “mildly enlarged”, they also found that 2 of my parathyroid glands are also enlarged. I was sent to an endocrinologist late May and she ordered a load of labs, parathyroid function, kidney function,tsh, metabolic panel, vitamin d and tested for thyroid antibodies.My tsh was .93 (late may), my last tsh was this january and was 1.9. I tested positive for thyroid antibodies and my level was 69, my vitamin d is also low and is the supposed reason for my parathyroid glands being enlarged,am now taking 1000 units of vitamin d daily now.
    At my initial appt. with my endo she talked to me mainly about hyperthyroidism because of they way my level dropped, I told her I have none of those symptoms. She called me at work to tell me I have Hashimoto’s and low vit d levels, take vitamin d daily and she will recheck my tsh and vit d in 6 months. She had no time to answer any questions and said absolutely no to any medication.. so I did my own research. I have just about every symptom of HYPOthyroidism and have had them for years. My mother had hashimotos and no longer has a thyroid gland, almost every one of her siblings is hypo and a few are hyper (there are 9 total). I called her back w/my concerns and still said absolutely no to treating it.
    I’ve had pain in the joints of my fingers x 3 years
    pain/swelling in my knees x 8-9 yrs (i do not have lymes or arthritis, mri and xray done on my knees show nothing wrong at all) I’ve seen orthopedic doctors for this.
    my muscles ache all the time in all sorts of places, legs,arms, back.
    my skin is very dry and seems to be bad yr round, am now using a prescription scalp solution for my horribly dry scalp that seemed to come out of no where 2 yrs ago.
    I cannot get pregnant again (5 yrs of trying-finally gave up and decided it was’nt meant to be), i missed 2 days of birth control 9 yrs ago and got pregnant instantly.
    I could sleep all day if I did’nt have a life, I am tired all the time and feel like I’m in a fog. I have been on 3 antidepressants (over 5 yrs) the doctors threw at me and nothing really worked so I just stopped them.
    I used to be someone who never really got nervous or scared about things..over the past few yrs I have anxiety over many stupid little things that shouldnt bother me,even meeting w/friends for dinner and sometimes break out in hives on my chest and back when my anxiety is bad.
    my weight fluctuates every couple months w/ no change in diet. I gain about 10 lbs and a month or so later I lose that plus maybe some more. (i am not a large person, so this usually goes unnoticed by most people)
    I have and have had bad menorrhagia for many yrs. but usually don’t get anything to stop the bleeding because I have a clotting disorder already and extra hormones puts me at higher risk for a clot.
    the list goes on…
    If my tsh was only .93 in May, why do I feel like someone with hypothyroidism? Maybe it’s just coincidence? I have a very slim neck and my enlarged thyroid is a tiny bit noticeable (by my endo and now me since she showed me) Why is this a “wait and see” disease? Why would they allow your thyroid gland to get bigger? It does’nt make sense.I would rather feel hyper than hypo any day, I have felt like crap for way too long.
    (fyi- i am 28 yrs old..going on 80) I have an appt with a new endo on Thursday but he works alongside with the last one I saw so I’m guessing he wont be of any help either and just a waste of another copay.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh my goodness, the TSH test as the only thyroid test, and no treatment? ugh
      This is NOT a wait-and-see disease. The thyroid is one of the most
      important glands in the body. It regulates the entire metabolism, and when
      the thyroid is not functioning properly it can affect everything from
      adrenals, sex hormones, bones, circulation, hair, and weight, to energy,
      mental acuity, eyesight, and so on…

      Here is an article that might help you find a better doctor:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

      Here is the Hashimotos article:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos

      Lots of great thyroid treatment info:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      Recommended tests:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      What the test results mean:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      There are a couple of thyroid groups that I think will benefit you:

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones/

      http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless (co-mod has Hashis)

      I sincerely hope this info helps you.

  45. QUESTION:
    thyroid palpitations synthroid?
    I have hashimoto’s disease, I have been on .25 of synthroid for over a month now and I am starting to get my symptoms back from before I started my meds. Palpitations, foggy brain, aches and pains, and dry skin to name a few. I know I have to get bloodwork I spoke to my doc about it. I am wondering could it do any harm for me to take 1 and 1/2 pills instead of just one to see if I feel any better until my bloodwork comes back?

    • ANSWER:
      Oh no, synthroid for Hashi’s, and at such a small dose?
      Why not natural thyroid, getting adrenals properly tested/treated, and low ferritin addressed?
      There ‘are’ better, and more effective ways to address this.

      Perhaps these articles will help you:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/things-we-have-learned/

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc

  46. QUESTION:
    Which Thyroid Medication Works Better?
    I was diagnosed with Hypothyroiditis/Hashimoto’s Disease in 2006. I was on Levothroid for 3.5 years and then a new doctor switched me to the generic form (Levothroxin). Since my T4 levels fluctuated so often and they kept having to up the dosage, my doctor finally referred me to an endocrinologist. She upped my dosage again and switched me to Synthroid. I’ve never had major hypothyroid symptoms (I only initially got checked for it because it runs in my family) it’s hard to tell if ANY of the medications have done any good. I little weight but that was it.

    I was just wondering if anyone had been on both types of these medications and how you felt when you compared one to the other.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend to get your lab work done for t3 and t4 uptake or use the present one recently done. The results are often misread and what might seem in normal levels may be too low but is not considered low. Research shows that since the 1960s in the USA iodine was removed from food sources because of the cost. Prior that time in the USA, people suffered from Hyperthyroid. Today, we see a much higher incidence of your condition…low thyroid. Ask the question what nutrient are you deficient in? Potassium iodide, where can I get this valuable source from to nourish my thyroid? Food source are very lacking compared to Japan where they receive 200 time more daily in their diet: fish and seaweeds. There are books you can educate your self on the condition. Regular exercise and getting your heart rate up assists with weight control if you fluctuate. Also if you area woman you may have problems with your monthly cycles which is connected with the thyroid. Do your home work and find out what you need nutritionally wise. Find a good chiropractor, acupuncturist, idiopathic doctor, nutritionist, and ask who can assist you in your concern. Ask many questions, what results have they had and you will find the right person to address such a common issues that is most often missed. Check the area you live to see if there is any nuclear radiation this can damage your thyroid too. There are foods that need to be avoided that really affect the thyroid too. Do your home work and you will be pleasantly surprised what you can learn. Take charge of your health.

  47. QUESTION:
    My doctor can’t find what’s wrong with me… do any of these symptoms add up to something to you?
    20. female. healthy weight. vegetarian.

    What could all of this add up to? I’ll just list anything abnormal… see if it rings a bell for anything….

    dizziness
    lightheadedness
    2 fainting spells (which looked to have other causes – but listing them just in case)
    fatigue
    heart palpitations
    brain fog
    occasional numbness in hands
    mild headaches — uncomfortable feeling, instead of sharp pain
    normal blood pressure, but on the low side,
    wacko menstrual cycle (have taken BC to regulate for years)
    slightly overractive gag reflux — I gag when I brush my teeth or see something that grosses me out… this has only happened for the past 2 years, it’s not normal for me.
    insides (organs) occasionally feel like they “itch”
    nausea when i’m hungry, to the point of gagging
    slight intolerance to lactose – nothing catastrophic

    diagnosed with: narcolepsy, hashimoto’s disease, heart arrhythmia

    tested negative for: diabetes, sleep apnea,

    Alright, my doctors can’t figure it out (I’ve seen 7… I’m about to see 2 more: a neurologist and a infectuous disease specialist).
    But often, it’s the patients who diagnose themselves — in fact, I’m the one who told my doctor to give me a sleep test… told him to test my thyroid… and asked for an EKG. So far, I’ve pretty much diagnosed myself. But I’m stumped.. he’s stumped… what about you?
    P.S. I am NOT asking you to diagnose me… I am asking you to give me leads on what else to be **tested** for. Don’t tell me to go to my doctor — I see him ALL THE TIME….
    Oh, and for anyone who has a medical background…. this is what I’m on:

    ocella (menstrual)
    metroprolol (heart)
    levothyroxine (thyroid)

    And, my sleep doctor thinks I’m on Provigil…. but he’s not a very good doctor… I told him it didn’t help with my fatigue and just made me nervous and shaky — he said “lets double the dose”… super smart guy.
    Thanks guys —
    the metroprolol is for the heart palpitations… I went on it *before* the levothyroxine. Unfortunately, though I’ll look into it, I don’t think checking the dose will do much — I had all these symptoms before I went on the levothyroxine.

    I will definitely take everyone’s ideas into consideration — I’ve heard the thing about celiac and actually went off wheat/gluten/dairy/sugar over the summer to check it out… can’t remember why I stopped… that’s actually really weird now that I think about it. haha. Brain fog much?

    Thank you :-)
    I’ll be back in case you guys add any other thoughts… I’m also going to ask the infectuous disease guy to check for lyme disease… I’ve had my fair share of ticks.

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    Help, high resting heart rate at 15!!?
    I would just like to say that i am a male, 6′ 6″ an 155 pounds with 17% body fat. I’ve been having this problem since may that doctors at first thought was a sinus infection. I visited a page that someone wrote and has all the same symptoms as me pretty muchhttp://www.medhelp.org/posts/Undiagnosed-Symptoms/Dizziness–spaced-out-feeling–head-pain–sinus-pressure-and-feeling-shaky/show/203445) and gathered these possible causes:

    Anxiety
    Lyme Disease
    Celiac Disease
    Thyroid Problems
    Thyroid Nodule
    Systemic Candidiasis
    Candida (yeast)
    Menieres Disease
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Schwannoma
    Magnesium Deficiency
    Amalgam Illness
    Inner Ear Disorder
    Vestibulocochlear Disorder
    Mastoiditis
    TMJ
    Vestibular Nerve Problem
    Pituitary Gland Problem
    Hashimoto’s Disease
    Peripheral Neuropathy
    Intercranial Hypertension
    Dysautonomia
    CerebroSpinalFluid Leak
    Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity
    Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfuntion System
    Sinus Tachycardia

    Anyway, i just joined a gym and found out on the assessment that my resting heart rate is about 101 and when i was on a cardio machine, the stairmaster, i saw on the heart rate monitor that it reached 210( after only a few minutes on the machine), i didn’t know what was normal so i didn’t think anything of it. I then asked my mother as she was in the health care field and she says that’s a crazy heart rate. I do martial arts so it’s not like i’m sitting around aaaaaaallll the time although i have been getting back into internet marketing lately so spending more time on the computer. I’m going to see the doctor tomorrow but i’m looking for some information in the mean time.
    I’m nervous. Thanks guys and gals
    i’m 15 years old

    • ANSWER:
      If you really think its something you need to check on i would suggest you go to your doctors to find out if the reading you got from the machine was true! It could be that the machine is out of wack and needs to be fixed!

      Also when checking your Resting heart rate you need to check it right after you wake up… that will be the most accurate way to check it… otherwise your resting heart rate will turn up to be 101 bpm.
      So check your RHR tomorrow morning and if it still says over 80 beats per minute then you should go to the doctors!

  49. QUESTION:
    Are there any thyroid experts here? Endocrinologists?
    I’ve had hashimoto’s thyroiditis for at least 20 years. My daughter was actually just told she has Graves Disease(I’m not sure if that’s related).
    I’m on 150 of levoxyl and Cytomel. I have horrible symptoms which I believe are related to my thyroid. It seems like my thyroid medication just doesn’t work. I have horrible itching, no libido(I am very low on testosterone and on that medication also), I have major body aches 24/7 that I’ve had for 14 years. They say it’s fibromyalgia, but I really think it’s related to the thyroid. It feels like I have acid running through my body. Someone on a thyroid message board suggested I try Kelp to see if the iodine might help me feel better. Well, after just one day I had severe thyroid pain where I could barely swollow. I wasn’t even taking much. That seems like such an odd thing to happen. I stopped and this person wondered if my body was starved of iodine. I really think I’m feeling as if I have no thyroid medication in me, but my levels with medication show normal. Do you have an ideas on what might help me?
    Also, I saw a lady who had these antibodies in her and they did a plasma exchange for her. Why don’t think do that with the thyroid antibodies? They said they got them all out.

    • ANSWER:
      what do you eat? maybe your eating habits affect this.
      you could get another medication or eat iodine rich things such as bananas, seaweed, strawberries. licorce and coconut are supposed to help too.

  50. QUESTION:
    Is this bipolar or something else?
    These are the symptoms my boyfriend is having. Tells stories that are too wild to be true about things he has done. Extreme argumentativeness, wanting to have sex with other women no matter what they look like. buying things we dont need. out the door and doing things all the time when before he was a loner and liked to watch tv and smoke cigs all day. everyday he says a whole list of things he is going to get done today and does none, instead he is out going to the bar ( and he doesnt drink) he is up each day for about 19 hours. He can get really mean and nasty when i try to talk to him about anything. what is going on? i feel like i dont know him. big change in personality, morals and energy. right now he is at a casino and got a room with a lady that looks old. what in the world is he doing? is this mental illness? bipolar? he also has Hashimoto disease which has something to do with thyroid problems.

    • ANSWER:
      It does sound a little like mania but not entirely…. If he has Hashimoto’s I would first think that he is having a bit (or a lot) of hyperthyroidism… you should find out of his heart is racing and if he sweats a lot. when you have hashimoto’s your thyroid level can go both up and down and an overactive active thyroid can cause symptoms that mimic a bipolar mania… he does need to see his doctor and have a TSH and a T4 and T3 check (labwork). Hyperthyroidism can be dangerous because in addition to the mania symptoms it is really hard on the heart….


Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

Hashimoto’s disease is a disease characterized by the immune system attacking the thyroid gland. . A family history of thyroid disorders is common, with the HLADR5 gene most strongly implicated conferring a relative risk of 3 in the UK. The person may experience symptoms of hyperthyroidism at first when the thyroid may actually produce too much thyroid hormones. It is caused by a reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland. Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Hashimoto’s disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, causes inflammation of your thyroid gland that often leads to underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Lymphocytic thyroiditis may also occur as a self-limited condition which lasts 2-6 months, resolving spontaneously, and leaving most patients with normal thyroid function. Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto’s disease is a common thyroid gland disorder that can occur at any age, but it is most often seen in middle aged women. It is more prevalent in women than in men (8:1), and its incidence increases with age Blood tests of thyroid function are used to detect Hashimoto’s disease. Patients with this form of thyroiditis sometimes exhibit so few symptoms that the disease may go unnoticed for many years, but eventually it may destroy so much thyroid tissue that hypothyroidism develops.

Many people with this disease have no symptoms. Hashimoto’s Disease is often referred to as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, autoimmune thyroiditis, lymphadenoid goiter, struma lymphomatosa, and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is not uncommon. Many people with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis have other endocrine disorders, such as diabetes, an underactive adrenal gland, or underactive parathyroid glands, and other autoimmune diseases, such as pernicious anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjgren’s syndrome, or systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). In many cases, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis usually results in hypothyroidism, although in its acute phase, it can cause a transient thyrotoxic state. Hashimoto’s disease progresses slowly over a number of years and causes chronic thyroid damage, leading to a drop in thyroid hormone levels in your blood. Less commonly, Hashimoto’s disease occurs with hypoparathyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and fungal infections of the mouth and nails in a condition called type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. The thyroid gland typically becomes and the antibodies the body normally produces to protect the body and fight foreign substances such as bacteria, are found to ‘attack’ their own thyroid tissue. Treatment with synthetic thyroid hormone replacement medication usually is simple and effective. Natural treatment options also exist.

Causes of Hashimoto’s disease

The common causes and risk factor’s of Hashimoto’s disease include the following:

The exact cause of Hashimoto’s disease is unknown.

A reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland.

If someone in your family has had thyroid disease, you may have an increased risk for Hashimoto’s disease.

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is most common among women, particularly older women, and tends to run in families.

It may rarely be associated with other endocrine disorders caused by the immune system.

A combination of factors including heredity, and age may determine your likelihood of developing the disorder.

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is seen more frequently in people taking extra iodine in their diets.

Symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease

Some sign and symptoms related to Hashimoto’s disease are as follows:

Fatigue.

Enlarged neck or presence of goiter.

Small or atrophic thyroid gland.

Dry skin.

Joint stiffness.

Excessive sleepiness.

Dry, coarse hair.

Facial swelling.

Hair loss.

Heavy and irregular menses.

Hoarse voice.

An elevated blood cholesterol level.

Intolerance to cold.

Most often, people with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis suffer from symptoms of Hypothyroidism (fatigue, lethargy, decreased metabolic rate).

Treatment of Hashimoto’s disease

Here is list of the methods for treating Hashimoto’s disease:

Iron supplements.

If Hashimoto’s disease causes thyroid hormone deficiency, you may need replacement therapy with thyroid hormone.

Antibiotics to fight infection.

Hormones to suppress or replace thyroid function.

Sucralfate, an ulcer medication.

Long-term prognosis is very good. Most people with the disease can be easily treated.

Cholestyramine (Questran), a medication used to lower blood cholesterol levels.

Replacement therapy with thyroid hormone is given if the hormone is deficient or may be given if there is evidence of mild thyroid failure.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis?
    I am 16 and i have hashimoto’s thyritis (auto immune thyroid disease). my mother has the same condition but I do not know the cause of her’s, she also has rheumatoid arthritis, does this increase my chances of having rheumatoid arthritis?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. If you know that you have an autoimmune condition it DOES increase the statistics of future autoimmune problems like Lupus, Addison’s, RA, Cushing’s, etc. (many more)

      Because your body has already proven itself to be unreliable in it’s immunity actions (Hashi’s) it’s assumed that there will lbe more. Many patients with autoimmune thyroid itis often develop adrenal issues. (adrenal insufficiency)

      So odds are your mom’s thyroid is autoimmune since she has a second autoimmune deficiency. Don’t get scared these things can be managed but it is important to understand your risk factors.

  2. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Disease and Tachycardia……….?
    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Thyrioditis (Autoimmune Thyroid disease) about 5 years ago The Doctor gave me Synthetic thyroid hormones… Synthroid and Levoxyl about 6 months later I would develope chest pain with in an hour of taking my meds. Over the years it got worse. To the point I went to the ER for treatment they said, my meds were working too well and that my symptoms were Tachycardia. They took me off all meds, but I am now feelings the effects from my thyroid and even after stopping I still have heart episodes. I never have had heart problems until I started taking meds. Is there anyway I can treat one condition without affecting the other?
    I went to the ER for treatment for the pain from the tachycardia. I don’t rely on them for my treatment of my illness. My regular Doctor took me off of my meds after the ER doctor discovered the Tachycardia. I thought I was having a heart attack.

    • ANSWER:
      You see your doctor is a very competent , he knew that Synthroid was accumulating in your blood resulting in false (Pseudo hyperthyroidism) symptoms, he had to do an ABRUPT WITH DRAWL. Kindly tell him to have the level of Synthroid in your blood/serum if facility is available.

      Recheck with your doctor, these ER don’t take proper history or satisfy the patients.

  3. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Disease: Cancer vs Hashimoto’s?
    I have recently been diagnosed with a thyroid disease. I am really not sure which one, my doctor is not very informative. I know that my grandma had her thyroid removed but I do not know the specifics and she is now deceased. I do know she had four incisions; two on the upper neck parallel with the jaw line, and two on lower neck parallel with the clavicle. I am curious to know if this was an autoimmune disease or cancer. And are there any genes that mark for these conditions.

    As a side note my Thyroglobulin level is 26 and my Thyroid peroxidase level was 731.

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have any nodules? If not, you probably don’t have cancer. They would have had you go in for a scan or a fine needle asperation or both to determine if you had cancer. You probably either have hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Here are some sites for you to look at, and don’t hesitate to ask a lot of questions when you see your doctor – or even call them. If they are not informative enough, please find another doctor. The thyroid is nothing to fool around with. I am sorry I do not know more about the test results you gave… I too am newly ( as of Jan. 2009) diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. I had a partial thyroidectomy too, due to nodules that were “suspicious”. Even after going through that, I am still very new to all this and read everything I can about it.

      Best wishes and hope these sites help.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does having an autoimmune disease increase your chances of getting sick?
    I have hashimoto’s disease (an autoimmune disease) and am being treated. My thyroid and some nodes were taken out two years ago. I am a healthy person. I eat well, exercise, sleep and drink plenty of water- and I don’t lick handrails or anything but I keep getting sick. The last three months I have had pneumonia, digestive fungus and strep throat. I am a stay at home mom to young (not school aged) kids. I can’t figure out why I keep getting so sick. Does the autoimmune disease, although being treated, make me more likely to get sick? I am the only one in the house that is getting sick. The kids don’t even pick up the bugs from me.
    I see my Doctor every six months and have my levels checked every six-eight weeks so my drugs are being managed perfectly.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all there is no such thing as an autoimmune disease. The body does not just attack itself for no reason. INFECTION is the key. You need to find the source of the infection in your body that is causing the problem. ALL infection(s) deplete the body of it’s minerals and iodine is a mineral. Removing thyroid nodes is treating a symptom, not getting to the root cause of what is creating the problem. That is a bandaid. Many thyroid problems like this come from bad dental work or infections in the teeth. NICO (neuralgia induced cavitational osteonecrosis) is one of the most common things causing biofilms to be produced and infections to rage with NO PAIN this kind of problem is rampant in the U.S. today. Root canals done to the “Standard of Care dentistry” is to blame for a lot of this. Interference fields from any scar, trauma, tattoo, piercing, surgery, etc. can reflex to the thyroid making it weak and a victim creating this problem. Since the thyroid is a part of the pituitary axis, when any of the four glands become insufficient for any reason, they all get sick together and your symptoms may be obvious with the thyroid, but not so obvious in the other glands that include: thyroid, adrenals, ovaries, and pituitary. Also, something that is not well understood by endocrinologists is that the parathyroid may be insufficient or have a low grade infection causing the hashimoto’s.

      There are many things you need to be doing to support good immunity that doctors have no clue how to approach. Nutritional help can greatly help you and you should seek out a certified nutritional therapist that can work with you and possibly your doctor if he is open to that to solve your problem.

      On the surface of what you have described, you could have excess Candida albicans causing many of these problems in combination with low minerals and endocrine problems due to a high carb, low fat diet.

      good luck to you

  5. QUESTION:
    If it’s not hashimoto’s, what is it?
    For two years I have suffered with hypothyroid symptoms and eighteen months ago I developed a lump on my thyroid.

    Hashimoto’s thyroiditis runs in my family, my Mum was diagnosed at 32 and both my aunt and my Nana have it. I have TPO antibodies but my thyroid function tests have always been within reference range, therefore my GP says I don’t have hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an underactive thyroid or an autoimmune disease and I don’t need to be treated with thyroxine.

    My symptoms include; extreme tiredness, always very cold, dry skin, weight gain, hair loss, swollen ankles, puffy face, breathlessness, achey muscles, joint pain, tingly/numbness in fingers and toes, heavy periods, irritability, forgetfulness and weak/breaking nails.

    If it isn’t hashimoto’s, what could be wrong with me? I feel like I’m about seventy but I’m 33. I used to be very fit and active, now I struggle to climb the stairs.

    • ANSWER:
      What you just described is hypothyroidism. Here are some of the symptoms:
      Less stamina than others
      Less energy than others
      Long recovery period after any activity
      Inability to hold children for very long
      Arms feeling like dead weights after activity
      Chronic Low Grade Depression
      Suicidal Thoughts
      Often feeling cold
      Cold hands and feet
      High cholesterol
      Bizarre and Debilitating reaction to exercise
      Hard stools
      Constipation
      No eyebrows or thinning outer eyebrows
      Dry Hair
      Hair Loss
      Dry cracking skin
      Nodding off easily
      Requires naps in the afternoon
      Inability to concentrate or read long periods of time
      Forgetfulness
      Foggy thinking
      Inability to lose weight
      Always gaining weight
      Inability to function in a relationship with anyone
      NO sex drive
      Moody periods
      PMS
      Excruciating pain during period
      Nausea
      Swelling/edema/puffiness
      Aching bones/muscles
      Osteoporosis
      Bumps on legs
      Acne on face and in hair
      Breakout on chest and arms
      Hives
      Exhaustion in every dimension–physical, mental, spiritual, emotional
      Inability to work full-time
      Inability to stand on feet for long periods
      Complete lack of motivation
      Slowing to a snail’s pace when walking up slight grade
      Extremely crabby, irritable, intolerant of others
      Handwriting nearly illegible
      Internal itching of ears
      Broken/peeling fingernails
      Dry skin or snake skin
      Major anxiety/worry
      Ringing in ears
      Lactose Intolerance
      Inability to eat in the mornings
      No hair growth, breaks faster than it grows
      Joint pain
      Carpal tunnel symptoms
      No Appetite
      Fluid retention to the point of Congestive Heart Failure
      Swollen legs that prevented walking
      Blood Pressure problems
      Varicose Veins
      Dizziness from fluid on the inner ear
      Low body temperature
      Raised temperature
      Tightness in throat; sore throat
      Swollen lymph glands
      Allergies (which can also be a result of low cortisol–common with hypothyroid patients)
      sore feet (plantar fascitis); painful soles of feet
      now how do I put this one politely….a cold bum, butt, derriere, fanny, gluteus maximus, haunches, hindquarters, posterior, rear, and/or cheeks. Yup, really exists.

      By the way, my own experinence is that I was also in range whenever I was tested. However, I would go from hypo to hyperthyroid. It took my surgeon to finally diagnose me with Hashimoto’s over my Endo. I ended up have a total thyroidectomy due to a multi-nodule goiter caused by Hashi’s plus an iodine deficiency. I’m going to include a great web site for you to check out on all of this.

  6. QUESTION:
    Do You Know How Your Thyroid Gland Affects Your Entire Body?
    Your Thyroid Gland affects your entire body. Thyroid disease can cause ‘Graves’ Disease, a goiter, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Thyroid Cancer and so much more. This is an Autoimmune Disorder. Visit www.isityourthyroid.webs.com

    • ANSWER:
      i have graves’/hashimoto’s. it’s debilitating, mentally and physically.

  7. QUESTION:
    Losing weight with hypothyroidism, HELP!?
    I am a 250 lb 18-year old girl. I have just been diagnosed with autoimmune thyroid disease, also known as Hashimoto’s Disease, which in turn led to me developing insulin resistance and hypothyroidism. I am eating low-carb, low-fat, cutting out sweets and sodas, and doing an hour of racquetball at LEAST 4 days a week. I am also on Metformin and Levothyroxine to help regulate my insulin and hormones. I tried Hydroxycut in addition to my diet and exercise, but to no avail. The scale has not budged in nearly three weeks. What else can I do? Why am I failing?
    Also, I’d appreciate you not peddling your disgusting diet pills to me. I’m interested in a lifestyle change, not a quick fix that gives me a heart attack. (:

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I have Hashimotos Disease as well. It’s more common than you realise. Alot of people have variations of this such as Graves Disease. It is controlled with the Thyroxin you are taking daily.
      Although the Thyroxin should be combatting this directly to help you lose weight – you and me both know it doesn’t.
      With research I have found that if you can get some iodine into your diet, it will help. This is in fish and seaweed.
      Coconut also contains an enzyme which assists with the function of the thyroid. So try to have coconut on deserts/meals when you can. I know, not an easy ingredient to add.
      Also, cut out red meat – you don’t have the digestive abilities to obtain all the nutrional elements anyway but you will certainly obtain all the fats.
      Also remember your 5 fruits and vegetables per day. This should be taking up the majority of your foods. Its actually really hard to fit in 5 fruits and vegetables. But this means you need to replace other foods with these healthy alternatives.

      Your body may take some time to give in and let the fat burn, so do persevere, when it starts happening, you will start to lose weight easily as you’ve done the hard yards. But most importantly, be realistic in your diet and exercise. After all the dieting, you wont be able to keep up a diet of starvation and an overexcercising routine. And you’ll put it all back on.

      Good luck.

  8. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to develop a goiter?
    I was recently diagnosed with an autoimmune disease which resulted in a goiter (Hashimoto’s Disease). Does anyone know how long it would have taken for it to develop after being infected with an autoimmune disorder? My thyroid is 2-3 times larger than the normal size. How long has my goiter been developing? Months? Years?
    Please, help. Thanks to everyone who answers.

    I would reallllllllyyyyyyyyyyy like to know!

    • ANSWER:
      I had a goiter for about 5 years,from what i remembered my neck started swelling uop from nowhere when i was out with my friend and then it went down on its own again. However before the swelling i noticed major changes in my mood and craving for alot of food. I thought nothing of it…and a couple of weeks later the goiter finally formed and it was huge.long story short i controlled it with medicine and radioactiive but neither worked as my body threw out the radioactive. so ten days ago i finally decided to have surgery and removed my entire thyroid because i simply could not control it with mediciation anymore and taking herbs and natural remedies did not work for me either. i feel great after the surgery,my heart is not longer pounding,no more breaking out in hives etc. I found an excellent surgeon who did not destroy my voice and my calcium levels were a little low after the operation but its back to normal now. however if u get save ur thyroid n radioactive works for u,then great,surgery should be your last option for graves disease.

  9. QUESTION:
    heart palpitations thyroid issue?
    I have had heart palps for about 3 years. I know it sounds stupid but I didn’t know what they were until about a year ago. I had a lot of blood work, wore a 2 week holter moniter, had an echocardiogram and the results were all normal. The holter showed the palps but they weren’t from an abnormal origin. I did find out I have hashimoto’s thyroiditis. An autoimmune disease that attacks my thyroid. Now I live in a small town with not the best healthcare that’s why I am here posting. I went to an endocrinologist who didn’t want to give me medicine but my pcp thinks I need it so for almost 2 months I’m on .25 of synthroid. Worked great at first but I am having palps again, I called my pcp she gave me more bloodwork but it all came back normal so she won’t increase my synthroid so I tried on my own to double it I felt great but I can’t keep that up I will run out of meds. So what should I do now? Look for yet another doctor, suffer with my palps? I am going crazy here!

    • ANSWER:
      Overactive thyroid can cause heart palpitations. Similarly the drug (Levothyroxine) you are taking can also cause heart palpitations as side effects.
      Levothyroxine (generic name) Synthroid (brand name), a thyroid hormone, is used to treat hypothyroidism, a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. Without this hormone, the body cannot function properly, resulting in: poor growth; slow speech; lack of energy; weight gain; hair loss; dry, thick skin; and increased sensitivity to cold. When taken correctly, levothyroxine reverses these symptoms. Levothyroxine is also used to treat congenital hypothyroidism (cretinism) and goiter (enlarged thyroid gland).
      Consult your Endocrinologist.

  10. QUESTION:
    elevated levels of IgA (613) but don’t have celiac disease. what’s wrong with me?
    i have idiopathic gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying with no known cause or trigger) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (an autoimmune thyroid condition). my gliadin and tTg antibodies were not present and my duodenal biopsy showed norma villi functioning, so i have a conclusive “no” for celiac’s disease…. but why is my IgA so high? ref range is 81-463 and mine is 613. this is my biopsy report from april. what does this indicate?

    A. Duodenum, biopsy:
    Duodenal mucosa with vascular congestion, focal minimal chronic inflammation
    and preserved villous architecture.

    B. Stomach, antrum, biopsy:
    Gastric antral and fundic mucosa with mild chronic inflammation, vascular
    congestion and mild reactive fibromuscular and foveolar hyperplasia, suggestive
    of mild reactive gastropathy. No H Pylori organisms are seen with routine stain.

    C. G.E. Juction, biopsy:
    Gastric cardiac and fundic mucosa with edema and vascular congestion.
    No intestinal metaplasia seen.
    No squamous mucosa present.
    yes, i have seen an endocrinologist. i know quite a bit about my gastroparesis and hashimoto’s already. my question was more directed at my elevated IgA levels and whether the results of my biopsy could help determine why my IgA is so high.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you seeing an endocrinologist? here is what I found on the net..

      Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

      http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/search?term=thyroiditis&submit=Search (clinical trials…one with selenium..one with hep c relationship to hashimoto’s, one with postpartum link)
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashimoto’s_thyroiditis (wikipedia)
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000371.htm (medline plus)
      http://autoimmune.pathology.jhmi.edu/diseases.cfm?systemID=3&DiseaseID=22 (John Hopkins…hashimoto’s thyroiditis is linked to sjorgren’s syndrome)
      http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdbdetail_abstract.html?disname=Hypothyroidism (NORD..hypothyroidism…scroll down for related organizations)
      http://www.hormone.org/public/thyroid/hypothyroidism.cfm (the hormone foundation)
      http://www.thyroid-info.com/hashimotos-encephalopathy.htm (Hashimoto’s encephalopathy…rare)
      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/yersinia.htm (hashimoto’s and food borne infection,Yersinia enterocolitica infection, via contaminated meats — especially raw or undercooked products — poultry, unpasteurized milk and dairy products, seafood — and particularly oysters — from sewage-contaminated waters and produce fertilized with raw manure. Foods can also be contaminated by food handlers who have not effectively washed their hands before handling food or utensils used to prepare food. Improper storage can also contribute to contamination.>> stool test that can detect yersinia enterocolitica )
      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/cohen.htm (hashimoto’s and anergic depression)
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/a/hashivshypo.htm (hashimoto’s vs hypothyroidism..what is the difference… In the study of 21 patients with euthyroid Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (normal range TSH, but elevated antibodies), half of the patients were treated with levothyroxine for a year, the other half were not treated. After 1 year of therapy with levothyroxine, the antibody levels and lymphocytes (evidence of inflammation) decreased significantly only in the group receiving the medication. Among the untreated group, the antibody levels rose or remained the same.
      The researchers concluded that preventative treatment of normal TSH range patients with Hashimoto’s disease reduced the various markers of autoimmune thyroiditis, and speculated that that such treatment might even be able to stop the progression of Hashimoto’s disease, or perhaps even prevent development of the hypothyroidism. )
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hypothyroidism/a/hashivshypo_2.htm (page 2…selenium might help…and calcium with magnesium supplements for nighttime problems)
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/hashimotos/a/encephalopathy.htm (hashimoto’s encephalopathy)
      http://thyroid.about.com/od/hypothyroidismhashimotos/a/preventative.htm (treating antibodies when TSH is normal)
      http://thyroid.about.com/blcohen.htm (treating anergic depression)

      3 books on disease symptoms and treatments

      you could also get these books on ebay or amazon or a half price book store. (last two are very similar)..
      1.Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine
      2.Handbook of Diseases (Lippencott)
      3.Professional Guide to Diseases (Springhouse)

  11. QUESTION:
    What do you think of my thyroid hormone results?
    After losing quite a lot of hair for 8 months I finally pushed for some blood tests suspecting a thyroid problem and discovered that my TSH was 4.2 U/mL (0.3 – 3.0 U/mL) and my T4 level was 12 pmol/L (10 – 23 pmol/L). My doctor didn’t seem very sure as to what course of action to follow as he described it as only slightly under active and decided that I should come back for a second blood test.

    I returned today for blood test number two and my doctor prescribed me 25 micrograms of Eltroxin and depending on the results of the blood test, I will have to take it.

    I was hoping to possibly get a second opinion from someone who might know a little more about it than me.

    I’ll be 19 next month and I’m moving away to University next week so I’m wondering how it might have an effect on my day to day life.
    I’m a healthy weight, but I have found it slightly easier to gain a pound or two in recent months and a lot more difficult to lose it, I find myself being exhausted during the day for a few hours and then completely fine a while after (without having consumed food) and I’ve noticed my memory and concentration has gotten a little worse too (simple words for day to day items seem to just vanish from my mind sometimes). However I don’t have any signs of goitre.

    I was also wondering if anyone else had experienced a lot of hairloss at the same level of under activity I have?

    I’ve considered that I may have Hashimoto’s but apparently here in Europe people are more likely to have Ord’s Thyroiditis, which is similiar to Hashimoto’s but instead of an enlarged thyroid, the thyroid shrinks. There isn’t very much information online about it though.
    (I want to get a thyroid antibody test to find out if I do have an autoimmune disease but I’m moving in a few days and I won’t be able to see my doctor for another blood test until late October.)
    I live in Ireland :)
    With that measurement for T4 I believe I’m 0.9
    My hair loss shows no signs of stopping and has gotten more severe in recent months, I’m afraid that If I postpone getting treatment, I’ll end up with very little hair, It’s already extremely thin.

    • ANSWER:
      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      With Hashi's (main cause of hypOthyroidsim) the thyroid often is NOT enlarged...It is that the body is attacking the thyroid.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  12. QUESTION:
    Military question about BMT?
    Ok, I wear a retainer at night to keep up the wonderful orthodontic work I had done years ago. Can I still wear it in Basic? I would assume so, but…

    Also, I take a thyroid replacement hormone – I have an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto’s that causes antibodies to attack my thyroid gland and slowly kill it. It flares up and dies down just like any autoimmune disease. It’s nothing serious, not debilitating or anything. I can go without my pills for quite some time – mostly I take them to slow the progression of decay of my gland. At this point it’s not so terrible, and it’s being treated with a thyroid replacement and is well managed. I assume I’d still be able to take my thyroid pill everyday during Basic, right?

    I know I can ask a recruiter this stuff, but I’ve not gotten to the point where I’m ready to talk to a recruiter just yet – I know I want to go, I just need to get myself to a good point before taking the next step. I gained a lot of weight from the sudden onset of problems with the Hashimoto’s, so I need to lose that first and then I’ll be good to go. Hence, I’m asking the wonderful folks of Y!A.

    Thank you!
    Ok, I did a bit more research and finally found some info: most pills you are not allowed to take during Basic, such as birth control or OTC drugs. But some, such as thyroid replacement you can. You have to take the prescription into MEPS the day you report to leave for Basic and the Rx is exchanged for a military issue prescription. Now, I don’t believe everything I hear on the internet, so can anyone verify this with their own experience? And, if it matters any, I’m choosing the Air Force, just in case I haven’t mentioned that yet. Thanks!
    Ah, and just to add this: I found the regulation regarding orthodontics for BMT. You are allowed the retainer – you just can’t have braces when you go because there is no orthodontist available if something goes wrong with the braces. So, retainer yes! Thank goodness because sometimes if I don’t wear it for a couple days, my mouth starts hurting something fierce from my teeth moving around. Eek.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your recruiter. I dont think the retainer would be a problem but the pills would. You have to be off any sort of medication for at leas 6 months i believe before you can even join.

  13. QUESTION:
    What autoimmune disorder(s) do you think I am most likely suffering from?
    I am currently waiting on lab results and am wondering if you could help me pinpoint which auto-immune disorder(s) I am MOST LIKELY suffering from??

    I have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease with Hypothyroidism and most recently, Fibromyalgia. I am currently waiting for the results on a ton of bloodwork, but wanted to get some opinions if anyone is knowledgeable about this stuff. I will leave you with my master list of symptoms that i have compiled over the last 2 months:

    I am unable to sleep less than 10 hours a night. If i do, i wake up completely sore, exhausted and crabby.
    My weight fluctuates greatly. Last week I weighed 145, this week 152.
    Have been trying to conceive for 3 years with no success using charting/opks and perfect timing for over 30 cycles (without medical intervention)
    Dermatitis on right foot, scalp and behind ears
    Extreme sensitivity to cold, anything below 76 degrees causes numbness and pain in extremities
    Sensitivity to light (prefer to sit in darkened rooms, have been this way since i was a child, can’t stand bright lights or glare)
    Night blindness (unable to drive at night, no depth perception at night, etc)
    Irregular periods made less irregular with Synthroid, but still different lengths every cycle
    Very delicate skin, light touch causes bruising, always have bruises. Some of them are without pain.
    (severe)Mental fog, extremely bad memory and worsening. Unable to do mental math. I can set something down and then spend two hours looking for it and this happens every day. I also
    forget what i am doing ALL THE TIME!
    Have had a slight studder since I was a child.
    Sometimes I read numbers backwards
    Have to reread sentences or paragraphs to comprehend it
    I write in an “uphill” fashion, i cannot write on the line unless i turn the paper completely sideways, this developed in middle-school.
    (severe)Have problems saying what i mean, the words come out in the wrong order or i will accidently use a word that is similar to what i mean but not exactly and it won’t sound right. Husband calls me yoda!
    Constantly crave sweet or salty food, worse with period
    Terrible depth perception, always walking into table corners and door frames and unable to judge distances

    feet hurt (after 5 or more hours of standing activities)
    tingling and cold sensations below knees
    stiff knees
    sore knees
    sore thigh muscles
    aching hip pain
    stiff hips
    (severe)sore hips (feels like walking will pop them out of socket- can’t walk straight)
    (severe)stiff & sore forearms (can’t lift objects without pain & shaking)
    stiff shoulders
    (severe)sore shoulders
    (severe)sore shoulder muscles/tendons (can’t lay on sides to sleep, makes pain worse)
    (severe)unable to lift or flex shoulders due to pain
    (severe)During flare-ups i have immense weakness in hips, arms & wrists
    (severe)stiff fingers
    (severe)pain in fingers (swollen feeling, sometimes unable to move them upon waking)
    shaky hands
    alternating constipation/diarrhea
    abdominal pains
    abdominal cramps
    gas

    MOST RECENT
    popping muscles/tendons all over body
    random nearsightedness
    random chest pain
    left eye twitching at random and happens every day now

    Thyroid Panel is NORMAL, TSH at 0.9. So it’s not hypo symptoms :/

    • ANSWER:
      With a list like that, I would expect them to come back and tell you Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, if not also including the possibility of Lupus. I would say I don’t want to scare you, but I doubt very much having lived with this much that anything I say would do that. A lot of your list can readily be attributed to Fibromyalgia (which I have, as well as connective tissue disease & suspicion of SLE), including the digestive & female problems. IBS and various issues such as PCOS commonly run with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. So does neuropathy, which you’ve also aptly described.

      The sensitivity to cold you’re describing screams of Raynaud’s Syndrome (which I also likely have). Along with all that, if your light sensitivity includes being photosensitive w/ or w/out a malar rash… and you’ve got an elevated ANA, then your Dr should be considering Lupus. You should be seen by a rheumatologist if you haven’t already. You *might* need a neurologist at some point.

      There are treatment options, whatever the case. You clearly look like a classic case of SOME kind of autoimmune disease. No matter what anyone says about it, Fibromyalgia is in that category as well. There is scientific proof of that. It’s just that some “professionals” want to turn a blind eye to the genetic markers that have been identified. Hashimotos is already accepted as being autoimmune anyway. Plaquenil is the usual first offering, and it’s very effective for a lot of people. If it’s tolerated well, it can be a literal lifesaver. Just discuss low-dose options to reduce the risks of toxicity. (Over 400mg is the danger zone for potential retina damage, even though it’s not common… why risk it?)

      Be aware that a firm diagnosis can be drawn out and frustrating to obtain. Just take a deep breath and know that it may take some commitment on your own part to get answers. If a Dr doesn’t work well with you, move on to another. You may need to repeat labs to catch it in the act as well, as the results can vary wildly… Try to go when you feel your worst or close to it, if they come back negative the first time. Inflammation can be elusive in some people’s profiles when it comes to that paper confirmation.

      I hope you get sound medical answers, and I wish you well.

  14. QUESTION:
    what medications are generally used to remove wisdom teeth?
    My daughter is scheduled to have her wisdom teeth removed (all 4 at once) over Thanksgiving holiday. The medications the oral surgeon is planning to use are: valium, versed and laughing gas (nitrous oxide), and of course, local anesthetic. It seems like a lot. I’m so nervous for her as I don’t like anesthesia. She has hashimoto’s disease which complicates it a bit. However, her specialist spoke with the oral surgeon about the anesthesia and said it should be fine. Due to the hashmimoto’s, she can’t eat certain foods as her sensitivity to them can exacerbate the disease (the autoimmune system becomes inflamed and attacks the thyroid), so mashed potatoes are out since she can’t have milk products; she hates jello and pudding; so I will have to be creative. No use of straws, of course, to avoid the dreaded dry socket.

    Thanks for your input.
    Thank you for your response Eric. We just found out about the hashimoto’s and started the dr’s protocol of fish oil, probiotics and selenium, vitamin D with some other vitamins. He is a traditional and alternative physician who believes it is not a thyroid issue but an autoimmune disease. If you calm the immune system down, it won’t inflame the thyroid. Her thyroid immunoglobulins (sp) are way out of the norm, but her adrenals are okay so far. She’s been on the protocol only a month, and she just did her bloodwork again the other day so we don’t know if this is working. I don’t want to put her on thyroid hormones since it isn’t a thyroid issue yet. We are also seeing a pediatric endocrinologist on Nov 10th. So if things are getting worse, then I will postpone the surgery, as that is what the oral surgeon’s concern was to make sure it is under control. He did say it is safer for hashimoto’s than to extract wisdom teeth on someone with hyperthyroidism.
    Dr Akhil, thank you for your kind response and input. I will follow that protocol. Yahoo answers is an incredible resource with such dedicated and knowledgeable responders! It is much appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      its good to see that you have a very good knowledge about your daughters problem.
      relax and dont worry.
      all the 4 teeth will be extracted with minimum effort because they are not still fully grown,so the dentist can remove all 4 at one sitting.
      just remember to give her a cold diet for 24 hrs and AFTER 24 HRS start warm salt water rinses 4-5 days for a week.
      this all will help in early healing and minimum pain.
      do take all the pain medication on time 4-6 hrs.

  15. QUESTION:
    Possibly celiacs? Looking for serious replies!?
    I’m diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease and despite having my thyroid levels in range I’m still feeling down a lot of the time physically and mentally. My new endo ordered a series of blood test including an allergy test.

    I tested extremely high as having a milk allergy, and moderately high for a gluten allergy as well as peanuts. I also have a low ferritin count (8).

    I’m just a little concerned as I’ve read many people with celiacs probably have another autoimmune disorder (such as hashimoto’s), are lactose intolerance until on a gluten free diet and the ville is able to heal, and have anemia.

    Other symptoms I have include the following:
    Chronic headaches (I almost always have a mild to sever headache)
    Night blindness (and light sensitivity)
    Increased blurryness in vision
    Anxiety/depression
    Strange appetite (some days I’m not hungry at all or can only eat a very small amount and other days I have a hunger that just wont go away)
    Weakness
    Chronic Fatigue

    And heres some of the more embarrassing symptoms
    smelly gas
    smell stool (usually floats and sticks to the toilet when I flush hahaha)
    Sometimes I go a few days without having a BM and some days I’ll have the runs in the morning.
    Stomach ache (more like a burning feeling) most of the time although very mild and easy to tolerate.
    Heart Palpitations
    I don’t think the answer is by buying stuff, stop spamming these boards, at least take your spam to a less serious category

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds exactly like the same symptoms I had before I was diagnosed with celiac disease.

  16. QUESTION:
    Raw Food Diet-Reversing Sicknesses/Diseases!? Urgent!?
    I remember hearing that going on raw foods can heal diseases/sicknesses, but I still have to look into this more!

    Now for the question: My mother has a few conditions and one she just found out about which may require extensive (and quite intimidating!!) surgery. It’s something along the lines of cervical spinolosys? (spine issue). I’m not sure how to spell it exactly. She also has an autoimmune disorder, muscle pain, hashimoto’s thyroid syndrome, etc. lots of things!!

    My question for you is: Do you think that going on a raw food diet, alone, would help to reverse any of this? I’m kind of a rebel in my thinking-I don’t want her to get the surgery. I think there are other ways. But, it’s bad. She actually has spine issues that she hadn’t ever known about until today!

    Or…would you have to pair it with supplements/yoga?

    Sorry for this being so long and I hope you have time to read it! Thank you so much in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Those of us who know anything about the complexity of diseases, know that the most cannot be fixed by diet alone, much less the way food is prepared/cooked. Diet actually plays a small part in disease, although you do need to eat healthily. Obviously this excludes diseases that are actually caused by deficiencies (which are rare in the western developed world) and illnesses like type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension, – which can sometimes be managed with diet alone.

      There is an argument to say that over cooking vegetables, etc may cause it to loose many of its nutrients, but there is no evidence that a raw food diet is more beneficial than a cooked diet.

  17. QUESTION:
    Raw Food Diet-Reversing Sicknesses/Diseases!? Urgent!?
    I remember hearing that going on raw foods can heal diseases/sicknesses, but I still have to look into this more!

    Now for the question: My mother has a few conditions and one she just found out about which may require extensive (and quite intimidating!!) surgery. It’s something along the lines of cervical spinolosys? (spine issue). I’m not sure how to spell it exactly. She also has an autoimmune disorder, muscle pain, hashimoto’s thyroid syndrome, etc. lots of things!!

    My question for you is: Do you think that going on a raw food diet, alone, would help to reverse any of this? I’m kind of a rebel in my thinking-I don’t want her to get the surgery. I think there are other ways. But, it’s bad. She actually has spine issues that she hadn’t ever known about until today!

    Or…would you have to pair it with supplements/yoga?

    Sorry for this being so long and I hope you have time to read it! Thank you so much in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend you go to hacres.com and read the testimonies there.

      But that is just 85% raw and for best effect one needs to go 100% raw. The diet must also be vegan and whole foods without processed, junk or fast foods.

      Get the book by Gabriel Cousens at the library or through inter-library loan (or buy on amazon) called conscious eating and read the pages about the pottenger cat study

      I can try to see if I can email you the video by Victoria boutenko who cured many things in her family on a 100% raw food diet if you want to ask me (to remind me) when sending an email address (as this cannot be attempted on yahoo answers only via real email.

      She highly believe one needs to add green juices and smoothies. (important that you alternate the greens daily) This created miracles in their family even after 13 years on raw foods. Ask me more about that when you email me as I was just going to bed.

      I can also send you the links to the incurables save your life diet.

      If she combined the incurables program with good organic tinctures (not capsuled) herbs and things specific to her diseases, she would stand very excellent odds of healing herself.

      The raw may be enough alone but may be too slow. someone sent me about ten videos on raw foods and I was amazed at their healing power. People reading some of Boutenko’s books on her and her family’s experiences were so impressed and motivated they immediately went on it and did things like lose over 200 pounds. Others like Dave the raw food trucker (on youtube) lost well over 200 pounds, cured his diabetes in 3 days, and reversed the kidney disease and colon cancer that was killing him. The incurables program also has many similar absolutely miraculous cures on everything. Years ago I read the books of Arnold Ehret and he believed man’s ideal diet was above the ground fruits and veggies (and maybe some raw nuts) and his and his disciplines reached unheard of levels of health.

      People following the raw and healthfood diets of say Anne Wigmore had her gray hair turn back to black and into her 80s it was black and she ran for hours a day as she had incredible levels of energy drinking wheat grass, eating raw foods and drinking fermented things like rejuvelex. Boutenko’s husband on the green smoothie (and raw foods) saw his beard go from gray to black. People say they have energy in their middle age better than when they were 5. I am starting to think `100% raw is comparable to the incurables program but then schulze also use 100% raw and even juice fasting so his might be better.

      Also add lots of juices and drink then within 15 minutes and not with any pulp or food for at least 20-30 minutes and also chew the juice.

      I do not think ehret or wigmore or maybe even boutenko paired it with supplements but I feel the best chance is a combination of the full incurables program –email me for the links to the videos ..they will give great hope and is said to work for all diseases even ones one does not know the name of but in the clinic he also used herbs and foods etc specific to the disease so finding out what would help each disease and adding that would only enhance your chances of full recovery.

      so in conclusion

      1 100% raw food, whole food vegan diet

      2 lots of green smoothies and dark green juices (email me for more on this)

      3 full incurables program (email me for the free links to the manual/video which tells everything (his products are found at herbdoc.com and many of the recipes are in the manual and can be made yourself..be sure to use only organic or wildcrafted bulk herbs and 80 or 100 proof vodka to make the tinctures.

      4 specific things to help each disease she has..ie herbs, foods, practices and so forth

      5 also check out curezone.com ask advice and also look up each thing your mom has there. Wonderful site.

      6 email Victoria boutenko and ask and maybe she will email you back. Her website is called raw family or something like that and I think it gives contact info..she is an expert on raw foods. She probably also has her books and maybe videos for sale there not sure.

      7 look at the testimonies and info at hacres.com also see what is the hallelujah diet there for ideas on what is considered to be raw foods. I would do 100% not 85% but she might need to ease into it but I think boutenko’s family went immediately into it as the husband had just 2 months to live and the child needed insulin for some time as a type 1 diabetic and she refused to do it and finally found the info to heal him and they both completely recovered and stayed recovered I think like 10 years or more.

      8 see the videos and books I mentioned.

      Also I can get you the links to the online books by Arnold Ehret. Be sure to send your email; address if you want me to try to upload and send as an attachment that video by boutenko on raw foods but it may be too big to send in email. I am not sure as I never sent it to anyone.


Hair Loss Thyroid Hypothyroidism

A thyroid disorder called hypothyroidism means you have an underactive thyroid gland. If you have trouble losing weight no matter what you do, it could be because you are hypothyroid. There are almost 30 million Americans with thyroid disease and women are 7 times more likely than men to have it. Hypothyroid is the most common thyroid disorder and often misdiagnosed by doctors. You may get this because it is inherited, or because of previous problems, such as nodules, goiter, thyroid cancer, previous thyroid surgery, another autoimmune disease. This is a condition where the thyroid gland, a small butterfly shaped organ located at the base of the neck, does not produce enough hormone to function properly. What happens is that it takes in iodine, combines it with tyrosine (an amino acid) and converts it into the hormones T4 and T3. If your thyroid is normal, 80% will be T4 and 20% T3. These hormones travel through the bloodstream, converting oxygen and calories into energy. If this process doesn’t work properly, then the calories and oxygen cannot convert the energy properly and you may gain weight or incapability to lose weight. The symptoms can include : weight gain, depression, forgetfulness, fatigue, hoarseness, high cholesterol, constipation, feeling cold, hair loss, dry skin, low sex drive, tingling hands or feet, irregular periods, infertility. You may even experience recurrent pregnancy loss, resistant high cholesterol, difficult menopause, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, or mitral valve prolapse. Do you feel sluggish and fatigued on a regular basis, or do you get bouts of depression and sadness? Are you always feeling cold, especially your hands and feet, or do you have brittle nails? These are just some of the possible signs of the disease. There may be other causes, but at least this may give you a clue as to why you do not feel well. Check with your doctor in all cases to be sure. When your metabolism doesn’t work right because you have this disorder, you may find that there’s no amount of dieting or exercise that takes the weight off. You may in fact put on extra pounds, even though you are doing just what you are supposed to. What can you do ? Meet with your doctor and ask if you need a thyroid examination and blood test. These likely will be a TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) blood test, along with T4, T3, Free T4 and Free T3 tests. A drug called levothyroxine (often called Levo-T, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid) may be prescribed for you. It is usually inexpensive, has minimal side effects, and has uniform potency. However, all thyroid hormone replacement therapies, whether natural or synthetic, have the ability to restore thyroid hormone levels. Supplements that contain the following might also help : – L-Tyrosine – is one of the amino acids that your body needs to make thyroid hormones. It is included in some weight control products because it works to stimulate your metabolism. It’s also an element in helping your brain operate more efficiently which makes you feel better. – Guglipid – an extract from the Indian guggal tree, may improve thyroid function and assist in controlling your weight. Scientists are finding that guglipid lowers bad cholesterol and increases good cholesterol, and thus can help somewhat to prevent heart disease. There is always hope and lots of help out there for you. If you suspect that you have this condition and you are not sure what to do, talk to your physician for guidance and advice.About the author Ken Black is a freelance writer on Health related subjects. Visit our site for more information about Thyroid Disorders and Hypothyroidism.Source: http://www.articlesalley.com/article.detail.php/1474/175/Weight_Loss/Family/31/Can%27t_Lose_Weight_%3F_Maybe_You_Have_a_Thyroid_Disorder

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Thyroid hair loss patterns?
    Can a thyroid problem, such as hypothyroidism, cause hair loss in a pattern similar to male pattern baldness rather than just general thinning?

    I have hypothyroidism, and my hair has thinned a little all over the top, but there’s a very noticeable spot in the back of my head where the hair naturally swirls where you can see my scalp quite clearly, and it seems my temple areas has receded though my widow’s peak has barely seemed to move, maybe just a little.

    Up until I started taking thyroid medication a few years ago (I now take levothyroxine, which i guess is the same thing as synthroid), my hair was so thick the hair dresser had to thin it out after she cut it. To do so now would be unthinkable.
    Edit: Thank the three of you so far, and I am going to ask my doc about maybe switching the synthroid, but I really want to know if this condition or the meds can cause hair loss in a pattern that looks like MPB

    • ANSWER:
      try switching to name brand synthroid. It helped me

  2. QUESTION:
    HELP – Hair loss question related to Thyroid?
    Hi, I have a question regarding hair loss and hypothyroidism(slow thyroid) that I would appreciate any ones help and input. I am 27 year old male now and have been on levothyroxine for my hypothyroidism since I was 12. I have always had a full head of hair until I got a haircut about 3 months ago. After my haircut, my hair was insanely thin and I still have a bald patch on the side of my head. I wear my hair up and all over the place(messy look) and it was totally obvious. Up to this point there were no signs of my hair thinning or loss on general. My doctor recently increased the dosage on my medicine to 175. He initially said my levels were fine, but then increased my medicine anyway? Also, looking at recent photos from a friends wedding you can tell my face was very bloated and skin very white. Can anyone give me some insight on there experiences? When and how long should I expect before my hair grows back? This is horribly stressing. It hasn’t seemed to approve yet maybe just a little but that could be in my head. All of this happened so suddenly. Also, male pattern baldness does not run in my family.. Help!

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    How is hyperthyroidism causes hair loss?
    The thyroid hair loss is mostly caused by hypothyroidism due to decrease of metabolism in scalp follicles. But i’m not sure how can an increase of metabolism (hyperthyroidism) causing a hair loss..Can someone please help to clarify?

    • ANSWER:
      A large gland in the neck that functions in the endocrine system. The thyroid secretes hormones that regulate growth and metabolism
      Indian medicine is the best

      http://medicine-clinic.com/order_thyroid_en-us.html

  4. QUESTION:
    can u have Postpartum Hair Loss and hypothyroidism?
    had a baby 7 months. got thyroid checked because i have so much hair falling out and they said i have hypothyroidism t.s.h came back as 8.35

    could i have postpartum hair loss as well? (im just scarred) im 27 and so afraid to be bald.

    i am making a appointment with a endocrinologist

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. You would be better off going to see a Dermatologist about your hair loss. Trust me, they know more about hair loss from hypothyroidism then Endocrinologists do. I’ve had Thyroid disease for about a year now and i have lost almost all my hair ( sorry, don’t mean to scare you ). That’s how i found out that i had it. My hair started to fall out really bad all of a sudden, so i went to the doctor right away and got blood work done, and it came back that i have Hypothyroidism ( i never even heard of it before this ). So after seeing a few doctors, i decided to go see an endo. He could care less that my hair was falling out, and was not sympathetic at all. He said it was no big deal. Dermatologists are a little more understanding when it comes to hair loss ( especially a women one ). Seeing an Endo is also very expensive ( my visit was 0.00 ). Which ever kind of doctor you decide to go see, try to see a women ( men have no compassion for hair loss ). I’m sooo sorry you have to go through this. I know how upsetting it is. It has devastated me ( i use to have thick beautiful hair, now it’s gone ). Not really sure if it will ever grow back, even though i have been on thyroid meds for about 9 months now, which is suppose to help the hair grow back. I cry a lot, and don’t go out very much anymore. I hope things get better for you soon. Good luck <<>>

  5. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism lead to body hair loss?
    I know hypothyroidism can cause hair loss on your head, but i have been experiencing body hair loss as well ( Chest, Armpit) Fall out or very easy to pull out.

    My story- Im 20 years old and about 8 months ago my doctor found a small goiter on my thyroid. After a few blood tests and even a thyroid scan my hormones came out to be normal, but i am still not convinced.

    • ANSWER:
      Actually hypothyroidism can cause hairloss all over the body not just the hair on the head.. thats normal.. when yur TSH value comes back to normal.. yu will not experience this problem any more

  6. QUESTION:
    Hair loss and Hypothyroidism?
    For those that have hypothyroidism and are taking meds, Did your hair grow back after a prolonged time of taking the medication? (synthroid, armour thyroid, whatever)

    I have been taking Armour thyroid for a year now and my hair is still as thin as ever. My doctor says that my thyroid levels are in the healthy range now (with the medication) and I make sure to take the medication every single morning an hour and a half before breakfast. Has anyone else had this problem?

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve been diagnosed with hypothyroidism for the past 13 years. I’m on medication now and have been for the 13 years. My hair thinned too. I’m not sure if I could attribute it all to hypothyroidism or if some of it was genetics. My Mom had thinning hair in the latter part of her life.

      But Dr. Oz recommended Minoxidil, to apply to the scalp to regenerate hair growth. I get it at Target for about .00-18.00 for a 3 months supply. Each morning and night you apply a small amount onto your scalp and it enhances hair growth. I’ve been doing it now for about 3 months and I definitely see a difference in my hair. It appears thicker and a little more coarse. They say this is for genetic loss of hair, so since my Mom had thinning hair I guess that’s what they are talking about. It seems to be working for me, and I would recommend you at least trying it.

  7. QUESTION:
    Is the hair loss caused by hypothyroidism permanent?
    Or does it come back after you keep your thyroid in check?

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on your family history. I have Grave’s Disease. I started losing hair after general anesthesia in 1990. It wasn’t really noticeable until 1995 when I started thyroid replacement therapy. Now, my hair is very thin, and my thyroid is completely non working. Be very vigilant with your doctor and perhaps you can retain what hair you have with further loss. Rogaine does work for regrowth, please check out these two websites for great information.
      www.stopthethyroidmadness.com
      www.heralopecia.com

  8. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and hair loss?
    I am an otherwise healthy 23 yr old who was diagnosed with and underactive thyroid a few months ago and have been taking meds for about 8 weeks now. My eybrows were thinning out on the edges and that what got me to go get my thyroid checked. However, i notice that pretty much all the hair (except facial) on my body pulls out rather easily with a slight pull (including my eyebrows and arm hair) I was just wondering if this could be cause by the medicine im taking because i never noticed this with my arm hairs until yesterday. Thanks in advance
    i think i should also mention that for the first 4 weeks that i was on levothyroxine, the pharmacy gave me 6 times the dosage that my Dr prescribed. I have been taking the correct dosage for about 4 weeks now

    • ANSWER:
      Your body may have to take a few more weeks to normalize after the overdose. Hair will pull out like that from hyper or hypo thyroid. I wouldn’t worry about it just yet, give it a few more weeks and have your TSH checked to see if levels have gotten back to normal. My TSH levels are normal but hair still pulls out quite a bit.

  9. QUESTION:
    Hair Loss And Thyroid?
    Hey all,
    First off I am a 17 year old female, I’m not sure if that helps the answer or not. Anyways a while back I had to go get numerous blood tests for hypothyroidism, all those tests later turned out I did not have it. Now I’m just fed up with my freaking hair. I know it is normal to shed but I am going to go crazy. I cannot take a shower without strands of hair coming out and then when I go to brush, more comes out. Even if I just group my hair and run my fingers through it more hair comes out. My towel needs to be washed all the time because hair is all over it and I just want to stop having people tell me “you have hair on your shirt”.

    Ok enough with the fluff. Someone told me that if my hair is falling out a lot over a period of time I should get my thyroid checked out. Why? What does hair have to do with the thyroid? Does my concern with thyroid in the past increase something now? Should I get it checked out?
    Thank you for answering! (and reading the long question lol)
    My hair is naturally very thin. I have always had thin hair so I don’t know if that helps. Thank you for all the help

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid imbalance is just one of many possible causes of hair loss. Teenage hair loss is becoming more and more common. Some of the more common causes include medication, recent vaccination, trauma, infection, major life change, birth control, extreme diet/weight loss, nutritional deficiency etc. Any change, disturbance or imbalance can disrupt the hair growth cycle causing more hairs than usual to retreat to the telogen (resting) stage where they will then be shed 1-3 months later. It may be helpful to think back to the months prior to hair loss for clues. Essential oil scalp massage is very helpful. The links below have information on the types and causes of teenage hair loss.

  10. QUESTION:
    What should be the range for a healthy Thyroid? Hypothyroidism?
    I am Hypothyroidism and i take Synthroid. I heard the is a disparity between Natural Paths and THE AMA what a healthy count should be. My Dr. says I take the correct dosage but my feet are always cold, i cant weight lose weight( I work out hard 5 days a week ” Run/Weight Train”) and my hair is thinning in spite of no inheritable hair loss.

    • ANSWER:
      If you are referring to TSH levels and hypothyroidism I might be able to help you out

      According to an article from http://www.HypothyroidismExposed.com titled “TSH levels and Hypthyroidism, TSH levels vary from person to person but many doctors believe that “normal” range is between .5 and 5.0 μIU/ml. If you go by this scale, then if your TSH level is above 5.0 you could be considered to have hypothyroidism.

      This .5 to 5.0 scale has recently been changed though and in 2002 the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) instituted a new TSH level reference range of .3 to 3.0 μIU/ml. The AACE believed that this new range would result in more accurate diagnosis for people with mild thyroid abnormalities that haven’t been treated.

      With this new scale, anyone with TSH levels over 3.0 should be considered hypothyroid and seek treatment.

      Hope this helps…

  11. QUESTION:
    Excessive hair loss – Hypo or Hyper thyroid? Antidepressants?
    I had luxurious thick long hair. I have mild hypothyroidism but was not very regular with taking my meds.

    In the aftermath of a bad depressive episode, I started losing some hair , but I put it down to stress and I was too depressed to do much about it anyway. Once I got a hold of myself, I doubled my weight loss efforts, so went to the doc who reproached me for not taking my meds regularly, and insisted I start with just 50mcg of T4.
    Taking 50 previously hadn’t really helped with my weight problems, so I increased myself to 75 mcg daily. I didn’t think there’d be much harm in it. Also on a roll to sort myself out, around the same time I went to see a doc as my depression was too much to cope with. He put me on Zosert (Sertraline) 50 which really helped, and then upped me to Zosert 100. So up to now, I’ve been on T4 for 3 months and anti-depressants for 2.5 months.

    Everything was going great but somewhere in the last 3-4 months I started losing hair excessively. I was too messed up so I cant even recall exactly when I started noticing. I kept thinking it would stop eventually, but without exaggeration, I’ve lost enough hair ( I’ve collected it, I know, gross) to make a wig for a 5 yr old. I’m even more depressed, I cry in the shower and I’m completely at a loss.

    Because of all the medical changes and the stress/depression I can’t tell what is causing my hair loss. I want to see a doctor, but where I come from, hair loss isn’t taken very seriously, and if at all, I’d have to figure out what caused the hair loss together with them anyway so I may as well try to do that on my own first. What in the world do I do? As of last week, I made the following changes, are they enough? what more should I do?

    1. Weaned myself off the anti depressants over a week ( I know.. i know.. i shouldn’t stop, but the hair loss is too much to bear and the doc said it was mild-moderate depression..besides he said my not taking thyroixine regularly was what depleted my body’s ability to cope with depression in the first place, so now im taking T4, im hoping it will be ok..withdrawal is bad, but manageable)

    2. To give myself natural anti-depressants and encourage hair growth, I’m eating things like salmon, chicken, turkey, almonds, chocolate etc.

    3. Taking the following supplements : Biotin 250, Zinc & Vitamin B complex, Vitamin E 200, Green Tea capsules, Evening primrose oil, Omega 3

    4. Reduced my T4 dosage to the doctor recommended 50mcg.

    Could it even be something else causing the hair loss? Who do I see? dermatologist? endocrinologist?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello. As someone who has lost almost all her hair from thyroid disease, i can totally relate to your story. The first thing you need to do is get some blood work done. A full thyroid panel, which includes TSH, T3, T4, and an Antibodies test, a full cbc ( complete blood count ), iron, vitamins and minerals, blood sugar, bottom line, pretty much everything. My guess, is your hair loss is thyroid related. The anti-depressants definitely could have made it worse, along with the stress. It’s best to rule out medical causes first, so that if you need treatment, you can start it as soon as possible. I know all about crying in the shower. Taking a shower has become a nightmare for me. I lose clumps of hair everyday. I figure in about 4 to 6 more months, i will be completely bald. It’s the most devastating thing that has ever happened to me, and i’ve been suicidal for the last year because of it. I no longer leave my house, because i’m so embarrassed by the way i look. So go get your tests, and try to find out what’s going on with you. I knew from day one my thyroid was causing my hair loss, but even after trying 6 different thyroid meds, i can’t stop it from falling out. I hope that you have better luck. Hang in there. Take care.

  12. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and hair loss? please help! :(?
    I was diagnosed with an underactive thyroid in march this year and to start off with i never had any symptoms for months except feeling very tired. I was on a low dose for a few months because i was ‘having problems with the tablets (side effects because i’m very sensitive to it) and i was on 50 mcg for about 3 months which was too low but i didnt have any symptoms, so after 3 months i ended up getting lots of symptoms including hair loss, so i immediately went up to 75 mcg of Levothyroxine despite the side effects. It’s been 4 weeks on that dose and my hair loss is terrible! it’s not improving it’s getting worse!! I can’t deal with it anymore and its even more upsetting because i used to have very very long blonde thick hair :( Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Hair loss is a very common problem among people. In most cases abnormal loosing of hair is a sign of health problems. What is abnormal loosing of hair? Do not panic if you loose from 50 to 100 hair per day – this is normal. If you clearly lose more or you see hairless spots on your head – see your doctor.

      So 50-100 strands of hair loss is totally normal and in limits, but if you still want to have stronger hair against hair loss, i advice you to check the following web page in the source, where you can find recent best 10 shampoos that help you to recover from your hair loss problem and they are really great. The page ALSO has information about the possible reasons of hair loss.

      I advice you to give Nioxin a try. In the web page below you will also find some other information than just shampoos, such as how to prevent hair loss and what are the common reasons of it..

      Also i advice you to check the Bosley company, you will see their link in the web page above, where you can get free consultation with Bosley Medical physician, they are hair loss experts and one of the best world wide and the consults are totally free of charge and you will get the correct information without spending a dime and then decide your next step.

      Source(s):

      http://www.iknowhair.com/hair-loss-shampoo

  13. QUESTION:
    I have been prescribed levothyroxine 25 mcg for mild hypothyroidism. Question about hair loss, weight loss?
    I have been on Levothyroxine for two days now, in 25 mcg doses. A symptom can be “some hair loss”. Just how much is “some”? The thought of losing my hair is a bit frightening. Also, will I lose these pounds I gained as a result of hypothyroidism? I eat extremely healthfully, and cardio and weight train for at least 35 to 60 minutes at least five days a week, yet I’ve gained at least ten pounds over the past several months, due to my underactive thyroid. Will the weight go away with this synthyroid medication, and how long does it take?

    • ANSWER:
      this medicine is in the top ten prescriptions filled. you are on a low level dose. you won’t notice anything for a month or six weeks. keep up your health program and you should feel better and the side affects will be very slight. it will be worse later if you have to go off it.

  14. QUESTION:
    I have problem of Hypothyroidism (means Low Thyroid Hormone Level) . What is remedy?
    Please tell me the formula of medicine that can be remedy of Hypothyroidism (Low Thyroid Hormone Level) or any other solution in this matter . Due to this problem i face constipation , poor appetite , poor growth , dry skin , hair loss & depression. I want to increase my Thyroid Hormone Level.

    • ANSWER:
      Remedies for Hypothyroidism:
      1.)You can increase your iodine intake through diet and kelp supplementation. Kelp is rich in iodine and is very affordable. I buy it in tablet form with 225 mcg. of iodine per tablet.

      2.)Bladderwrack is a seaweed that is a rich source of iodine. Traditionally it has been used for weight loss and hypothyroidism. The low incidence of goiter in maritime people has been attributed to the iodine in bladderwrack.

      3.)Regular intake of vitamin B complex is extremely helpful in treating thyroid conditions. Taking them also prevent other minor diseases. You should include green leafy vegetables.

      4.) If we talk about the medication, levothroid or Levothyroxine is used to treat an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). It replaces or provides more thyroid hormone, which is normally produced by the thyroid gland. Low thyroid hormone levels can occur naturally or when the thyroid gland is injured by radiation/medications or removed by surgery.

      To know more about the medication check:

      http://www.canadiandrugsaver.com/hormones/levothroid_95.html

      Also if you looking for generic version check:

      http://www.emedoutlet.com/health-wellness/Levothroid/95.html

  15. QUESTION:
    hypothyroidism and hair loss: is there a way to stop hair loss associated with Hashimoto’s disease? Also,?
    what do you think is the best brand of thyroid medication–no ‘health/herb’ treatments please. My case is too severe for that.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with you that herbal and nutritional treatments are a waste of money. Hypothyroidism is a hormone based immune system disease requiring medical care–it is not just “stress!” When I read your question, I was hoping you might get some helpful answers since I have the same problem.
      I’ve tried a variety of shampoos, conditioners, herbal, and other nutritional mumbo-jumbo, to no avail.
      I’m assuming that you, like me, eat a healthy diet. I hope you get an answer that gives more information than just a link to yet another hebal . . site.
      Don’t you wish people would read your question before giving answers you don’t want?

  16. QUESTION:
    Will a hospital see me over hair loss and other symptoms related to PCOS or Thyroid trouble?
    I’m 23yrs old and having hair loss now to the point where it is Noticeable in the back of my head, I don’t smoke, I’ve never done any sort of drugs, Never taken Birth Control, Low Thyroid & Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome run in both sides of my family…My diet is good, I exercise, I am not Much over weight at all…Did have a BIG stress happen in my life these past 10months I’ve dealt with my hair loss but show other Several other symptoms of Hypothyroidism & Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome. I can go on, but without trying to ramble on…

    Will a hospital see me? Would they test my Iron levels? Thyroid & Hormone levels? If I asked?…
    Or am I wasting my time even trying to go that route? I don’t have money to even make payments to a Drs office. Are their any other options for me? Would I be better off going somewhere like a Health Department? We have one in our town, but I’m just not sure where to go or what to do.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone that has Hypothyroidism done anything to resolve their hair loss problem?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothroidism and was medicated for 4 years, over the years my hair loss has increased, suprisingly now I have a normal thyroid level function and have stopped medication for the last couple of months. I have noticed that the hair loss is continuing and the fatigue/memory loss is continuing as well. I need to do something about the hair loss — I am only 31 and it looks terrible– not sure what others have done– I was taking vitamins but that doesn’t seem to do much.. Help!

    • ANSWER:

  18. QUESTION:
    Weight Gain, Hair Loss, DR says its not my thyroid.?
    I need help!

    In September of 09, I started having difficultly losing weight. I tried everything.. Lowering my intake of food, upping my exercise, and still had no results. I infact found that I gained weight during this time of dieting. I continued to lower my caloric intake, and up my exercise until I was down to 500 calories a day, 4 hours of exercise a day. Even with this extreme diet, I was losing insignificant amounts.. Less then a pound per week.

    In september, I was 160, and in early March of 2010, I was 130. 30 Pounds may seem like a lot.. But on 500 calories a day, and 4 hours of cardio a day, for 7 months.. It was not enough. Most people lose that in 4 months on NORMAL diets. I couldn’t do it anymore and decided to stop.. Hoping the weight would just stay off… But it didnt. Since March, I have gained 15 pounds, and I keep getting bigger.

    Even though I have returned to my healthy lifestyle, of normal eating and exercise, I am still gaining weight. Even more disturbing, my hair is beginning to fall out in huge clumps, and I am constipated. I have begun to experiance a real sensitivity to the cold, where before, I could breeze past a winter day in a tshirt no problem. I am TIRED alllll the time. Lethargic, even. Falling asleep in the car on the way to school where I just woke up a few hours before from a 12 hour sleep.

    Everything keeps getting worse.

    My Doctor thought it was Hyporthyroid, as I did aswell, but after doing bloodwork, it seems that my TSH levels, and my free T4s are normal. I spoke to her the other day, and she did not seem to think it was a big problem, instead telling me that I should not eat past 6pm, and I should not have any snacks (even though I barely have some as it is– I showed her a 7 day portrait of what I am eating), and I should eat more protien.

    She did not adress the hair loss, constipation (though saying I need more fiber.. Though my diet clearly indicates that I am getting 100% of my daily fiber needs), or cold sensitivity. But she did say my White blood cell count was high.

    Could someone please tell me what is wrong with me? I REALLY do believe it is Hypothyroidism, but I am not sure how to approach my doctor to convince her otherwise. Could it be Hashimotos?

    ~Help!

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible you have hypothryoidism…you have all the symptoms. But you were not tested properly…no free T3, no antibody test. This website goes into the tests you need to ask for:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

  19. QUESTION:
    Question about hair loss and Hypothroidism?
    For those that have hypothyroidism and are taking meds, Did your hair grow back after a prolonged time of taking the medication? (synthroid, armour thyroid, whatever)

    I have been taking Armour thyroid for a year now and my hair is still as thin as ever. My doctor says that my thyroid levels are in the healthy range now (with the medication) and I make sure to take the medication every single morning an hour and a half before breakfast. Has anyone else had this problem?

    • ANSWER:
      I have low thyroid too. My hair was awful! Just awful. But it was partly because my skin/scalp was thrown out of wack too. My scalp was just awful. I just did baths and it got everything back to normal. I also found this new age guru guy who has a hair product line that works pretty well. I started using it on my eyelashes too because I had bald spots at the ends. All of his products help with hair growth, not just the serums (link below). For bath, I know it sounds nutty but it works, just google each ingredient’s health benefits, and its loads of neat stuff.
      20minute bath
      1/2 cup raw honey
      2 cups milk
      1/4cup baking soda
      1/4 cup bath salts
      massage scalp half way through, rinse off, shampoo, condition hair. Try to use mild products like baby shampoo.

  20. QUESTION:
    Hair loss at 22 years old?
    I am a 22 year old female, diagnosed with hypothyroidism years ago. I take a thyroid replacement medication daily… 90 mg Armour thyroid. I have had about every symptom in the book as far as hypothyroidism goes, except for hair loss. For the past few months I have been losing a handful of hair per shower. I use an organic/vegan shampoo and conditioner, eat healthy and exercise. My thyroid level’s are really good right now and my doctor won’t up my medication. Does anyone have an idea what could be causing the excessive hair loss? I’m sure a part may be related to my thyroid but at this rate I won’t have any hair left and up until recently I’ve never had this problem. Any help is appreciated thank you :)

    * Sorry if you see this post somewhere else I posted it in the wrong category and tried to delete it.
    Yeah I’ve talked to my doctor and she thinks it’s not natural but related to my thyroid. I know that 100 hairs a day is pretty normal but Im talking a big clump of hair in the shower on top of the hair that I naturally lose through out the day. I always comb my hair before the shower but I’m not sure I’ve never lost hair like this until about 3 months ago. Before it was a way smaller amount like less than a fourth of what it is now.

    • ANSWER:
      I would say it is thyroid related, except you said that your levels are really good. I am a licenced cosmetologist and I also have a similar problem. I am 30 and am now experiencing hair loss as well and my thyroid tested normal. Have your vitamin B12 levels checked out because a difficiency in B12 will cause hair loss. In the mean time, I know it’s not cheap, but you can get Nioxin shampoo, conditioner plus many more suppliments from Nioxin including scalp theropy etc that are made specifically for hair loss and there are different formulas for each hair type. Nioxin differs from rogain and all those other in store “cures” because you will re grow hair that you’ve lost and keep that hair after you stop using the product whereas with rogain and the others cause you to lose the new hair after you stop using them. Hope that helps!

  21. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven’t changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don’t wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  22. QUESTION:
    Hair loss, synthroid, HCG. HELP! PLEASE!!!!!?
    I am so frustrated… SO frustrated. I did the diet HCG a few months ago. One round of 26-days. Right after that, my hair started to fall out like crazy. In chunks… and hasn’t stopped. In fact, my eyelashes are falling out as well and my hair is at least 1/2 as thick as it used to be and i have also been gaining rapid weight. I went to the doc to get my blood and thyroid checked for reasons this is happening. I have been experiencing stress / anxiety lately these past few months, but i have been much more stressed out in my life before now and never lost hair. In my blood results, my TSH level was a bit high, so they decided to put me on Synthroid (1-week ago),,, however now im researching it, and realizing a common side effect of Synthroid is hair loss and anxiety?!!!! I thought that is why i was going on it, was to stop the hair loss due to having hypothyroidism??? I have gone to 3 docs and a dermatologists. They all give me b.s. answers, but i can’t afford to lose anymore of my hair and am considering taking myself off the synthroid… Especially because i don’t want to be on it the rest of my life, and read that once you do go off, you lose even more hair. I am taking every supplement none to man that is supposed to help with hair loss, and nothing is helping. SOMEONE PLEASE HELP!!!!! I want to cry every time i shower and see the hair ball in the drain, and when i now have to wrap my hair elastic around my hair 3 times instead of two. Please..im desperate….

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry this is happening to you.
      Don’t ever diet again. Eat healthy foods and drink much water. (I think this is a hard lesson for you to learn to never diet again.) Don’t eat any supplements other than your doctor gives you.
      Don’t brush your hair and don’t wash it too much. Don’t us chemical products in your hair. And don’t wear anything in your hair. All those things can increase damaging your hair.
      Listen to your doctors. And hang on. Your hair will grow back again eventelly.

  23. QUESTION:
    Will thyroid medication help fill in fur loss?
    My lab has hypothyroidism. She is currently taking medication for it. However I noticed the loss of hair on both sides of her body has yet to fill in.

    Is this normal?

    • ANSWER:
      If your dog is on the right dose and it’s being administered properly, yes, the coat should come back.

      If the hair does not seem to be growing back, you may need to have the blood level taken again and the dosage amount or schedule may need to be changed. Or there may be another issue that is also producing a coat issue.

  24. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn’t an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, constipation, intolerance to cold, and muscle cramps
      Later symptoms include mental clouding diminished appetite, and weight gain.

      Some other signs may be brittle fingernails and dry hair.

      You need tests to confirm, but it sounds like you have it. However, the prognosis is great. You may have to undergo hormone relacement therapy, but that is easy. But if you experience hypothermia and stupor, you require immidiate medical attention.

      Have your doctor test your T4 and T3 levels.

      By the way, I’m not a doctor. So dont take my advise over any real medical professionals. I’m just a high school freshman who wants to be a doctor one day.

      Get well. Let me know if I was correct,
      Jake P

  25. QUESTION:
    Is sudden weight gain and hair loss a thryoid problem?
    When I turned 16 I was thinner than 80% of the guys my age and I had a full head of hair. By the time I was 16 & 6 months I had a gut and my hairline had badly receded. Around this time I also stopped growing at 5’8”. Before, during, and after the weight gain I exercised regularly, ate healthy food, and did not take medication. 7 years later I’m 23, still have a gut, am almost bald, and I’m hairy on my body. I’m otherwise healthy and I live a healthy lifestyle. I’m strong and alert but I do get tired easily. I know that weight gain, stunted growth, hair loss, and fatigue are all signs of hypothyroidism in men, but of course they could also be caused by other things.

    Is the weight-gain just because I stopped growing? Or could the weight, stopped growth, hair loss, and fatigue be signs of thyroid problems? Obviously I won’t get taller now, but if I have a thyroid problem then can it be treated with hormones? Is it too late for me?

    • ANSWER:
      It is so frustrating to learn that otherwise intelligent guys like you ,will not Act wisely. Please consult an Endocrinologist ,let him decide what to do and then simply follow his instructions. And whatever questions you have regarding benefit of any treatment ,please ask that doctor. I hope i have been able to push you !

  26. QUESTION:
    Any hypothyroidism (thyroid disease) sufferers have the same problems…?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a year ago now (I am 23 now) and was wondering when the symptoms actaully stop once you are put on the tablets!! I have been taking only 50micrograms of levothyroxine since diagnosis and I still feel the same as I do when I was diagnosed and the symptoms are still going on. I am still experiencing weight gain (and if no weight gain then a difficulty in losing ANY weight no matter what I do), hair loss, bad circulation and freezing cold hands and feet, tiredness all the time and low metabolism. Surely the tablets are supposed to help and get rid of the symptoms? I have had about 3 tests recently and they have all come back as normal meaning I am on the correct dosage but I still do not feel myself at all. Is this normal? Does anyone have any other experiences of hypothyroidism? Please help. Thanks x

    • ANSWER:

  27. QUESTION:
    Change in water/hard water cause hair loss?
    I’ve lived in the same area for about 12years using the same water, I recently had to move to the city with my father while going through a divorce. I’ve now lived here 9months and I am experiencing major hair loss (I’m 23), over all my hair has thinned but the back of my head I have a bald spot now that is continuing to grow. My father is almost 70 and has always had thin hair but at his age still almost no Greys and a full head of hair, but I noticed the past couple months in the back of his head as well he’s really starting to lose his hair quickly-he’s lived here 2years now…hes also lived out of this town with a different water supply 2yrs ago. I notice I’m regaining most of my hair that has been list over all of my scalp but not the bald spot in the back…
    Keep in mind that my father has a low thyroid, my sister has hypothyroidism, and I am at a high risk for polycystic ovarian syndrome, two things which have hair loss as a symptom.
    But could i be seeing hair loss from hard water? Or this water change? It happened a month after I moved here, but I was also VERY stressed, now Ive been able to calm down a lot and still no hair regrowth.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      My father was almost 98 when he died, and he had a full head of hair, too! Mom also.

      Do many of the people where you live now HAVE a lot of hair on their heads? That will give you a clue, if the water caused them to have hair loss. It may not be from the water, maybe from your medications?

      I have low thyroid, and I have as much hair now as when I was in HS, except it’s longer now than then. Stress, usually doesn’t cause hair loss. Both of my parents died 3 years apart, selling their house and fighting my sister in court . . . also getting laid off and quitting my job to care for my parents AND no hair loss there! My sister, mom & dad all have some kind of cancer, so I am high risk of cancer, but I’m almost 60, and still no hair loss here. I did suffer with frequent migraines when I was abusing hair dyes & perming my hair in the 80′s & 90′s, and I hardly get headaches before & AFTER I have stopped.

      Reasons why that might have happened:

      1. During the last 3 years, OK 2, how have you been styling or have you been straightening & dyeing or highlighting your hair?
      Google FDA website Hair dye & relaxers. Those are 75% the reason why.

      2. Have you been taking supplements or using hair oil? Supplements ( billions are wasted and could hurt your lungs, liver, organs). FDA has found that from face creams to soaps and other items of personal care, cosmetics companies are taking the general public for a ride. Oil could be coming from eels or shark. Another 5% why. CNN, Slate, Consumer Reports, MSN, YAHOO have posted them online for years how people spend billion per year on vitamins and supplements.  According to Everyday Health, here’s an article that will tell you why . . . those PRODUCTS by any other name do NOT WORK.  It is false advertisements. Google: Are Supplements Good For You? About 7,430,000 results (0.15 seconds) Google: Are vitamins & supplements good for you? About 4,250,000 results (0.14 seconds) Some can actually shorten your life! The Food & Drug do not approve of them!

      3. Have you been stressed out or changed your diet? Genetics of balding runs in your family? Another 10% why.

      4. Have you been taking medications with testosterone, certain antidepressants, menopause, anti-acne? Another 10% why you have hair falls.

      Eliminate them and your hair will improve. Not overnight, it could take weeks, months, even years, since it took that long to start the hair loss.

      The hair industry is a billion dollar business, they sell products that cleans & condition the hair. They also sell products that damage and causes hair loss. They also DO NOT give money back guarantee for damaged hair or hair loss due to ‘abuse’.
      Google Hair Salon Horror About 2,070,000 results (0.15 seconds) 
      Hair dye & extensions ex: May 22, 2011model and businesswoman Katie Price, who was formerly topless model Jordan, is demanding compensation from a top Los Angeles hair salon after she spent ,000 on hair colourings and extensions that she claims were botched, leaving her hair so damaged it began falling out. She has spent more than 0,000 on her hair, during the last 3 years.

      Source(s):
      I know hair. I have over 4 decades of hair know-how. I have silky, shiny, soft, smooth very healthy hair down to my knees. Previously damaged by perming & dyeing in the 80′s & 90′s. I’ve known people in their 30′s whose hair stopped growing from ironing their hair in the 70′s.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do you lose weight with Hypothyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when I was 17. My thyroid function is “normal” or at least that’s what the doctor says. I’ve been taking levothyroxine for as long as I’ve been diagnosed. I’m 22 now and even thought I’m taking the medication, I’m still having symptoms: Hair loss, Intolerance to cold and of course, weight loss. Does anyone have any suggestions about how I can lose weight with Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Lil Jack Workout Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKCGe2Ezris its free and it works

  29. QUESTION:
    Thyroid levels and hypothyroidism?
    My TSH is 1.69 and my Free T4 is 1.1. I don’t see the doctor until the end of February. My cholesterol is 195 and triglycerides at 160. I am not any any medications other than Januvia for insulin resistance. My blood glucose is at 78. Bloodwork was done fasting. I am trying to figure out if I have hypothyroidism and research what can be done about it. I have hair loss, cold extremities even though I live in Florida, fatigue, bascially a lot of the symptoms. I have been on a rigorous diet for 6 months now and have only lost about 7 pounds. I don’t cheat so I can’t figure out why I am not losing weight. I am also exercising 3-4 times a week. Does anyone have any idea what these levels mean? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      normal levels.

  30. QUESTION:
    Can someone give me more information about HYPOthyroidism?
    Thyroid problems run in my family and lately I’ve started to notice more hair loss than normal.. which is a symptom of hypothyroidism.

    I also read that a symptom is low pulse. Does that mean that your pulse is very hard to find? Because mine is very difficult to find.

    • ANSWER:
      A faint pulse is not considered a symptom of hypothyroidism. If you are concerned about having an dysfunctional thyroid I would suggest letting your family doctor run a thyroid test on you to determine if you might need hormone therapy. Actually, hypothyroidism is quite common. Symtoms include:
      •Fatigue
      •Weakness
      •Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
      •Coarse, dry hair
      •Dry, rough pale skin
      •Hair loss
      •Cold intolerance (you can’t tolerate cold temperatures like those around you)
      •Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
      •Constipation
      •Depression
      •Irritability
      •Memory loss
      •Abnormal menstrual cycles
      •Decreased libido

      Hope this helps.

  31. QUESTION:
    What can i do to make my hair grow after it fell out from hypothyroidism?
    I’m 16 and all my life i have had very thick glossy blonde hair which used to go down to my waist, i know this may sound big headed to some of you but it was gorgeous and it defined who i was, everyone commented on how beautiful it was and i loved my hair. Then i got diagnosed with hypothyroidism last year and at first i never had any problems with my hair, just all the other symptoms, my tablets never relieved any of my symptoms and for 5 months now i have had very bad hair loss, it’s devastated me to the point where i cry every day. I take Levothyroxine and have done for the whole of the time i’ve had an under active thyroid. It’s showing no signs of stopping falling out and i’ve had no new growth. Theres no thickness to it at all, it’s very dry and knotty and i hate it. It started off gradually but in the past 2 months it has been rapid hair loss and im starting to get patches with hardly any hair on it. I am pretty certain i will go bald unless i do something about it and i have no idea what to do. I wanted to switch to armour so i went to a private doctor and he said if i went on it i would have to come off levothyroxine for 4 weeks because i have an adrenal problem, and i dont want to do that because although the levothyroxine isnt doing much for my hair loss it’s stopping my fatigue slightly and i get a lot worse when i’m off the tablets. The hair loss really has made me feel suicidal, i know that sounds silly but my hair really did mean everything to me. I have had some answers on here previously about my hair loss and all my other problems and they have been quite insensitive towards how i feel about it. Please can someone give me some reasurance that things will be ok? :( I’m pretty desperate and if i ever did go bald im pretty sure i couldn’t carry on anymore.

    • ANSWER:

  32. QUESTION:
    Ladies with long hair, do you have more hair loss in the fall/winter months, or as you age?
    I am 47, I do have hypothyroidism, which I am on Thyroid medication for and I just had my blood work done, and according to that, I am on the right dose. I had a lot of hair loss before I was diagnosed, and then it got a lot better.

    It seems like every time I wash or brush my hair, I am losing more than I should be. I have never had my hair this long before. (mid-to lowerback) So I’m just wondering if it is a seasonal thing, a hormonal thing because I am perimenopausal and I know my hormones are all screwed up, or is this normal?

    I almost feel like I’m on Chemotherepy sometimes when I wash my hair, because it comes out in handfulls, probably guessing 50 or so strands at a time. I do have very fine somewhat wavy hair. Don’t know if that has anything to do with it or not. I have found that Aussie products work best for me, and it’s in my price range.

    Help me please?

    • ANSWER:
      Well I’m not 47, but I do have hypothyroidism and even if you’re on the medicine, you can still lose a lot of hair. not as much as before, but it’s definitely evident. and don’t worry haha, i shed like a dog. my hair gets EVERYWHERE. i’m pretty sure it’s a common thing, and I do shed more in the winter as opposed to summer, but i think hair is overall healthier in the summer. but it shouldn’t cause to have hair loss or anything to that extent, but if you notice that your hair is getting thinner, or it’s falling out more than it should, you should ask your doctor for his/her opinion.
      hope this helps!
      also, try prenatal vitamins, and drinking water instead of soda. simple things like that, and you’ll notice your hair improving in it’s quality.

  33. QUESTION:
    What supplements/treatments do you recommend for hypothyroidism?
    I have been experiencing hair loss, excessive sweating, severe depression, severe intolerance of hot climates/surroundings, frequent nausea, and stomach pains since I was seventeen. The year before, I starved myself for a month in order to lose some weight. I have a very prevelent family history of thyroid disorder. I think, perhaps I triggered this with the shock to my metabolism that my anorexia caused. I have been eating regularly since I was 19, but the symptoms persist. What should I do? I am tired of being uncomfortable all of the time, and having thinning hair in parts because of my body’s problem…I’m only 19! My libido is one eighth of what it used to be, and my cognitive abilities aren’t what they once were…I did a bit of research and saw that all of my symptoms lined up with hypothyroidism, and I wish to know where to look or what to eat, or what I can do to change my body back…

    • ANSWER:
      Levothyroxine from your doctor though he will want to do a thyroid function (blood)test first to confirm.

      There are also herbal supplements available (ask in store) but as alternative not in addition to thyroxine I would go with prescribed thyroxine which although synthetic is similar to what you are missing and should rectify all the symptoms.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of an under active Thyroid?
    I believe its called hypothyroidism..??? I have hair loss, tiredness all the time, loss of appetite, thirsty all teh time, ect…. just to name a few…. Can someone give me some useful info,… Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Yep…go here and find all ya wanna know…

  35. QUESTION:
    Hair loss- when’s it going to stop?!?
    I’m a 16 year old girl. My hair’s been falling out steadily since last September (eight months). I’m sure it’s telogen effluvium, triggered by an episode of severe stress earlier on last year. It’s diffuse and hasn’t been coming out in handfuls or anything like that. I thought it might be hypothyroidism because I have some of the symptoms (feeling excessively tired, yawning all the time, the outer ring of my eyebrows have fallen out, getting heavy periods and tension headaches often), and also because my grandmother has it. My mother also has a lot of the symptoms for hypothyroidism.

    I’ve been to the doctor twice, had my blood tested twice (the first result showed my thyroid levels being a little below normal, the second result was normal) and I keep hoping that it’ll start slowing down soon, but it’s not. The doctor seems to take me seriously, but when they’re finished with their blood tests they don’t offer any followup. This isn’t normal, you don’t lose your hair at 16!

    I’ve always had really thick hair and luckily even though I’ve lost, by now, what seems like loads, to other people it doesn’t like like I’ve lost an awful lot (although I notice it). It’s just so annoying, finding hairs everywhere, feeling scared of washing it or brushing it, constantly checking my clothes to pick off hairs. It still looks all right now, but in another few months I’m not so sure. I’m getting it cut regularly and stuff and I never get split ends.

    I’ve noticed new hairs growing in- but I’ve only noticed because they’re falling out. I think the follicles have ‘minituarised’, so now the only hairs I grow are short, weak and colourless. Also normal long hairs keep coming out. Every time I think it’s stopping, it just bulldozes on.

    I do have important exams coming up but I don’t think they’re stressing me out. I actually like exams (freak, haha).
    Has anyone else experienced telogen effluvium, or any other sort of hair loss? Thanks in advance (:
    I take biotin and evening primose oil vitamins. The primose will help if it’s hypothyroidism (hormone balance), although not enough, and I doubt I have a biotin indeficiency but they were b.loody expensive so I’m going to finish them!

    Oh, and I don’t have to pay for doctor’s appointments (the wonder of the NHS), and I only go to the doctor for things I’m really worried about, so hardly ever.

    • ANSWER:
      Heredity, hormones, stress, diet, illness, poor hair care – all are factors in hair loss.

      Stress, diet and illness are more temporary conditions and usually the hair loss is reversed when the anxiety-producing conditions dissipate, when the diet is improved, when hair care improves and when an illness is cured or gotten under control.

      Heredity and hormones are different matters, however. Heredity is an irreversible condition. You are a product of your parents, and hair loss is often inherited. Hormones are tricky, hidden things, however, and they have different effects on an individual basis.

      In a male, testosterone abides abundantly. There are also enzymes working on testosterone which product a substance called DHT. DHT is now known to circulate in the blood and cause other conditions, one of which is the shrinking of hair follicles. When hair follicles shrink enough, they are unable to produce and push a new hair through. As old hair dies, it is then not replaced.

      In women, hormonal imbalances can also cause hair loss. Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause all cause significant hormonal change and imbalances with both physical and mental effects. These changes can also cause hair loss, both temporary and permanent.

      Hair loss and re-growth products have been around for centuries. In ancient times, a variety of herbal and oil-based remedies were concocted and used by Egyptians, Aztecs, Mayans, and American Indians, all with some degree of effectiveness for some people. Modern medical research has focused on ways to re-open and stimulate “dead” hair follicles, so that hair growth can re-occur naturally, as well as keep the healthy follicles healthy. Thus, a number of products have become available, both by prescription and over-the-counter. They are advertised on radio and television and all over the Internet. One need only do a “google” search on hair loss, and there are literally thousands of sites and products for investigation.

      One ingredient in many hair loss products is minoxidil. Research studies have shown that in about 80% of the participants, products containing this ingredient are effective in slowing hair loss and, in some, causing re-growth to occur.

      Probably the most well known is Rogaine, available at any drug store, in varieties for both men and women. Most scientifically-produced products do have separate products for males and females, because, of course, hormones in each are different and of different levels.

      An additional product containing minoxidil is Provillus, and, again, studies have shown it to be effective. The difference between Provillus and other similar products is that the makes have added Azelaic Acid, an additional ingredient which appears to enhance the follicle repair in both men and women. Provillus has been the subject of many studies, just as the other products, and level of effectiveness may be higher.

      Provillus is available for both men and women, and the treatment is a combination of a topical liquid applied to the balding areas, as well as a pill or capsule to be taken in conjunction with the liquid. The critical key to effectiveness, according to its makers, is the addition of the azelaic acid, however, the correct amount of this acid is most important piece of this treatment.

      As with most hair loss products, the makers recommend patience. It may take from 3-6 months for improvement to occur, however, there is a money-back guarantee up to 180 days if one is not satisfied that it is working for him/her.

      Medical research is far from finished in its exploration of products which will stop hair loss and promote re-growth of “permanent” loss. As this research continues, existing producers will undoubtedly alter their products accordingly.

      Fortunately, a lot of money is being poured into the research, so hair loss sufferers, take heart!

  36. QUESTION:
    hair loss, fatigue, and numbness?
    I suspect I may have the beginnings of carpal tunnel, I have forearm elbow and wrist pain. As well as pain in the palm of my hand, I have trouble gripping things and often feel like I will drop smaller objects. I have had this problem since I was in college to become a hygienist.

    I wondered if the hand issues i’m having could be related to the hair loss and chronic fatigue I have been suffering from. I had labs done and my thyroid is technically okay but almost at the cut off point and I have a history of hypothyroidism in my family. Also my bun/creat ratio was marked as high and my rbw and nuetrophil were marked as low. I am not working and dont have another appt at the local clinic for a month! But I need help now

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. When i was diagnosed with thyroid disease, my numbers were within range, but i had every symptom of hypothyroidism you can have. Soon after that, my numbers got worse, and continued to rise, so i went on medication. You should always get retested for thyroid disease if you have symptoms that continue. Your numbers can change from day to day, so going by one test isn’t a good idea. Fatigue and hair loss are 2 red flags for a thyroid problem. Those were the first 2 symptoms i had ( and still have ). A lot of people with thyroid issues also can develop carpal tunnel ( i had that also ), because thyroid disease can affect your joints and muscles. With your symptoms, and a family history, i would say it’s quite possible you have a thyroid problem. Seek a second opinion ( always a good idea when dealing with this ). I actually went to 3 doctors in the beginning, and though my levels were not that bad, they all thought i had a thyroid problem by the symptoms i was having. Good luck :-)

  37. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroid/hair loss and dieting?
    I found out I had hypothyroidism in August 2007. I am on 50 mcg of levothyroxine…I am trying to loose 15-20 lbs and just can’t seem to do it. I have never had any weight problems till June of 2007. I am now 22 and I feel like I should be able to loose the weight with diet and exercise but it isn’t happening. My doctor says my levels for my thyroid are fine. My hair is also continuing to fall out slowly and is very coarse. Which is also a problem that I have never had? Can anyone help or suggest anything that would help?

    • ANSWER:
      Aww I feel your pain, but am a tiny bit confused.

      I was severely hypothyroid, ie could not get off the couch.

      So anyway, my hair was fallin out and all the other lovely things that come with this, but now my levels are way better and I lost 80 lbs and got my hair back once my medicine kicked in.

      So all of your symptoms should have gotton better or gone away when your medicine started working? So you may want to get your bloodwork done again and look at those numbers some more, because it doesn’t sound like it’s working, or maybe it was a mess-up at the lab

      Let me know if you have any more questions or want to talk :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Question about hair loss….PLEASE HELP!!?
    I went vegan over three months ago. Over the past few weeks, but particularly over the past week, I’ve noticed that my hair has gotten thinner. It’s not noticeable to other people at this point, but I can definitely feel a difference when I run my fingers through my hair and I’m starting to be able to see my scalp through my hair. I used to have very thick, healthy hair. Did this happen to anyone else after going vegan or has anyone experienced this even if they haven’t gone vegan? What was the cause of it, exactly? What did you do about it? Did anything restore your hair to it’s original condition? Please, I’m freaking out here!!

    Please, no rude comments about veganism. Veganism itself is not to blame. I’m guessing that it’s a nutritional deficiency although it *might* be a thyroid problem, as I was diagnosed with borderline hypothyroidism a few years ago (but then again, I only started noticing this change very recently, after going vegan). I also had a very traumatic year in 2008 (I lost my mother and my grandmother within five months of each other – could stress be partially to blame?) Please, if you have any words of wisdom and personal experience to offer me, I’d really appreciate it. I’m so scared right now.

    Yes, I am going to schedule an appointment to get blood work done soon. But I just need some words to ease the anxiety I’m feeling at this very moment.
    More info:

    1) I have changed shampoos but that has never caused this kind of problem in the past.

    2) I also thought I was deficient in iron but my hemoglobin was high enough for me to give blood about a week ago (and I didn’t feel weak afterward). Could I still be iron deficient? I don’t notice that I bruise particularly easily and my periods are no heavier or lighter than they used to be. I do feel very weak and exhausted during them though.
    3) My hair doesn’t seem to be falling out (I’m not pulling out chunks of hair) as much as it is thinning.

    Thank you all for your answers. Really, this means so much to me. Will my hair return to it’s original condition after I take care of whatever the problem is?

    • ANSWER:
      I would say it’s probably your thyroid since you were diagnosed with borderline hypothyroid and all the emotional stress is bad for your thyroid. Plus you could be getting less iodine on a vegan diet. You really need to find out from the doctor but I would bet it’s your thyroid.

      Also, I don’t think it has anything to do with protein. (it’s so annoying when people always freak out over protein).

  39. QUESTION:
    should i see a doctor about hair loss?

    http://www.freemd.com/hypothyroidism/symptoms.htm

    I found this for symptoms of thyroid something that might be causing hairloss. I have alot of the symptoms but not all of them. i am not anorexic. i dont think i have facial swelling or leg swelling. and im only 16 and i guess im weird but sex isnt on my mind. and i dnt get numb. i dnt think i have palpatations and im a male so not female cycles. I am trying to find another reason than male pattern baldness. Ive had a receding hairline pretty bad since 7th grade(13) and my hair lady said that it was nothing. but now the front part inbetween my receding hairline is visibly thinning. What should i do. Oh and jst throwing this out there. I have 2 cats that live in my room. I got them august and i got allergy tests back and i am highly allergic to cats and dust mites. Ummm, i also took claritin which i ended up stopping because i got really bad headaches and it never helped. I also take Excedrin migrane because i frequently get migranes. I take advil or alieve sometimes. I live in my basement and was exposed to black mold 2 months ago but we had it professionally removed and i keep my room pretty clean. I cant think of anything else. everybody i go to says its nothing. I never consulted a doctor yet. But I really want advice because i am too embarrassed to ask my mom to make an appointment because i am balding=(
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Ryan

      Stop believing everything you read over the Internet. Use only reputable websites like WebMD, NIH (National Institute of Health), the Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic.

      And who are these ‘everybody you go to’ that says it’s nothing. One of those ‘everybodies’ should be your doctor and not people who know less about it than you do. You’re listening to the wrong people, dude.

  40. QUESTION:
    12wks PP, hair falling out…?
    I am a breastfeeding mother and am currently at 12weeks PP. Thought I’d ask in this section to see if there is any relation. I noticed about 4 days ago that my hair is falling out like crazy, or so it seems. I have fairly long hair so it may just look like a lot, but nonetheless I’m shedding a lot more than normal lol

    Did anyone else have this experience after delivery? I don’t feel stressed. I am on my usual sleep schedule. I do have hypothyroidism that is being treated. My aunt told me my thyroid could cause hair loss. I go for blood work whenever I get up off my butt and do it to see if my dose needs to be changed. I feel as if I eat healthy/well.

    Just wondering if anyone else experienced the same thing.
    LOL I just pulled up my kellymom.com link that I’ve been browsing around today and found this link….

    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mom/hairloss.html

    I’ll leave the question up anyway in case someone else searches it and needs the info :
    Come and get your two points! lol
    I have been on 50mcg for about a year now but I’m due for refills so that means more bloodwork. I wouldn’t doubt if it’s low, probably because of breastfeeding.

    I spent YEARS with period issues and had blood work done out the waazoo then I go to a military doc who finds the problem. From 14-20 years old I suffered! lol I never had protected sex with husband except before we got married and after this medicine got me back to normal within 6 mos I was pregnant heh
    50mcg Synthroid that is…

    • ANSWER:
      Oh hunny, my son is 14 months and I’m still shedding! =]

      I actually started losing my hair WORSE after I stopped breast feeding. When I was breast feeding, I didn’t seem to lose my hair.

      Maybe you’ll be the opposite; maybe you’ll stop losing your hair when you wean …

  41. QUESTION:
    Will my symptoms go after taking pills?
    I have a bad case of Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) and every symptom on the list, you name is, I got it bad… from hair loss, muscle weakness, tiredness, poor memory, swollen hands and feet, bad immune system, shortness in breath, thin fingernails, deepness in throat!!! I am starting medication for it tomorrow and I was wondering will all these things I have go away? I hope so..
    thanks for answers kind people and God bless.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. After a while you will start to go back to feeling normal. I have had hypothyroidism for a long time and I can tell you that being on the synthroid made a huge difference for me. I had all the classic symptoms dry skin/hair, exhaustion, low voice, aches and pains all over my body, frequent migraines, etc. Now 10 years later I am symptom free and have had a couple of adjustments in the dosage but no real problems while on the synthroid. Don’t be afraid to discuss your concerns with your doctor. I hope you start to feel better soon. Good luck.

  42. QUESTION:
    I think that I have hypothyroidism. What can I do to help with the symptoms? Is it hereditary?
    My blood test comes back on the low side of normal. I have many of the classic symptoms such as fatigue, DRY skin,excessive weight gain, chest pain, intolerance to cold/heat, hair loss, carpal tunnel syndrome, and many others. Also, my mother had complete thyroid replacement in her young thirties (i’m 34).

    • ANSWER:
      Take your underarm temp the first thing in the am for 5 days. If below 97.6 it is probable your metabolism is too low. Exercise, adding Vit A and Kelp. Retest in 1 month. If still low get a Doc that unddsrstands the contraversy associated with both hypothyroid testing and limitations of synthroid! God bless!

  43. QUESTION:
    Anyone take levothyroxine for hypothyroidism?
    I went to see my doctor today because over the last few months I have been experiencing several signs and symptoms that are indicative of hypothyroidism, including hair thinning/loss, dry skin and mouth, generalized fatigue, weight gain no matter how much I work out and eat healthy, and more recently occasional diarrhea and anxiety issues, which all relate to thyroid dysfunction. I am 26 years old and have always been very healthy and fit and almost never get sick. My doctor said that my thyroid felt mildly enlarged, so I had a TSH blood test done and will get the results tomorrow. If I do have hypothyroidism, which I’m fairly certain I do, my doc is going to have me start taking levothyroxine. Has anyone else had good results with this medication? I and just so sick of feeling tired and lousy with all of these symptoms and want to be able to be my normal happy, healthy, and energetic self again.

    • ANSWER:
      I know it’s scary knowing that you’re gonna need a pill every day forever.
      I’m proof, there’s NOTHING to worry about. I’ve been on Levo since 1996.
      If given the option, have your thyroid completely removed. It will save you MUCH hassle.
      If you just “supplement”, you’ll always have blood tests and changing dosages all the time.
      Drop me a line, I’ll answer any other questions you have.

  44. QUESTION:
    Thyroid test said no…now what?
    I had my thyroid tested for hypothyroidism because I am tired of everything that happens physically with me. But the test came back negative yet I have every physical sign including the extremely difficult to deal with: memory loss, weight gain,hair loss, excessive tiredness,depression, etc.
    What should be my next move? Should I ask for another test?

    • ANSWER:
      There are several things we need to consider when your test comes back negative. First “negative ” means that the test results fall within the range set by the lab for normal.However let us say your body needs an ounce of TSH(thyroid stimulating hormone) and the test is set for above for negative means above an ounce, can you see that you can just borderline and still test negative? when in fact your body has serious needs but the test setting misses it.
      you should do two things
      1. do several tests to see if all say the same thing and
      2. get copies of the tests and see how far off you are from the norm set be the test.

      you see your body will behave as if the thyroid is defective but the test may not be sensitive enough to pick it up.

      you can get help at http://www.natural-remedy-guide.com/Thyroid-disease-symptoms.html

      Brentnol@natural-remedy-guide.com

  45. QUESTION:
    Can thyroid medication cause a dog to have itchy ears and skin?
    My 13 year old beagle has been on thyroid meds for hypothyroidism for the past 3 weeks. In the past year she has had some skin and coat problems. Some of the symptoms were short-lived, but she is still stuck with a thin coat, hair loss on her tail and some areas with dark skin.We are hoping that eventually the thyroid treatment will correct this. However, after being on these meds for a few weeks she has been itching her ears and skin. For the first time ever I cleaned out her ears with q-tips and ear solution… lots of dry, flaky, dark gunk. They are less itchy for her now, but not perfect. She has also been scratching her skin and upon inspection her skin is very dry and flaky. WIth all the skin problems she has had, she has never been itchy. I’m assuming it is just due to it being dry and flaky. Can thyroid medication cause this – or perhaps too high of a dose? She is due for a check up soon to see if her dosage needs to be adjusted. I’m hoping someone can speak of experience with their hypothyroid dog.
    I believe the medication is thyroxine. Not sure of the dosage, but it’s twice a day.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to consult your vet and you need to pull the bottle down and LOOK at the label and read it to see to make sure that you are giving him his meds correctly as you stated that you aren’t sure what it is.

  46. QUESTION:
    Side effects of taking unnecessary thyroid medication?
    I have been taking 30 mg Armour Thyroid for subclinical hypothyroidism. My TSH was 4.7, my T3 was 209 and my T4 was 1.1. Since taking the medication my TSH is now 4.3, my T3 is lower 192 and my T4 is now 1. I now have symptoms I never had before taking the medication (flaky nails, hair loss and my heart beating loudly at night-I know these are hypo symptoms but I didnt have them before the medication) and have been gaining weight. I have gained 9 pounds since starting the medication. Im wondering if I should even be taking the meds since I feel worse since starting them. Is weight gain a side effect of taking unnecessary thyroid medication?

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid is a hormone produced by the body. When taken correctly, thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, hair loss, dry skin, dry coarse hair, muscle cramps, decreased concentration, aches and pains, swelling of the legs, and increased sensitivity to cold. Thyroid is also used to treat goiter (enlarged thyroid gland). Thyroid is in a class of medications called thyroid agents. It works by supplying the thyroid hormone normally produced by the body.
      Thyroid helps control the symptoms of hypothyroidism, but does not cure this condition. It may take up to several weeks before you notice any change in your symptoms. To control the symptoms of hypothyroidism, you probably will need to take thyroid for the rest of your life. Continue to take thyroid even if you feel well. Do not stop taking thyroid without talking to your doctor.
      Please see the web pages for more details on Desiccated thyroid extract (generic name) Armour® Thyroid (brand name).

  47. QUESTION:
    Help me find out about this thyroid disease…?
    Hello. I am a 22 yo guy.

    My great-grandma, my grandma and my mom have hypothyroidism. And my aunt have hypothyroidism and had thyroid cancer.

    I have several symptoms of it (like unexplained high cholesterol, difficulty in losing weight, although my weight did not went rampant, hair loss, itches, and psychological problems that resemble depression and mania), so I went to a specialized doctor (the one that take care of the glans, I don’t know the name of it in english…)

    The first doctor, refused to even ask examinations, and said that I am overweight because of what I eat. After two years, struggling to lose weight eating less crap, I actually reduced levels of several blood sugars to reasonable levels, but no weight loss, and still high LDL. It was then that I discovered about the rest of the family with hypothyroidism and went to check again.

    This new doctor made me take several exams, including TSH, but not T4, TSH was normal, so she insisted that I have something else (not a thyroid problem), but after I really annoyed the doctor, she was willing to ask for a Anti-TPO test (no T4 :/), and it resulted in 111.7 UI (the reference value was maximum of 35 UI).

    Also I did a… I don’t know the name in english, a examination using sound waves for imaging, and my thyroid had a nodule (that the doctor believed that was from the parathyroid, but all blood levels from minerals and hormones from the parathyroid are normal), and a “strange texture” according to the examination machine operator (a medic too).

    I will return to the doctor (although I don’t trust, the one that refuse to allow me take a T4 test because TSH is normal…), and show the latest results (parathyroid blood levels and anti-TPO), I am convinced that I have hereditary thyreoiditis, and hypothyroidism (otherwise, where my symptoms came from? They are not a psychological “invention”, because several it was other people that noticed, not me, I have some symptoms for so much years that to me was normal, I did not knew that it was wrong…)

    My question is: Should I trust this doctor? Or my theory that just TSH alone (and no T4 test) is not sufficient to diagnose is correct?

    So, why TSH would be normal?
    Extra detail:

    The reason why I go to this doctor, is because is the only one that accepts my health plan, and non-health plan consultations here have absurd prices (that is: I would need to borrow lots of money to pay one…)

    • ANSWER:
      With a positive TPO, you may very well have Hashimoto’s, and you should insist not only on T4, but also T3. if your doctor won’t run the tests, fire him. Get a new doctor who will.

  48. QUESTION:
    Why are thyroid conditions hard to detect? What is the best way to detect them?
    I have virtually every symptom of hypothyroidism, and yet my thyroid panel came back normal. I am convinced something is wrong…should I seek the opinion of an endocrinologist? Is there a more reliable way to detect hypothyroidism?

    FYI: I have:
    consistently low blood pressure (90/55 or so)
    consistently low body temp (36.4 avg)
    consistently slow heart rate (50 bpm)
    hair loss (2 years)
    extreme cold sensitivity
    very pale, sallow (yellowish) complexion
    very tired/low energy
    sleep problems (including apnea)
    forgetfulness (I used to have a VERY strong memory – I’m only 34 and it has deteriorated in the last 2 years a lot)

    I really want to investigate more fully a possible thryoid connection….

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosed as hypothyroidism in early december. I had many of the symptoms you do too…I went to the doctor and got my blood work taken. Make sure you follow the fasting rule before hand because that could change your outcome. There are different ranges out there that doctors go by. Get a copy of your blood test results and do a little research. Its possible you could be just shy of hypothyroidism, which means you could probably take a low dosage of the medication and it might help. Since taking the medication, I am feeling a lot better and my symptoms are reversing. I really think you have all the key signs for it. My only suggestion is to just get a copy of your results and do a little research, or seek another doctor for a second opinion. :) good luck!

  49. QUESTION:
    I’m a female who wants to shave her head?
    I’ve been having hairloss due to hypothyroidism (low thyroid) which I’ve been treating it for 3 mths. My doctor said it could take 1-2 yrs for the hair loss to stop completely. I’ve medium length hair but it’s very evidently thinning and I’m “shedding” a few hundred strands a day all over my home, car & workplace. The reasons why I want to shave my head: (1) I spend too much time cleaning my home; (2) Social embarassment (e.g. hair falling in my food) (3) Spending 0 a month on cleaning supplies (lint brushes, drain declogger, etc.), would probably save money on hair products too; (4) The bald patches may get larger anyway; (5) My hair seems to grow fast (3/4″ a mth); (6) I have mild acne on my scalp which could be easier to treat without hair. Other than a wig & head coverings, what repercussions, social or otherwise, should I worry about, as a 30-year old female living in a small college town with a shaved head? What should I worry about as my hair starts to grow back?
    Wow 10 answers in 13 mins. I am planning on donating the shaved hair to “Locks of Love” (http://www.locksoflove.org/). I actually do it almost every 18 months or so (that’s how fast my hair grows). Hair has to be at least 8 inches though and I’m not sure if I have that much right now, I probably do if I get it cut off right at the scalp. My boss’ wife, whom I was also pretty close to, died of breast cancer last thanksgiving. It’s more of a convenience thing, not vanity. But I guess I do care a lot about what people think and I may have to look for a job sometime in May-June and I’m not sure whether it’d have grown out enough by then.

    • ANSWER:
      I say if you feel comfortable with doing it,then go for it,Good Luck!!

  50. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism with galactorrhoea AND 30 weeks pregnant. Effects on baby? What do you think?
    Long one – sorry!
    Could do with an endocrinologist here, or just someone who may have had a similar problem!
    I went to see my GP last Spring when I noticed I had developed galactorrhea (leaking from my breasts). She did all the usual, examined me for lumps and bumps, tested my field of vision as pituitary adenoma suspected, etc, and eventually took some blood.
    However, it was so long since my initial visit til I got an appointment to test my bloods that I had conceived in the meantime, and was around 6 weeks pregnant when the blood was taken. Blood results came back – elevated prolactin levels, which could easily be blamed on the pregnancy.
    I was referred to an endocrinologist at long last, who took more blood recently ( 6mths after last lot ), just had a letter asking me to pick up a prescription for levothyroxine – so assuming (from a million and one google results) I must have hypothyroidism which has been undiagnosed for nearly 7 months of my pregnancy.
    I have been doing a bit of research as I’ve lost all faith in the Doctor’s Surgery, they don’t seem to take anything seriously, take forever to do something, and tell you nothing about your own condition/illness.
    Have read that improperly or untreated thyroid problems in pregnancy can cause :
    Fatigue, Hair loss, Depression, Miscarriage, Stillbirth, Premature labour, Low milk supply and Mental retardation in the unborn child. OMFG! I am absolutely furious and seriously concerned now! What should I do?
    Just thought I should maybe reiterate that I’m not currently, nor have been receiving any treatment through out the 30 weeks of my pregnancy. I have just received a letter from the surgery this morning asking me to pick the prescription up.

    • ANSWER:
      I had galactorrhea for three years after I miscarried and it didn’t stop until I got pregnant again. Elevated prolactin levels, thyroid fine, no pituitary tumors, etc. Pregnancy actually should stop or reduce lactation, so elevated prolactin in the early part of your pregnancy might not have had anything to do with being pregnant. I hope they also checked your thyroid back then. You might want to call and ask. If the thyroid started malfunctioning during your pregnancy, not before, that’s probably a good thing for your baby and could bring you a bit of reassurance. You may actually have a pituitary problem, though, no just a thyroid problem. I had to get an MRI to see if I had a pituitary tumor, but that may not be a good idea while you’re pregnant. Prolactin is also regulated by your pituitary gland, not particularly to your thyroid.

      So long as your endocrinologist knows you are pregnant and you’ve run it past your GP or whoever is doing your prenatal care, it’s probably very important that you get your thyroid medication and start taking it ASAP. The only reason I say you should double-check is because you might need to be on a different medication because of your pregnancy. I don’t know anything about thyroid medication though, so I’m no expert. I just always double-check when it comes to medication and pregnancy.

      I would talk with your prenatal care provider about getting an ultrasound scan to look for deformities just to be sure, and I’d try to take some reassurance from the fact that your pregnancy has been healthy so far that things will continue like that.

      Fatigue, hair loss, weight gain, and depression are all things that can happen with thyroid problems regardless of pregnancy, and if you had none of these symptoms before, it may also indicate that your thyroid problems didn’t start until after you got pregnant. You may have a pituitary problem that led to a thyroid problem, which could explain the galactorrhea without thyroid problems, then thyroid problems. Because of the problems I’ve had with my pituitary-related hormones, I suspect that you can have these problems without having a tumor or anything like that. You may need some hormone therapy or something, and it would help to see a naturopath or the equivalent of one there in the UK during and after your pregnancy to see what type of natural things you can do to increase the health of your pituitary gland, thyroid, etc.

      I was told when I first saw a naturopath that they could have done something for my galactorrhea had I seen someone about it at the time. As it was, the typical medical people did nothing and I simply dealt with abnormal lactation for three years. I later found out I had other hormonal issues that caused my first two miscarriages to begin with. This was very frustrating because they could have been prevented if I were seeing a homebirth midwife or naturopath at the time. As it was, the typical medical system knew nothing and did nothing.


Graves Disease Symptoms Hypothyroidism

Graves Disease: Graves’ disease is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, affecting 13 million people and targeting women seven times as often as … more about Graves Disease.

Graves Disease: A form of hyperthyroidism where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroxine which results in various symptoms such as goiter, protruding eyes and skin disorders. More detailed information about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of Graves Disease is available below.

Causes Graves’ Disease

Graves’ disease is caused by a malfunctioning of the immune system. Antibodies that usually protect the body against infections, viruses and bacteria, attack the thyroid gland.

The thyroid gland, in turn, produces excess thyroid hormone. It is not known what causes the immune system to attack the thyroid gland. A combination of factors such as heredity, sex, age, stress, smoking, and radiation have been implicated as possible triggers for Graves disease.

Graves disease is an autoimmune disorder that is more common in middle-aged women than in any other group of people. The symptoms of Graves disease are caused by hyperthyroidism or overactive thyroid gland, which produces more thyroid hormones than the body can handle. It is not known how the thyroid gland becomes overactive, however. So the exact cause of Graves disease cannot be pinpointed.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism or graves disease?
    I would like to hear from people who have some personal experience with this because i think i may be in the early stages of graves disease. my doctor wants me to have blood tests and an ultrasound of my thyroid, but i cannot do it right now because i don’t have any health insurance. I have to wait until i have some way to pay for these tests and anything else if i do have the disease. my thyroid is definitely enlarged, and i have lost a lot of weight unintentionally.

    • ANSWER:
      I had Graves Disease (it’s in remission right now), so maybe I can help you with this one. It’s definitely something that you should get taken care of though, so maybe there’s a way you can get yourself to a free clinic or something to get a simple blood test. Pretty much what brought me to the doctor initially was that I lost weight without really trying to. I also had a voracious appetite. Other symptoms that I only noticed later were dry skin, a dull headache above my eyes (I thought it was a sinus infection until I realized that it went away once my graves was under control), irritable mood swings (this is one of the main reasons you should get it taken care of asap- graves can affect your personality… it can trigger anxiety, irritability, inattention, etc.). Good luck and feel better! Luckily, graves is very treatable but unexplained weight loss can be symptomatic of other more serious illnesses, so you definitely need to get this taken care of.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can you tell me what are symptoms of thyroid disease?
    please tell me about any symptoms you know of from Hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease, Grave’s disease, or thyroid storm

    • ANSWER:
      HypOthyroid symptoms:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic

      HypErthyroidism and Graves Disease:
      Some of the symptoms are rapid unexplained weight loss, rapid heart rate, hair loss, shaking, diarrhea, sweating, etc.

      Hashimotos symptoms:
      HypEr and hypO symptoms – see above.

      Thyroid storm is sudden excessive thyroids hormones for whatever reason and is similar to hypErthyroid symptoms.

      Read about thyroid stuff here:

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  3. QUESTION:
    President John F. Kennedy had this disease whose symptoms include:?
    -inability to maintain glucose levels between meals
    -plasma Na+ levels drop
    -blood pH decreases
    -K+ levels increase
    -weight loss
    -muscular weakness

    These are symptoms of. . .

    a) diabetes mellitus, type I
    b) hypoadrenalism, or Addison’s disease
    c) hyperadrenalism, or Cushing’s syndrome
    d) hyperthyroidism, or Grave’s disease
    e) hypothyroidism, myxedema

    • ANSWER:
      B :)

  4. QUESTION:
    What dangers am I facing since I have not taken my thyroid medication for 10 years?
    I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism (and Graves Disease, per my mother) when I was 13. I am now 28 and have let my condition go untreated for the last 10 years. I am seeing some major symptoms now and have begun the process of getting an updated diagnosis and treatment plan (2 weeks from now). I would like to know what to expect; have I done serious damage to myself?
    I wish I had been more diligent on my own, but you don’t think of these things when you are younger.

    • ANSWER:
      You may have allowed serious damage. Graves is hypER. Make sure when they test, that they do test for antibodies and not just TSH.

      Blessings

  5. QUESTION:
    What disease do these symptoms indicate?
    I’ve been having some weird symptoms lately but they don’t stay constant, they seem to change day to day.
    They include:
    Joint Pain
    Muscle soreness and I don’t lift weights or exercise much so it doesn’t make sense
    Fatigue
    Sleeping much more than usual like 9+ hours
    Hair Falling out not localized to one spot but more thinning out
    My hands will turn dead white and get really cold
    My eyes are really red all the time and they’re achy but they don’t feel itchy or watery like allergy eyes
    I have bad mood swings and anxiety

    I had Grave’s disease but took methimazole and ended up going into remission but my endocrinologist said there was a possibility of my thyroid reverting into Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which I know hypothyroidism can produce some of those symptoms but I had my thyroid hormone levels checked and they are completely normal so that rules that out. What does all of this sound like?

    • ANSWER:
      you could have anemia.
      however, with the history of Grave’s disease, it more likely is sluggish thyroid. sometimes, the basic tests of the thyroid don’t register a hypothyroid condition. Tell your Dr. your symptoms and ask that you be further tested.

  6. QUESTION:
    My thyroid shocked my doctor, what do I do now?
    My story in short – diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism & Graves Disease in May of 09, was quickly put on medication, underwent radioactive iodine in October 09, doctor saw only a tiny change in early December 09, sudden hypothyroidism in mid-January 10

    My doctor has ordered that I immediately stop all of my medication (with the exception that if I feel my Graves disease symptoms return I should resume my medication and call). I was so shocked by the news that I instantly forgot all of the questions I had prepared for (and hadn’t expected would need for a long time).

    I now have several questions and am very confused. December was a very difficult month for me, I constantly felt cold so I spent the majority of it in bed in an attempt to keep warm and as a result slept more than I usually did (more than 11 hours at a time but no real pattern and with very vivid dreams)….

    Somewhere in the 6 weeks between my doctor visits (December 1st and mid-January) I went from being hyperthyroid to hypothyroid. I also somehow gained 9 lbs in that 6 weeks (although the weight gain itself doesn’t surprise me, but the amount worries me).

    As I’ve said, my doctor has taken me off my medication and I’ll be having blood tests done in a few weeks to see where I am without medication. But until then…

    - Should I be worried about such a sudden change?

    - How much of the being cold, tiredness/excessive sleeping, and weight gain can I contribute to my changing thyroid?

    - What are some things I might expect while I’m completely off medication? (Should I seen an increase in energy/activity?)

    - I know it’s not unheard of for radioactive iodine to have such quick results, but should I be concerned about or expect slipping farther into hypothyroidism in the future?

    - Could my age (21) be a factor in the sudden flip?

    - My doctor has taken me off of my medication because he thinks that it’s pushing me farther into hypothyroidism than I should be, is it possible that I could still be hypERthyroidism and that I was just being over-medicated?
    Ok, maybe he wasn’t SHOCKED but he was quite surprised because it’s only been 3 months since I underwent the radiactive Iodine & results often take between 3 months to 2 years to even begin showing.
    Also, he isn’t JUST a doctor, he’s actually a specialist in his field.

    • ANSWER:
      - Should I be worried about such a sudden change?

      No.

      - How much of the being cold, tiredness/excessive sleeping, and weight gain can I contribute to my changing thyroid?

      You can contribute most, if not all of it from your changing thyroid. You are hypothyroid.

      - What are some things I might expect while I’m completely off medication? (Should I seen an increase in energy/activity?)

      You should see an increase. Hyperthyroid patients take anti-thyroid meds to bring up the TSH into the normal range. Since you had radioactive iodine and you’re still on anti-thyroid drugs, it’s making your TSH too high, causing hypothyroidism.

      - I know it’s not unheard of for radioactive iodine to have such quick results, but should I be concerned about or expect slipping farther into hypothyroidism in the future?

      Depending on how big your radioactive iodine dose is, you could become more hypothyroid. You have to basically wait and see.

      - Could my age (21) be a factor in the sudden flip?

      No.

      - My doctor has taken me off of my medication because he thinks that it’s pushing me farther into hypothyroidism than I should be, is it possible that I could still be hypERthyroidism and that I was just being over-medicated?

      Probably not. If you had regular lab work done, they probably kept your dose on check. The anti-thyroid meds and radioactive iodine is what is causing your hypothyroidism.

      Good luck with everything.

  7. QUESTION:
    Recently diagnosed with hyperthyroidism?
    I just received the results of a thyroid test, and it showed I have hyperthyroidism. My TSH was very low (0.004), my T4 was high (14.1) and my T3 was high (298). I haven’t been able to get into an endocrinologist yet. What, exactly, do these kinds of levels indicate? Are they severe levels, or do they indicate something like Graves Disease? Also, I’m concerned about the treatments. I’ve heard horror stories about the meds, and I had a small reaction to iodine dye in a CT scan, so I don’t know if RAI is an option.
    I also have had almost no symptoms; in fact, I showed symptoms of HYPOthyroidism. I sweat very little, I’ve been having weight gain, my hair is thick, I’m sensitive to cold, not heat, heavy/long menstrual periods, constipation, hoarseness, muscle aches. I have no Graves symptoms. I do have breathing problems, but I smoke. My thyroid is enlarged.
    Has anyone heard of being diagnosed with hyperthyroidism when most symptoms are opposite? Also, what can I expect from treatment?
    I also suffer from depression, like hypothyroidism causes, but I also am a nervous twitchy person as well. Also, despite the weight gain, my appetite hasn’t changed, in fact, my diet has improved because of it, as well as exercise, to no avail. No problems with nails, except that they’re thin/weak, no myxedema, no clubbing of fingers. No signs of Graves’ opthalmology except for occasional dry eyes and frequent blinking.

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperthyroidism is a condition caused by the effects of too much thyroid hormone on tissues of the body. Although there are several different causes of hyperthyroidism, most of the symptoms that patients experience are the same regardless of the cause (see the list of symptoms below). Because the body’s metabolism is increased, patients often feel hotter than those around them and can slowly lose weight even though they may be eating more. The weight issue is confusing sometimes since some patients actually gain weight because of an increase in their appetite. Patients with hyperthyroidism usually experience fatigue at the end of the day, but have trouble sleeping. Trembling of the hands and a hard or irregular heartbeat (called palpitations) may develop. These individuals may become irritable and easily upset. When hyperthyroidism is severe, patients can suffer shortness of breath, chest pain, and muscle weakness. Usually the symptoms of hyperthyroidism are so gradual in their onset that patients don’t realize the symptoms until they become more severe. This means the symptoms may continue for weeks or months before patients fully realize that they are sick. In older people, some or all of the typical symptoms of hyperthyroidism may be absent, and the patient may just lose weight or become depressed.

      It seem as if you will be around for awhile. Hope this helps.

  8. QUESTION:
    The benefits of radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism?
    I was diagnosed with Graves disease 9 months ago and we tried medication for 8 months, but it did not really work, just slightly alleviated my symptoms. I got RAI 2 months ago and I honestly feel great. I can exercise and do not feel crappy anymore. Is it normal? I read I will most likely develop hypothyroidism. When will this show? Will I keep feeling better from now on?

    • ANSWER:
      You already experienced the benefit of such procedure pal. The main purpose of this treatment is the reduction/disappearance of symptoms of hyperthyroidism. yeah u will keep feeling better of course. For better explanation of this Please see the link below. Good Luck and stay happy thus making u feel a lot better. :)

  9. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with me? Not tired, thyroid disease?
    i’m 23 type 1 diabetic. Just had a baby 2 months ago.
    -symptoms
    in the last 34 hours I’ve slept for 2 hours and am not tired at all.
    rash on upper arms
    irritable
    I do have nodules on my thyroid
    my mother has hypothyroidism
    I’ve lost all my baby weight and 5 extra pounds just this past week even though i’m eating normally or more than normally.
    Iron level is fine
    To me I look super skinny, cause i can see my ribs and such.
    I’m starting to get worried that this could be my nodules that are actually cancer
    or maybe graves disease.

    anyone have this happen to them?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      From my own experiences – I used to be allergic to my own sweat that I was burning off during exercise – during a time in my life when I used to have considerable toxins stored within my body fat. I eventually learned that itching or rashes are symptoms of maladies that could become much worse if never healed with good choices.

      Although I have seen that most root problems for ‘skin’ issues for myself and others has usually always been from long and or short term allergic reactions to ‘something’ COMBINED WITH a weakened lymph liver kidney skin and immune systems – IF the following symptoms would ever occur – I think the worst rash one might possibly have rapidly acquired is from deadly bacterial meningitis, BUT bacterial meningitis would be VERY RARE.

      The two quotes below are from: <> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_Meningitis <>

      <>
      “IF a rash is present, it may indicate a particular cause of meningitis; for instance, meningitis caused by meningococcal bacteria may be accompanied by a characteristic rash.”
      <>

      <>
      “The MOST common symptoms of meningitis are headache and neck stiffness associated with fever, confusion or altered consciousness, vomiting, and an inability to tolerate light (photophobia) or loud noises (phonophobia). SOMETIMES, especially in small children, only nonspecific symptoms may be present, such as irritability and drowsiness.”
      <>

      For further details see: <> http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/faq.html <>

      <><>

      To help you with more information on itch rash illnesses and for long term solutions TO THEM ALL – the following link has considerable info within a ‘report’ I recently posted:

      <> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091113104039AAbnGet <>

      I truly hope what you learn will help you to decide on the correct choices that will remedy your painful malady in the future.

      My best to you and yours,

      AI – self taught nutritionIsT ><+>[(-:]

  10. QUESTION:
    Normal Thyroid Levels?
    I was diagnosed with Grave’s Disease in January of this year. I underwent the radioactive iodine treatment I-131 to kill my thyroid in February. After a visit to the doctor this last week I found out that I am now hypothyroid with a TSH level of 36. They tell me that normal is .2 to 5.0. I have gained nearly 23 lbs in one month but they say that it is water retention.

    I’m assuming I still have the Graves Disease as I believe it never goes away. What are some of the symptoms of the hypothyrodism? My endocrinologist isn’t much help and tells me to research the internet for help instead of getting answers from her. How frustrating.

    My question is, my level seems awful high? How long does it take to get regulated once you are on synthroid? What are some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through the same thing about ten years ago. You still have Grave’s disease. I found that out for sure when I had serious eye problems from it years later. Most people end up hypo active after radio iodine. They’ll adjust your medicine to make your levels normal. I gained weight, had water retention, sleep a lot, and was crying over nothing until my dosage was straightened out. I was also cold, cold, cold. I still seem to have some mild symptoms of both conditions. I don’t know if it’s in my mind. I feel much more sane and healthy with normal thyroid levels. Be sure to let your doctor know any symptoms you’re having as they are adjusting the medicine. Don’t let them go by the “numbers” alone.

  11. QUESTION:
    Have I possibly been misdiagnosed?
    So, My doctor and endocrinologist tell me I have Graves Disease and HYPERthyroidism. But what I don’t understand is all my symptoms point towards HYPOthyroidism. The fatigue, the brain fog, the weight gain…no matter how much I diet and exercise, the confusion and so on and so on. My endocrinologist is being very insistent in giving me radioactive iodine to destroy my thyroid. But if I do that, I will become hypothyroid anyways. I just don’t understand and I am getting very upset…mostly over the inevitable weight gain. I mean…I am already fat, I don’t need to gain more weight. I’ve been trying to call her, but she always seems to be out of the office. I’ve tried all sorts of medications to control the T3 and T4 hormones that are supposedly “out of control” and nothing is working. That’s why my doctors want to give me the RAI treatment. I also find it very suspicious that before I went on this medication (methimazole 60mg, recently bumped down to 50mg) I was losing weight left, right, and center…now, no matter how hard I try, I can’t lose even an ounce. And every time I go get blood work done to see how the medication is doing me, I am told my thyroid hormones are still “out of control”. I am just at the end of my rope here. I just don’t understand! Somebody please help me before I make a huge mistake I have to live with for the rest of my life!

    • ANSWER:
      Uh-oh. I think this article will help: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/how-to-find-a-good-doc/

      It’s important that you get hard copies of all your lab tests and results.
      TSH – should be less than “1″, or almost zero. Some doctors think a low TSH means “hyperthyroidism”, when in fact it does not. It could mean a number of things from being normal to have pituitary damage. http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/tsh-why-its-useless/
      FREE T3 and FREE T4 – the 2 thyroid hormones that should normally be tested. They should be high in range with the FREE T3 being higher than the FREE T4. It’s ok if they are slightly over range.

      There can also be other reasons for your issues like adrenal problems, low ferritin, electrolyte imbalance, etc.

      Your body temperature should be 98.2 degrees F (36.777 C) or a bit higher, NOT lower.
      If it’s lower, this points to a metabolic (low thyroid) issue. Symptoms would be: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

      If it is higher than 99 F (37.222 C), and diarrhea, shaking, sweating, racing and rapid heart rate, excessive and rapid weight loss, hair loss, exhaustion, excessively high Ft3/Ft4, etc this points to possible hypErthyroidism. Treating hypErthyroidism with RAI (radio active iodine) is wrong and dangerous (just say NO to RAI). Giving someone an antithyroid drug will lower the production of thyroid hormones by lowering body iodine. However, most times hypErthyroidism is caused by iodine deficiency….sigh…

      What I suggest is to read the first article I posted, find a better doctor, do a little investigating of your lab results, join one of the Yahoo thyroid groups (thyroidless is a great one as is Naturalthyroidhormones), read the files and database sections, and ask ask ask those that have been thru the same. Ok? That is how I learned to save my own life.
      Here are the addresses for the 2 groups I mentioned: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/thyroidless/ http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Naturalthyroidhormones

      Don’t do anything permanent!

  12. QUESTION:
    Hyperthyroid and can’t lose weight?
    A year ago i was diagnosed with central hypothyroidism. This made SO much sense b/c ever since i was a little kid no matter what i do i can’t lose weight. I’ve always had extremely dry skin and hair, and my mother was always concerned about how much sleep I needed. Then they started me on medication. My levels were too high so they lowered my medication twice before taking me off of it completely. They waited three months and tested me again. Now they are taking back the central hypothyroid diagnosis and saying i am now hyPERthyroid and could have graves disease. Yet i still have all the symptoms i did when i was hypo and cannot lose weight to save my life (short of starving myself completely and i know thats not healthy). My doctor completely ignores any symptoms i have other than a high heart rate (which was even higher when i was hypo) and my blood work. I just want to know what the crap is wrong with me!!

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest switching doctors. I am also hypothyroid and have always had the same weight and sleep problems that you do. It may be that you were put on too high of a dosage of medication and it actually reversed your thyroid levels. I suspect you really are hypothyroid and just haven’t had the right dosage of synthroid prescribed to you. Get a second medical opinion and good luck.

  13. QUESTION:
    Would a recent MRI I had to diagnose a cervical spine problem also reveal something wrong with my thyroid?
    Four months ago, after visiting a neurologist, I had an MRI done of my cervical spine, which was read by a neurosurgeon. That problem, which was a bulging disc, has been resolved. For a while now, I’ve been having worsening symptoms that friends have told me really sound like hypothyroidism, or Grave’s disease (they all have it). I’m waiting to see a new doctor in 7 weeks. But I’m wondering about that MRI. If I have an abnormality of my thyroid, would it have been noticeable on that image?

    • ANSWER:
      No. You need blood tests to detect thyroid problems. The tests that you need are free T3 and free T4. Ask for them by name, or all you will get will be a TSH test, which doesn’t tell you much of anything. It’s not even a thyroid test. TSH is a pituitary hormone.

  14. QUESTION:
    high thyroid peroxidine antibodies?
    I have hypothyroidism and am on synthroid. Docs in the past kept telling me I was depressed b/c I am a stay at home mom with 3 kids. I changed GP’s and the new one sent to a rheumatologist b/c of many symptoms that mocked lupus. Lots of blood work was done…all was great, except my thyroid peroxidine antibodies. I believe normal is anything below 35 and mine was 629. If I am already taking synthroid…what else can be done? I have been reading that it could be Graves Disease or Hashimotos. I can’t take any more synthroid?Do I just have to live in misery for the rest of my life if it is either of them. I guess I just need some hope that something else can be done. Please no sarcastic answers. Any help or advice is MUCH appreciated!!

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    Do you have any of these conditions?
    Adverse reactions and side effects of aspartame include:

    Eye
    blindness in one or both eyes
    decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
    pain in one or both eyes
    decreased tears
    trouble with contact lenses
    bulging eyes

    Ear
    tinnitus – ringing or buzzing sound
    severe intolerance of noise
    marked hearing impairment

    Neurologic
    epileptic seizures
    headaches, migraines and (some severe)
    dizziness, unsteadiness, both
    confusion, memory loss, both
    severe drowsiness and sleepiness
    paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
    severe slurring of speech
    severe hyperactivity and restless legs
    atypical facial pain
    severe tremors

    Psychological/Psychiatric
    severe depression
    irritability
    aggression
    anxiety
    personality changes
    insomnia
    phobias

    Chest
    palpitations, tachycardia
    shortness of breath
    recent high blood pressure

    Gastrointestinal
    nausea
    diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
    abdominal pain
    pain when swallowing

    Skin and Allergies
    itching without a rash
    lip and mouth reactions
    hives
    aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma

    Endocrine and Metabolic
    loss of control of diabetes
    menstrual changes
    marked thinning or loss of hair
    marked weight loss
    gradual weight gain
    aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
    severe PMS

    Other
    frequency of voiding and burning during urination
    excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
    increased susceptibility to infection

    Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
    death
    irreversible brain damage
    birth defects, including mental retardation
    peptic ulcers
    aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
    hyperactivity in children
    severe depression
    aggressive behavior
    suicidal tendencies

    Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Epstein-Barr
    Post-Polio Syndrome
    Lyme Disease
    Grave’s Disease
    Meniere’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    ALS
    Epilepsy
    Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    EMS
    Hypothyroidism
    Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
    Fibromyalgia
    Lupus
    non-Hodgkins
    Lymphoma
    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

    THEN PLEASE WATCH THIS VIDEO!

    • ANSWER:
      Aspartame cannot cause Lyme disease, but Lyme disease can cause fibromyalgia.

      I agree with you, aspartame is very nasty stuff. It should never have been approved for human consumption.

  16. QUESTION:
    Aspartame Side Effects?
    Can aspartame really cause side effects such as:
    Eye blindness in one or both eyes
    decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
    pain in one or both eyes
    decreased tears
    trouble with contact lenses
    bulging eyes

    Ear
    tinnitus – ringing or buzzing sound
    severe intolerance of noise
    marked hearing impairment

    Neurologic
    epileptic seizures
    headaches, migraines and (some severe)
    dizziness, unsteadiness, both
    confusion, memory loss, both
    severe drowsiness and sleepiness
    paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
    severe slurring of speech
    severe hyperactivity and restless legs
    atypical facial pain
    severe tremors

    Psychological/Psychiatric
    severe depression
    irritability
    aggression
    anxiety
    personality changes
    insomnia
    phobias

    Chest
    palpitations, tachycardia
    shortness of breath
    recent high blood pressure

    Gastrointestinal
    nausea
    diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
    abdominal pain
    pain when swallowing

    Skin and Allergies
    itching without a rash
    lip and mouth reactions
    hives
    aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma

    Endocrine and Metabolic
    loss of control of diabetes
    menstrual changes
    marked thinning or loss of hair
    marked weight loss
    gradual weight gain
    aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
    severe PMS

    Other
    frequency of voiding and burning during urination
    excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
    increased susceptibility to infection

    Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
    death
    irreversible brain damage
    birth defects, including mental retardation
    peptic ulcers
    aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
    hyperactivity in children
    severe depression
    aggressive behavior
    suicidal tendencies

    Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Epstein-Barr
    Post-Polio Syndrome
    Lyme Disease
    Grave’s Disease
    Meniere’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    ALS
    Epilepsy
    Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    EMS
    Hypothyroidism
    Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
    Fibromyalgia
    Lupus
    non-Hodgkins
    Lymphoma
    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

    • ANSWER:
      This rumor has been going around for years, and it totally false. Some people may be sensitive to it, but it does not cause the diseases you listed or any other illness. Several of the diseases have been around since the late 1300 or early 1400, such as Multiple Sclerosis.

      If only this were the answer, then it would be great. I for one have Multiple Sclerosis and never drank a diet drink until a few years ago, way after I had symptoms. And that is only once or twice a week at most. A family member of mine is a Neuro Pharmacologist and a professor at UC Irvine medical school She stated that she is one of the worse diet coke drinkers and is very healthy.

      She is the one that said the statement about how long some of these diseases have been around. I trust her totally and not because she is related, because she has been in research for several years.

      Please check this website for more info on Aspartame. Take care.

      www.snopes.com and type in aspartame. It has a lot of info that I did not post.

  17. QUESTION:
    I had hyperthyroidism; is it possible that I can now get hypothyroid?
    I am currently 16. I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism when I was 14 and had it for about a year until the symptoms started to completely subside. When I was free of Grave’s disease, my doc. told me that I most likely will get the opposite disease in my 20s…HYPOthyroidism.

    Is this true?

    Because right now I have a mix of the 2 diseases…My metabolism sucks lately (hypo) yet I’m hot all the time (hyper) YET I’m freezing cold at night (hypo) and also get night sweats (hyper) !!!

    • ANSWER:
      ive had hypothyroidism since i was 11, but my dad has hyperthyroidism! i havent heard of anyone switching from one to the other but since i got hypothyroidism from my dad who was hyperthyroid, it makes me think they’re related. hope that helped a little…. :)

  18. QUESTION:
    Simple (or not so simple) thyroid question?
    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 15 years ago. I have been on the same treatment, and have had many adjustments over the years, but have always used the same medication (Synthroid). Recently though, I have had gigantic swings of symptoms (tiredness, brittle nails, brittle hair, edema, cold swings, lethargy, etc) even while being on my meds. I have been to the doc, platlet count is normal, white blood cell count is normal, blood oxygen 98%, blood glucose normal. My doc says that my thyroid may be “shutting down” and I may need radiation therapy yet again to stabilize it, or surgery to remove it.
    I have never heard of such a thing without having either cancer, some sort of immuno disease, or Grave’s disease.
    It seems more like my body is rejecting or is indifferent to the actual drug than the thyroid (since there isn’t an elevated wbc). I guess what I am asking is…
    …have you ever heard of such a thing?
    I’ve been an RN for 11 years now and haven’t.
    I also take Stratterra for ADD (for 7 years now), but it is compatible with Synthroid – never had a problem like this before.
    I’m 31, my mother and her mother went through the “change” in their 60′s, and didn’t even have premenopausal symptoms until their late 50′s. Thank you for asking, I never thought of age as a factor.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m hypothyroid and I’ve been on Synthroid for about seven years. I’ve never experienced anything like that before. But that doesn’t mean that it couldn’t happen.

      It is perfectly possible that you could receive normal test results but still have symptoms of hypothyroidism. This is because (as you may know, if you’re an RN) your thyroid gland fluctuates a bit. The result you get one day is not necessarily the same result you’d get the next day. Also, doctors have recently realized (accroding to my doc, within the last year or two) that, if you have your blood test done less than six hours after taking your thyroxine, your result will be way higher than it should be. Point being that your thyroid gland may still be quite low despite normal-looking test results.

      The other thing is, sometimes people who are hypothyroid or hyperthyroid will experience symptoms belonging to the opposite problem; that is, hypo people may experience hyper symptoms while hyper people may experience hypo symptoms. I’m not sure why this is, but I know that it does happen. If you’re having hypo symptoms despite taking your thyroxine, this could be the problem.

      You mentioned immuno diseases. Hypothyroidism can be caused by about a million different things, but the most common one is Hashimoto’s Disease or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. (My hypothyroidism is because of Hashimoto’s.) Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease where your body decides that your thyroid gland is a foreign invader and hence decides to attack it. The result of this is that your thyroid gland become incapacitated and cannot produce enough natural thyroxine – enter hypothyroidism. I don’t know if this is the case with you or not and I don’t know if there is any connection between autoimmune diseases and the symptoms you’re experiencing; I just thought that, if you know of a connection, that I should let you know that you COULD have an auotimmune disease.

      I’ve heard of people having part or all of their thyroid glands removed in two cases: cancer and hyperthyroidism. If people are just slightly hyperthyroid, they generally opt to simply live with it. However, if they are severely hyperthyroid, the treatment of choice is generally to destroy enough of the thyroid gland that the person then becomes HYPOthyroid and is then able to control their thyroxine levels with medication. I don’t know about your case.

      I do know people who have had their thyroid glands removed and are then put on large doses of thyroxine to make up for it. It doesn’t affect them at all. They don’t have any problems with it. The only thing is, that if they don’t take their medication, they’re insanely tired and lethargic. So, if you do need to get your thyroid gland taken out, don’t panic about it.

      I’ve never heard of anyone who has found that their body has rejected sythetic T4. Honestly, that doesn’t even seem very plausible to me – simply because thyroxine is a fairly gentle drug that almost no people have problems with. However, if you do think that it could be that your body is rejecting your T4, you could ask your doctor to try putting you on T3. Doctors generally prefer T4 because it keeps your thyroid levels much more even than T3. (And T4 is much, much cheaper to buy!) But, doctors will put patients on T3 when, for some reason or another, T4 doesn’t work out.

      Finally, if you’re unsure about your doctor’s diagnosis, get a second opinion. Doctors are smart, but they do make errors. And, after all, you’re the one experiencing the symptoms. If you think the doctor is making a mistake (like sending you in for surgery), talk to another doctor or two and see what they say. Protect your health.

  19. QUESTION:
    What disease do these symptoms indicate?
    I’ve been having some weird symptoms lately but they don’t stay constant, they seem to change day to day.
    They include:
    Joint Pain
    Muscle soreness and I don’t lift weights or exercise much so it doesn’t make sense
    Fatigue
    Sleeping much more than usual like 9+ hours
    Hair Falling out not localized to one spot but more thinning out
    My hands will turn dead white and get really cold
    My stomach always seems to burn and when touched it causes pain
    I get an uncomfortable feeling in my chest once in awhile
    My eyes are really red all the time and they’re achy but they don’t feel itchy or watery like allergy eyes
    I have bad mood swings and anxiety

    I had Grave’s disease but took methimazole and ended up going into remission but my endocrinologist said there was a possibility of my thyroid reverting into Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which I know hypothyroidism can produce some of those symptoms but I had my thyroid hormone levels checked and they are completely normal so that rules that out. What does all of this sound like?
    And headaches that come on very suddenly

    • ANSWER:
      i dunno, i hope you are well and in time get better. but i will say that i had similar stuff going on and than my neurologist recommended Organic Matcha Green Tea, and the past 6 months have been steady and sometimes i even feel things are getting better.


Good Diet For Hypothyroidism

An overactive or underactive thyroid gland can result in a number of troublesome symptoms that require medical attention. Fortunately, while you find out what is the most appropriate treatment for you, you may start including foods that help the thyroid gland; they support thyroid function mostly by providing a source of the mineral iodine, which is crucial to a healthy thyroid.

The thyroid gland, which is located in the neck, produces hormones that affect a variety of metabolic processes in the body. If the body does not produce sufficient amounts of the thyroid hormone T4, symptoms of underactive thyroid result. Among these symptoms are fatigue, depression, weight gain, hair loss, feeling cold often, constipation, brittle or splitting nails, memory problems, and dry skin. Since iodine is required to produce thyroid hormones, certain foods that are rich in this important mineral may play a key role.

Iodine-rich Foods that That Help The Thyroid Gland

Thyroid activity involves several hormones, most notably T4, T3, and TSH. When levels of T4 are low, symptoms of an underactive thyroid gland will become apparent unless hormone levels are regulated. Under normal circumstances, this regulation takes place when the pituitary gland produces TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). TSH stimulates the thyroid gland to extract more iodine from the blood. The iodine is used to produce enough T4 to restore adequate hormone levels in the blood.

There is usually 20 to 30 mg of iodine stored in the body, mostly in the thyroid gland, though some iodine is also stored in the lining of the stomach, salivary glands and in the blood. If iodine stores become depleted, the body will not be able to make enough thyroid hormone. In such cases, foods that have shown to help the thyroid gland to produce T4 are important to help the body make adequate amounts of thyroid hormones.

Some of these foods include:
seaweeds like lato, kelp, nori, gamet and balbalulang
yogurt
cow’s milk
seafood
foods grown in iodine rich soil

Foods You Should Avoid

It is also important to note that in addition to foods that help the thyroid gland naturally, there are also foods that inhibit the production of thyroid hormones. These foods, known as goitrogens, contain compounds that interfere with iodine absorption. Goitrogen-containing foods include cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower.

To learn about other 5 foods that can interfere with the thyroid function – and for a full and easy-to-follow diet and weight loss plan for hypothyroidism, visit: hypothyroidism, food and diet.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    where can i find a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    i would like any help i can get without having to take diet pills.. i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 4 years ago. since then i have put on almost 40lbs. i would like some input on what foods to eat that would help speed up my metabolism. also a good workout regimen would help too. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      According to Dr. Todd Nippoldt of the Mayo Clinic, “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.”

      Question asked of Dr. Nippoldt: “Can iodine supplements help regulate thyroid function in a person with hypothyroidism?”

      Dr. Nippoldt: “No. Some alternative medicine practitioners recommend iodine tablets or kelp supplements — which are high in iodine — for people with hypothyroidism. It is true that severe iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism. But iodine deficiency is extremely rare in the United States and other developed countries since the addition of iodine to salt (iodized salt) and other foods. If iodine deficiency is not the cause of hypothyroidism, then iodine supplements provide no benefit.

      “Hypothyroidism is safely and effectively treated with the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine.”

      Walking a couple of miles twice a day would help keep your metabolism revved up naturally. If your health is good enough, try it. My prayers are with you. The main thing is not to forget to take the synthetic thyroid hormone your doctor prescribes for you.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    My TSH levels are elevated but not to the point of needing medication in my Endocrinologist opinion. I am rapidly gaining weight without changing my eating habits. I was wondering if anyone knew of a diet that would help loose weight while you are caught in that ‘grey’ area.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function.

      if you have hypothyroidism, take thyroid hormone replacement as directed by your doctor — generally on an empty stomach. It’s also important to note that too much dietary fiber can impair the absorption of synthetic thyroid hormone. Certain foods, supplements and medications can have the same effect, including:

      Walnuts
      Soybean flour
      Cottonseed meal
      Iron supplements or multivitamins containing iron
      Calcium supplements
      Antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium
      Some ulcer medications, such as sucralfate
      Some cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as cholestyramine and colestipol
      To avoid potential interactions, avoid these products or use them several hours before or after you take your thyroid medication.

  3. QUESTION:
    what would be a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    I have no thyroid an am on meds,but weight is not cooperating. I stay within the same 2-4 lbs and cant seem to get down to my old weight

    • ANSWER:
      Avoid processed and refined foods, and foods with white flour and sugar. Avoid tap water — Chlorine and Fluoride block iodine receptors in the thyroid gland. Include the following items in your diet: apricots, dates, egg yolk, molasses, parsley, potatoes, prunes, raw seeds and whole grains. Eat fish or chicken.

      Be careful with brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, kale, peach, pear, spinach and turnips. They have the potential of further suppressing thyroid function.

      If you want to try some supplements, use Kelp (contains Iodine, the basic substance of thyroid hormone) and L-Tyrosine. And, take your vitamin B complex supplements.

      If you are on any other meds, take them several hours apart. Thyroid medications can interact with other ones. In terms of exercise, I assume you are doing some aerobic exercise so that you can burn fat. I have noticed that if I try to lose weight only with a diet, it rarely works. But if I incorporate some light fat burning exercise like walking or biking with the pulse being around 110-125, i.e. not that high, but high enough to burn fat, my weight just comes off like crazy.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a good diet for hypothyroidism?
    This thyroid is the one were you gain weight.

    • ANSWER:
      everyone would say…yeah go see a doctor..and the end result is medication or directs you to a specialist, that’s how it goes.

      usually 95% of the time, doctors help relieve the symptoms and most of the time doctors don’t try to fix the root of the problem. (don’t attempt to cure the problem)

      hey if they did cure the problems, what would happen to the big pharm industry? no denying that businessmen cant make money off of healthy people.

      visit the link below (google.book) the book describes what hypothyroidism is and treatments available.

      if you want to go see a doctor, you will be mostly likely be using synthetic thyroid hormone treatment and worst part you probably have to use it for the rest of your lifetime.

      don’t eat goitrogenic foods such as rapeseed, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, maize, lima beans, soya and pearl millet.

      you need food high iodide such as fish.

      eat a well rounded meals with mixed fruits and veggies.

      if you are looking for in-depth details i suggest looking at the sources down below

  5. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for people with hypothyroidism?
    I just got diagnosed with hypothyroidism, and I am looking for a good diet for the thyroid. So if anyone could give me any suggestions I would appreciate it.

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      WAIT,BIANCA???? OMG i am SO confused ok fruits,vegetables,and lots of water are all good and stay away from lots of salt and soy products because they mess up your levothyroxine,(your medicine) and they also make you tired so yeah as long as you stay away from those products and eat vegetables and fruit AND take your medicine everyday then you are good.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is a good diet for someone with hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and trying to lose weight any suggestions for a diet for people with hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Losing weight with hypothyroidism is difficult but can be done. You must do 60-90 minutes of cardio daily.

      You must eat three regular meals and 2 healthy snacks. Reduce the refined carbs in your diet, like pototos, white bread, rice and replace them with lots of colourful veggies, eat lots of chicken and fish, and make sure you eat some protein with all of your meals and snacks.

      I assume you are on medication, and once the medication starts doing its job it will be easier for you to lose weight.

      Good luck.

  7. QUESTION:
    Looking for good diet for people with hypothyroidism….?
    I was diagnosed with Hypothroidism about 6 years ago. I gained almost 100 pounds! Even though I take my meds I have not lost any weight, my doctor says the meds really don’t help you lose weight. Has anyone found a good, healthy diet that works for people with Hypothroidism? I know I’ll never lose all of it, but I’d like to give a good try. I would prefer only serious answers please.

    • ANSWER:
      The imbalance in your thyroid can lead to imbalances in other glands, pituitary, ovaries and pancreas. You can have adrenal problems as well that increase weight gain. So you can have 4-5 factors working against you, not just one. The doctors don’t really tell you this. You have to read up on things yourself.

      I suffer from this condition after being treated with radioactive iodine. The result has been a nightmare. I used to be stick thin and could eat anything. Now I have to be careful and fight constantly. For the most part I have been successful, but if I stop at all, my weight goes up relentlessly. Remember that you will become increasingly hypothyridic for the rest of your life, so be aware that your thyroid meds will slowly have to be increased over time. You have to be vigilant. Most endochrinologists also are not huge amounts of help, I find. An interesting fact, btw — if you do manage to lose the weight and get pregnant, your chances of having identical twins increases by something like 30 per cent (read that somewhere).

      You have to exercise – a lot; you must raise your overall metabolic level over time, which means exercise every day. It is better to do two small sessions in the morning and evening (like two walks, or go to the gym and a short walk in the evening) than one big session. The idea is to keep everything at a constant and consistently raised metabolic level, which other lucky people have naturally. So you must work more activity into your whole life across the board (take the stairs, walk to work, lift small weights at your desk if you work behind one, etc.). You need to do yoga or other stretches like pilates and take vitamin and mineral supplements to reduce stress (chromium, hoodia, essential fatty acids, B vitamins, etc.). Try to get a good and sympathetic personal trainer, who understands people with medical problems like this and diabetes.

      Be aware that you are at a higher risk for diabetes, and you should basically switch to a diabetic diet, in order to avoid actually getting the disease. No white bread/noodles/rice. Cut out sugar. Eat celery and cucumber, whole grains, chicken and fish. Oatmeal is very good, as it burns slowly and you will find that you will feel better if you eat it without sugar, just cook it with fruit (blueberries, apples) and coconut, cinnamon or vanilla. Also, for some reason, pumpkin seeds are good for this disease (read it somewhere).

      Another thing I have found that works is small light meals and timing — eat each meal at the same time through the day every day, to the minute, if you can. You have to reconceptualise food and treat it like medicine. Try to get up early. This illness creates wakefulness in the late evening (you will get hormone rushes at the wrong times), prompting snacking late at night and staying up late (naturally thin people have appetite surges at different times of day and tend not to eat at night). Also, my doctor says that staying up late causes obesity. They have done research on shift workers and found that people whose internal clocks are not in rhythm with the sun gain a lot of weight. So go to bed at 11 (as you can see I am wide awake and it is 3:13 a.m. here so so much for good advice).

      This will help your body learn to regulate itself metabolically again, as the thyroid condition seems to involve an auto-immune disorder, in which the body becomes allergic to itself and unable to manage itself properly. It is like a ship swinging from side to side; the more it tries to fix things the more it pushes the swinging further. You have to create gentle, slow and small but beneficial changes in all aspects of life, step by step, over time. So aim first to lose five pounds only. Then another five, then another.

      It is NO FUN, horrible, I know, but you have to do it if you want to salvage your health.

      Mary Shomon is a patient’s advocate who writes extensively on this disease and also suffers from it. Check her website, sign up for her newsletter, and read her books; somewhere on her site is a list of doctors all over the UK and North America who are recommended by patients. She has spent years researching this illness and you will find out a lot that will help you to get your weight down to its ideal level and you will feel a lot better. Do NOT let anyone tell you that you cannot get your weight back down to its ideal level ever again, because I have done it, but have had doctors tell me that it is not possible. I think Shomon also has organised online groups where people can commiserate about having this illness, which helps, since most people with this ailment have to deal with a distinct lack of sympathy and understanding from the rest of the world.

  8. QUESTION:
    Ihave hypothyroidism…what is a good diet pill i can take..is hoobia any good for me?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no diet pill on the planet that works nearly as well as a healthy diet and exercise plan. I’ve tried them all. The best diet plan is one that a Dr. McDougall has. He has cured more patients of diet related problems (with a nutrition plan that has been around since the dawn of mankind) than all the diet pills in the world combined. Pills cure nothing… remember that. If you give the body the nutrition and activity it was designed for, it will cure itself. Understanding this simple concept is essential, if you want to get healthy again.

  9. QUESTION:
    Losing weight with hypothyroidism?
    My husband has to lose 30+ pounds for his job (military), within two months. He wants to try the P90x diet, which is high in protein at first, if he has hypothyroidism won’t this make him gain more weight??

    What is a good diet for people who have hypothyroidism?

    I need to know so I can write out a menu plan to fit his needs.

    • ANSWER:
      It shouldn’t…..

      I would hope that he is taking medication for his low thyroid levels…..

  10. QUESTION:
    What natural remedies are good for hypothyroidism, slower thyoid?
    I am looking for an alternative to Synthroid and suggestions on diet & natural supplements.

    • ANSWER:
      It will depend on how low your function is. Have you tried iodine? Iodine is essential in allowing your thyroid components to be docked at the receptor sites. There are several forms but I know that Iodorol from Opitmox Corporation and Dulse liquid from Natures Sunshine have both been effective for many people, including myself. If you need thyroid supplementation, you should request dessicated thyroid, Amor is the manufacturer. It is the actual bovine thyroid. Doctors say they don’t know how much you actually get, but your body is able to use all of it and it is the entire thyroid component. Synthroid is only a synthetic piece that the body does not like and has a difficult time processing and using, not to mention the junk it leaves behind that the body has to try to eliminate. Good Luck. I work with a Naturopathic Doctor that specializes in thyroid and adrenal disorders. If you would like more specific information, contact me.

  11. QUESTION:
    What is a good workout for a hypothyroid?
    I’m actually really muscular but I still have a lot of fat on me, the muscle is starting to show since I started working out more but the fat won’t go away even with my synthroid pills
    Since May I’ve lost seven pounds
    So how often should I workout? what kind of workouts should I do? What is a good diet for a teen with hypothyroidism?
    A trainer comes three days a week to help workout, but I still think i should do more, I need to lose a lot of weight soon because I’m in the JROTC and we have a physical fitness thing for an entire quarter and last year I humiliated myself plus I sweat like crazy in Texas weather and sweat off my deodorant, my diet is pretty good, we have a health nut chef who uses organic and healthy stuff, but when he isn’t around (weekends nights and lunch) I eat junk like crazy, I dont eat lunch at school because the food they cook makes me queasy,

    Can you help me?
    Just got a blood test because my synthroid needs to be adjusted

    • ANSWER:
      ginger, flaxseed along with increaseing your calcium and magnisum intake increases your metabilism which will help you lose weight quicker. and you should really be working out every other day to 5 times a week. lifting weights before you do cardio is the most effective way to drop weight so always lift them do cardio afterwards

  12. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism treatment and weight loss?
    Right now I have subclinical hypothyroidism. I’m about to have my T3, T4, T3 Free, T4 Free, and TSH tested again, so it may be clinical now. I have most of the symptoms, even some of the uncommon ones such as inability to concentrate, memory problems (such as walking up the stairs and forgetting why), etc. I didn’t realize how many of the symptoms I had until a few weeks ago. I know that I have this and I do need treatment. Most days I can barely concentrate, absolutely cannot study, and I feel like the human sloth. I have absolutely no energy most of the time. Most days, I wish I didn’t exist because I cannot function as I should be able to. I lack the concentration to read casual books now (most of the time).

    Quick note. Two months ago my TSH was at 4.06 and is expected to be higher now. For those who don’t know, anything below a 5.5 is subclinical. Anything above is clinical. 1 is normal.

    I live very healthily. I take a lot of vitamins as suggested by my doctors. I also exercise everyday and I have a very good diet. I’m very knowledgable when it comes to diet and exercise. I don’t overwork myself, I utilize muscle confusion, and I allow my body to rest. I never work the same muscle group two days in a row. Lots of stretching and yoga. As far as my diet goes, it’s tailored to help me with my acute onset inflammatory arthritis which I am in the process of conquering. Making progress everyday.

    However, and this is extremely frustrating, I have the hardest time losing weight. I had A LOT of medical issues this past year and I learned a lot about my body. Deficiencies, conditions, etc. I also learned a lot about hypothyroidism and I know that weight gain, or the inability to lose weight is a symptom. I also know that weight loss is common when treating hypothyroidism.

    What should I expect after starting treatment? I know that it takes about 4-8 weeks to have results, but how soon can I expect to lose weight. Also, how soon could I expect to feel normal again (normal concentration, energy, no depression, no insomnia, etc)?

    I know that it varies from person to person, but a rough estimate would be nice. I’m a 22 yr old male, 5’10 at 160 lbs.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:

  13. QUESTION:
    diet plan for hypothyroid… good plan?
    i have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but unfortunately it took them 9 months to figure it out! in the meantime i went from 156lbs to 220lbs, im very happy to finally be on the right medication and started on my levothyroxine yesterday, the problem is i have a holiday in 5 weeks, and i really dont want to spend the whole time miserable because of my weight, so id like to get as much off as i can before i go, but i dont want to go on a silly unhealthy diet as my health is my focus right now, so i was thinking of having 4, 350 calorie meals a day which would be 1400 cals, and going on a 30min walk or 30 mins on the rebounder a day, along with lots of water, i am a vegetarian but will eat eggs and tuna if i have to! so my diet will be mainly, fruit/veg, cereal, milk, pasta/rice, eggs, tuna, water…
    NO bread, cheese, butter, sugar or any other bad carbs……
    is this diet a good idea and will i see results in 5 weeks?
    female, age 26, height-5’7 weight 220lbs

    • ANSWER:
      I can’t tell you how much you’ll lose because that is going to depend a lot on how your body is responding to your medication. I WILL tell you that you ARE going about this in a healthy way, which will make your body happy…and when your body is happy, it gladly begins to shed some of those unnecessary pounds :)

      When you go for a walk, up the intensity by taking your mp3 or CD player with you. Each time the song changes, change your speed to match the beat of the song. Take a pair of weights with you and “dance” with them instead of just swinging your arms; do things like bicep curls, pec flyes, mimic swimming motions, military presses, and anything that feels good. All that extra movement will not only improve your weight loss, but it will also help to tone your body. Make sure you do this outside, NOT on a treadmill: you will burn far more calories this way because the treadmill does some of the work for you.

      I am your height and weighed more than you, and I lost a lot of weight doing a lot of good exercise and just eating to fuel it. If you feel like doing something like that, you can always email me.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is there a link between hypothyroidism and gluten?
    Hello,

    I’m a 27 year old female with a good diet and regular exercise program.
    I’ve been on 50mg thyroxine for the past year and I am still so tired all the time, I’m lucky if I can go a weekend without a long nap on both Saturday and Sunday! I also occasionally feel bloated and gassy (I thought it might have been lactose but it doesn’t always happen with dairy). So my next idea is maybe gluten. I know it’s the ‘in’ thing to have these days, but is there a link to thyroid issues (some website seem to imply this)?

    • ANSWER:
      I am a nurse and I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism 14 years ago. I read medical/health websites and journals but only ones that are accredited by the United Nations Health On the Net Foundation as being written by medical personnel and they are up to date and accurate.

      I have never read that hypothyroidism has a link with Coeliac disease !

      Sorry but you must be reading bogus websites that are trying to sell you something.

      Go to this website for the Health On the Net Foundation and download their toolbar for accessing reliable medical/health websites :

      http://www.hon.ch/index.html

      You may have an intolerance to wheat.

      Additional 9 minutes later : I just HONcoded the gluten/thyroid issue and I did find some articles. This must be new research as I haven’t noticed that before. Don’t forget though Coeliac disease is a congenital thing.

  15. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism, Pre-diabetic diet and work outs?
    I’ve had hypothyroidism for almost 2 years along with being pre-diabetic. I’m taking medicines for both, plus i’m on a food supplament pill that my doctor prescribed after 6 MONTHS of me excersising and only losing 5 pounds you could say i was pretty deppressed after that. I’ve got 3 months till i’m 16, that’s a young age to have all these things wrong with me! I can’t lose weight easily, but I can gain it like it’s nothing! i watch what i eat, and i’ve continued to excersise… so far i’ve lost 16 pounds in almost 8 months..it makes me so depressed and upset because i dont know what to do! so i guess my question is, What is a good work out and diet plan to stick to in order for me to lose weight more easily without the risk of hurting myself physicaly,mentaly, and internaly?
    I know it’s a lot to ask for, but I reaallly need this. i don’t want to be this size (20 in pants) for the rest of my life…. my goal is to be down to a 12 in pant size BEFORE i’m a senior.
    Thank you all so much!

    • ANSWER:
      sorry it might not be that much help but i googled it and Pre Diabetes Diet (the second site google came up with) seemed to have a whole bunch of answers. i hope this helps and helps u feel less depressed (i think personally from all the weight u said u lost that it probably shows the mirror might make us feel bigger than we r. (though i should also take my own advise i keep obsessing over weight 2. crunches seem to work well though))

  16. QUESTION:
    Hypothydroidism and losing weight? Please help, in a hurry.?
    My husband has to lose 30+ pounds for his job (military), within two months. He wants to try the P90x diet, which is high in protein at first, if he has hypothyroidism won’t this make him gain more weight??

    What is a good diet for people who have hypothyroidism?

    I need to know so I can write out a menu plan to fit his needs.

    • ANSWER:
      Someone with hypo active thyroid, they gain weight pretty much no matter what. It’s hard for them to lose any weight due to the fact that the thyroid is the metabolism, and hypo is the prefix of slow or under. In this case, his thyroid is under active. Yes, it is possible to lose weight, however it will be difficult. I’ve only had basic nutrition, however I do know the food pyramid has changed. He will need to consume more grains and vegetables, and exercise for at least 1 hour on top of his daily activities. I don’t recommend any weight loss meds because they’re just not healthy for you. However, the safe weight loss (average) is about 2-5 lbs per week. If he has two months and eats a lot of green leafy vegetables (roughage), he might be able to lose 30 lbs.

      This is just my advice, however contact your physician.

  17. QUESTION:
    I’m on a diet. Is it good enough?
    I’m losing weight, while exercising, and eating nothing but bagels and lite cream cheese for the 3 meals a day. I, also, eat 2 little cups of yogurt, in between.

    So, around 9 or 10 I’ll start my day off with a bagel with lite cream cheese.

    Around 12 in the afternoon, I’ll eat another bagel with lite cream cheese.

    When 3 o’clock whirls around, I eat a small container of yogurt. (The Carbometer brand, unless we run out, then it’s Yoplait.)

    If someone doesn’t cook something, then I make a bagel with lite cream cheese, again. (I’m not a very good cook, so I just whip up something quick.)

    Around 7 o’clock, I eat another small cup of yogurt. (Carbometer brand, unless we run out…then it’s Yoplait.)

    I seem to be losing weight on this diet. I want to keep improving. Do I need to make some changes? Advice is much appreciated! :)

    Note: I have hypothyroidism, and I’m taking medication for it which could possibly cause me to gain weight. Any advice on keeping that under control would, also, be much appreciated.

    I thank you for your *polite* and helpful answers! :)
    The only other details I can think to add is:
    - that I’m 18 years old.
    - I don’t know how much I weigh, if that’s what you want to know. (and no I’m not avoiding putting up my weight. I really don’t know it.)
    - The medicine I take is Levothyroxine.
    - I was diagnosed with hypothryoidism last year.

    - I don’t drink any sodas or anything like that. I mostly just drink near unsweetened tea and water.

    • ANSWER:
      The hole I instantly see is that you’re missing out on protein. I would switch out at least one of those bagels for a peanut butter and honey sandwich, and then also add in a meat, preferably skinless grilled chicken or fish to keep fat content low. Any time you try to slim down protein is very important, especially if you’re working out, because your muscles need protein to feed them and it burns better than fats or sugars.

      Variety is important in your diet and eating the same thing all the time isn’t going to cover it. Try adding in fresh fruit(all you have to do is rinse) and veggies like carrots. Missing out on essential nutrients can end up causing you problems in the long run. At the very least at in a daily vitamin to make sure your bases are covered. I like the Multitab brand, you can find it at any GNC.

      UPDATE- It’s actually good that you don’t know how much you weigh, because weight is a completely deceptive measurement. Muscle weighs more than fat, so you could gain three pounds and lose two dress sizes in the same month. Good for you for not basing everything off of weight.

      Another thing you should keep in mind is that you need to have a calorie intake of at least twelve hundred(below 1200 is an intake level that should only be done under a doctors direction because you’ll end up burning muscle rather than fat…not a pleasant experience.) and that nothing should be more than 40% fat in order to lose weight. It’s also really really good that you’re eating several small meals a day rather than three large ones. That helps train your metabolism to burn fat faster.

  18. QUESTION:
    Can a person on thyroid drugs for hypothyroidism do the Atkins diet safely?
    Extra weight is causing me to be depressed.
    Not feel good about myself
    I just hate it!!!
    please help…

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve got hypo myself, and I don’t see why not. Atkins just deals with low carbs or no carbs right? I think that diet also works with the glycemic index as well. I know some of the products include nutrients that most overweight people are lacking like selenium. In fact, my doctor told me that it’s a good idea to take selemium daily to assist with my hypo. Here’s a website I found – check out #11 for info on your thyroid: http://www.low-carb.com/at-art5.html.

      Hope that helps!

  19. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Diet?
    I really need some help with knowing what foods are good for my thyroid and which are harmful. There’s just so much information out there. Is there anyone out there who has hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) who has found a healthy diet that helps them boost thyroid function and lose weight? I need some success stories from hypothyroid people or doctors. I’m ready to try anything. Please no spam please. I don’t want info on fad diets. I want to be balanced and healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      Many years ago, Lou Costello said that a diet was “When you could have all you wanted of everything you don’t like.” With that in mind, no one actually wants a diet, but they want to find things that they can enjoy that fit their needs.

      Your Doctor will probably be able to refer you to a nutritionist. That would be the best place to start.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is this Diet and Exercise Plan good to lose 3 lbs a week?
    I’m 34, 5’4″ and weigh 183lbs.
    I’m trying to lose 3 lbs a week by doing this:
    Diet:
    Whole Grain Bagel with whipped butter and a skim latte
    Yogurt and fruit
    Vegetable with beans soup, fish or meat, rice or potatoes and salad
    Yogurt and fruit
    Vegetable with beans soup and fruit
    (sometimes a eat a slice of bread too for dinner if I’m hungry)

    Exercise (60 minutes)
    S – Yoga
    M – Triple Fit (combination of cardio, legs and arms)
    T – Spinning (45 min.) or Elliptical (90 min.)
    W – Triple Fit
    R – Spinning (45 min.) or Elliptical (90 min.)
    F – Spinning (45 min.) or Elliptical (90 min.)
    Sat. – Triple Fit

    What do you guys think? I also have a hypothyroidism that’s being treated and my levels are ok. I also don’t want to hide behind this problem.

    Thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      I see problems. Your diet has too many carbohydrates. Matter of fact it’s nearly all carbohydrates (bagel, yogurt, beans, rice, potatoes and fruit). Too many carbs will cause blood sugar spikes which create cravings and keep the weight from coming off. You need less carbs, more protein. The exercises look good.

      Suggestion, use whole grain toast (11 carbs) instead of bagel (60 carbs). Read the labels on yogurt, it can have up to 40g of carbs. Fruit has carbs too, but they are healthier, however you don’t want to mix yogurt and fruit, you’re overloading on carbs.

      Bottom line, if you are trying to lose weight, fruit, vegetables, green salads (easy on the dressing) and low fat white meat (turkey, chicken breast, white fish). The meats will be an excellent source of protein. Ever see one of those plates that has 3 sections? 1 section is about 1/2 the plate the other two are about 1/4. Your carbs and protein should be the size of the 1/4 portion and the salad should be the 1/2 portion. Hope this helps.

  21. QUESTION:
    I need some advice on how to help treat hypothyroidism?
    When I first met my fiancee, he was 21, quite a thin guy, healthy though, except for the smoking part. After he quit smoking, he suddenly gained a lot of weight (I mean, like… 30 pounds in a few months). At first I thought it was because he wasn’t smoking anymore, but a year goes by and more symptoms appear… after a visit to a doctor, looks like he has an under-active thyroid.

    I’m in a holistic health program right now, and I’m just learning, so I don’t know much about how to treat this. I have an idea of a homeopathic treatment, I have the idea that a weak liver could cause hypothyroidism… so I’m just wondering, is there any natural ways that I can help him? I don’t want to put him on drugs, or have him popping a pill for the rest of his life. Is there something we could do to, maybe, help his thyroid for good? Any diets or anything?

    Thanks for any insight!

    • ANSWER:
      I think this article might be of some help:
      “…One of the key amino acids involved in the manufacture of the thyroid hormones is tyrosine. This nutrient, by the way, has been used to help cocaine addicts kick the habit by helping them avoid the worst of the withdrawal symptoms, including tiredness, depression, and irritability. It is also one of the active agents in a new formulation called Thyro Boost, which will help too. It includes kelp, which provides iodine (the other nutrient needed to make thyroid hormones) in the form of iodide and energy-boosting Co-Enzyme Q10. Thyro Boost is available by mail order from the Nutri Centre (0800 –587 2290)….”

  22. QUESTION:
    What is the BEST way to lose weight FAST in a month and a half??
    okay so what is a good healthier way to lose 20 or 15 lbs in about a month and a half? some of you may say its not healthy but i am asking what the healthiest way is. i have a Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) and i am not like everyone else where i can eat 3 times a day or anything like that. i believe its harder for me to lose weight.so what is a good diet plan and excercise. give any tips

    [PLEASE DONT SUGGEST ANY DIET PILLS]

    thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Two (2).Things
      You need Willpower & Wont power
      Wont eat Junk food
      Wont drink soda’s
      and Wont eat Ice Cream
      Will Exercise everyday
      Cycling, Swimming Tennis and Brisk Walking,
      Skating is good too
      Sound like hard work?
      2 coin a phrase ‘just do it!’

  23. QUESTION:
    what is the healthiest way to lose 20 lbs in 2 & half months? any tips?
    okay so what is a good healthier way to lose 20 or 15 lbs in about a month and a half? some of you may say its not healthy but i am asking what the healthiest way is. i have a Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) and i am not like everyone else where i can eat 3 times a day or anything like that. i believe its harder for me to lose weight.so what is a good diet plan and excercise. give any tips

    [PLEASE DONT SUGGEST ANY DIET PILLS]

    thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      do the “three day diet” some people lose 8 pounds in just 3 days! just type “three day diet” on google and it shows u what to eat for three days. you can do this every once a week.

  24. QUESTION:
    What to do with an elevated TSH?
    I have a friend that has a recent TSH of 11.7 and TSH a couple of years ago of 9.4. He has not thyroid antibodies and his T4 is normal.
    He took levothyroxine a couple of years ago but stopped taking them because he had a palpitations and has refused to take medication since then.
    He only has some of the symptoms associated with hypothyroidism like a slightly puffy chin and a bit depressed but no weight gain and fatigue.
    He seems to think that lots of exercise and a good diet will make it better, is this true? Are the TSH figures anything to be worried about for the future if he doesn’t take any medication?

    • ANSWER:

  25. QUESTION:
    Can losing weight or over exercising cause thyroid dysfunction?
    Hypothyroidism is linked to both sides of my family (my mom, grandma and basically all my aunts suffer from it). Last May I got blood work done and found no issues with any TSH, T3 or T4 levels. I was 23 at the time. That September I set out to lose just 20 pounds to be at my ideal weight. Over the course of 5 months I was able to do so by good diet and exercising 1-2 hours 5 days a week (also, at this time I was taking one graduate course and working 40 hours a week). I was about 2 pounds shy of my goal weight and found myself EXHAUSTED and almost unable to function for over 2 weeks! I went to my PCP in February and she ran more tests and suddenly my Thyroid was way under-functioning and lacking mostly in T3 (less than 9 months since previous checkup). Since then I’ve been on synthroid and have gained over half of my weight back (I am too exhausted to keep up that workout regimen). I was just wondering if maybe I jump-started the onset of the disease by losing weight or overworking myself. Also, I’m hoping to find some tips for how to get back on track of weight loss now that my energy level and appetite is all out of whack due to this disease. :-/

    • ANSWER:
      Proper diet. Cut out all processed foods; pasta, bread, cereal, and even potatoes. Processed food spikes blood sugar which increases insulin which increases hunger. It’s much more complicated than that but I’m trying to keep this short.

  26. QUESTION:
    Discontinuing Synthroid?
    I have been on the generic version of synthroid for several years due to hypothyroidism. My doctor did blood work and instructed me to stop taking the synthroid the labs reported that my thyroid is healthy. What will the effects be of discontinuing this? I know when you go on this medication people tend to lose or gain weight easier. I know with my healthy thyroid I should be able to follow a good diet and workout, but I am really concerned. How will my body react in terms to weight? It is having a drug that influences the thyroid (which influences weight) taken out. This is a huge deal to me.

    • ANSWER:
      I was taking synthroid for about a year when I was a teenager, as so was my entire family. Before I started the pills I weighed about 115 pounds and then I dropped to 107. I was way too thin for my frame size and went of the pills. I then returned to my former weight within a few months. My brother, mother, and father were overweight when they started and their weight did not change while on of after they stopped the medication. It really depends on the individual, but I would say that you would return to the weight you were before, but don’t quote me on that. I experiences headaches and mild insomnia after stopping the medication, but I quit it cold turkey. You could ween yourself off the pills by taking half a pill a day for a few weeks, or ask your doctor what you should do.

  27. QUESTION:
    What foods should I eat/avoid with Hypothyroidism, Hypercortisolism, Pernicious Anemia, Vitamin D2 deficiency?
    I am being treated for them all, but I’m wondering if with the right diet I can get better faster.

    Currently taking Synthroid 75 mcg, vitamin B12 injections weekly, vitamin D2 vitamins weekly, and getting help for high cortisol (possible Cushing’s– undergoing more testing)

    • ANSWER:
      Of course a good diet will help you recover, but there aren’t any magic foods. Your body is doing its best with the slightly odd chemical system it inherited.

      Your doctor will be thrilled if you maintain your weight at a healthy level and eat a balanced diet. Lots of fresh veggies, some fruit, whole grains, and your choice of proteins (but not too much meat).

  28. QUESTION:
    best diet for hypothyroid??
    ive been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, along with very high antibodies… after 9 long months before being diagnosed, i put on almost 60lbs…… now my endocrinologist has started me on 50 mgs of levo thyroxine, im really pleased about finally getting the right treatment, but would really like to shift this weight, is there a good way for people with hypothyroidism to diet? 3 large meals of 5 small meals? im also a vegetarian…
    thanks for any advice

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest the 5 small meals. It will keep you full throughout the day so you don’t have the urge to snack. Trust me though, the mere fact that you have started treatment will make a huge difference in your weight loss. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism about 3 years ago after a struggle to lose weight for several years (I was only 13 at the time, but I was 5’1″ and weighed around 150 pounds). Several weeks after I started taking the medication, I noticed a difference. Now I am 5’6″ and 115 pounds, and I’m actually trying to gain a couple of pounds :P

      Best of luck!

  29. QUESTION:
    Hair loss help? (stress/hypothyroid)?
    I have been diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, I am now on a pill and trying to find the right dose and pill that is right for me. I have been having hair loss for 2years, I am 23 and it is now to the point that I cannot wear my hair down anymore at all, I have to keep it up to hide it but I have lost so much even that has become a CHORE to hide it. :( I need help!
    I’m working on a better diet, I am drinking more water, I am starting on Fish Oil, Multi Vitamin and/or hair, nail, skin vitamin.
    I have used Olive oil, raw egg, Aloe and Apple Cider Vinegar in my hair/on my scalp and they seem to help some but never used enough or continuous enough to see if it actually helped promote hair growth. Now I am reading more about Evening Primrose Oil and taking the pills along with it to help promote hair growth and I just need HELP!! I’ve also read about Hot oil treatments, that open up the shaft and pore and help to clear out any debris and then you seal the pore/hair shaft. But I have read so much my head is spinning…
    Anyone out there going through or have went through this and have found things that has worked for them?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    Can a doctor perscribe diet pills? Are there diet pills out there that are actually good?
    My doctor mentioned to me it was an option but he did put me on synthoid for hypothyroidism but I’m thinking about taking diet pills but I know a lot of them have a bad reputation and aren’t healthy for you. But are there some a doctor may reccommend?
    Actually I am well versed on health and how to lose weight properly but when it comes down to it, it’s too difficult to do.
    Well I am very obese so yes, I could probably take medically perscribed diet pills. I do try to work on my weight issues but I’m going through so much stress and psychological issues that keep me from trying to be healthy. I wish I could just stop eating period and become so skinny I would be considered attractive and elegant.

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors won’t recommend diet pills unless you’re morbidly obese because they all come with risks, and it’s only once you get to be massive that the risks of the pills are outweighed by the medical risks of you staying at that weight.

      Also, diet pills don’t fix the root problem – whatever it was that got you to where you were overweight or obese. If it’s not managing your hypothyroidism than you need to learn to do that. If it’s not eating properly, eating too much, or not being active enough, then one needs to learn to do those things. Taking drugs won’t help you fix those problems and you’ll end up right back where you started when you stop taking them. Yo-yo dieting is even more dangerous that many of those drugs are.

  31. QUESTION:
    question for people who have thyroid problems?
    I have been diagnosed as having a thyroid nodule on the right side of my neck. it is moderate in size and so it has been suggested by the doctor ( my gyno found it during a routine exam, sent me for an ultrasound and sure enough there it is) that I see a regular MD and have it further evaluated.. I must admit that after reading about nodules that I have a lot of the symptoms that could be assosciated with hypothyroidism, specifically the constipation, depression,fatigue, heavy mentral cycles,musle aches and pains,very pale dry skin,thin brittle hair and nails, weekness and also unintentional weight gain. or rather i should say that since giving birth to my baby boy about 11 months ago even being on a good healthy diet i am still holding on to the weight gain.. I am trying to find a MD to go and have the nodule looked at, but what I want to know, and am curious about is if it comes back benign and that i do in fact have hypothyroidism what is the treatment, medications ect.? and also, any of you who have been diagnosed with this in the past, how successful was the treatment been for you, meaning have your symptoms eased up or gone away entirely? have you been able to control or lose the weight gain successfully with the meds and or treatments added to a healthy diet? what about the other symptoms like the fatigue and the problems with skin, nail and hair? are those better now? I guess i want to know what I can expect to get better for me once I am diagnosed. I can’t say 100% but I have a feeling that is exactly what is wrong with me and what is causing all of my issues.. I appreciate any and all info that anyone can give me on your personal experiences.. Thank you!! =)

    • ANSWER:
      First, don’t put off having the nodule taken care of! It can be very dangerous if it’s cancer! In any case, it probably needs to come out.

      I have recurrent painless thyroiditis that ends up killing a part of my thyroid with every bout. There is no way to make your thyroid consistently put out more thyroxin once it’s damaged (it can grow back sometimes on its own, however). There is no treatment–there is only replacement. To replace the needed thyroxin, I take Armour Thyroid (if it’s available) or synthroid (if it’s not). By monitoring your blood levels every few months, your doctor can adjust the amount of replacement you need. Symptoms caused by low thyroxin should go away COMPLETELY if your levels are adjusted correctly.

  32. QUESTION:
    losing weight with hypothyroidism?
    Has anyone else who has hypothyroidism had a problem with losing weight. Im 5’8 and about 80 pounds overweight. I know my diet is not so good and I haven’t been taking my synthroid like I am suppose to. When I lose weight it seem like it comes right back. When I exercise I like to walk do workout dvd’s like taebo and I dance..workout machines are too boring. I lost like 10 pounds in 1-2 weeks just from dancing in my mirror everyday but I gained it right back. how did you or how do you think I can keep the wweight off. Thanks for any suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      Probably not just anyone who has it but EVERYONE who has it. That is the most likely problem that one w/ hypOthyroidism would have. You did not even say whether or not you are on meds….that would help the problem if you get on the right dose. TSH should be down less than 2.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  33. QUESTION:
    Dieting with hypothyroidism…please help! 10 points!! =)?
    I have hypothyroidism and really need to drop 20 lbs. ( pounds) really fast. I have been on a diet for a week now.. I have cut out all junk and regular soda.. and have been eating better and smaller portions, but when you have hypothyroidism, its harder to lose weight, so what I am asking, .. do any of you guys know how and what I can do to drop the weight faster?? I walk everyday for a mile or more, and eat extremely better. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    I am on Synthroid.

    • ANSWER:
      try the link below. You must be seeing a doctor, I think you know. Are you on meds? I hope so. Or a special diet. Happy dieting.

  34. QUESTION:
    My immune system is dead!?
    Can someone tell me what the hell is wrong with me?
    Iam a 20 year old college student. I have Hypothyroidism and for some reason i keep getting sick.
    My diet is good, I take my vitamins, I excercise, I get a good amount of sleep, yet every few weeks I start comming down with something.
    I can usually tell when im getting sick because of this pain i feel in my inner ear (usually the right) and a right gland in my throart starts to swell and then just gets worse from there. I dont ever cough so im really not sure what it could be. Its more severe then then common cold. Can someone help me please or give me some form of guidance?
    Thank you very much. =)

    • ANSWER:
      allergies

  35. QUESTION:
    How do I lose weight with Hypothyroidism?
    I am 22 years old, and 2 weeks ago, I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. The doctor put me on 75mg of Synthroid daily.

    Before I was diagnosed, I had been on a diet for about 8 months with very little results (hence the reason…). I am curious to know if my diet will be more effective since I am on Synthroid, or if it will be easier in general to lose weight. If so, what is the general degree of effectiveness, or what is typical to expect? If not, are there any suggestions as to how to lose and/or maintain weight with this disorder?

    If you need more details on my diet to make a better judgement, let me know.
    Thanks
    I do realize Synthroid is not a “diet” pill. I do not expect miracles. But after maintaining a healthy lifestyle for 8 months, I expected to be more than 15 lbs closer to my body’s healthy weight range. I am not starving myself. I eat around 1500 healthy calories a day, and do light exercise. Because I am hypothyroid, my metabolism is slowed. I was wondering if taking synthroid would put my metabolism at a more normal level therefore enabling me to lose weight at a more normal rate.

    • ANSWER:
      Keep up your diet but the Synthroid should help. Were you told … is your hypothyroidism from Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis?

      Here is some info:
      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  36. QUESTION:
    Curious about the vegan diet?
    My husband is overweight by thirty pounds and has hypothyroidism. I love my meat and dairy, but I love him more so I’m willing to try this.

    1. Is this good for people who have hypothyroidism? I’ve heard yes, and I’ve heard no. What should he be eating to balance it out?
    2. Is being vegan hard? (I think I may die.)
    3. Can he lose weight easily on the vegan diet?
    4. How do I start this?
    5. What should be on my grocery list? (I love baking.)
    6. Please hold me, I’m scared.

    • ANSWER:
      1. it is great to be vegetarain. Yes, it is fine to be vegetarian with hypothyroid because that is not really related it.
      2. Yes, eating vegan is not easy because human has been so spoil and “not compassion: (include me and espically me since I was a meater eater) to continue to enjoy “food” while someone die for us to eat them. You will die faster if you eat meat (already mentioned the answer in the above)

      3. Yes, he can lose weight. Easier than eating meat but not that easy because losing weight is not easy already. But it help because you are not eating all those saturated and high fatty food. It is hard to eat a lot of high fat food on vegetarian unless you fried all your food and you put a lot of butter or you over eat than usual or you ate too much sweet.

      4. start one meal per day..and give yourself reward on doing it. first plan the meal before you start..of course.

      then once it is doing good. start two meal per day and so on. whatever suitable for you.

      5. you should ck out more recipes on vegetarian nurition.

      6. I am holidn gyou now, and dont’ be scared. actually you

      should feel honor and storong because you are about to change your and your husband’s life for a better and healthier future. You will be blessed. I just pray for you two.

      Yes, you can get a proper diet and nurtient from eating Vegetarian diet. IN FACT: YOU’RE GOING TO BE HEALTHIER AND LIVE LONGER compare to many many meat eater.

      Vegetarian or vegan (which better) often are much much healthier than rest of people.

      ****You can replace your meat with:

      Beans (mixed beans with rice cover most the amino acid you need for your bod)

      Tofu-ck out recipes at internet or the below link I provide. I love tofu, you might want to buy Firm one and be sure to ck the expireation date (usually it last for a whlie). Cheaper to buy them at Chinese store or asian store than in the amiercan supermarket.

      Quorn-A AWSOME VEGETARIAN REPLACEMENT FOR MEAT. Taste so so so so so so so so so so good -you can get them at supermarket or Organic store for sure. (some supermarket might not carry it)

      http://www.quorn.us

      soy burger, soy meats, you can get that at many supermarket it.

      Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter,-please be sure to use nonsalt nuts so not to get too high of sodium and also buy the better kind of peanut butter (the one you see the fat and protein are separate).

      You would need to avoid any products that has aniimal in it like meat, poultry, pork, beef, fish and shrimps, seafood. Basically if it was a living creature you dont’ eat it.

      You can eat egg while you are vegetarian, but egg does hurt the animal too because what they did to the chicken so my goal is to become a vegan soon. And I don’t drink that much milk. also egg yolk is high in cholesterol.

      You can replace your milk with soy milk which is great and love it. get the low fat soy milk

      also you can buy the vegetarian feed egg and hopefully once you are doing well then you can become vegan. Egg count as protein.

      Your body need only about 6 oz of protein a day. 1/4 cup ( 1 cup is about size of your fist) of bean is 1 ounce. your palm is about 3 ounce to 4 ounce. a tablespoon of peanut butter is 1 ounce of protein so is egg.

      ck out this website:

      http://www.mypyramid.gov

      Good luck. I am very proud of you.

      ck out peta’s webiste too. You will be very blessed.

      http://www.nutrition.gov/nal_display/ind…

      http://www.vrg.org

  37. QUESTION:
    Will a hospital see me over hair loss and other symptoms related to PCOS or Thyroid trouble?
    I’m 23yrs old and having hair loss now to the point where it is Noticeable in the back of my head, I don’t smoke, I’ve never done any sort of drugs, Never taken Birth Control, Low Thyroid & Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome run in both sides of my family…My diet is good, I exercise, I am not Much over weight at all…Did have a BIG stress happen in my life these past 10months I’ve dealt with my hair loss but show other Several other symptoms of Hypothyroidism & Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome. I can go on, but without trying to ramble on…

    Will a hospital see me? Would they test my Iron levels? Thyroid & Hormone levels? If I asked?…
    Or am I wasting my time even trying to go that route? I don’t have money to even make payments to a Drs office. Are their any other options for me? Would I be better off going somewhere like a Health Department? We have one in our town, but I’m just not sure where to go or what to do.

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    advice about the Nutrisystem diet…….?
    i have 40lbs to lose and i plan on buying the nutrisystem meals that i know you are supposed to suppliment with fruit and veggies.
    i need the convenience of not having to prepare meals as i am very busy right now and need the ease of prepared diet meals. anyway i’m wondering can i drink diet sodas like “fresca”? i only usually drink water and nothing else, but i do love fresca and it is sugarless. i have heard that the “fake” sugar is bad for a diet and that the carbonation is not good also? i love water, but it does get boring and where as soda isn’t as refreshing as water is is a nice change and tastes good. anyone else out there that has done nutrisystem and has a slow thyroid like me? has it worked for you? i find it very hard to lose weight with hypothyroidism even while taking replacement therapy. just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      expensive and did not work for me buy the frozen meals in freezer lean quisine and look for the calories and less sodium will do just as well good luck I am on thyroid tabs and trying to loose

  39. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism, does eating sugar make symptoms worse or am I diagnosed incorrectly?
    I have been to a doctor who really can’t find what is wrong with me. He thinks its either candida or hypothyroidism. 9 months ago I took a drug called mephedrone, and since then haven’t felt the same since. I can’t eat sugars or grains really without feeling really woozy and spacey. I also have really red itchy eyes, mucus under my eyes, massive fatigue, digestion problems, really dry skin, and difficulty thinking straight, I mean I can barely type this out too due to all the mistakes. I took diflucan for about two months now and haven’t really noticed a huge improvement. I still have all the problems, maybe slightly better. I have completely changed my diet since I have seen him and I think that maybe has helped. I think I have felt some die off symptoms, but I don’t know, could actually be me worsening something. The reason he suspects it could be hypothyroidism, or just plain something wrong with my thyroid, is because I had told them that for as long as I can remember I have had dry skin. I also have alopecia (sp?) and have had that since about third grade. I don’t believe that taking a synthetic drug could cause a candida outbreak or cause all the symptoms to flourish, but I’m not a doctor. Could someone please give me some additional insight?
    Btw, I had blood work done and he said that my thyroid levels were fine, but my white blood count levels were above normal, and my cortisol levels are super high during the morning when I get awake, but then lower and level off around 3 p.m. I also have super low estrogen levels, I should be at around 28 or so, I believe, and I am at around 2.
    Ok, my TSH, 3rd Generation: .63
    T4, Free: 1.5
    T3, Free: 3.0
    Does anyone know if thats normal or something could be wrong? Btw, I am on a gluten, sugar free diet.

    • ANSWER:
      heya! I really suggest you try water purification drops. If there is anything in your body that is causing this.. which I highly suspect, it will kill it.

      When a chlorine dioxide ion contacts a harmful pathogen, it instantly rips up to five electrons from the pathogen, in what can be likened to a microscopic explosion… harmless to us, but terminal for pathogens.

      The pathogen – an electron donor – is rendered harmless due to the involuntary surrendering of its electrons to the chlorine dioxide – an electron acceptor – and the resulting release of energy. Oxidized by the chlorine ion, the former pathogen becomes a harmless salt.

      This process benefits a body that has become toxic.

      Throughout the body, anywhere chlorine dioxide ions – transported via red blood cells – come in contact with pathogens, the pathogens give up their electrons and cease to exist. The chlorine dioxide armed cells only “detonate” on contact with pathogens, which include harmful bacteria, viruses, toxins, heavy metals, and parasites. All of these will have pH values that are out of the body’s range of good health. They will also have a positive ionic charge. The chlorine dioxide equipped cells do not oxidize beneficial bacteria, or healthy cells, as their pH levels are 7 or above, and hold a negative ion charge.

      Chlorine dioxide ions will oxidize – meaning vaporize – diseased cells… anything that is acidic, with a positive ion charge.

      Just try it. If you feel sick after taking it, you know your body is toxic. Healthy people can take 30 drops of this and not feel anything, because there is nothing to destroy.
      How do you do with supplements too? Can you take supplements okay?

  40. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism test…?
    I’m a 16 year old girl. In a few weeks, my mom is taking me to get bloodwork to get tested for hypothyroidism because i’ve been having a big problem with my mood, weight, and energy. It’s mainly about my weight, because i’m 140 pounds and 5’1″ and i’ve always been athletic and eating right. I’ve just been having trouble losing weight. I also always seem to be depressed and tired alot. I sleep 7-9 hours a night so i know i’m getting enough sleep and i eat a balanced diet with vitamins. my mom mentioned this at my checkup and suggested i get tested for hypothyroidism and my doctor said it couldnt hurt. I also tend to have lots of aches, pains and cramps, but i didnt mention it to my doctor or mom. I was just wondering:

    How will my life improve if i DO have hypothyroidism and get perscribed meds?
    What will happen if i get miss diagnosed and go on meds (such as synthroid) but i actually dont have hypothyroidism?
    What can i do to make these problems(weight, mood, & energy) better if i dont have hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism Help…?
    Does anybody know of specific diets or food that are good for people with this condition?
    Also, what can I do to stop the pain my knees, the thyroxin was supposed to help but it hasn’t subsided and it’s been ages.

    • ANSWER:
      5 top supplements essential for good thyroid health – iodine, selenium, vitamin D, zinc and vitamin E. A gluten free diet is recommended but it’s tough! :) 200mcg of selenium (500IU of vitamin E to maximise absorption) will lower TPO antibodies if you have hashimoto’s thyroiditis. To check if your are iodine and zinc deficient, you can purchase iodine tincture and a zinc sulfate at a pharmacy. If you are lucky, the pharmacy will give you the test for free :) ….i had a free zinc taste test and was deficient! Vitamin D is almost guaranteed to be low. Test for this with a blood test – optimal 200nmol/l or 80ng/ml. 5000IU is usually needed to maintain if you are not in the sun but test your levels every 6 months. Take a good multi vitamin as well. A recommended book is Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal by Dr. Kharrazian.

      Top 5 supplements for hypothyroidism>>>

      http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/topsupplements.htm

      Zinc taste test >>>

      http://www.diabetesexplained.com/zinc-diagnostic-test.html

      Iodine tincture test>>>

      http://www.naturalhealthtechniques.com/healingtechniques/iodine_patch_test.htm

      Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests are Normal>>>

      http://thyroidbook.com

  42. QUESTION:
    I quit meth. I quit smoking. in the last year i gained 70 pounds. Need to lose at least 50! am trying a diet..
    I was on meth 24/7 for a year.Have now been clean for 1 yr, and quit smoking cigarettes 4 months ago. Have gained so much weight…now excercising, eating dry toast for breakfast, 2 apples for a snack, leancuisine for lunch, an apple and a lowfat granola bar for snack, and another lean cuisine for dinner.I eat dinner around 5:00, jog half a mile, then have another apple.I also have an hypothyroidism which I am on medication for.Is this a healthy diet? Is it low enough in fat and calories that I should lose weight? My eating was out of control, since getting clean, food has taken on a whole new meaning and has never been so good! and of course, since quitting smoking, i ate instead of smoked. now the cravings are under control, but i am up to 200 pounds!hope someone can make some suggestions!

    • ANSWER:
      first off I will congratulate in making the right choice that you do want to lose some 200 pounds.

      if you do exactly what I tell you, I guarantee you that you will see results.

      you must do the following:

      1. food.
      (a) unhealthy foods – - -please say good bye to any form of unhealthy food including junk foods whatsoever.
      (b) healthy foods – - – - please consult with a doctor about nutrition and diets to see what forms of foods you are allowed to eat.
      2. liquids.
      (a) because you will go to the gym, every single day, you will be required to drink at least a gallons worth of liquids (excluding sodas of any sort and mineral water) such as water, milk, orange juices, etc., etc., etc.
      3. exercise
      (a) I suggest that you do at least between 2 or 3 miles in the treadmill in which it should be approximate about 40 to 60 minutes

  43. QUESTION:
    I changed my diet, and started exercising 3-4 times a week, what can i do to speed up my weight loss?
    I’m a 20 yr old female, and I’m pretty heavy. It’s always been a problem for me but recently something snapped and made me really upset about it so I’m doing my best to keep motivated to look better… and maybe even more important feel better, I’m just done being overweight and unattractive.
    My diet before was full of fast food and junk, so changing that, although a little hard is definitely seeming worth it already. I mainly buy fruits and vegetables and more fresh stuff in general. No chips/candy/soda, but im not on any sort of diet plan or anything. I do have a thyroid problem– hypothyroidism, which I am on medication for, and recently I signed up for the gym and I’ve been doing an hour of cardio every other day for almost 2 weeks now.
    So far I’ve lost about 6 lbs. which is good. and i know if i keep going it’ll keep coming off, but i was hoping maybe there is something, like a specific diet plan, or maybe a natural sort of diet pill, maybe even a different way to exercise, that could help speed my weight loss along a bit?
    ANY suggestions would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Well you’ve done a swell job of cutting back on junk food. Most people can’t even take that step…so GOOD job!

      Definitely stay with the Natural stuff, even though it’s tempting to have a go at the sugary food.

      I would recommend that you use some herbs like Cinnamon (help with thyroidism), Green Tea, and black seeds.

      As for exercise, you don’t need to be hardcore…just start by walking 2-4 miles a day (or bicycle 3-5 miles)…keep a bottle of water with you to hydrate yourself.

      There’s so much more I can talk about. If you need to know more, just ask me..or go to this site

      http://TwitPWR.com/LgJ

  44. QUESTION:
    do you think i should push for treatment based on my symptoms, hypothyroidism, details inside?
    ok so ive been feeling down recently, not emotionally, im a rock upstairs, but physically run down

    in the last year ive put on a huge amount of weight, and i know i dont exercise enough and i eat a little too much (or used to) but the last time i lost weight i was eating maybe 500 calories a day and my job involved 6 hours a night of essentially cardio workouts and even then i didnt lose much.

    i decided to go to the doctor because i had tried dieting and exercise again to no avail so i went to see what help i could get. she took a history to which i provided to following symptoms (some answers were prompted by her, they are all true, but some i dont notice without thinking on it)

    sensetivity to cold (im used to working in a kitchen, followed by long stints in the walk in freezer) now i get shivery if the wind blows

    weight gain as discussed above

    low energy

    lack of desire to eat, infact if i dont eat breakfast, i can go about 2 days without any food before feeling hungry (my blood sugar is normal, as is my cholesterol)

    low sex drive (my testosterone came out as low, havent had it rechecked yet, but ive gone from having or desiring sex at least once a day to not really wanting sex at all… im 22 and ive gone off sex!!!) its not a performance issue btw it still works fine, i just have no desire for it.

    inability to sleep, and then when i do sleep, i find it incredibly difficult to wake up again.

    muscle weakness, now i know im overweight and out of shape, but i get cramp going up stairs, my hands cramp opening a tin of beans, ive lost no muscle mass but i cant lift or carry the same amounts anymore and i tire very easily.

    now my TSH level was 4.6 which if you dont know is .4 below the “treatment” stage (tsh is the indicator to how much of a kicking your thyroid needs to start working, the higher the number, the more effort it takes to get it to turn on)

    my t4 level was “normal” so she said, but she would have to watch my tsh to see if anything develops

    now considering that since the last blood test on record had a normalish tsh and the huge weight gain (im talking 100lbs in 12 months with no considerable change in diet/lifestyle) that to me shouts “hypothyroidism” but she suggested that the low testosterone may be to blame.

    now im no doctor, but my testosterone was 9 point something, and 10 is normal whereas my tsh is 4.6 gone up alot in the last year, blood relatives with thyroid conditions, and all the symptoms of hypothyroidism, surely that seems a more likely diagnosis? anyway if ive gained weight of course my testosterone will be low, thats why fat people have low fertility… i weight 24 stones at 6 foot tall! i actually make scales say error or the dial do a complete circle (dont laugh lol, ok ill let you laugh) of course there will be other problems, but surely treating for the symptoms is a good idea i mean, its either gonna work, or its not, right? i mean thats diagnostics at its simplest, surely starting at a low 50mg of thyroxine wouldnt cause any harmful side effects? if the symptoms show signs of improvement then increase the dose as necessary, if no improvement in symptoms or the TSH then sure, keep looking…

    am i right in demanding treatment based on the symptoms and the evidence provided above? i cant survive like this much longer im too damn fat, too damn tired, and if i dont get my sex drive back, my relationship with my fiancee is going to take a hit… shes hornier than a dog in heat!

    i await your responses,
    a valid point about the “fat” dieting

    i got a little fat, so i exercised, my job took up my whole life so i didnt get time to eat (never been one to remember to eat… go figure! a fat guy who doesnt get hungry!)

    i have tried eating balanced meals at regular intervals to no avail.

    and fyi, i dont like processed foods, i really love vegetables and as a chef i regularly cook proper food, and when im too busy my fiancee or parents make sure i eat right (cause they know what im like)

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly no one can, or indeed should, demand any treatment that their physician does not feel appropriate. To make a confirmed diagnosis of hypothyroidism requires 3 criteria in most cases, a raised TSH, a low T4 and a positive thyroid antibody. Though of course it does occur in men, it is also much more common in women. It is also the case that in most patients these days who do get a hypothyroid diagnosis, even when levothyroxine is given it makes no difference to the patients weight, as this is usually unrelated to the thyroid disease.

  45. QUESTION:
    How do I go about ‘detoxing’ my body?
    I am a morbidly obese 31 y/o mother of 2 small children. I have hypothyroidism and am unable to be treated with the conventional hormone therapies. I want to try radically changing my diet and have recently gone nearly meatless as I still eat chicken and seafood. Besides letting go almost completely of caffeine, sugar, and salt, what else can I do to detox my system and really cleanse myself to sort of re-start my metabolism? Are there any really good foods to aid me? And what about antioxidants? What are they good for? As you can see, I am really uneducated in this area of holistic foods.

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest green tea, or slimming tea [i call them both green tea :P] you can get those at a local grocery store and they work wonders. It cleanses the system of toxins and it provides fast, temporary calorie burning. I have lost 2 pounds in one week just from having 2 cups of it but mostly I’ve noticed that i’m not as tired and my stomach, although not losing alot of weight, is still a flatter than what it was before. The longer you let the tea bag sit in the water, the more potent it is. It isn’t alot, but every little bit counts. Good luck

  46. QUESTION:
    Best Diet to follow? 3 Stone to lose?
    Hi all, I have approximately 3 stone to lose in 12 months ( for my wedding!) Firstly, is this achievable? Secondly, who has the best diet out there? There are so many to choose from, weight watchers, rosemary connelly, atkins, hollywood diet, etc etc! It’s so confusing! My partner and I are joining the gym next month ( I would join this month – but i’ve just had an operation) Any tips or ideas ppl have would be greatly appreciated. I have hypothyroidism ( v severe – 300 mcg thyroxine a day) So losing weight is difficult, but it will NOT get the better of me!

    • ANSWER:
      hi there – i lost 2 stones in 3 months on weightwatchers – the variety of foods means that you dont feel as if you are on a diet and doing daily excerise soon became a habit – good luck i’m sure you’ll lose what you want before your wedding x

  47. QUESTION:
    Crohns, Celiac, Lupus, Hypothyroidism????? Help!?
    I started to have mental fogginess issued back in 2004, and remember having a general feeling of not feeling well. I can’t really remember exactly what it was like back then though. By the time 2006 came along, my issues had progressed pretty rapidly. I…

    - Had mental clarity issues.
    - I would get up to go to the grocery store and get in the car and realized I had forgotten where I was going.
    - I would bruise easily. I had diarrhea.
    My stomach was extremely bloated.
    I could barely carry on a conversation.

    After a few failed attempts at the doctors, I DIAGNOSED MYSELF with Celiac’s disease. Immediately, I went on a gluten free diet. After 6 months of being gluten free, I did notice improvement in some areas. But I never got to feeling 100%. Not even 60%.

    So I continued my research…

    About a year ago, I truly thought I was dying. I had…

    It feels as if all my stomach organs are swollen along with my head
    I feel like I have a fever, and my skin is hot to the touch (but no actual fever)
    Severe mental fogginess
    Underarm sweating
    Diarrhea
    Severe grogginess when waking
    Severe bloating
    Bruisings
    Pressure headaches (get migraines on occasions with blurred vision, I think unrelated)
    Swollen and puffy eyes
    Got sick easily
    Cold hands and feet
    Shiver in cold weather
    Fatigue
    Major skin issues. Pustuals on the hands and feet, rashes, etc. However I was able to get that at bay with very very mild soap.

    I knew at this point, I had to make a change. I cut everything out of my diet and slowly reintroduced things. At the end of this test, the only thing I could eat (at not perfect at that) was fruits, veggies, millet bread, sunflower butter (peanut butter substitute). I stuck to that diet for about 6 months and really better but dropped to 140 pounds. I went from a 1 out of 10 to a 6. But then started noticing that I was lacking nutrients and was getting other symptoms for not being balanced nutritionally. I have added a few things back in with a major herbal supplement system that I have created to help assist.

    Right now my diet is this…

    Food:
    Fruits
    Veggies
    Millet bread
    Sunflower butter

    Supplements:
    Garden of Life meal shake with probiotics and enzymes
    Activated Charcoal (Draw out poisons)
    Aloe Juice (Digestion)
    Basil (Digestion)
    Cayenne (Immune Booster)
    Cilantro (Detox)
    Cinnamon (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Coconut (Anti-Viral, Anti-Bacterial)
    Flax Oil (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Garlic (Anti-Viral, Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal)
    Ginger (Anti-Inflammatory)
    Ginko (Blood Flow)
    Ginsing (Digestion)
    Lime (Anti-Biotic)
    Mushroom (Cancer inhibitor)
    Peppermint (Digestion)
    Rosemary (Blood Flow)
    Tumeric (Anti-Inflammatory, Cancer Fighter)
    Lemon Water

    I have seen certain improvements with my herbal remedy, but nothing too major.
    I thought way back that it was celiac’s. Deleting gluten from my diet helped, but did not fix the problem. My current research makes me feel like it is either Crohn’s or something similar, or Hepatitis C. I have read that the two can be confused. I have recently been tested through a private company for Hep C and it came back Negative. What confuses me is that I do not have stomach pain like most Crohn’s patients do. However, I am pretty sure I have an ulcer. I do have a sharp pain in my stomach that comes and goes at times. And the biggest issue for me is mental clarity and this swelling fever I deal with. I can deal with irregular bowel movements, but the way I feel is unacceptable. I have a copy of blood work I had done a year ago when I was feeling my worst, and I noticed that they didn’t test for Hypothyroidism? Do these symptoms sound like this could possibly be a culprit? Lupus?

    I am probably the healthiest person you know. I don’t drink, I don’t smoke, all of my diet is natural organic from the earth foods, herbs and minerals. I should not fee the way that I do.

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t see any protein or saturated fat in your diet which are essential to good health. I would highly suggest eating eggs if you can. Can you eat oysters? I started eating 1 oz. canned oysters every morning for the naturally occurring zinc (170% DV) & found it also had 90% DV of B12 as well as getting an extra 3g a week in EPA/DHA.

      Optimize your vit.D levels most people are deficient & especially ill people. Vit.D is not really a vitamin but a hormone that regulates your immune system. I would highly suggest researching. I personally did 35,000iu a day for 3 months to refill my depleted stores & now do 10,000-20,000iu per day. The constant fibromyalgia pain I had for 10 years went away doing this. I did 35,000iu for 2 months, then knocked it down to 2000iu day & the pain was back after a week, so I did another month of higher levels.

      I highly suggest filtering water to remove fluoride & other things. I’m using a zero water filter but wish I had invested in a Berkey water filter system because the filters are cleanable & don’t need to be replaced. What I’ve spent on filters, I could have bought a berkey system.

      I highly recommend a green drink with 2 tablespoons each of chlorella, spirulina, kelp, turmeric (pinch of pepper & half teaspoon of cinnamon) mixed in 28oz of water with a splash of raw apple cider vinegar & raw honey. I add half a cup of chia seeds to another 28oz blenderball bottle of water & serve these half & half over ice. The chia seed makes the green drink much more enjoyable. I buy chia seeds in bulk from getchia.com & algae from nutsonline.com

      I would suggest testing your thyroid at home with the Barnes Basal Temperature test (instructions online) – consistent low basal temperature is indicative of thyroid dysfunction & is more accurate than blood test (but harder to document) Low thyroid can cause a lot of health issues including brain fog.

      Are you using unrefined salt – preferably mined celtic or himalayan – Unrefined salt contains over 80 minerals. Salt and water work together to do important work in your body, including stimulating your metabolism, helping you detoxify, support your adrenals and making sure your nerves, hormones and immune system function properly.

      The body needs saturated fats to make vitamins & minerals & even omega 3 oils bioavailable so they can be incorporated into the body structure. I do not recommend flax seed oil – ground flax seed is fine (chia seed is better, because it doesn’t need to be ground) Unsaturated oils are fragile & oxidize (go rancid) when exposed to air & create free radical damage in the body – oils in whole foods are fine though.

  48. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism; is it too risky or can i do this without a doctor for now.?
    i have had this problem for several years now.
    I keep a well balanced diet having fish several times a week.
    not to mention leafy greens meats fruits and grains the whole nine yards when it comes to foods that are good for the thyroid for more than a year now with little to no effect on it .

    currently i don’t have the time or means to consult a doctor for this problem.
    and so i am thinking of adding TYROSINE & IODINE “kelp” supplements to my daily diet in hopes of alleviating my symptoms.
    i was wondering sense they’re only supplements whether it’s okay to take them without getting my levels tested first, as i am a bit concerned because no two cases are exactly the same when it comes to hypothyroidism. and so you might end up making it worse as a result.

    another is what are the risks of taking T4 and what are the doses they come in.

    exercise doesn’t seem to have much effect on it either.

    i appreciate any help i can get for this problem as it’s gotten pretty annoying. my mind isn’t as sharp as it use to be and my fingers are always freezing among other things.>_<

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      There used to be a weight loss med that had thyroid in it. Withdrawn because too many people died.

      Iif you have been hypothyroid for a while, the heart cannot take a full dose of thyroid. It must be slowly titrated up. I would strongly advise you do NOT try this on your own. There are free clinics in almost every city- why not go to one, and let someone with some experience manage your problem?

  49. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism, I think I may have it? What do you think?
    I am going to the doctor in the morning but I just want to know what you guys think. I have been out of school for a few weeks because we had Christmas break. My schedule has been go to bed at 4am and wake up at 1 or 2 pm. My parents think this is what is wrong with me but I did this over the summer and I felt fine. Okay now these are some of my symptoms. I gained 10 or 15 pounds in one year for no apparent reason. I tried to lose that weight with exercise and diet but no luck, I still look the same. I feel tired sometimes but I fight it. I am always hungry ( this wasn’t listed as a symptom but I am always hungry ). I got my period and it is heavier and I seem to have stopped on my 2nd day. Which is unusual for me. When I brush my hair quite a bit of it comes out. My heart rate is faster ( slow heart rate was a listed symptom of hypothyroidism ). Sometimes at night when I go to bed I have this episode where it feels like my throat is the size of a coin and it is hard to breathe. I feel dizzy sometimes. My fingernails are thin looking. My skin is itchy for some reason. My feet are always cold even though I wear socks. I even sleep in my fuzzy socks at night! I sometimes feel a little depressed but nothing severe. Today I was looking in the mirror and at the back of my throat I noticed this big glob of white stuff. It was nasty looking. I have allergies I don’t know if that will help but I just thought I would mention it. I have trouble remembering things. My concentration is poor. In my class I would often find my mind wondering, which was not good. What do you think? Does it sound like it might be something else? Thanks for your help I really appreciate it. :) Sorry I forgot to mention this. For about a year or so the glands in my throat have been swollen and I have these hard lump like things going down the side of my neck in the throat area.

    • ANSWER:
      Cold feet could be due to hypothyroidism but the other symptoms could be due to lots of other causes including an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise and many others.

  50. QUESTION:
    would like input of any or all that have tried the diet “fatloss for idiots?
    I have dieted all my life as others have done the same, Ive lost and gained over and over, What ive read about the diet “fatloss for idiots ” makes a lot of sense, because Im nutritionally trained , I just dont follow directions well, (grin) I have lost all my weight twice and regained both times, Now I have at least a hundred pounds to loose, Am not in good health at all, Im 59 , the doctor seems to think surgery would not be an option for me as my health stands, so Im again grasping at straws, If anyone has tried this diet and whether it workeed or didnt work for you, woudl you send your opinion, I also have a bad thyroid condition which is very hard to work around when it comes to dieting, Now im on one of the highest dosages there are for hypothyroidism, So any pills to loose weight is definitely a no no, dr says, Thank you,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, lookign to hear from someone, just anyone, please,, sooner the better, Pat smith

    • ANSWER:
      I have a friend that battled her weight issue since she was 9. Today she has lost 101 lbs. and has kept it off for 6 years. She say’s it wasn’t that hard and is even easier to maintain. She has never felt better in her life. Here is a page with her story (and a few others in the “Testimonial” tab). http://www.wlc101.net

      And here is the sign up site that they used:

      http://www.freeloseweightnow.com


Free Underactive Thyroid Diets

Weight loss is one the hottest topic that everyone talks about. There are just so many weight loss diet tips and weight loss products that claimed to help people loss those inches of fats easily. But to lose weight you have to do more than just changing your diet, you also need to exercise. It is important to exercise as you have to make sure that you are keeping your body in the condition for losing weight. Exercise can be just anything that keeps your body and muscles moving. You have to keep your body in constant, regular motion in order to lose weight and keep extra fat off. Here, let us look at a few easy weight loss exercising tips you can use to lose those extra pounds easily.

When you think about losing weight what is the first set of methods that come to mind? Many people think of calorie restriction and going on a run. In a way you could say that there is a lot more to it than that. On the other hand the solution to your fat loss predicament is fairly simple and intuitive when you stop and think about it.

The queston that dogs yu s how t lose weight with an underactive thyroid nd th answer s not simpl, givn that the condition i always set fo life and thre i no escaping t a long a yo re alve and s yo ar perpetally subjet to gaining weigt. So it has to b an ongoing process.

It is not always te ft accumulation that s th ause of weght gain n hypothyroid patient. A water and salt retention is not dne way with to the desired level in th underactive throid patients, they ar stred n the body and th weight increases. Whn the treatment i in lace and is eing rigorousl impleented, weight lss can e an assured reslt but it will nt b anything dramatic. In ptients wo resond well, t can b some 15% or thereabouts. Th treatment, oer time, starts productin of te homones and t takes a wile for th ody t adjut itself fr the new condition and a stability s achieed onl after som tme. And, it i only at this stage that weigt los starts. When this hapens, it is u to the affected persn to carefully screen th food tht e taks in order to maintan the equilibrium

Seledium nd iodine rich fod lik seaweed, spinach, avocado, asparagus and carrots work as stimulants to odine producton nd thereb secretion of tyroid. Food tat cold adversely ffect the production of thyroid nd the resultant weight gain re yams, soy, cabbge and peants. You had better avid the s fa a possible. These are foods that hav th answer to the quetion of ho to lose weight wth an underactive thyoid.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to lose weight with an underactive thyroid?
    Hi I was diagnosed with an underactive thyroid 2 years ago and have struggled to lose weight, I have been back to the doctors and my medication is fine and I was referred to a dietician and my diet is fine. I have started aerobics twice a week and on a carb free diet but still not losing the weight. Has anyone had any success losing weight with an underactive thyroid, if so how did you manage to do it. Or has anyone got any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      To lose wait you have to be sure to get alot of edurance and if you like – go on a diet. To get a six pack, it’s nice and easy, do about 50 sit ups each day,,..,, 5 days a week, and in about a month, you will have a six pack!

  2. QUESTION:
    I have an Underactive Thyroid?
    it’s been brought to my attention that i should folow a Gluten free diet , is there anyone knows anything about this … My Doctor has never said i should . thanks for your answers

    • ANSWER:
      There is absolutely NO relationship between gluten and hypothyroidism or its management. Whoever ‘brought it to you attention’ is basically talking poppycock!

  3. QUESTION:
    Underactive Thyroid & Raynauds Disease please help!!?
    Hi Everyone,

    I really need somebodys help please! I have all the symptoms of an underactive thyroid:

    Extreme being sensitive to cold,
    extreme constipation,
    depression,
    tiredness,
    slowness in body and mind,
    muscle aches and weakness,
    muscle cramps,
    dry and scaly skin,
    brittle hair and nails,
    heavy or irregular periods
    Extreme weight gain.

    I have had tests in the past and been told I have a slight small goiter in my neck but my tests show as “normal” and I do have a risk of having underactive thyroid in the future but not now!

    I have recently been diagnosed with Reynauds Disease as I am extremely sensitive to the cold and get very purple hands and feet that turn white and blue and red!

    I have looked online and it says that a likely cause for Raynauds disease is an Underactive Thyroid!!

    I have gained so much weight over the years, for example I have gained a stone since July with no change in my diet at all and I walk alot everyday because I can’t drive and I do eat a healthy diet

    I am adamant I have an underactive thyroid as i have every symptom! even Raynauds disease! and I need to know how am I going to prove to the Doctor I do or to run more thorough tests! I have been told I have antibodies positive in my thyroid just normal in my thyroid apparently.

    My test results were on: ,
    24.11.09 – TSH 2.34miU/L & Free T4 14.1pmol/L
    08.10.2009 – TSH 1.76miU/L with Free T4 13.1pmol/L

    I don’t know what these mean! but can please somebody give any advice I can’t take gaining weight anymore and suffering all these symptoms all the time and no one listening!

    Sorry for ranting and rambling on!

    Thank you! xx

    • ANSWER:
      I would highly suspect you have hashimoto’s thyroiditis (autoimmune hypothyroidism). Most cases of hypothyroidism is hashimoto’s. As this is an autoimmune disease, lowering antibodies is a must to prevent more damage to the thyroid gland. Studies show 200mcg of selenium (around 4 brazil nuts) daily lower antibody levels up to 40% in 3 months and “…researchers found that…organ-specific autoantibodies (i.e., thyroid antibodies) — will disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet.” You may be given thyroid supplements, natural desiccated thyroid hormone is much preferred by many, but it is very recommended to go gluten free and take selenium as well.

      TSH is not the most accurate indicator of thyroid conditions. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis swings between hyper and hypo so test results go up and down. TSH should be between 0.3 – 3.0mU/l but your levels can be normal and thyroid antibodies can be very high. The highest i’ve read on a blog was 100x higher than normal antibodies with normal TSH, free T3 and free T4. Free T3 and free T4 are optimal in the high normal range. A few websites that explain further. >>>

      Why do i still have thyroid symptoms when my labs tests are normal>>>

      http://thyroidbook.com

      Recommended lab tests>>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Hashimoto’s – the autoimmune attack on your thyroid>>>

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection>>>

      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

      Selenium and hashimoto’s thyroiditis>>>

      http://www.science20.com/natural_medicine_101_jeffrey_dach_md/blog/dr_dach_selenium_and_hashimotos

  4. QUESTION:
    Gluten Free Diet…how long until you see results?
    I think my husband’s endoscopy for celiac disease came back negative. The doctor is a flake and his employees are useless. My husband has not had a blood test yet.

    If he went on a gluten free diet, how long might it be before he saw an improvement in his life? Here are his worst symptoms:

    stomach upset
    all over body rash
    fatigue
    psoriasis
    underactive thyroid

    Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Since you asked how long it might be before he saw an improvement in his life, I’m guessing that he hasn’t gone on a gluten free diet yet, correct? if so, results come very quickly. There was one case of Celiac disease that I researched recently. Although the patient was a child, he saw improvements within days. I’m not quite sure if it will be the same for adults. I’m still learning myself…

      Hope this helps! at least a little..

  5. QUESTION:
    Fat cat . . . thyroid?
    Would LOVE a response from a vet professional. I have a 13-year-old female cat, spayed. Last winter, she strayed into diabetes for about 4 months, and then strayed out of it. I keep her on a low glycemic index, grain free diet. I play with her daily, and despite her age, she is not an “old” cat. She is frisky and has good response times, likes to hunt insects and is engaged with her environment. Keeps herself impeccably groomed. She is an indoor cat.

    But despite carefully controlled caloric intake and no changes in her routine or activity, she has begun to gain weight. And also, during the evening hours when she used to be awake and looking (from a curled up position) for insects or action outside the window, she is now sleeping — and I do mean sleeping, not napping. She also sleeps through the night near me. And of course, she sleeps through the day.

    Can this be underactive thyroid? I know this is unusual (and please don’t mention a trip to the vet, which is scheduled), but is this even a possibility? I would suspect aging, but the slow down has been dramatic, within a month or so, and so I am reluctant to attribute it to her age.

    Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible, but as you said it would be unusual. You are already going to the vet, that is fantastic. While you are there, have her blood drawn for a full panel, including a T4. (I’m sure this was your plan anyway… :)
      There could be other things as well, her diabetes might be coming back, her kidneys or liver might be starting to have issues too. 13 is not old for a cat these days, but unfortunately they do start to show signs of aging around this time. Modern medicine has made some big advances, and even with chronic aging diseases, your cat should be able to live a happy healthy long life.

  6. QUESTION:
    Could I get the diet pill Allí on prescription (in the UK)?
    I get prescritions free as I have an underactive thyroid..and can’t afford 50 pound a month to buy it in boots!
    Is it possible to get the half dosage (ie wha they sell in shops) from the DR?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      The prescibed equivalent is Xenical or orlistat, which has twice the drug dose in Alli. It is available on prescription for patients with a BMI over 26. Unfortunately in community use it has a poor success rate anyway and is no substitute for diet + exercise.

  7. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with Hypothyroidism and confused about the disease?
    I was diagnosed with an underactive thryoid recently (I’m 20, by the way) and I really don’t know much about it at all. Basically, my doctor’s nurse briefly informed me over the phone and put me straight on Levothyroxine. I’m extremely confused and no one has given me in depth info :(

    I know that Hypothyroidism means that my thyroid is not making enough hormones for my body…but now that I’m reading through different support forums, I realize there’s a lot more to it all (they’re talking about B12 vitamins, gluten free diets, painting iodine on their feet, iron levels etc.) and I don’t know where to begin. Any help is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not surprised at your confusion. There is a LOT of information (and misinformation) out there!

      Please, be very careful when researching any disease or condition on the Internet. There is a lot of bad and misleading information out there! It can be difficult to acertain what is reliable information and what is not.

      As a nurse (who also has been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, by the way), I can tell you that while eating a generally healthy diet is important, you do NOT need to go to extremes. Gluten free diets, painting iodine on your feet, blah blah blah . . . . this is a bunch of woo that you need to remember has NOT been backed up by any actual scientific information.

      Hypothyroidism is simply a state where your body is not making enough thyroid hormone. It’s quite common, especially among young women. It can cause fatigue, weight gain, hair loss, cold intolerance, and heavy menstrual cycles. It’s easily treatable with thyroid supplementation. It’s safe and effective – no need to paint your feet with iodine!

      Be aware that it does take a while for you to feel the full effects of medication. I had to take my levothyroxine for about 6 weeks before I noticed a difference, but what a difference it made! I lost weight, slept better, had more energy, and my only regret is that I didn’t see my doctor sooner about my horrible fatigue! I suffered a long time – needlessly.

      You wanna try a gluten free diet – fine. You want to take a B vitamin supplement – fine. Just know that these interventions are NO substitute for real treatment – medication. I hope you will take the medication your doctor has ordered for you and judge for yourself. Meanwhile, remember that there is lots of information out there – be careful whom you trust. Check out reputatable websites (Web MD, Mayo Clinic, etc) rather than visit forums where misinformation and conspiracy theory abound.

      Hope this helps and that you feel better soon!

  8. QUESTION:
    Could there be an actual medical reason why i can’t lose weight?
    I am 28 years old and weigh nearly 19 stone. I was always a chubby child and teen but never obese. I made a conscious effort to lose weight when I was 21 using Slimming World and extensive exercise and got down to a UK size 10-12 and was very happy. However after an accident which destroyed my ankle ligament I put 4 stone on. Even after I had an operating to fix the ankle, i continued to pile on more weight, and when i met my boyfriend 3 years ago, even more. And now i am 19 stone. I was honest with myself and knew that the reason i’d put on weight was because
    a) I wasnt really bothered what i ate and often had treats like takeaways and ice cream
    b) I couldnt do any exercise at all

    However about a year and a half ago I decided I wanted to lose weight as I want to have children in a couple of years. I tried Slimming World again as that worked well with me before but this time nothing happened! I stuck with it for 6 months but lost nothing and I know i was doing it right because i’ve done it before and lost 4 stone. I decided to do my own diet at home and made healthy swaps. I havent had a takeaway in a year. I don’t eat ready meals and make pretty much everything from scratch. Here is an example of what i eat in an average day
    Breakfast: Bowl of Apricot Shredded Wheats with Semi Skimmed Milk and sweetener
    Snack: Banana
    Lunch: Wholegrain bread sandwich, no spread, chicken, salad, extra low fat mayo. Fat free yoghurt and an Alpen Light bar.
    Dinner: Pasta with homemade tomato sauce and salad. Fat free yoghurt or Bowl of grapes.

    I consider this to be an extremely healthy diet and rarely eat chocolate, never eat crisps. My only treat is that once every two or three weeks I have 2 scoops of ben and Jerry’s Half Baked Ice Cream.

    As my ankle is improving all the time I have joined a gym and now me and my boyfriend are doing around an hour and a halgf of exercise (consiting of 35 mins of cardio, 15 mins of weights and half an hour of swimming), 5 times a week which we love.

    But since starting this a year ago, I have lost barely anything (around 6 lbs in total). I just don’t understand how my lifestyle is supporting a 19 stone weight and that i’m not losing more when i’m trying so hard. I have been to my doctor who did tests for diabetes, insulin resistance and an underactive thyroid which all came back negative. She then referred me to a dietician who has been no help at all as she doesnt believe me when i tell her that i eat pretty healthily. She thinks i’m making up my food diary and is really patronising, once even telling me to go into the waiting room where a seriously anorexic girl was sitting in a wheelchair and “swap some diet tips with her!”..

    Could there be any other reason for me not losing weight? What else can i do?!!

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    Metformin and Weight Loss with PCOS please answer?
    back in 2008, I was about 137 lbs, 5 ft 4.
    I started feeling so horrible, I never had acne but my face was covered in acne some how, I tried acne free, proactive, every face wash in the markets. and worst of all, I was never a hairy person but I started getting feet, and stomach hair! one week I gained 10lbs, I was shocked, I was eating no more, 3 months laters I gained another 30 lbs and so on! by 2010 I was over 180lbs I was so scared, I was like if I’m gaining weight like this monthly, imagine how I’d look in a few years!
    I went to the doctors and had a blood test, he said I had an underactive thyroid, I took another one a month later, I had high testosterone levels, and 2 scans, I finally knew I had PCOS.

    so thankfully I caught my pcos quite quickly before I got any more symptoms.
    he gave me METFORMIN, 1000mg a day.I’ve been on it for 2 weeks, my face is clear!!! No acne, I feel AMAZING, I’ve been told I look like I’ve lost a lot of weight, I feel like my old self! I have lost 8lbs in 2 weeks, and I’ve not been dieting actually I’ve been eating so much candy… minus the symptoms of dirreareah (sp), sweating, dizziness… before the doctor gave me the pills he said I would have drastic rapid weight loss… did anyone loose weight on them also with PCOS?

    I’m 18 years old, female if that matters!

    thanks SO much for answers. very appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Metformin often helps women with PCOS lose weight. For those of us who are insulin resistant, it really helps us get things under control. Not all women with PCOS have insulin resistance. I lost about 30 lb with metformin, exercise, and a whole grain diet.

  10. QUESTION:
    Metformin and Weight Loss with PCOS?
    back in 2008, I was about 137 lbs, 5 ft 4.
    I started feeling so horrible, I never had acne but my face was covered in acne some how, I tried acne free, proactive, every face wash in the markets. and worst of all, I was never a hairy person but I started getting feet, and stomach hair! one week I gained 10lbs, I was shocked, I was eating no more, 3 months laters I gained another 30 lbs and so on! by 2010 I was over 180lbs I was so scared, I was like if I’m gaining weight like this monthly, imagine how I’d look in a few years!
    I went to the doctors and had a blood test, he said I had an underactive thyroid, I took another one a month later, I had high testosterone levels, and 2 scans, I finally knew I had PCOS.

    so thankfully I caught my pcos quite quickly before I got any more symptoms.
    he gave me METFORMIN, 1000mg a day.I’ve been on it for 2 weeks, my face is clear!!! No acne, I feel AMAZING, I’ve been told I look like I’ve lost a lot of weight, I feel like my old self! I have lost 8lbs in 2 weeks, and I’ve not been dieting actually I’ve been eating so much candy… minus the symptoms of dirreareah (sp), sweating, dizziness… before the doctor gave me the pills he said I would have drastic rapid weight loss… did anyone loose weight on them also with PCOS?

    I’m 18 years old, female if that matters!

    thanks SO much for answers. very appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like my story. I am 5ft 4 and was 130. I went up to 180 and wasnt eating terribly, I was so confused till I got Diagnosed with PCOS.

      It takes 1500mg-2000mg over a period of 3-6 months to start seeing improvements and to loose weight. Metformin helps with insulin resistance and weight loss BIG time. In about a year your symptoms should be under control. 30% ovulate with weight loss and Metformin alone. You should go on birthcontrol pills. This will lower your male hormones, give your ovaries a break and help make the unwanted hair go away. It is important you have a regular cycle too. Prevents cancer and also the BCP prevents more cysts on your ovaries. When you are ready for kids you will go off the birth control pill and try for them. 70% of PCOS women need clomid. Most ovulate the third cycle BUT have been on Met for about 6 months or more and their BMI is under 25%. Dont worry you can have kids with a Drs help. :-)

      I also took a 1 credit weight training course at the college. It showed me how to excercise effectivly. All the stuff I learned was like recieving the holy grail for weight loss. LOL It also didnt cost much.

      Heres the food to look for. Lean meats, veggies, fruit, wheat or whole grain bread and pasta products (you need carbs, whole grain is good carbs, they slowly release glucose), skim milk, low fat yogurt and for your sweet tooth, low surgar products, like jelly or surgar free wafers and dried fruit helps. Try also getting low fat not non fat products. (higher sodium in non fat products, ya need a little fat it helps fight cravings) You can get diet frozen meals that have no pasta in them for meals at work or on the go. The whole grain bread products will help fill you up too. Buy a multi vitamin, B complex, calcuim and fish oil. If pills make you sick, I take flintstones, fish gummys for brain health, and oscal for calcium. Folic acid , b complex and Metformin are the only pills I need to take. This will reduce cravings, and might as well, they are good for ya, couldnt hurt. :-)

      Try to cut down on white. Like surgar, bleached flour, mayonaise, ranch dressing, cheese sauce white bread and pastas. Parsnips are high on the glysemic index. Also try to cook with olive oil and different blends of spices. I have a blend for each type of meat for example. You can also season with veggies too. I say this so you have variety. :-)

      For breakfast I have wheat toast with low surgar jelly, a little bit of butter or a wheat begal with low fat cream cheese (warmed) and or a peice of fruit or yogurt. I make a lot of salads. I love advacados so I put them in my sandwiches and salads or a topping on meat and eggs. I also add tomatoes since I hate dry sandwiches. Dinner is lean seasoned meat cooked with an onion, little olive oil and water, with a veggie and whole grain. I try to make 50% of my portions veggies or fruits. The 50% dairy meat and grain.

      The South beach diet and the Glysemic index diet is good for you. I mean that the types of foods in the diet are the ones you should aim for. Foods that dont release a bunch of glucose quickly. More like a slow release.